Nairaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / Login / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 1262679 members, 1711560 topics. Date: Friday, 31 October 2014 at 03:20 PM

Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures - Politics (23) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Politics / Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures (174249 Views)

The Most Powerful Military In History:the United States Of America...!!! / Gruesome Footage Implicates Military In War Crimes. Video. / Nigeria Has The 4th Strongest Military In Africa. (1) (2) (3) (4)

(0) (1) (2) ... (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:37pm On Nov 18, 2011
South AFRICAN PRODUCED MILITARY HARDWARE

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:38pm On Nov 18, 2011
Tribute to the pride of the nation SANDF

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:40pm On Nov 18, 2011
Tribute to our brothers in the SANDF

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:42pm On Nov 18, 2011
Amongst the best in Africa

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:44pm On Nov 18, 2011
Lions of the South of Africa

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:57pm On Nov 18, 2011
Tribute to the South African Navy

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:59pm On Nov 18, 2011
Tribute to the South African Navy

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by soyebode: 8:44pm On Dec 18, 2011
Chongaiman:

Abeg naval guys, what are the characteristics of NNS Thunder? Does it outclass ARADU?
NNS Aradu was purpose built for power projection and image reckoning by Shagari administration in 1980- it was equipped with good sensors, torpedoes, radars and mid range missiles( ship to air and anti shipping missiles) considered fit for this purpose. There has been news on refit (not confirmed by the navy) and the present state of the ship itself, its radars, sensors, missile systems is unclear. NNS Thunder (ex-Cutter chase) was a second hand dash from US and customized for fit the operation intended for; which is primarily ant-piracy and sea patrol. It was stripped of bulk of its advanced radar and satcoms( it won’t be of any use to the NN anyway since it surely tailor made for US military). It is not clear whether any additional stuff were installed during the $8m refit. Definitely this amount would not be enough to include anti- shipping missiles, air to air missiles and very modern radars, FCS.

Armament wise, Aradu if refitted and upgraded is far better and also a bit faster even though it’s a bit heavier and larger.
Engine wise and maintainability: this is complicated-too many factors are at play here
Trying to compare Aradu with Thunder is not really comparing apple for apple, there purpose and history is quite different.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by ratty7000(m): 9:24pm On Jan 18, 2012
na wetin una dey take our money buy bdat abi,useless leaders.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Need2Drive(m): 2:25pm On Jan 27, 2012
paddy_lo
I have a different perspective to Nigerian Military and want to meet with you after I have seen all the post in this piece.
This is the most thought-provoking post on nairaland for me.
Can you send me your phone number via email to altthink @ live.com
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Samminixon(m): 12:47pm On Mar 11, 2012
paddy_lo: OK first of all i am posting pictures of the Nigerian military,mostly from skyscrapercity and other online sources of pictures
The nigerian military is a highly proffesional fighting force
especially since the return of democracy.it has distinguished itself abroad in terms of peacekeeping all around the world
Today, Nigeria leads the world in international peacekeeping. Of the 80 countries contributing troops to over 20 global operations, Nigeria has more than 6,500 men keeping the peace outside its borders in places such as Bosnia Herzgovena, Iraq, Kuwait, Western Sahara, Liberia, Angola, Rwanda. Nigerian troops have also served in Somalia, Mozambique and Cambodia, The Congo, Chad, Lebanon, India, Pakistan (Kashmir). The key thing in global peacekeeping are the men and women risking their lives in the interest of peace. Nigeria has more of those people than any other country in the world.
the military is also helping to quell occasional outburst of violence anywhere in the country,like the boko-haram crises that was just crushed in northern nigeria
below are pics and some random information about the pictures from online sources

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Joooo(m): 1:20pm On Mar 12, 2012
When we talk abt proffesinality and job that is taskin, a job where livin or diein make no sence to yu kudos shuld be givin to the armed force nt the(police) hav yu ever immagine bein in the slum for weeks without food, hav yu ever been next to a man and the nxt minute he is shutdead, hav yu ever been away from yur family for 2 to3 years without goin home, all this put together are the secrifier the soldiers makin for the unity of this country. Let us nt be like serria lione and liberia that until they are doom before they kw the value of bein alive
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by kikuyu1(m): 2:05pm On Mar 12, 2012
Actually Naijjaboys,you should be doing better. How can Africa's giant be limited to a 50 year old Chinese attack jet design? The Aradu is now approaching end of hull life;you should be having at least 3 Mekos. Where are your gunships? Don't tell me those few hinds are all you have. Here we have md 500,z-9,mi 28 and the revolotutionary ka 52 to enter service in 3 years.You're still making do with Vickers 3;you should have upgraded buy now!
Come the Bleep on!! This is a crucial issue black people universally take for granted.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Joooo(m): 4:48pm On Mar 12, 2012
Sunny_bobo:

