₦airaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / Login / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 1,423,002 members, 2,305,096 topics. Date: Tuesday, 01 September 2015 at 09:19 PM

Origin Of Various Igbo Clans - Culture (6) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Culture / Origin Of Various Igbo Clans (32030 Views)

Database Of Audio/video Recordings Of Various Igbo Dialects / The Arab Origin Of The Yorubas / The Origin Of The Igbo (1) (2) (3) (4)

(0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 9:15pm On Dec 27, 2012
Abagworo: I don't use wikipedia as a source. Most of my posts are from the natives of the immediate group involved or their official website.
I'm surprised you even took the time to respond to his posts. Anyone who actually read through this topic would know that the information posted was not sourced from Wikipedia, but was instead sourced from indigenes and their representative socio-cultural organizations.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Onyegecha(f): 1:31pm On Aug 04, 2013
Abagworo, you are a great historian and i doff my cap for you for this brilliant post. Igbo history is one thing i really want to understand and i find this very enlightening. Kudos! I wish you could be a great political analyst as well. I guess we all have our weaknesses. cheers
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Ihuomadinihu(f): 11:50am On Sep 12, 2014
Why do i feel like the proto igbos are those found within Okigwe, Uturu,Owerri and Awka axis. The rest of these igbo groups have long tales of origin and migration.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by azuson(m): 11:10am On Sep 15, 2014
T
cino1: is it trueth that Igbos de go this year?


My broda if u have any property outside igboland u better move it now or u forget it. Igbo will surely return this year or early next year


Nice article.I want to add that some igbo left and still settle further south.like Ola and his family left Nnewi and still in present day Aba area.Umuola in Aba and Rumuola are his children. Rumuola was Umuola and all the Rumu's in Rivers state all are lineage of Ola from Nnewi
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by owhobrus: 2:24pm On Jan 11
undecided please is there a point or need for all of these? We are all kids to what ever you are chasing after. If after all you silly research those you call Igbo clans finally say, "Yes we are Igbo" please how does it change anything. Ypu are taking your time to force something on people who are comfortable where they are and who say they know their roots, WHY? WHAT IS THE GAIN? Jeeezzz
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 3:06pm On Jan 21
Irete

Irete was the last son of Nwoha. Nwoha it should be recollected migrated with his younger brother Ara from Owaelu in the present Uratta in the Owerri North Local
Government Area. Among the brothers of Irete are Ohii the eldest, Orogwe, Ndegwu, and Amakaohia-Ubi that make up the famous Umunwoha clan and aptly constitute the
Umunwoha Political bloc. These five sons of Nwoha founded their respective towns named after them as they dispersed to their present locations.
Irete town shares boundries with Owerri municipal native community with which it
fought prolonged wars in protection of its territorial integrity and preservation of its lands and environment. Irete defeated Owerri in most of these wars and secured its boundaries with the natural boundary provided by the Nwaorie River.
We also share boundaries with Umuguma, Egbeada, and Akwakuma. And in the
prehistoric period Irete fought with the surrounding neighbours to secure its agricultural vast lands and rid it of uncontrolled encroachment.

http://www.iretecommunity.net/history-of-origin.html
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 3:24pm On Jan 21
Is Uratta a clan or a single town. In some literature I see it referred to as a clan, but people I know say it is a town. Which is it?

If it is clan, which towns/communities make it up?
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 4:41pm On Jan 21
Urata is a clan. Every town and village south of Isu, north of Ikwere, east of Ugwuta/Oru and westward from the Mbaise/Ngor-Okpuala complex constitutes Urata. One of the towns in this area is also known as Urata.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 5:25pm On Jan 21
Oh thanks, Chinenye.

Although, I must say that I was not aware that a constituent community within a clan could have the exact same name as the entire clan itself.

Is it possible that the Uratta clan is a modern arrangement of some sort (like the Nsukka 'clan' of the Northern Igbo) rather than a genuinely pre-colonial clan?
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 6:37pm On Jan 21
That's not the case in this instance. They form a genuine pre-colonial culture-group, recognizing socio-cultural affinity and kinship with each other. Urata (town) is also acknowledged as the both the cultural capital and ancestral homeland for much of the Urata clan.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 7:58pm On Jan 21
I get it now. Thanks.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by nnenneigbo(f): 8:31pm On Jan 21
Antivirus92:
akuko na egwu. Go and study ur family history first before igbo history.

you killed me with the Akuko na egwu statement
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Abagworo(m): 9:29pm On Jan 21
ChinenyeN:
That's not the case in this instance. They form a genuine pre-colonial culture-group, recognizing socio-cultural affinity and kinship with each other. Urata (town) is also acknowledged as the both the cultural capital and ancestral homeland for much of the Urata clan.

I think "culture group" might be the most adequate phrase instead of "clan". Uratta consists most of the area we call Owerri today but we should be careful as Mbaitoli/Ikeduru area which shares direct border with Uratta belongs to Isu but sometimes also referred to as Owerri by lay men.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by odumchi: 12:23am On Jan 22
ChinenyeN:
Urata is a clan. Every town and village south of Isu, north of Ikwere, east of Ugwuta/Oru and westward from the Mbaise/Ngor-Okpuala complex constitutes Urata. One of the towns in this area is also known as Urata.

