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Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK - Education (10) - Nairaland

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Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 8:44pm On Aug 21, 2012
The only 10 universities that do not have clearing places despite, for the first time the government having no cap on the number of AAB+ students a university can enrol, are all in my top 12.

The only 2 that are not, and offer clearing places, are Warwick and Edinburgh.

[size=18pt]Scramble for university places begins as doors close on those without top grades [/size]

[size=14pt]Students lacking AAB grades at A-level are being left in the cold as high-flyers muscle in[/size]

Universities were beginning to put up the "house full" signs to students without AAB passes or better at A-level yesterday – leaving thousands with lower grades struggling to clinch a place.

A survey by The Independent showed that many universities were only taking top-grade students through the clearing system, because the Government will only allow them to expand if they take such students.

That means, though, that the number of places for those with lower grades has been slashed by 20,000 to make way for the extra AAB students.

Southampton University was one of those stipulating a minimum of AAB on the clearing page of its website. It said it had "no fixed limit" on the numbers it was willing to accept.

The university said it was being approached by "large number of students" with lower grades whom it would normally take but who are being turned away because of the Government cap on numbers.

Exeter was also setting aside extra places through clearing for high-flying students. Nottingham said it had set aside an unspecified number of places for AAB students. And Sheffield said it was recruiting more students with AABs through clearing because of the government changes; a limited number of places – for example on its straight law course – were still available for those with ABBs, it said.

Oxford Brookes University was the first in this A-level round to say it was cutting student numbers this year, though it still had 300 places on offer through the clearing system. Sussex, said the government cap meant there were more opportunities for overseas students than for those from the UK.

Academic experts have predicted that the "squeezed middle" universities may cut student numbers this year as fewer places are available for those with lower-grade passes.

At least 10 universities said they were not taking part in clearing this year because all their places had gone. These included Oxford, Cambridge, the London School of Economics, St Andrews, University College London, King's College London, Bristol (even though it had offered 600 extra places this year), Durham and Imperial College, London.

Ucas, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service, has revealed that 170,000 students are chasing around 50,000 places in the clearing system.

The survey also showed that the number of students accepting university places had risen to 379,635 yesterday, well below last year's 407,722; 9,000 of these places were snapped up on the first day of clearing. A total of 70,591 were checking whether places were still available to them.

Meanwhile, the University of Ulster revealed it had emailed offers for 400 places to the wrong students. The offers were later withdrawn.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:09am On Oct 03, 2012
Hundreds of leading companies in Western countries' CEOs and Chairmen's top 10 UK universities based on their employment preferences:

UK Rank) University (World rank)

1.) Cambridge (4th)
2.) Oxford (8th)
3.) UCL (12th)
4.) Imperial (14th)
5.) KCL (22th)
6.) Edinburgh (29th)
7.) Nottingham (31st)
8.) LSE (40th)
9.) Birmingham (55th)
10.) Durham (70th)

Universities in my top 10 that missed out: Bristol [15, 122nd], Warwick [12, 92nd] and St Andrews [-, -]


Top 10 (World)

1.) Harvard
2.) Stanford
3.) Yale
4.) Cambridge
5.) Columbia
6.) Northwestern
7.) MIT
8.) Oxford
9.) HEC Paris
10.) Chicago

http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/10/20/education/20iht-SReducEmploy20-graphic.html?ref=education


All the 22 UK and US universities in the list's World Top 30 are universities in my "Hot Group 1a and above" list. Only after the Top 30 do you start seeing "Hot Group 1b" universities in the list, starting with Nottingham.

https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/4#5905180
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:53am On Oct 04, 2012
More about highly and richly funded universities.

Top 10 universities by income per full-time equivalent student 2010-11 (£k)

1.) Cambridge 65.84
2.) Imperial 48.82
3.) Oxford 46.82
4.) UCL 37.61
5.) Edinburgh 27.77
6.) LSE 26.24
7.) KCL 25.87
8.) Bristol 23.74
9.) Liverpool 23.47
10.) Warwick 22.17

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/sep/24/university-inequality-income-resources-unfair
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 9:37am On Oct 06, 2012
The telegraph did a research on the Top 10 UK universities that educated the richest UK-based people.

Top 10 (% of UK millionaires produced)

1.) Oxford (7.8%)
2.) London [inc. LSE, Imperial, UCL & KCL] (7.5%)
3.) Cambridge (4.3%)
4.) Edinburgh (3.5%)
5.) Glasgow (3.1%)
6.) Leeds (2.7%)
7.) Manchester (2.4%)
8.) Aston (2.3%)
9.) Southampton (2.3%)
10.) Open (1.9%)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/9427636/Top-10-universities-for-joining-the-super-rich.html?frame=2288256

This is aligned to my suspicion that Oxford produces more highlightedly successful people than Cambridge. More nerds in Cambridge.


The telegraph did a research on the Top 10 UK universities good starting salaries.

Top 10

1.) LSE (£28.968)
2.) Imperial (£28,831)
3.) St George's London (£27,015) mainly a medical school, so very screwed to do well
4.) UCL (£25,020)
5.) Royal Veterinary College (£24,936) mainly a veterinary school, so very screwed to do well
6.) Cambridge (£24,926)
7.) KCL (£24,798)
8.) Oxford (£24,773)
9.) QMW (£23,961)
10.) City (£23,674)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/9532912/Graduate-jobs-Best-universities-for-high-starting-salaries.html?frame=2334382

* In my view, this should be taken with a pinch of salt as a lot of Oxbridge students move to postgraduate roles/academia, so the average pay might be dragged down compared to those that got a private sector job.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 5:08am On Nov 18, 2012
Update on fundraising campaigns by universities.

https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/8#10426465

Largest fund-raising campaigns
Oxford – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £1.25bn by 2016. After already raising the target sum of £1.25bn by 2012 (i.e. in 4 years and with 4 years to go), they have increased the target to £3bn.
Fundraising rate: £312.5m per year.

KCL – Launched a campaign in 2010 to raise £500m by 2015. They have already raised £400m by 2012, almost at the target after 2 years and with 3 years left to go.
Fundraising rate: £200m per year.

Cambridge – Launched a campaign in 2005 to raise £1bn by 2012. They raised £1.2bn by 2012 (i.e. in 7 years) and have ended the campaign.
Fundraising rate: £171.4m per year.

Nottingham – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £150m by 2016. They have raised £81m (over half the target) in the first year and with 5 more years to go.
Fundraising rate: £81m per year.

Edinburgh – Launched a campaign in 2006 to raise £350m by 2011. They have finally raised the target of £350m by 2012 (i.e. in 5 years) and have ended the campaign.
Fundraising rate: £70m per year.

Imperial – Launched a campaign in 2007 to raise £207m by 2010. Stopped at £157m raised (i.e. in 3 years), did not meet the target.
Fundraising rate: £52.3m per year.

UCL – Launched a campaign in 2004 to raise £300m by 2014. They have already raised over the target with £316m (i.e. in 8 years) and have ended the campaign.
Fundraising rate: £39.5m per year.

Birmingham – Launched a campaign in 2009 to raise £60m by 2011. They raised the £60m (i.e. in 2 years) and ended the campaign.
Fundraising rate: £30m per year.

