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Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s - Foreign Affairs - Nairaland

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Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by MyJoe: 2:13pm On Dec 18, 2013
Reading the first few pages of this thread again confirms that people react to these issues emotionally. I will try to look at the facts here by answering some questions.

Nigerians liberated South Africa. Why are they ungrateful?
The South Africans liberated themselves. They were the ones who got shot on the streets of Soweto, murdered in detention, jailed, exiled and humiliated. Nigeria made its contribution but so did some other countries. Yes, it is normal for you to express dissatisfaction if you feel someone you helped fails to recognize or denies your efforts. But on the Mandela funeral episode, it was the prerogative of the organizers to choose who spoke and Nigerians should not make too much out of it. It appears some of the choice of speakers were made for extant practical reasons. For example, Obama because he is the first black president. Hailemariam of Ethiopia and Banda of Malawi were chosen to speak at the funeral because they are the heads of the AU and Sadc respectively. I don’t know the criterion by which some of the others were chosen but like it said it was the organisers’ prerogative. Nigeria was one of the first countries visited by Mandela on coming out of prison – that was gratitude.

Nigeria did nothing for South Africa – putting Mbeki in a guest house doesn’t amount to helping South Africa.
Nigeria probably contributed more than any other country to the fight against apartheid. Its contribution to efforts to end apartheid was mainly in four areas (1) diplomacy (2) financial contributions (3) scholarship (4) economy.
1. Diplomacy: Right from the time of Nigeria’s first leader, Tafawa Balewa, Nigeria made the matter of South Africa a major issue at diplomatic forums. Its main platforms were those presented by the UN and the Commonwealth. At Commonwealth CHOGMS, it campaigned, cajoled and threatened to pull out. This was revved up with the coming of General Murtala to power in the 70’s. Nigeria’s foreign minister General Garba made lengthy speeches at the UN, calling for sanctions and urging more actions. Nigeria’s diplomatic efforts were often countered by the likes of Kamuzu Banda of Malawi whose constant refrain was that nobody would leave the Commonwealth and destroy it. Obasanjo kept the fire burning when he assumed Nigeria’s leadership in 1976. If you have not read this letter he wrote to Thatcher, you should so do. http://omojuwa.com/2013/04/an-open-letter-to-mrs-margaret-thatcher-from-general-olusegun-obasanjo/
2. Finance: Nigeria made financial contributions to the ANC. These monies came from the Nigerian government and from donations made by the Nigerian people. Yes, the money got to the ANC. Others who made financial contributions included Muammar Ghadaffi of Libya.
3. Scholarship: Nigeria granted scholarship to many South African students to study at Nigerian universities. A good number of them were also employed as teachers and in other positions. Some other Africa countries like Ghana also did this.
4. Economy: Nigerians were encouraged to boycott anything made by companies that did business with the apartheid government.
Nigeria also granted residence and Nigerian passports to many freedom fighters who were exiled from their country and denied passports.

However, for all of Nigeria’s contribution, the country that suffered most for its efforts against apartheid was Mozambique. ANC bases in the country were often attacked by Pretoria’s commandos and its president Samora Machel, a fine gentleman, was killed in a plane crash believed to have been orchestrated by the apartheid’s government’s intelligence agents. Other African countries, including Zambia, Angola and Tanzania also made useful contributions although some of them were a bit of late comers having not gained independence until the late 70’s and 80’s. Uganda also played a role, especially under Museveni.

Why should Nigerians assist African countries in difficulties? For example, South Africa.
If you are in the sitting room and you hear sounds of someone being murdered in the bedroom, what would you do? You would spontaneously stand up and rush to the scene to try to help. Apartheid was a horrendous episode of evil. It was an affront to all right thinking people. It was an insult and a slap on the face of every non-white person alive since it was the ultimate case of institutionalization of white supremacy. We had a responsibility to do something. Everyone did. It is very likely that Freetown would have been razed to the ground during the RUF invasion of 1999 were it not for the efforts of Brigadier (then colonel) Maxwell Kobe. Were it not for Nigeria the RUF would have taken over Sierra Leone completely and turned it into a state of nature. We saved tens of thousands of lives, possibly hundreds of thousands – that is the satisfaction we get.

Nigeria is the most populated country in Africa and has immense resources, including one of the continent's largest armed forces. We should be involved in the CAR at the moment to prevent the situation degenerating completely, as that will cost us more. Ditto for South Sudan. Involvement does not always involve putting boots on the ground. Our diplomats should be more involved.