You're referring to Owaelu, right?
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 3:41am On Jan 22
To the best of my understanding, Owaelu is one of the villages that constitutes Urata town (unless something's changed in recent times).
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 3:03pm On Jan 23
@ChinenyeN

I've been researching Ndoki origins. Unfortunately, the internet doesn't have anything nearly as comprehensive as the accounts you posted sometime last year. It appears the posts were lost in the last year's cyber attacks, however.

Would it be too much trouble to ask you to post them again... here, perhaps?

smiley
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by pazienza(m): 11:04am On Jan 26
http://nigerianewspoint.com/?p=968

Ok, ah say make ah post this one here.

It seem a bit fictional, speculative and recent, but still makes for an interesting read. *grins*
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by letu: 1:08pm On Jan 28
pazienza:
http://nigerianewspoint.com/?p=968

Ok, ah say make ah post this one here.

It seem a bit fictional, speculative and recent, but still makes for an interesting read. *grins*
some of the stories are not speculative,there is a part of the story i read some where that speaks of a name Agbaja as a character/person with seven sons,and also there are area in Kogi state, Benua state that has this Agbaja name but cant be historical link to the character Agbaja while others do. Among the Agbaja Igbos they dont speak exactly the same igbo language, the Isu part cant be all true base on the story of the historical character know as Agbaja, i think is the other way Agbaja to be an ancestor of Isu people inwhich the Isu of today speaks difrently some speak a mixture of urata and what is obtainable in Ezinaihite and Ngwa.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 10:04pm On Jan 28
The connection between the Agbaja sub-ethnicity in Enugu State and other communities in Igboland with the name 'Agbaja' as described in that article is largely speculative. The similarity in name stems only from similarity in topographical features. ('Agbaja' connotes 'sandy infertile land'.)
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by letu: 4:09am On Jan 29
Radoillo:
The connection between the Agbaja sub-ethnicity in Enugu State and other communities in Igboland with the name 'Agbaja' as described in that article is largely speculative. The similarity in name stems only from similarity in topographical features. ('Agbaja' connotes 'sandy infertile land'.)
But the article and other Agbaja story place the origin of Enugu,Anabra and Northern Imo state as Agbaja or withing Agbaja so what about the Eri origin, betwee Eri and Agbaja which among the two is the real history.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 8:14am On Jan 29
letu:
But the article and other Agbaja story place the origin of Enugu,Anabra and Northern Imo state as Agbaja or withing Agbaja

I do not think there are any traditional stories that place the origin of Enugu, Anambra and Northern Imo within Agbaja. Agbaja (Enugu) accounts only say that the eponymous ancestor of the Agbaja culture-group had 5 sons who then founded the 5 clans that make up Agbaja: Neke, Oshie, Ojebe Ogene, Ugwunye, Ezedike. The accounts do not suggest any kinship with other communities that bear 'Agbaja'. The article's account is the product of recent speculation.

so what about the Eri origin, betwee Eri and Agbaja which among the two is the real history.

If by real history you mean which of the accounts (the Eri story and the Agbaja story) is the authentic account of Igbo origins, the answer is neither. Each of the stories is only intended to explain the origin of the separate groups within the Igbo meta-ethnicity.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 5:46am On Jan 31
This thread would actually be an appropriate place for such a post, so sure. In keeping with the theme of the thread...

Ndoki

The Ndoki are an Igbo-speaking community, bounded to the north by Ngwa, to the east by Annang/Ibibio, to the south by the Ogoni and the west by Asa. The Ndoki are balkanized into three states, namely Abia, Rivers and Akwa Ibom. As with all other Igbo-speaking communities, Ndoki retains a rich and in some ways peculiar culture and speech form. A notable example of this peculiarity (an example which is also shared by their Asa and Ngwa neighbors) is the lack of the New Yam festival celebration that has become synonymous with Igbo culture. Regarding their origins, the Ndoki as a whole do not claim to share a single or common ancestor. However, some anthropologists like Mulhall and Talbot have classified Ndoki as an offshoot of their Ngwa neighbors, both by their physical anthropology and by virtue of the sheer number of villages which at the time independently claimed descent from various parts of Ngwaland (The Physical Anthropology of Southern Nigeria: A Biometric Study in Statistical Method, pp 98).

The 'Ndoki' Ethnonym

One tradition states that the ethnonym is derived from the expression "Anyi na-ado ke" (meaning, 'for what are we contending?'). According to this tradition, the question was posed during a period of contention between the communities in Ndoki and Bonny, and the name was derived from the question. A second tradition however states that the ethnonym is instead derived from the Ijo expression 'a mina dokiari' (meaning, 'I'm searching for my sibling'). This tradition has corroboration. As late as the late 19th/early 20th century, there were Ndoki communities who, along with the Ibani, actively referred to each other as 'a mina mina' (meaning, 'my sibling'). This late 19th/early 20th century dating is noteworthy as it suggests that the ethnonym 'Ndoki' is of recent coinage; a suggestion which also finds support in Ndoki oral traditions.