Durham – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £175m by 2007. They raised the target £175m by 2007 (i.e. in 10 years).
Fundraising rate: £17.5m per year.

Aberdeen – Launched a campaign in 2000 to raise £150m by 2009. They raised the £150m by 2010 (i.e. in 10 years).
Fundraising rate: £15m per year.

LSE – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £100m by 2007. They raised over the target of £105m by 2007 (i.e. in 10 years).
Fundraising rate: £10.5m per year.

Bristol – Launched a campaign in 2003 to raise £100m by 2014. They had already raised £83m by 2011 ((i.e. in 8 years), no further campaign updates.
Fundraising rate: £10.4m per year.

St Andrews – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £100m by 2016. They had already raised £32m by 2012 (i.e. in 4 years).
Fundraising rate: £8m per year.

Warwick – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £50m by 2015. Still no updates yet.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 10:47pm On Dec 09, 2012
Thousands of leading recruiters from companies in 20 developed countries' top 10 UK universities based on their perception of employability of the university's graduates:

UK Rank) University (World rank)

1.) Cambridge (3rd)
2.) Oxford (4th)
3.) Imperial (9th)
4.) LSE (15th)
5.) UCL (16th)
6.) KCL (38th)
7.) Edinburgh (42nd)
8.) Birmingham (60th)
9.) Nottingham (70th)
10.) Manchester (71st)

Universities in my top 10 that missed out: Bristol [11, 115th], Warwick [13, 135th] and St Andrews [-, -]


Top 10 (World)

1.) Harvard
2.) Yale
3.) Cambridge
4.) Oxford
5.) Stanford
6.) MIT
7.) Columbia
8.) Princeton
9.) Imperial
10.) Goethe (Frankfurt)

http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2012/10/25/world/asia/25iht-sreducemerging25-graphic.html?ref=nf


Combined with the CEO's preferences above,

https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/9#12409920

It seems HYPMS + Columbia lead for employability in the US and Golden Triangle + Edinburgh lead for employability in the UK.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Nobody: 11:21pm On Dec 16, 2012
@Sagamite

Pls, my girl has just been called to bar in Nigeria and currently doing her NYSC. She really intend to proceed to UK for her Masters in Law. I need you to give me five great schools in the UK that will not cost too much money to achieve her goal. Her intention is to come back to Nigeria after her Masters and look for a very good job.

You help is highly appreciated.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:45pm On Dec 16, 2012
payless: @Sagamite

Pls, my girl has just been called to bar in Nigeria and currently doing her NYSC. She really intend to proceed to UK for her Masters in Law. I need you to give me five great schools in the UK that will not cost too much money to achieve her goal. Her intention is to come back to Nigeria after her Masters and look for a very good job.

You help is highly appreciated.

I really can't give 5 great schools that will not cost money. You get what you pay for.

For Law, the premier schools are:

- Cambridge
- Oxford
- LSE
- UCL
- KCL

The last 3 are quite strong because they are London based and literally 10-20 minutes walk/by bus max to the highest courts, top chambers or law firms. Some of the top lawyers even go to the schools to give part-time lectures. Furthermore, senior law lecturers, career-wise, literally rotate among those 5 universities and those 5 have the strongest law alumni (hence the people that will make the hiring decisions to the top jobs after graduation, if one is like them then they will have a better chance).

These other schools are quite top too for Law:

- Durham
- Bristol
- Warwick
- Edinburgh
- QMW
- Nottingham
- Birmingham
- Manchester
- SOAS
- Exeter

That said, apart from Barrister roles, law firms try not to be elitist. They are the only elite career that visit the widest range of universities to hire students for their premium roles (Banking and Consulting only offer the 'inferior' roles to universities outside their small select list of target universities). I know top law firms visit UEL and Greenwich too to get the best of ethnic diversity. So they are not that bad.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Nobody: 12:03am On Dec 17, 2012
Thanks! I will go with Durham.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Don1Dee(m): 1:29pm On Dec 21, 2012
@Sagamite
Good job you're doing. Plz I want to be a full & livelong academic, Early Childhood Education to be specific. Which five schools can you recommend in the field of education. If possible, include their tuition, and as usual your "take" on them.
Thanks
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 2:04pm On Dec 21, 2012
Don1Dee: @Sagamite
Good job you're doing. Plz I want to be a full & livelong academic, Early Childhood Education to be specific. Which five schools can you recommend in the field of education. If possible, include their tuition, and as usual your "take" on them.
Thanks

Early Childhood Education is not an academically rigorous field, it is more a practical and socially-important field and there are loads of jobs which are all of similar prestige you just need to have the qualification. So I don't think there is really any elitism in it. One can go to basically any institution and it is what you learnt and how you performed that matters (even the latter, I am not sure counts for much as long as you finish and pass).

If you are talking about research and being an academic, which is the academically rigorous area, then the top universities are the best place. E.g.

- Cambridge
- Oxford
- Institute of Education (University of London)
- And some of the russell group of universities and other top universsities (like Edinburgh, Durham, KCL, Manchester, Southampton to name a few)
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Don1Dee(m): 12:33pm On Dec 24, 2012
Sagamite:

Early Childhood Education is not an academically rigorous field, it is more a practical and socially-important field and there are loads of jobs which are all of similar prestige you just need to have the qualification. So I don't think there is really any elitism in it. One can go to basically any institution and it is what you learnt and how you performed that matters (even the latter, I am not sure counts for much as long as you finish and pass).

If you are talking about research and being an academic, which is the academically rigorous area, then the top universities are the best place. E.g.

- Cambridge
- Oxford
- Institute of Education (University of London)
- And some of the russell group of universities and other top universsities (like Edinburgh, Durham, KCL, Manchester, Southampton to name a few)
Thanks...
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 3:10pm On Jan 12, 2013
Another indicator of prestige is where Marshall Scholars select to spend their scholarship to the UK.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Scholarship

The Marshall Scholarship is one of the most selective and prestigious postgraduate scholarships available to only Americans (who also must have done their undergrad degree in a US university). It provides them with full funding to travel to the UK and study for one or 2 years at postgraduate level. The aim is to enable intellectually distinguished young Americans, seen as the country's future leaders, study in the UK. The 2 year scholarships can be utilised at one UK institution or the scholar can decide to elect to go to two different UK institutions (hence doing 2 masters). Some very few of the 2 year scholarships are on rare occasions extended to 3 years if the scholar decides to convert to a PhD.

The scholarship is very selective and highly competitive and people can only apply with a minimum GPA of 3.7 out of 4.0 and with endorsement from their university that they are one of the best students available both academically and leadership-wise. These criteria tends to limit applicants to between only 800 to 1000 annually. Then out of these 800-1000, less than 180 are selected by a board for interview for the scholarship. And eventually roughly 40 are picked as Marshall Scholars. Basically, only 4 to 5% of these best of the best all-rounders in the USA get the scholarship.

The Marshall scholars selected have to select 2 preferred choices from any of the UK universities in any field they desire. Data shows approximately 75% of Marshall Scholars choose to study at Oxford, Cambridge or University of London, hence there is a rule if one of their 2 choices is a college/school in these three universities, their other choice has to be from outside these three.