Why do Nigerians respect Mandela so much? He did nothing for us. He helped free his country, so what?
See the above response. Apartheid was our problem – all of us. People like Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King deserve the global respect they get. And we should start giving the same regard to other heroes and liberators – Samora Machel, Kenneth Kaunda, Julius Nyerere, Franz Fanon, Amilcal Cabral, Augustinho Neto, Sam Nujoma, John Garang, Albert Lutuli, Steve Biko, Walter Sisulu, Winnie Mandela and others - instead of going on about Mohandas Gandhi and Winston Churchill. Mandela may have been the face of South Africa’s struggle but he did not work alone. There were many others.

Why do Nigerians feel superior to other Africans?
The myth of the super black has been around for quite some time. It is found mainly among Nigerians, South Africans and African-Americans. African-Americans feel they are the super blacks just because they live in the great USA and not Africa which is worse than death itself. One of them even said he was happy his forebears jumped on a slave ship. South Africans feel they are the super blacks because they live on the European patch of the continent. Nigerians feel they are the super blacks because – well, because they are from Nigeria, the “giant of Africa” (who invented this terrible phrase, for Christsakes?). The myth of the super black man is foolish.

Why do South Africans hate Nigerians?
South Africans don’t hate Nigerians. There are many Nigerian businesses in RSA and no one has ever tried to organize a boycott of them or impose special taxes on them. There are Nigerian professionals and no one has tried to stop South Africans hiring them. Many Nigerian men are happily married to South African women.

What exists is a considerable amount of suspicion of Nigerians – and, yes, this sometimes manifests as hatred. But the suspicion is understandable – even Nigerians are suspicious of Nigerians and you usually have to prove yourself first before you are trusted. At the end of apartheid, many Nigerians went to the country. Unfortunately, there were a good number of them with criminal intentions.

Why are South Africans xenophobic?
Anti-immigrant sentiments are fairly common reaction in countries that get a large influx of economic migrants. Britain is retching things up. Every European country now has its anti-immigrant party doing well at elections. Japan doesn’t take in up to a couple of hundred a year. The people often feel that foreigners are taking their jobs. This is often not entirely true but it’s the common belief. Under the same circumstances, many Nigerians would react the same way. Remember Ghana must go?

Why are so many foreigners perpetrating crime in South Africa?
Most of the crime in South Africa is perpetrated by South African nationals. Unfortunately, apartheid nurtured a culture of violence. Add that to a large number of people who did benefit from formal education and you have the present situation.

Why is not Nigeria not respected?
Nigeria is disrespected because of its failed leadership and reputation for corruption, decay and crime. The present state of Nigeria is not only a shame to thinking Nigerians, but all thinking people of black skin. Anything South Africa achieves will always be seen as the achievement of white people. The only way black people are going to be respected globally is when Nigeria gets it right. But our leaders put their interest before that of the people and siphon money to foreign accounts while poverty spreads. Intelligent and capable Nigerians have to either leave the country or grovel before idiots to get crumbs or eke out what they can out of stone. This is what gives Africans the right to be mad at Nigeria. Unfortunately, this is often expressed emotionally – as you can see in the other thread - rather than constructively.

In the 90’s Nigeria stuck out its neck for Liberia. It lost many soldiers. At a point, Nigeria’s foreign minister Tom Ikimis’ aircraft was landing, frequently too, at Monrovia airport with the aid of a torchlight in his bid to bring peace to that country. Some would expect that Liberian streets would today be named after people like Ibrahim Babangida, Sani Abacha, Tomi Ikimi, John Iniengar, Victor Malu and others. Not so. They don’t even mention their names. When it comes to expressing gratitude Madam Johnson-Sirleaf would rather thank the United States for bringing peace to her country. What the United States did? My memory fails me.

South African companies contribute nothing to Nigeria’s economy and milk people of their money
South African companies contribute a lot to Nigeria’s economy. Businesses exist to make money. It is the responsibility of the government to ensure that in doing so, rights are respected. The South African companies in Nigeria operate within the law. If the laws are inadequate or not enforced that is the fault of the government. Imagine what would have happened in 2001 if MTN had not come in. There were no Nigerian companies ready at the time and having only Econet would have caused us a nightmare. There are Nigerian companies in South Africa too (President Mbeki encouraged Nigerian businesses to come in a lot) and they operate within the law, making their contributions to the socioeconomic development of the country.

Where is Nigeria headed?
In the absence of good leadership, anything can happen, but it’s most likely to continue tottering as it is. If a good leader comes, the country still has enough materials and people to make it one of the world’s top ten.