@ Yorubaman

Pleas, endeavour to read through the posters first post before calling him names. The poster duely acknowledged that most of the pictures here are from skyscrapercity!
pls tell him jux they jab talk
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by auwal87(m): 5:19pm On Mar 12, 2012
No wonder they are still struggling to fight BH, lacks communication equipments, lacks intelligence and strategy. Old machines.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by andrewza: 5:42pm On Mar 13, 2012
you really need to get a real fighter air craft. Even some old F16 would be a good buy has they are multi role and can there for be of use, since i doubt you will see many dog fights.

all so your flag ship is old but the best in the region and one of the best in Africa. Still how often dose it sail.
Due to your threat some good FAC/OPV are better than a old frigate
(from defence web)


These are South Africa warrior strike craft used has a OPV. Something like these are a good choice. We are replacing ours soon with new ones that will have a helicopter facilities.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Bluetooth2: 6:29pm On Mar 14, 2012
Why cant they adopt white like the british police ?
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by texazzpete(m): 8:22am On Mar 15, 2012
Bottom line, the Nigerian Army/air force is in pathetic shape with old, outdated and inferior technology.

As a fighting force, we are WELL below the Egyptians and not nearly as well equipped as the South Africans.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Loskee(f): 8:28am On Mar 15, 2012
paddy_lo: Nigerian police force in Liberia


GOOD ONE, BUT...
some of these people are not fit 'size-wise' to be in the police force... take a look at that male officer's potbelly that he tried so hard to tuck under his trousers
they should keep fit in order that they may discharge their duties without bodily encumberances
goodness, the female officers even have much time for makeup!
i still believe things will get better for our nation.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by guru01: 6:19pm On Mar 20, 2012
Keep them coming.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by BlackBaron: 9:59pm On Mar 31, 2012
1st image of one of three 24 metres patrol craft being built for the Nigerian navy by French shipbuilder OCEA.

Presently undergoing sea trials . . .

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by BlackBaron: 12:56am On Apr 10, 2012
A Nigerian chinook ordered by the IBB regime.

Sadly, they were never delivered.

The one in the pic was for evaluation purpose.

Pic courtesy: Beegeagle

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by BlackBaron: 1:06am On Apr 10, 2012
andrewza: you really need to get a real fighter air craft. Even some old F16 would be a good buy has they are multi role and can there for be of use, since i doubt you will see many dog fights.

all so your flag ship is old but the best in the region and one of the best in Africa. Still how often dose it sail.
Due to your threat some good FAC/OPV are better than a old frigate
(from defence web)


These are South Africa warrior strike craft used has a OPV. Something like these are a good choice. We are replacing ours soon with new ones that will have a helicopter facilities.

We also got 2 new 95 metres OPV's complete with helipads included coming our way soon. Few (3) patrol boats already completed bar armaments and other acquisition.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by andrewza: 10:40am On Apr 10, 2012
Could to know your navy is getting new boats. Any other info on them. Like weapons and crew size. The IPV looks like the same thing we built for supplying the rigs in nigeria. Same basic look. If I was in charge I would increase the OPV numbers to 3 to 4 you got a real threat from MEND and pirates and if you only got 2 you can only have one out at sea on a continual operation.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by BlackBaron: 2:04pm On Apr 10, 2012
andrewza: Could to know your navy is getting new boats. Any other info on them. Like weapons and crew size. The IPV looks like the same thing we built for supplying the rigs in nigeria. Same basic look. If I was in charge I would increase the OPV numbers to 3 to 4 you got a real threat from MEND and pirates and if you only got 2 you can only have one out at sea on a continual operation.


There was meant to be another acquisition of 2 units of Portugese Viana do Castelo Class OPV's, however it seems an agreement could not be reached or talks stalled. Additional units would benefit our Navy's ability to effectively patrol our territorial waters where pirates, oil bunkerers and illegal fishing trawlers have free rein.