Here are the top 10 destination preferences of the 800-1000 Marshall Scholarship Applicants (2005 - 2013):
Format: University [Total number of applicants in the 8 year period] (Average range of applicants per year wishing to go to the university)
1. Oxford 2562 (260-300)
2. Cambridge 1053 (105-130)
3. LSE 772 (80-95)
4. UCL 388 (25-65)
5. Edinburgh 369 (30-60)
6. KCL 262 (25-40)
7. SOAS 250 (25-30)
8. Imperial 208 (15-30)
9. St Andrews 208 (15-25)
10. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 190 (15-25)
* UCL has the widest range. Its rise in applicants (upper range) coincides with the emergence of international league tables. It appears to be riding high on its high international rankings.
*St Andrews, on the other hand, is seeing a decline in applicants. Its earlier high rate of applicants seem to be linked to the novelty of Prince William attending the uni.



Here are the top 20 destinations of successful applicants, i.e. selected Marshall Scholars (2000 - 2013):
Format: University (Total number of scholars that have attended the university in the 13 year period)
1. Oxford (210)
2. Cambridge (93)
3. LSE (46)
4. UCL (26)
5. Imperial (19)
6. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (19)
7. SOAS (16)
8. Edinburgh/KCL (11)
10. St Andrews (9)
11. Sussex (7)
12. Queens Belfast (6)
13. Birmingham/Royal Academy of Music (5)
15. Essex (4)
16. Liverpool/Nottingham/Royal Holloway/Sheffield/Cranfield (3)


The destination of the 2013 Scholars are:
- Oxford 11
- LSE 9
- Cambridge 5
- KCL 5
- UCL 4
- St Andrews 2
- Imperial 1
- Edinburgh 1
- LSHTM 1
- Glasgow 1
- QMW 1
- Sheffield 1
- Liverpool 1
- Belfast 1
- Goldsmith 1
- SOAS 1
- Glasgow School of Art 1


Note: Oxford is disproportionately more selected than the others, not only because of its class, but also because there is an application rule that dictates if a candidate is also applying for a Rhodes scholarship (which most Marshall applicants will usually be doing), it is expected one of the two chosen institutions on the Marshall application should be Oxford. This is because Rhodes scholars can only apply to Oxford, no other UK university.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodes_scholarship

So Oxford has more applications and more choices to pick from. Also as the Marshall application rule states that if one has Oxford as one of its choices, then its second choice cannot be Cambridge or any of the University of London colleges, hence Oxford is picking applicants that would have applied to these institutions just because applicants are trying to improve their chances of a prestigious scholarship to the UK by applying for both the Marshall and Rhodes scholarship at the same time.


Top Producers of Marshall Scholars (1954 to 2013)
1. Harvard (239)
2. Princeton (126)
3. Yale (108)
4. Stanford (83)
5. MIT (60)
6. Brown (46)
7. US Military Academy (34)
8. Cornell (31)
=9. Columbia (28)
=9. UC Berkeley (28)

There have been 1818 Marshall Scholars from 1954 to 2013, and 783 of them are from just these 10 universities (i.e. 43%) out of over 1500 universities in the US. HYPMS produces 34% of the overall scholars.

So basically, the Marshall Scholars are frequently the best students from the best US universities.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by darellrivers: 8:51pm On Jan 13, 2013
I am Studying at Oxford University now and really, the experience is awesome! The beauty of many "rich" schools is that you do not have to be RICH to attend them! Oxford does offer lots of scholarships! Yes, getting in is competitive but the experience is truly worth it!
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by darellrivers: 9:07pm On Jan 13, 2013
[quote author=Sagamite]Update on fundraising campaigns by universities.

https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/8#10426465

Largest fund-raising campaigns
Oxford – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £1.25bn by 2016. After already raising the target sum of £1.25bn by 2012 (i.e. in 4 years and with 4 years to go), they have increased the target to £3bn.
Fundraising rate: £312.5m per year.

The funds raised are used to attract the "best" minds to Oxford! If you have a first class degree from Nigeria (A properly earned first class), or a CGPA from 4.0 (again, a properly earned 4.00 and above CGPA), you should give it a shot! There are three things to consider when applying to Oxford

1. Have a really good first degree (goes without saying)
2. Ask yourself: Why do I want to study at Oxford? Why do I want to have a post graduate degree? (Many Nigerians want to do a masters abroad only so they can "migrate" to that country) and What would I do with it in the future?
3. Remember you are competing against the very best in the world!
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 9:32pm On Jan 13, 2013
darellrivers: 2. Ask yourself: Why do I want to study at Oxford? Why do I want to have a post graduate degree? (Many Nigerians want to do a masters abroad only so they can "migrate" to that country) and What would I do with it in the future?

Many Nigerians do a masters because they just want to pack as much certificates as possible. In Nigeria, that increases employability. In the West, it usually counts for little in employability, it is the quality of your institution that matters most times.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by darellrivers: 10:16pm On Jan 13, 2013
Sagamite:

Many Nigerians do a masters because they just want to pack as much certificates as possible. In Nigeria, that increases employability. In the West, it usually counts for little in employability, it is the quality of your institution that matters most times.

I could not agree more! sadly, Nowadays, Sagamite, even a masters degree is beginning to loose its "hype" in Nigeria! Many people go back home from the UK roaming the streets of Nigeria! (I know quite a lot).. It really is no guarantee that you would get a job..
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by darellrivers: 10:22pm On Jan 13, 2013
Another thing that saddens me is that Nowadays, People do not go to school to get educated! People go to school so they can get jobs! If you are properly Educated (not schooled), Jobs will run after you! (My opinion anyway)

1 Like

Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 8:40pm On Oct 31, 2013
After another 3 years: https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/5#6921333

British universities have done well again this year in regards to Nobel prizes, somehow they are connected to 3 out of the 6 Nobels.

- Edinburgh hosts one of the winners of the Nobel prize in Physics who speculated and theorized the concept of the 'God Particle'. The professor did his B.Sc., M.Sc. and PhD at KCL and also previously had short stints teaching at Imperial and UCL.

- KCL also educated another Nobel winner in Chemistry in the same year. He did his B.Sc. in the same Physics at KCL and did his PhD at Cambridge but now teaches at Stanford.

- One of the winners of the Nobel prize for Medicine also spent his 3rd year as an exchange student at University of Edinburgh while undertaking his BA degree at UCLA.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Imperial missed out on hosting a worthy Nobel winner due to the faults/limitations of the awarding of the Nobel prize.

The rules of awarding the Nobel prize includes not awarding it to more than 3 people in a year and cannot be awarded posthumously.

In regards to the God particle discovery, more than 3 people, about 5, had very strong cases to be considered for the Nobel prize this year. Another 6th person that should have won, because his co-researcher is one of the winners, died in 2011 before proof existed.

Peter Higgs (who won the 2013 Nobel) did the research and first suggested that such a particle must exist but this was in 1964 and there was no facilities, or political will, to test his theory which costs a fortune. The test finally began in the 70s and only concluded last year. Two different people actually won a Nobel in Physics in 1999 based on Higgs' work.