Where is South Africa headed?
The ANC has Nigeria to learn from but it seems it has not done this yet. Although corruption is a major problem in the country, it has not got anywhere near Nigerian proportions yet. They don’t yet have government officials conniving with thieves to loot their mines on a large scale or evidence being presented against a minister for buying two cars for N255m and the president winks at her to carry on. Their former police chief is serving a long jail term for taking a mere $200,000 in bribes. Our own police chief got a slap on the wrist for billions of naira. Their institutions still function – recently a government person investigated Zuma’s house. That doesn’t happen in Nigeria. But with the way things are going, the signs are ominous – they already axed the Scorpions (their EFCC). If the ANC does not move to talk tough on corruption and reign it in, it’s mene mene tekel upharsin and the country could end up like Nigeria.

44 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by paniki(m): 3:28pm On Dec 18, 2013
There we go again.
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by sweetcheecks(f): 10:15pm On Dec 18, 2013
paniki: There we go again.

Hayi, there we go again nyani. WTF?

WHO THE HELL IS THIS GUY?
ON WHAT AUTHORITY IS HE SPEAKING FROM?
WHERE ARE HIS SOURCES? NOT NIGERIAN GOSSIP NEWSPAPERS THAT LACK CREDEBILITY
WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF THE PEOPLE YOU GAVE SCHOLARSHIP TO WHO STUDIED AND WORKED IN YOUR COUNTRY? I AM SURE A GOVERNMENT SHOULD HAVE ARCHIVES OF SUCH.
HAS HE EVER BEEN TO SA?
WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF NIGERIAN COMPANIES IN SA?
WHAT DO THEY OFFER THAT WE DO NOT HAVE?
WHO ARE THE MAJOR DRUG DEALERS IN SA?
DOES HE EVEN KNOW WHAT EFFECT DO DRUGS HAVE ON CRIME?

MR GO SITDOWN JOOR BEFORE SOUTH AFRICANS TAKE YOU TASK FOR EVERY SENTENCE YOU MAKE! PEOPLE GO TIRE FIGHTING RUBBISH DAY AND DAY OUT. lipsrsealed

MSHWEEEEEEEW! AND JUST LEAVE SOUTH AFRICA ALONE ASSEBLIEF!

2 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Nobody: 10:36pm On Dec 18, 2013
sweetcheecks:

Hayi, there we go again. WTF?

WHO THE HELL IS THIS GUY?
ON WHAT AUTHORITY IS HE SPEAKING FROM?
WHERE ARE HIS SOURCES? NOT NIGERIAN GOSSIP NEWSPAPERS THAT LACK CREDEBILITY
HAS HE EVER BEEN TO SA?
WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF NIGERIAN COMPANIES IN SA?
WHAT DO THEY OFFER THAT WE DO NOT HAVE?
WHO IS THEY MAJOR DRUG DEALER IN SA?
DOES HE EVEN KNOW WHAT EFFECT DO DRUGS HAVE ON CRIME?

MR GO SITDOWN JOOR BEFORE SOUTH AFRICANS TAKE YOU TASK FOR EVERY SENTENCE YOU MAKE! PEOPLE GO TIRE FIGHTING RUBBISH DAY AND DAY OUT. lipsrsealed

MSHWEEEEEEEW! AND JUST LEAVE SOUTH AFRICA ALONE ASSEBLIEF!
cheesy
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by morpheus24: 12:42am On Dec 19, 2013
@ poster.

I especially like this excerp......so on point




Why do Nigerians feel superior to other Africans?
The myth of the super black has been around for quite some time. It is found mainly among Nigerians, South Africans and African-Americans. African-Americans feel they are the super blacks just because they live in the great USA and not Africa which is worse than death itself. One of them even said he was happy his forebears jumped on a slave ship. South Africans feel they are the super blacks because they live on the European patch of the continent. Nigerians feel they are the super blacks because – well, because they are from Nigeria, the “giant of Africa” (who invented this terrible phrase, for Christsakes?). The myth of the super black man is foolish.

3 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by henchamb(m): 7:55pm On Dec 19, 2013
another wasted effort but for op mind, I made front page
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by swhiss: 7:57pm On Dec 19, 2013
as a Nigerian, why wasn't i the first to comment??

2 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Nobody: 7:58pm On Dec 19, 2013
What is this one looking for on nairaland sef??
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by kekakuz(m): 8:01pm On Dec 19, 2013
IS MANDELLA OVERATED

2 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Zakamori: 8:04pm On Dec 19, 2013
I'll read it soon. Booking my flight
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by pickabeau1: 8:04pm On Dec 19, 2013
Lawdy Lawd.. another ZA - naija thread..