Ideally, a new frigate is long overdue, our flagship(s) (F89 or F90) also needs to be replaced as soon as possible. Of course, all this requires a lot of money.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Henry120: 1:06am On Apr 11, 2012
I think what we need at the moment are atleast 8 or 9 brand new sukio/30, 14 refurbished sukio/ 27's. All these for about 400 million usd. The crises in mali protends major danger for us, sorry, imminent danger for us here in nigeria and also the algerians. But it seems the algerians are ahead of us in tackling this escalating problem. These two countries have suffered heavy casualties from terrorism and a safe haven for terrorists to hide to in mali spells danger for both countriesn thank GOD that our satellites ( nigcom-sat1r, and the one built by nigerian engineers, sat x or so) have come on stream delivering crystal clear images, it is time for them to be put into good use, delivering images to the nigerian military in real-time, which can then be shared with the algerians. Pls guys, why were the chinese fighters bought, is there any advantage those jets bring in general and moreso at this critical point in time? Any answer please?
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Henry120: 1:07am On Apr 11, 2012
I think what we need at the moment are atleast 8 or 9 brand new sukio/30, 14 refurbished sukio/ 27's. All these for about 400 million usd. The crises in mali protends major danger for us, sorry, imminent danger for us here in nigeria and also the algerians. But it seems the algerians are ahead of us in tackling this escalating problem. These two countries have suffered heavy casualties from terrorism and a safe haven for terrorists to hide to in mali spells danger for both countriesn thank GOD that our satellites ( nigcom-sat1r, and the one built by nigerian engineers, sat x or so) have come on stream delivering crystal clear images, it is time for them to be put into good use, delivering images to the nigerian military in real-time, which can then be shared with the algerians. Pls guys, why were the chinese fighters bought, is there any advantage those jets bring in general and moreso at this critical point in time? Any answer please?
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by BlackBaron: 2:24am On Apr 11, 2012
As it stands, the Airforce is in dire straits. Our combat aircraft inventory is not glaring at all. From the Chinese made copycat of the Mig 21,to a couple of gunships, helicopters, C-130s and other transport aircraft. In a war with Mali, our lead aircraft would be incapable, it is more of a short range aircraft that can at best go from Lagos to Abuja as the crow flies, an odd choice for Nigeria to choose. Her massive heat signature makes it prey to ex Gadaffi anti air missiles. The F7 suffered about 44 crashes in Pakistani Airforce from 1981 till date. Most recently Feb 2012 while we lost one already and another trainer crashed too.
Sadly our fleets of Sepecat jaguars and other capable fighter jets have been grounded or in a state of disrepair due to neglect from past Military regimes. Just wondering if there is a possibility to convert our present C-130s to AC-130 gunships ? though it seems the Americans are coy and wouldn't allow.

Our satelites meanwhile can be of very great use to pinpoint enemy formation and targeted bombing campaigns. we need better airframes as you mentioned like the Sukhoi 30 or Mig 27s and not some reverse engineered version of our previously owned fleets of Mig 21s.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by juman(m): 10:59am On Apr 11, 2012
auwal87: No wonder they are still struggling to fight BH, lacks communication equipments, lacks intelligence and strategy. Old machines.
^^
grin grin even we lack real human resourses.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by juman(m): 11:07am On Apr 11, 2012
Performance of retired military men shows that the nigerian military need to have new syllabus to train their personnel.

Most of the retired military men are selfish and not loyal to the country despite their training. They just plunged the nation in to serious backwardness, abject poverty, problems .... because of their greed.
Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:16pm On Apr 24, 2012
State-owned arms maker Denel has landed an R8-billion contract from the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to develop the South African Army’s new generation infantry combat vehicle.

The contract, dubbed Project Hoefyster, is the largest contract the struggling Denel has won in its 16-year history

Re: Tribute To Nigerian Military In Pictures by Thiza: 12:22pm On Apr 24, 2012
SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE ACQUISTION PROGRAMME

The acquisition focus of the South African National Defence Force in the near term will be on crisis response, border security and force projection as well as sustainment in a peace support context. That's the word from the 2012 Defence Review, released last Thursday.

“Prioritisation of defence acquisition is driven by the interaction between the evolving strategic situation and the composition and equipment state of the Defence Force,” it reads. “This is, therefore, also an evolving process during which priorities will be adapted to match operational requirements.”

From the medium term onwards, it will be necessary to re-equip the medium and heavy forces and the relevant supporting elements to ensure that they retain deterrent credibility and provide deployable peace enforcement and conflict containment capability. “Some of the projects to meet medium term requirements will have to commence during the near term to ensure that those capabilities are available in the medium term, partly because of the numbers required (for instance of vehicles, which are optimally built and delivered over an extended period) and partly because of long lead times (for instance in building and commissioning ships).”