Early Settlement

The communities that people now call 'Ndoki' constitute five (5) village-groups, which in turn constitute Ndoki. As stated earlier, these five village-groups (or clans) do not share a tradition of common ancestry from a single primogenitor. Rather, each village-group maintains its own traditions concerning settlement and the later development of their respective communities. The five (5) village-groups are as follows, in no particular order:

1) Umuokobo - This clan consists of the Azuogu, Umuagbai, Maraihu, Obete and Okpontu villages. Their traditions mention a common ancestor by the name Okobo. An interesting thing to note about the clan: It is from this community that we get our earliest accounts of Bonny and Ndoki history. According to the traditions of this village-group, the founder of Bonny and one of Umuagbai's earliest ancestors were brothers. Following Bonny's founding, subsequent accounts indicate ongoing close contacts primarily with this village-group, which lasted until about the seventeenth century, when the internal dynamics in Bonny began shifting. The present site of Umuagbai is said to be the site where Okobo finally settled. It is also the clan's cultural capital.

2) Umueze - This clan traces its origin to a common ancestor called Eze. It is made up of three component village-groups, which altogether seemingly represent a little less than half of Ndoki's population. These component village-groups are said to have each been founded by the three sons of Eze and are listed as follows:

1 - Umuihueze: This village-group includes the villages of Obunku, Umuosi, Obeakpu, and Afam among others. They claim a common ancestor, Ihu Eze, said to be the first son of Eze. Akwuete is their cultural capital.

2 - Umuilokoeze: This village-group is also known as Obohia. It claims common descent from Iloko Eze, a son of Eze. It includes the villages of Umuokoronta, Ohankata, Umuokwanta, among others. Obohia is its cultural capital.

3 - Umukwokwoeze: This village-group is also known as Ikwuiriato. It claims common descent from Kwokwo [Nwankwo] Eze. It includes the villages of Abaki, Mkpukpuoha, the Umuigubeachara offshoot and Ohaobu (in Akwa Ibom) among others. This village-group's cultural capital is Azumini. It is there in what later became Azumini that Kwokwo Eze is said to have settled with his family.

An interesting thing to note about the Umueze clan: Traditionally, they claim no ancestral relationship with any of the other clans, and likewise the other clans claim no ancestral relationship with them. Also, it is from this clan that we hear the archetypal "Ndoki"-type dialect, primarily spoken by the Azumini, Abaki, Akirika, Ohaobu, Egberu and other surrounding Umueze communities. This speech form is particular to the Umueze clan. Also, it would seem that the Umueze clan had some contact with Ijo. Evidence such as Kwokwo Eze having named his oldest on Bele, as well as the existence of a few Ijo-derived place names within Umueze seem to suggest an early affiliation with Ijo. By the late 19th/early 20th century, this affiliation becomes more pronounced and evidenced with the Umueze and Ubani (Bonny/Opobo) referring to each other as 'a mina mina' ('my sibling'). The village of Obunku is the Umueze clan's overall cultural capital. It is there at Obunku that Eze is said to have settled.

3) Ikwueke - This clan does not share a tradition of common descent. Instead, tradition has it that the respective villages in this clan were brought together by a mutual need for security. Their clan name is a sort of testament to this. As tradition has it, the social instability and warring between the communities became so bad that it was eventually agreed that fighting or any form of communal war be expressly forbidden on Eke day. As such, the communities do not go to war on Eke day. Hence their adopted name, Ikwueke. The village of Eti (Ogbueti) eventually became their cultural capital.

4) Ikwuorie (also known as Ohanku) - Most sources claim that this clan descended from Ikwueke. The details are sketchy between the two communities, but what is agreed on is that the ancestors of the Ikwuorie clan were living at the present site of Ohambele. As tradition has it, in an effort to resolve an inter-communal issue, the ancestors of the Ikwuorie clan moved out and settled at their present location of Ohanku. Ikwuorie claims no ancestral affiliation with any other Ndoki clans other than Ikwueke. An interesting thing to note: In their traditions, the Ikwuorie and also Ikwueke clan claim to have no affiliation with the "Ndoki" and instead claim to have already been settled in the area, long before the "Ndoki" migrated in. The Ndoki, in their traditions, are later identified as the Umueze clan.

5) Ohuru na Nkporobo - This clan does not share a tradition of common descent. The villages maintain their own traditions of origin. An interesting thing to note about this clan: Traditions place the origin of the various villages from Asa and Ngwa, but it would seem that the early Asa ancestors were the first to settle the virgin forest that is now Ohuru. Something to note about this clan: This clan is actually no longer part of 'Ndoki', though many still think of it as so. Instead it is grouped as part of Asa.

1 Like

Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by Radoillo(m): 11:55am On Jan 31
^ Copying this before there's another data loss.

Thanks.
Re: Origin Of Various Igbo Clans by ChinenyeN(m): 5:56pm On Jan 31
No problem.

(0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (Reply)

Historical Pix; Picture Of Christmas Celebration In Badagry, 1923 / Why Do Igbos Especially The Anambrans Marry From Their Tribe? / Where Did Nigerians Get That Superiority Complex From?

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2015 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 167
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.