Francois Englert (who also won the 2013 Nobel) also did a similar research at the same period as Higgs (1964) with a research partner called Brout (who died in 2011) and they came to the same conclusion.

During the same period, Gerald Guralnik, C. R. Hagen and Tom Kibble also did coincidentally work on this discovery and came up with he same discovery later in 1964 while all 3 of them were working at Imperial. Kibble still works at Imperial.

The Nobel committee have to award to only 3 people and considering that Higgs did it on his own first, Englert and Brout did it second and 3 researchers did it third (all 3 discovery work were independent of each other), they awarded it to Higgs and Englert (Brout was dead so cannot win). They could not recognise just one of the Imperial researchers as all 3 had equal claims, hence Imperial missed out totally.

That is the potential downside of no qualitative analysis of awards when judging performance and reputation.

Edinburgh would still have had an affiliation anyway if Tom Kibble won because he did his B.Sc., M.A. and PhD at Edinburgh before moving to Imperial for his academic career.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 3:18pm On Nov 03, 2013
[size=18pt]University rankings: which world university rankings should we trust?[/size]

Things looked rosy for Cambridge last month. Yes, the university may have lost pole position in the world university rankings to nerd’s paradise MIT. But in taking second place, three slots clear of its great rival Oxford and two ahead of UCL, it reaffirmed its status as the UK’s leading light in higher education.

Or did it? Today’s world rankings paint a different picture. Cambridge only manages seventh place, while Oxford clambers up to joint-second. UCL is a mere 17th. And what of MIT? Much lauded for its apparently peerless technological research last month, it now gazes up longingly at first-placed California Institute of Technology.

The obvious reason for these discrepancies is the use of different ranking systems. Today’s Times Higher Education tables are a different beast to last month’s QS World University Rankings. Although nominally answering the same question, they don’t share a methodology, a data set or indeed a winner.

Rather than argue over which is right, UK universities should perhaps just be glad that the widely respected Shanghai Ranking is less well-known on these shores – none of our universities come close to ending Harvard’s 10 years at the top of that list.

So, where can prospective students turn for answers? The simple truth is that there is no such thing as a definitive table. But in fact the wildly differing outcomes of these tables make them more, not less, useful. The key is in knowing how to interpret them.

The ‘Shanghai Ranking’, for example, originated in 2003 with Chinese government backing. It was designed to provide a global benchmark against which Chinese universities – enjoying billions in state and private investment – could assess their progress. It is a remarkably stable list, relying on long-term factors such as the number of Nobel Prize-winners a university has produced, and number of articles published in Nature and Science journals.

But with this narrow focus comes drawbacks. China's priority was for its universities to “catch up” on hard scientific research. So if you’re looking for raw research power, it’s the list for you. If you’re a humanities student, or more interested in teaching quality? Not so much.


Likewise the THE and QS rankings have their idiosyncrasies. Between 2004 and 2008 they were one and the same, before THE broke away to form its own tables. For THE, the need for more reliable world rankings that could be used for everything from government policy to shaping institutions’ reputations made the previous QS methodology – largely based on surveys – seemingly too volatile.

“Our rankings stand up to more academic scrutiny,” says THE rankings editor Phil Baty. “We produce high-end rankings which are used by governments around the world. And we’re the only global rankings that take teaching seriously.”

Predictably, QS says good riddance. “We’ve always been clear we’re aimed at prospective international students,” says Danny Byrne of QS. “Our rankings are easy to understand and of direct relevance to students – we’re unique in asking potential employers what they think of the universities, for example.

“THE cater for their audience – they’re a trade publication, and have an academic readership.”

The rankings differ in how they collect data too. QS’s rankings are reputation-driven, with 50 per cent of an institution’s score derived from surveys. And while THE does some reputation surveying, sending invitation-only questionnaires to a limited number of institutions around the world, QS opts for quantity to achieve reliability, mass-mailing some 46,000 academics before weighting the results to preclude regional bias.

Similarly, while QS canvasses academics' opinions on research but not teaching quality – reasoning that academics aren’t qualified to comment on the level of the latter at rival institutions – THE has five different measures of teaching quality. Indeed, teaching quality makes up a third of an institution’s THE score.

“Rankings are a useful source of information that wouldn’t otherwise be available – but they don’t make your decision for you,” says QS’s Byrne. “It’s about knowing what they do, and applying them intelligently. More is more.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/9584155/University-rankings-which-world-university-rankings-should-we-trust.html

To summarise:

ARWU - Focused on long-term, hard science research qualifiers. So a useful table for those interested in postgraduate research in STEM fields, especially those who want to work with or be taught by internationally elite STEM academics.

UK Top 10 (Global rank)
1. Cambridge (5)
2. Oxford (10)
3. UCL (21)
4. Imperial (24)
5. Manchester (41)
6. Edinburgh (50)
7. Bristol (64)
8. KCL (67)
9. Nottingham (83)
10. LSE (101)


THE - Focused on medium-term overall (teaching & research) reputation and performance across most academic subject fields. So it is a useful table for policy-makers and stakeholders to understand the overall relative reputation and performance of their relevant local institutions.

UK Top 10 (Global rank)
1. Oxford (2)
2. Cambridge (7)
3. Imperial (10)
4. UCL (21)
5. LSE (32)
6. KCL (38)
7. Edinburgh (39)
8. Manchester (58)
9. Bristol (79)
10. Durham (80)


QS - Focused on short-term subjective reputation of institutions. Hence a useful table for local and international students interested in institutions that would maximise their perceptive value in the global and local job market.

UK Top 10 (Global rank)
1. Cambridge (3)
2. UCL (4)
3. Imperial (5)
4. Oxford (6)
5. Edinburgh (17)
6. KCL (19)
7. Bristol (30)
8. Manchester (33)
9. Glasgow (51)
10. Birmingham (62)
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 9:48pm On Nov 05, 2013
Top 10 UK universities for producing "Very" and "Ultra" High Net Worth Individuals (i.e. people worth £20m+)

1. Oxford - 401 super-rich graduates worth an average £83m each

2. Cambridge - 361 super-rich graduates worth an average £169m each

3. LSE - 273 super-rich graduates worth an average £84m each

4. Imperial - 127 super-rich graduates worth an average £67m each

5. London Business School - 106 super-rich graduates worth an average £99m each

6. Manchester - 102 super-rich graduates worth an average £22m each

7. UCL - 99 super-rich graduates worth an average £29m each

8. Nottingham - 92 super-rich graduates worth an average £22m each

9. Edinburgh - 80 super-rich graduates worth an average £52m each

10. Birmingham - 68 super-rich graduates worth an average £69m each

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314550/UK-graduate-rich-list-reveals-universities-make-millionaire-Oxford-comes-top.html
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 4:49pm On Nov 06, 2013
Queen's University, Belfast, launched a new fundraising campaign late in 2012 after I did this: https://www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/8#10426465

This puts the University in the top 10 of University fundraising.

http://www.fundraising.co.uk/news/2012/10/24/queen039s-belfast-launches-%C2%A3140-million-campaign