Immediate capability enhancement

Capabilities that need immediate work, the review reads, include extending the Special Forces (SF). “Terrorism and paramilitary threats will be a factor that South Africa must reckon with in the near term and over the coming decades, both in the context of South Africa’s expanded regional security role and as direct challenges or threats. Countering those challenges or threats will require enhancing and expanding the capabilities of the SF by enhancing Special Forces capability requires acquisition of additional equipment, weapons and systems, which may include a small number of dedicated aircraft of several types for insertion/extraction operations; and expanding SF capability requires establishment of additional units focused on particular missions, for instance urban counter-terrorism, and the acquisition of the relevant equipment, weapons and systems.”

A second challenge is border safeguarding. “The Defence Force has been assigned the mission of border safeguarding. This will require establishing additional units, and acquisition of equipment, weapons and systems optimised for that role, including agile, protected patrol vehicles; surveillance equipment, such as fixed and mobile acoustic, optronic and radar sensors and unmanned air vehicles, particularly micro-UAVs for patrol-level use; a static backbone communications system integrated with tactical air/ground and Police communications systems; non-lethal weapons of several kinds; and a data collation/fusion system to facilitate intelligence-led operations.”

Third is airspace surveillance and protection. “A related requirement is for enhanced air space surveillance and protection, which will require acquisition of static, mobile and airborne radar systems able to acquire and track aircraft flying low and using terrain-masking; and aircraft able to intercept and shadow suspect aircraft flying at low altitudes and low speeds.”

Next follows extended maritime security. “The expansion of Somali-based piracy into the Mozambique Channel has highlighted the importance and urgency of expanding South Africa’s maritime security capability. The immediate requirements include maritime surveillance or patrol aircraft; offshore patrol vessels; inshore patrol craft; additional shipboard helicopters; and equipment for shoreline patrols.”

Fourth follows a crisis response capability. “South Africa’s expanding regional security responsibilities require the development of an effective crisis response capability beyond that inherent in Special Forces. This requires acquisition of suitable equipment and weapons for the parachute and air-landed battalion groups, including protected vehicles that can be transported by medium transport aircraft and light vehicles that can be delivered by parachute; expansion and rejuvenation of the medium airlift capability; establishment of a heavy/long-range airlift capability that, together with the expanded medium airlift capability, will enable the Defence Force to deploy a parachute battalion group or an air-landed battalion group within 48 hours from South Africa to anywhere within the continental SADC region, to support local forces; or a forward base within the SADC continental SADC region to anywhere in a contiguous country.” It further requires the establishment of an in-flight refuelling capability to enable effective fighters support for crisis response deployments; and to enable extended range Special Forces operations.


Urgent capability enhancement

Urgent capability enhancement requirements exist where Defence Force lacks adequate capability to perform likely near/medium term missions, and where existing equipment is obsolete and must be replaced if key capabilities are to be retained, the review avers.

There are seven capability areas involved:

Infantry Combat Vehicles. The mechanised infantry battalions have wide utility, being suited to peacekeeping in high-risk situations and to peace enforcement, and forming a key element of deterrent capability. The Ratel vehicle family is obsolete, old (30 years) and difficult to maintain, and must be replaced urgently if the mechanised infantry is to remain credible and effective. [Project Hoefyster]

Armoured Personnel Carriers. Armoured personnel carriers are the main equipment of the motorised infantry battalions, which form the core of peace-support capability, and are vital elements of other units, including the medical battalion groups of the Military Health Service. There are three related requirements for new APCs: The Casspir and Mamba armoured personnel carriers of the motorised infantry no longer provide adequate protection against weapons available to irregular forces and bandits, are old (30 years) and difficult to maintain, and must be replaced urgently if these units are to remain effective; the Mfezi protected ambulances of the medical battalion groups are equally old and difficult to maintain, and must also be replaced; and the spread of improvised explosive devices into Africa further means that there is a requirement for ‘mine-resistant/ambush-protected’ (MRAP) patrol vehicles and personnel carriers to equip a proportion of these units. [Project Sapula]/Sepula]

Logistic Vehicles. No defence force can function without reliable logistic vehicles that are suited to the nature of its operations and the terrain of the theatre of operations. The existing Samil fleet of trucks is old (30 years) and difficult to maintain, and will lack the mobility to effectively support modern combat vehicles. “The bulk of the fleet must be replaced with suitable vehicles, including protected variants, as a matter of urgency.” [Project Vistula]

Light Artillery. Several recent conflicts in Africa have demonstrated an escalation in the capability and level of aggression of the forces involved, including serious attacks on peacekeeping units. “The Army needs light artillery that can be deployed quickly as a part of a rapid deployment peace support contingent, to provide counter-battery and defensive fires to protect airfields and bases. It currently has no such artillery, although a suitable 105 mm long-range gun and ammunition family are in development.” [Project Musuku/Masuku]

Aerial Weapons. “The Air Force must urgently acquire suitable weapons for the Gripen, the Hawk (in its alternate light attack role) and the Rooivalk if these aircraft are to be able to support ground forces effectively.”