Largest fund-raising campaigns
Oxford – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £1.25bn by 2016. They have already raised the target (£1.25bn) by 2012.
Cambridge – Launched a campaign in 2005 to raise £1bn by 2012. They had already raised over the target (£1.17bn) by 2011.
KCL – Launched a campaign in 2010 to raise £500m by 2015. They have already raised £200m by 2012.
Edinburgh – Launched a campaign in 2006 to raise £350m by 2011. They had already raised £330m by 2011, seems they missed the target.
UCL – Launched a campaign in 2004 to raise £300m by 2014. They had already raised £200m by 2011.
Imperial – Launched a campaign in 2007 to raise £207m by 2010. Missed target, £157m raised by the end of the period.
Durham – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £175m by 2007. They raised the target (£175m) by 2007.
Aberdeen – Launched a campaign in 2000 to raise £150m by 2009. Missed target, £134m raised by the end of the period, but raised the £150m by 2010.
Nottingham – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £150m by 2016. No updates yet.
Queen's, Belfast – Launched a campaign in 2012 to raise £140m by 2017. They had already raised £17.5m by 2013.
LSE – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £100m by 2007. They raised over the target (£105m) by 2007.
Bristol – Launched a campaign in 2003 to raise £100m by 2014. They had already raised £83m by 2011.
St Andrews – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £100m by 2016. They had already raised £29m by 2011.
Birmingham – Launched a campaign in 2009 to raise £60m by 2011. They had already raised £50m by 2011, seems they missed the target.
Warwick – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £50m by 2015. No updates yet.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:30pm On Nov 07, 2013
Donations to universities also correlates heavily with prestige. Donations normally occur because companies or individuals have high regards for the institution, they believe the institution has some expertise to address some social issue they want tackled or because the donor is an alumnus of the institution.

Here are the historically largest donations from one source to UK universities from individuals or foundations (excludes companies) that have been heavily publicised. The kind of donation that gets things in the university named after the donor.

Top 20 Single Source Donations to UK Universities
1. Cambridge £132m
"A donation by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in year 2000. Adjusted for inflation, that's £188m in 2013."

2. Oxford £100m
"This is a donation by James Martin, who donated $100m in 2005 and a further $50m in 2009 as well as other donations used to create the Oxford Martin School."

3. Imperial £27m
"A donation by an alumnus Tech entrepreneur called Gary Tanaka to Imperial in 2000 to create the Imperial business school."

4. SOAS £20m
"A donation from the Alphawood Foundation in Chicago in 2013, set up by Fred Eychaner, a former Asian art student at SOAS, for the support of South East Asian Art studies."

5. UCL £20m
"An award from the Wolfson Foundation in 2011 for a new centre dedicated to the understanding and treatment of neuro-degenerative diseases."

6. KCL £20m
"A 2012 donation from the Hong Kong citizen & luxury-goods businessman, Dickson Poon, who is also a former student. Donated to the law department."

7. Nottingham Trent £15.7m
"A 2-stage gift from the John and Lucille van Geest Foundation in 2008 and 2013 to create a cancer research centre."

8. Leeds £15m
"A donation in 2005 by Marjorie and Arnold Ziff to fund a new landmark building housing a range of student services."

9. Queen's Belfast £15m
"A 2012 grant from Atlantic Philanthropies [foundation] to be used to help establish a world-leading Centre for Experimental Medicine in Northern Ireland."

10. LSE £12m
"Money from philanthropists Jeremy and Hannelore Grantham's foundation in 2008 to establish a research institute on Climate Change and the Environment."

11. Edinburgh £10m
"Donated by JK Rowlings (Harry Porter Author) to set up a research clinic in her mother's name in a bid to unravel the mysteries of multiple sclerosis."

12. Southampton £10m
"Donated anonymously in 2012 (even the university does not know who the donor is) to go towards building a cancer immunology centre at the university."

13. Sheffield £8m
"From the Sheffield Institute Foundation for Motor Neurone Disease (SIFMND) to build a research centre dedicated to researching the MND health condition."

14. Leicester £7m
"Donated by the John and Lucille van Geest Foundation in 2012 to support world-leading research into heart disease."

15. Birmingham £5.6m
"An alumni of the university, Terry Bramall, donates sum through his Liz and Terry Bramall Charitable Trust in 2010 to build a purpose-built home for the Department of Music."

16. Exeter £5m
"The Ruler of Sharjah, Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al-Qassimi, has supported Exeter’s Islamic studies center with these sum between 2001 to 2012."

17. Manchester £4m
"An alumni of the university, Dr Rory Brooks, and his wife Elizabeth donated series of monies from 2004 to 2013 to support poverty research by the university's Brooks World Poverty Institute."

18. Durham £2.5m
"Donated by the former Prime Minister of Kuwait, Sheikh Nasser Al-Sabah, in 2012 to fund research into international security."

19. Nottingham £2.1m
"A former student & Carphone Warehouse founder, David Ross, donated the money in 2012 to fund a project to help deprived youngsters reach higher education institutions."

20. Liverpool £2m
"A 2009 donation by the Wolfson Trust to build the the Wolfson Centre for Personalised Medicine."

Notes:
- For institutions with the same donation sum, I have rated those with a far smaller size higher, e.g. the £20m gift is worth more than a quarter of SOAS's annual turnover while it is less impactful to UCL and KCL, and then the next criteria is year of donation. A donation made years earlier is worth more than one made later (time value of money), hence why UCL is over KCL.

- Some of these donations count towards the fundraising activities I stated earlier above.

- All conversions from dollars to pounds was done at £1 = $1.6 rate.

- There are corporate donations to some universities that might be higher than the stated largest donations.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 12:20am On Nov 08, 2013
Other major donations to these Top 20
For all the above listed largest donations, it should be noted that this is a list of largest donation to respective universities. There are universities amongst these that have second, third and even twentieth largest donations that beat the largest donation of some other universities on the list. For example:

- Cambridge got £30m from couple, Ros and Steve Edwards, and renamed a college of the university after the donors. They also had David Harding, the founder, chairman and head of research of Winton Capital Management, donate £20m to the Cavendish Laboratory, the University of Cambridge's Department of Physics. And I am sure they have many other multimillion pound donations including an £8m donated by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia.

- Oxford has received £75m donations from 3 different sources (from Michael Moritz, Len Blavatnik and John McCall MacBain). And they have many other donations north of £20m and tens below that but above £1m.

- Imperial has a £20.1m donation from Hedge fund banker, Brevan Howard, given to Imperial College Business School in London to set up a research centre in financial economics and another £12m donation from the Grantham Foundation (the same one that gave LSE its largest donation of £12m) to set up the Grantham Institute for Climate Change. Paul K. Wooley, founder and former chairman of GMO Europe, a fund management firm based in London also donated £4.75m.

- KCL has an £8m donation from the The John and Lucille van Geest Foundation, donated to support Alzheimer’s research at the Institute of Psychiatry. The Foundation is the same as the one that donated Leicester's and Nottingham Trent's largest donation. The London university also has a £7m donation from the family of its Malaysian alumnus, Mark Yeoh, to set up a new Centre for Politics, Philosophy & Law. Another £6m came from another Hong Kong alumnus, Dr Lau Ming-Wai, for its China Institute.

- Leeds has a £2.5m donation from its former student, Peter Cheney, to fund scholarships.

- LSE has two £2.5m donations. One from the late ruler of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, and another from hedge fund manager, John A. Paulson, to fund new research and teaching on Europe's unique role in the post-crisis financial world. LSE also accepted a notorious £1.5m donation from Saif Ghaddafi.

- Edinburgh had £8m donated by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia (also donating the same amount to Cambridge) to build an Islamic centre. And another donation by holocaust survivor and software entrepreneur, Dame Stephanie Shirley, of £1m to research into autism.

- Leicester got a donation of £2m from Industrialist David Wilson for its Library which was named after the donor.

- Exeter's former student who went on to found the world's largest provider of clinical trials donated £1m to the University of Exeter Medical School.

- Durham had a local entrepreneur and councillor, Bob Young, donate £1m to launch a scholarship fund for County Durham local students.


Some universities that obtained over a million pound donation
Glasgow (£1.8m), Hull (£1.5m), Aberdeen (£1.1m) and Warwick, Bath, Loughborough along with London South Bank all got a £1m donation.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 8:09am On Nov 09, 2013
Top 20 Universities with Nobel Laurette Affiliation
1. Cambridge (90)
2. Oxford (58)
3. UCL (26)
4. Manchester (25)
5. Edinburgh (18)
6. LSE (17)
7. Imperial (16)
8. KCL (12)
9. Birmingham (8 )
10. Bristol (7)
11. Liverpool (6)
11. Glasgow (6)
13. St Andrews (5)
13. Aberdeen (5)
13. Sheffield (5)
13. Leeds (5)
17. Birkbeck (4)
18. QMW (3)
18. Nottingham (3)
18. Essex (3)
*Affiliation = award winner was a student, alumnus/alumna, or faculty member of the university before, during or after the Nobel prize award.

Top 20 Universities with Nobel Laurette Graduates
1. Cambridge (67)
2. Oxford (26)
3. Manchester (8 )
4. UCL (6)
5. LSE (5)
5. KCL (5)
7. Liverpool(4)
7. Birmingham (4)
9. Imperial (3)
9. Edinburgh (3)
9. Glasgow (3)
12. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (2)
12. Sheffield (2)
12. Leeds (2)
12. Essex (2)
16. Bristol (1)
16. St Andrews (1)
16. Nottingham (1)
16. SOAS (1)
16. Aberdeen (1)
16. East Anglia (1)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_university_affiliation
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 10:06am On Nov 14, 2013
[size=18pt]Moody’s: Elite universities dominate philanthropic fundraising[/size]

Elite UK universities receive a greater share of philanthropic donations than their peers in the US, a new report has revealed.

The report, from credit rating agency Moody’s, found that the result was likely to be an “increasing disparity of wealth”, as donations are focused on the top-ranked institutions.

The study – ‘UK universities increasingly tapping fundraising’ – found that, in 2012, the universities of Oxford and Cambridge received around 45% of all UK universities’ philanthropic income.

By contrast, Harvard and Stanford – the two most successful fundraisers in the US private university sector – received just 15% of donations to that sector. Meanwhile, the universities of California and Texas topped the public sector league table, receiving 18% of donations.

The report also found that, since 2005, philanthropic income has grown much faster in the UK than in the US, although this is from a much lower base.

In 2012, UK universities grew gift revenue to a record £774 million, up from £676 million in 2011.

Moody’s analyst Pranav Sharma said: “Universities with less private support and smaller endowments will be challenged to keep pace with their wealthier counterparts.”

He added the donations will become an “even more critical component of funding” for universities’ financial aid, academic programmes, research efforts and capital projects.

http://www.educationinvestor.co.uk/ShowArticleNews.aspx?ID=3584

The red highlighted is my main real point about how much finance a university can raise. And the Golden Triangle universities plus Edinburgh seem to be the leaders in this. This is more pertinent as UK government cuts or stalls public funding of universities and encourage universities to look out into the private sector fundraising and charging fees to raise funds to meet their growing needs.

The UK education landscape is currently experiencing structural and philosophical grand shifts due to austerity policy and globalisation (including the introduction of global comparison tables). The Golden Triangle universities plus Edinburgh have been the best in adapting to these monumental shifts.

Just by looking at the data on this thread's page 9, you will find the Golden Triangle + Edinburgh have the top income per student, high fund raising capability, high endowments, amongst the best international reputation and the highest employment rates. Other elite Universities like Manchester, Bristol, Durham, St Andrews, Nottingham, Birmingham and likes also do well in some aspects of these. Oxbridge dominates and far exceed all universities in them though.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:11am On Nov 14, 2013
A research by compiled by data research company WealthInsight and business magazine Spear’s into which Univerisities produce the highest number of millionaires had 42 UK tertiary establishments in the top 500.

All the 42 UK universities in the Top 500 for producing millionaire (World Rank)
1. Oxford (6)
2. Cambridge (9)
3. LSE (27)

4. University of London (45)
5. London Business School (63)
6. Imperial College (68)
7. Bristol (102)
8. UCL (114)
9. Edinburgh (115)

10. Leeds (148)
11. Southampton (150)
12. Manchester (152)
13. Newcastle (168)
14. Durham (173)
15. Warwick (181)
16 Strathclyde (192)
17. Birmingham (215)
18. Nottingham (217)
19. Exeter (223)
20. Liverpool (238)
21. Glasgow (267)
22. KCL (282)
23. Wales (288)
24. Lancaster (296)
25. Sheffield (299)
26. Bath (308)
27. QMW (316)
28. Aston (350)
29. Kingston (356)
30. St Andrews (384)
31. Sussex (393)
32. Westminister (395)
33. Royal College of Art, London (417)
34. Royal College of Music, London (418)
35. East Anglia (426)
36. Cardiff (440)
37. Cass (441)
38. Oxford Brookes (455)
39. Bradford (460)
40. Aberdeen (471)
41. Cranfield (477)
42. Leeds Met (486)


Top 10 World universities for producing millionaire
1. Harvard University (USA)
2. Harvard Business School (USA)
3. Stanford University (USA)
4. University of California (USA)
5. Columbia University (USA)
6. University of Oxford (UK)
7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA)
8. New York University (USA)
9. University of Cambridge (UK)
10. University of Pennsylvania (USA)


http://www.spearswms.com/spears-lists/lists/smarter-money-how-the-wealthy-have-been-educated/#.UoQh6SeeVkg

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/worlds-top-100-universities-for-producing-millionaires/2008749.article
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 11:28am On Nov 14, 2013
[size=18pt]Why Oxford University Couldn't Survive Without Philanthropy[/size]

You shouldn’t need a first in maths from Oxford to figure out that your ancient, inadequately subsidised alma mater urgently requires the support of private donors — and that your money is as good as (almost) anyone’s, says Josh Spero

It started with the Led Zeppelin concert.’ Unlikelier sentences have been spoken, but probably not in Oxford.

Professor Nick Rawlins is sitting in his office overlooking Wellington Square talking about the recently announced £26 million gift to the university by Mica Ertegun, the widow of Ahmet Ertegun, Atlantic Records founder and promoter of the Rolling Stones, Aretha Franklin and the Zep. The money will endow 35 scholarships for humanities graduates at a time when the sciences, seen as more practical or valuable, receive more philanthropic funding.