Combat Support Ships. The extension of the Navy’s area of operations to include the Mozambique Channel and its approaches, and the likelihood of a further extension to counter piracy along the west coast of Africa, requires urgent acquisition of a second combat support ship to enable frigates and offshore patrol vessels to be employed efficiently. “That ship must be followed by replacement of SAS Drakensberg, which has been in service since 1987.”

The review further reads that there are also many requirements for enabling or supporting equipment that is essential to the effective employment of deployed forces. Among them are the replacement of old and unsuitable water purification, field kitchen and field accommodation equipment; the replacement of obsolete field workshop equipment; the replacement of old field hospital equipment; and the re-establishment of the Air Force tactical airfield unit capability, to enable support of aircraft away from Air Force bases.

“The Defence Force must also acquire communications systems and related equipment suited to both its deterrent role and its regional and continental security responsibilities.” Another urgent requirement is to acquire munitions and explosives of all kinds to allow effective live-fire and explosives training and the rebuilding of stocks.


Longer-term force rejuvenation and capability expansion

“Given the long-term nature of defence planning and defence acquisition planning, it is wise to also set out some key longer-term equipment requirements that will arise if the Defence Force is to remain an effective deterrent and is to meet South Africa’s regional security responsibilities,” the review' writers say. Some of these projects will have to be initiated in the near term if the required capabilities are to become available within a reasonable period, it adds. They include:

Expeditionary Operations. “If the Defence Force is to meet South Africa’s growing regional and continental security responsibilities, it must develop the capability to deploy and sustain medium forces outside the SADC region. That will require the development of a sealift capability that will enable the deployment of a mobile battalion group in a single lift; and the retention of one sealift platform offshore the deployment area to serve as a secure helicopter base, headquarters and logistic base for the landed force, while follow on forces are brought up by air and sea. That will require acquisition of at least two and preferably three ‘joint support ships’ with full helicopter operations capability and the ability to deploy landing craft to allow forces to be put ashore in the absence of a functioning harbour.” [Project Millennium]

Air Defence. “The Defence Force currently lacks any modern air defence weapons other than a single battery of very short range missiles (Starstreak). There are, therefore, clear requirements to acquire additional ‘very short range’ missiles to enable deployed units to protect themselves against air attack in a country in which a peace enforcement operation is taking place, be it by disaffected or hostile air force elements or by improvised attack aircraft such as used in Biafra in the 1960s and Sri Lanka in the 1990s; acquire mobile and mechanised air defence systems for medium forces that may be deployed for peace enforcement; and to ensure credible deterrence by providing for the protection of air bases, critical installations and deployed forces.” [GBADS: Projects Guardian, Outcome, Protector]

Main Battle Tank. “The main battle tank remains a core element of mobile forces in the deterrent role, and recent operations in several parts of the world (including Bosnia and Kosovo) [as well as Iraq and Afghanistan] have demonstrated the very considerable value of the main battle tank in peace enforcement and similar operations. The current Olifant is essentially a [1940s] tank that has undergone several upgrades, and is now obsolete in almost all respects. While it can be retained for a time as a training system, it is no longer credible as part of deterrent capability and lacks the reliability to be effective in supporting a peace enforcement operation, and must, therefore, be replaced as soon as possible.” [Project Aorta]

Medium Transport/Attack Helicopter. “While the Oryx will remain effective through 2020, it is essential to begin planning for its replacement now, as replacing the Oryx will probably require development of a ‘hot and high’ optimised variant of the type selected. That is a factor that could provide interesting opportunities for the South African industry, if the new helicopter will be acquired in numbers adequate to South Africa’s actual needs in the context of its regional and continental security responsibilities.” Those opportunities could include the development of the new variant together with the parent company (as was done with Oryx); the manufacture of the helicopter for the Air Force; the manufacture, in agreement with the parent company, of additional helicopters of this ‘hot and high’ variant for other air forces with similar requirements; and the development of a Rooivalk replacement on the basis of the new helicopter.

(0) (1) (2) ... (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) (Reply)

Enugu, The Pride Of The East. / Abubakar Shekau, Boko Haram Leader Speaks To BBC Hausa, Enjoys Killing People.

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2014 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See Nairalist and How To Advertise. 130
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.