£1 million from the concert at the O2 was donated to Oxford by the band and ‘that got Mica Ertegun thinking she’d like to come to Oxford. She came to Oxford and she fell in love, not just with the buildings but with the people.’ It must be rare for donors to walk through the door. ‘There are several days when no multimillionaire comes to ask me if they can help,’ he laughs.

If the multimillionaires aren’t coming to Oxford, then Oxford has to go to them. With income which doesn’t nearly meet its expenditure on teaching and research, with capital funding decapitated, with medieval buildings and 21st-century challenges, philanthropy is not just desirable but also essential. Take undergraduate education: it costs £16,000 a year for a student in the tutorial system of one-on-two classes, but fees and government support only cover £8,000. The new fees of £9,000 barely replace the teaching grants removed, and Oxford and its colleges have pledged to expand their already generous student support programmes. There is a shortfall in the undergraduate current account of £77 million this year.

Not to be too gloomy, Oxford Thinking, the university’s major fundraising campaign, has reached £1.3 billion in eight years, £50 million over target. Still, ‘without philanthropy, we would be in truly dire straits,’ Professor Rawlins says.

Across the city, Sean Rainey, head of the development office at Magdalen College, takes a longer perspective but reaches the same conclusion: ‘Philanthropy is the reason we’re here. Everything about this college is the result of philanthropy. Everything we do from having students here, having fellows teaching, the buildings we sit in, is a direct result of philanthropy. Philanthropy is all-pervasive in this institution. It’s the reason it exists and without we would struggle to survive. That’s not wishing to be melodramatic — it’s the truth.’ Like many colleges, Magdalen was founded by benefaction, in its case the gift of William of Waynflete, bishop of Winchester, in 1458.

It has to be said that it’s hard to believe Magdalen could be in quite such danger as we sit in the State Room, where members of the Senior Common Room can retire for coffee. From our finely embroidered wingback armchairs, past walls hung with French tapestries, frames holding First World War medals and a vivid Sassoferrato Virgin, we can see Magdalen’s front quad and, beyond, the quiet quad I lived off for three years, with its kempt lawn and unruly gargoyles. The reason it’s all so pretty, Rainey says, is that to keep the college — heritage site that it is — in good repair costs £1.8 million each year, over a tenth of its expenditure. It faces making losses over the next few years without a greater endowment (already one of Oxford’s biggest).

Perception is a problem, says Kirsty MacDonald, head of the development office at Wadham College. While wealthy alumni tend to be well-disposed to their old universities, ‘the downside to being Oxford or Cambridge is that people think you’ve got lots of money and the reality is that most colleges don’t.’ Wadham’s endowment provides a quarter of its turnover every year. ‘We wouldn’t survive without it,’ adds MacDonald.


http://www.spearswms.com/news/why-oxford-university-couldnt-survive-without-philanthropy/#.UoShRSeeVkg
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 2:15pm On Nov 14, 2013
Research "Power Rankings" by Research Fortnight using the RAE 2008’s research results and rankings with consideration for the quality and quantity of a UK university’s research output. It takes both the volume of staff submitted and the quality profile of institutions into account.

Top 20 Universities for research between 2001 to 2008
1. Oxford
2. Cambridge
3. UCL

4. Manchester
5. Edinburgh
6. Imperial

7. Nottingham
8. Leeds
9. Sheffield
10. Bristol
11. King’s College
12. Birmingham
13. Southampton
14. Glasgow
15. Warwick
16. Cardiff
17. Newcastle
18. Liverpool
19. Durham
20. Queen Mary

*LSE was 27th. The School is smaller in terms of total student headcount than its main comparators. LSE has a much higher proportion of taught post graduates and a lower proportion of research postgraduates.

* This might have changed in recent years as reflected in international league tables. Next national assessment for the period after 2009 is due out at the end of 2014. So take this as a time/periodic snapshot.



http://exquisitelife.researchresearch.com/.a/6a00e54ee8dd978833010536671247970c-popup

http://www1.plymouth.ac.uk/research/assessment/RAE/Pages/Power-table.aspx

http://exquisitelife.researchresearch.com/exquisite_life/2008/12/research-fortnight-benchmarking-service.html
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 1:21am On Nov 17, 2013
Here is another survey of international employers. It is based on responses from 2,700 recruiters in 20 countries, who were asked which of their local universities produced the best graduates.

It was conducted by the French consulting group 'RH Emerging' in partnership with the German polling institute 'Trendence'. The result of the research allows to establish a ranking of what are considered the best universities in terms of employability at the moment and to hear recruiters idea of a perfect university. The proposed uniqueness of this particular rankings is that the international recruiters do not only establish a classification but above all give their opinion on what an ideal university should look like. The panel is made up by the biggest recruiting companies of 20 countries where 90% of the world's students can be found; it also contains recruiters from countries which do not often figure in international HR surveys such as India and Turkey.

UK Rank) University (World rank)

1. Oxford (1)
2. Cambridge (3)
3. UCL (13)
4. Edinburgh (15)
5. Imperial College (21)

6. Manchester (27)
7. KCL (37)
8. LSE (41)

9. Nottingham (45)
10. Birmingham (57)
11. Bristol (66)
12. London Business School (79)
13. Warwick (106)
14. Durham (129)

Universities in my top 10 that missed out: St Andrews [-, -]


Top 10 (World)

1. Oxford
2. Harvard
3. Cambridge
4. Stanford
5. MIT
6. Princeton
7. Columbia
8. Yale
9. Caltech
10. Tokyo

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/global-employability-university-ranking-2013/2008497.article

http://emerging.fr/rank_en.html


In terms of UK universities best for employability, the table is very similar in outcomes to the 2 other employability tables by New York Times surveying Executives and Recruiters that I showed earlier above.

As usual, HYPMS + Columbia in the US and the Golden Triangle + Edinburgh in the UK rate very well amongst professional hirers for employability.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 9:24am On Jul 02, 2014
Latest on the funding raising campaigns for those universities still fundraising:

www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/9#13009301
www.nairaland.com/141689/rough-guide-best-most-reputable/9#19350654

Oxford - After already raising the target sum of £1.25bn by 2012, halfway through its campaign, and reviewing the target to £3bn (the largest funding raising programme outside the US), they have raised £1.6bn by July 2013.

KCL - Have raised the entire £500m 18 months ahead of their target end of campaign. Like Oxford, they have now reviewed their target to £600m by end of 2015.

Birmingham - Have re-opened their successful campaign and has increased the target by £100m to £160m by 2015 and have already raised 125m by July 2013.

Nottingham - The fourth fastest fundraising campaign have raised £116m by Jun 2014.

Bristol - Very close to their target with a year to go, they have raised £94m by July 2013.

St Andrews - They have raised £48m by Jun 2014.

Queens Belfast - They have raised £48m by Dec 2013.

Warwick - Still no update.


Largest fund-raising campaigns
1. OxfordExtended its campaign target to raise £3bn by 2016. They have already raised £1.6bn by 2013 and exceeded previous target of £1.25bn.
2. Cambridge – Launched a campaign in 2005 to raise £1bn by 2012. They had already raised over the target (£1.2bn) by 2012 and closed the campaign.
3. KCLExtended its campaign target to raise £600m by 2015. They have already raised £500m by 2014 and exceeded previous target of £500m.
4. Edinburgh – Launched a campaign in 2006 to raise £350m by 2011. Missed target but they had already raised £350m by 2012 and closed the campaign.
5. UCL – Launched a campaign in 2004 to raise £300m by 2014. They had already raised £316m by 2013 and closed the campaign.
6. Imperial – Launched a campaign in 2007 to raise £207m by 2010. Missed target, £157m raised by the end of the period.
7. Durham – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £175m by 2007. They raised the target (£175m) by 2007.
8. BirminghamExtended its campaign target to raise £160m by 2015. They have already raised £125m by 2013 and exceeded previous target of £60m.
9. Nottingham – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £150m by 2016. They had already raised £116m by 2014. Seem on target.
10. Aberdeen – Launched a campaign in 2000 to raise £150m by 2009. Missed target, £134m raised by the end of the period, but raised the £150m by 2010.
11. Queen's, Belfast – Launched a campaign in 2012 to raise £140m by 2017. They had already raised £48m by 2013. Making target seems shaky.
12. LSE – Launched a campaign in 1997 to raise £100m by 2007. They raised over the target (£105m) by 2007 and closed the campaign.
13. Bristol – Launched a campaign in 2003 to raise £100m by 2014. They had already raised £94m by 2013. Seem on target.
14. St Andrews – Launched a campaign in 2008 to raise £100m by 2016. They had already raised £48m by 2014. Making target seems shaky.
15. Warwick – Launched a campaign in 2011 to raise £50m by 2015. Still no updates yet. It would appear this is a failing adventure.
Re: Rough Guide Of The Best & Most Reputable Universities In The UK by Sagamite(m): 3:56pm On Aug 11, 2014
I just saw an interesting survey done by the UK's Guardian newspaper asking over 1,700 UK university students and graduates which universities they regard as being equal to (that is, of the same quality as) their own university.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/interactive/2014/jul/24/interactive-which-universities-think-equals

There was some interesting opinions propagated by the responders which I will go through below.

I feel this survey is relevant to this thread because:
- It provides a useful insight (if the results are read intelligently) into how students/graduates view the prestige of certain universities in the UK.
- Hardly any student would state their university is on par with another they feel is completely inferior.
- Many of these respondents are the future recruiting managers for prestigious jobs, so knowing which universities they respect is good.

When assessing this survey, it is important to understand that this is not scientific and the responses are very susceptible to some weaknesses:
- They only reflect mainly perceptions that are local (i.e. UK-centric and specific), perception at international level might be different. They are perceptions, not scientific or methodological facts. That said, prestige is usually not a science.
- Many of the respondents are juveniles who would engage in wishful thinking, juvenile pride/denial and delusions of granduer. Some delusionally think their universities are as prestigious as Cambridge and Oxford.
- Many of the respondents are heavily influenced by the league tables they have seen or exposed to frequently. But that is simply the reality of university prestige nowadays and that would not change anytime soon.
- Many would pick comparisons based on their subject area/field of study, rather than whole university to whole university comparisons.
- A low proportion of students comparing a university as their equal might actually imply perception of superiority, not necessarily inferiority. For example, only 18% of Warwick students stated Cambridge was a university on the same level actually implies, most likely, the others think Cambridge is better; while only 30% of Warwick students think York is on the same level might actually imply, most likely, the others think they are in a superior university.
- Many respondents might refuse, in arrogance, to name universities that are their prestige rivals.

That said, if read intelligently, some pieces of intelligence and insight can be deduced from the survey.

Considering all these weaknesses, I think using the Oxbridge perception is probably the best measure as the weaknesses are minimised amongst these respondents. They know their universities are the best. They also had the highest number of respondents at 223 and 198 respectively, the third highest was UCL at 91. They are also the ones most likely to get the best jobs and be future hiring managers for prestigious roles.

After Oxbridge, there are inevitably delusions by a minority of university students; hence another good measure is using only the top 2 most frequently selected universities by respondents to demonstrate a better reflection of who they really see as their peer. This is because the top 2 most referred to are frequently:

(a) A true reflection e.g. Durham, Edinburgh and Bristol all picked each other

OR

(b) Are universities slightly better than the respondent’s university. One that they wish they could be compared to e.g. majority of Imperial/LSE students thinking their universities are on par with Cambridge/Oxford; and KCL students thinking their university is as prestigious as UCL/LSE. It is virtually impossible for a majority of respondents to compare downwards, like majority of Warwick students stating Bolton is on par.

Cambridge students think only 7 universities are on par with theirs (18% of them think no university is comparable to theirs)
1. Oxford 77%
2. Imperial 19%
3. None 18%
4. UCL 13%
5. LSE 12%
6. Edinburgh 5.5%
7. Durham 5%
8. KCL 4.5%

Oxford students' Top 10 universities they think are on par with theirs (12% of them think no university is comparable to theirs)
1. Cambridge 85%
2. Imperial 28%
3. LSE 18%
4. UCL 17%
5. None 12%
6. Edinburgh 10%
7. Durham 9%
8. St Andrews = KCL 6%
10. Manchester = SOAS 4%

Top 10 in the equality perception of top UK universities’ students & graduates (using top 2 selections only)
1. Cambridge
2. Oxford
3. Imperial
4. UCL
5. LSE

6. Durham
7. Edinburgh
8. KCL

9. St Andrews
10. Manchester

The Golden Triangle + Edinburgh are in the top as usual*.

* The top UK universities which I used their top 2 selections for the table are: Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, LSE, UCL, Bristol, Warwick, KCL, Edinburgh, Durham, St Andrews and Manchester. Majority of Imperial and LSE’s students might be deeply suffering the delusion though, so it might be best to look at their first 2 excluding Oxbridge.


Some other interesting observations from the responses:
- Cambridge students are the most arrogant. Arrogant enough for almost a quarter to think even Oxford is not a comparable university.
- The top 5 Universities (Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, LSE and UCL) actually all perceive themselves as the Top 5 in their responses. They all elected each other as the top 5.
- Imperial is beating LSE in the perception of students of the top 5 and many Imperial students feel LSE is an inferior university. This is the huge effect of the international league tables.
- Large, big city, England redbrick universities: Birmingham, Nottingham, Leeds, Manchester, Sheffield, Southampton, Liverpool all have their students comparing themselves to each other. Bristol was the only exception.
- Bristol’s rep has slipped drastically in the perception of the Top 5 universities' students.
- SOAS is highly regarded by fellow London's top universities students and Oxford (which is, like SOAS, a more social science and humanities university than Cambridge is).
- Only the Oxbridge pair seems to have a large proportion of students thinking they have no peers. After them, the next most pompous is LSE with 6% of its students thinking no university is comparable to theirs.
- Warwick has not done well in the perception Oxbridge students. It is not in their top 10.
- The Universities I frequently highlight as the Golden Triangle + Edinburgh are all in the peer-comparison by Oxbridge students and also in the Top 2 selections.

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