I dey look oooo
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by odizeey(m): 8:05pm On Dec 19, 2013
I dey observe
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Nobody: 8:06pm On Dec 19, 2013
for me i think the nigerian government should stop all her philanthropic gusture that we showcase in africa....all financial aids been given to south African,sanctioning of companies associated with apatheid at the expense of the Nigerian economy have all been forgotten...we never ask southafricans to pay us back but rather show appreciation for kind gusture and support during their time of trial.no African country did as much.there is a saying which says when you say well don to a king for what he has done it will still do more but am dissapointed at the southAfricans this time if not for anything why not use this time of mandela funeral to honour the good deeds of Tafawa Balewa,OBJ, this people did more.
they said our leaders are corrupt,how have they help us in this or how are tthe southAfricans helping millions of Nigerians who are under boundage of few corrupt officials,how have the southAfrican government seized most companies that is been open by our politicians in RSA i heard ODILI have a business runing in RSA
corruption is a modern form of apathied that is killing our country...how have southAfricans help most of our activist whom most of them are been detained unjustly by the ruling party?

7 Likes 1 Share

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by EloquentMedia: 8:07pm On Dec 19, 2013
Q and A

1 Like

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Dhurmynick(m): 8:09pm On Dec 19, 2013
I love this
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by AdaNri1(f): 8:09pm On Dec 19, 2013
These are not from Nigerians. Except the first question

2 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by MisterOladipo(m): 8:11pm On Dec 19, 2013
@ poster.... Pls just die, stop breathing


Tah!!! Abeg choose a struggle...

1 Like

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Lanceslot(m): 8:13pm On Dec 19, 2013
Absolute nonsense....
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by ceejayluv(m): 8:15pm On Dec 19, 2013
If this post didn't make sense to you, then you're a hopeless epitome of irrationality.

9 Likes 1 Share

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by chefdoeuvre: 8:16pm On Dec 19, 2013
Just 2 feel among... FP tinzz grin
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by PhysicsQED(m): 8:16pm On Dec 19, 2013
MyJoe, while I found your post interesting and agreed with some (but not all) of your points, could you do the rest of us from the younger generation (who might not be as knowledgeable as you are about these past events) a favor and explain this statement in detail and with references:

MyJoe: Nigeria probably contributed more than any other country to the fight against apartheid.

I see that you mentioned 4 things in the opening post that you see as evidence for this statement, but could you go into much more detail (if possible) and provide detailed sources/references about Nigeria-South Africa assistance in those areas, and then make comparisons to other countries that aided South African resistance during apartheid, so we can see if this is actually true.

I ask this only because, some public officials (including accomplished ones like Fashola) and leaders have echoed similar sentiments and I would just like to see what all the evidence for it is. I know a little bit about the actions against apartheid of certain leaders. But I would just like to see the fuller picture and see what the case is for saying that Nigeria "probably contributed more than any other country."

1 Like

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by StepG: 8:18pm On Dec 19, 2013
MyJoe: Reading the first few pages of this thread again confirms that people react to these issues emotionally. I will try to look at the facts here by answering some questions.

Nigerians liberated South Africa. Why are they ungrateful?
The South Africans liberated themselves. They were the ones who got shot on the streets of Soweto, murdered in detention, jailed, exiled and humiliated. Nigeria made its contribution but so did some other countries. Yes, it is normal for you to express dissatisfaction if you feel someone you helped fails to recognize or denies your efforts. But on the Mandela funeral episode, it was the prerogative of the organizers to choose who spoke and Nigerians should not make too much out of it. It appears some of the choice of speakers were made for extant practical reasons. For example, Obama because he is the first black president. Hailemariam of Ethiopia and Banda of Malawi were chosen to speak at the funeral because they are the heads of the AU and Sadc respectively. I don’t know the criterion by which some of the others were chosen but like it said it was the organisers’ prerogative. Nigeria was one of the first countries visited by Mandela on coming out of prison – that was gratitude.

Nigeria did nothing for South Africa – putting Mbeki in a guest house doesn’t amount to helping South Africa.
Nigeria probably contributed more than any other country to the fight against apartheid. Its contribution to efforts to end apartheid was mainly in four areas (1) diplomacy (2) financial contributions (3) scholarship (4) economy.
1. Diplomacy: Right from the time of Nigeria’s first leader, Tafawa Balewa, Nigeria made the matter of South Africa a major issue at diplomatic forums. Its main platforms were those presented by the UN and the Commonwealth. At Commonwealth CHOGMS, it campaigned, cajoled and threatened to pull out. This was revved up with the coming of General Murtala to power in the 70’s. Nigeria’s foreign minister General Garba made lengthy speeches at the UN, calling for sanctions and urging more actions. Nigeria’s diplomatic efforts were often countered by the likes of Kamuzu Banda of Malawi whose constant refrain was that nobody would leave the Commonwealth and destroy it. Obasanjo kept the fire burning when he assumed Nigeria’s leadership in 1976. If you have not read this letter he wrote to Thatcher, you should so do. http://omojuwa.com/2013/04/an-open-letter-to-mrs-margaret-thatcher-from-general-olusegun-obasanjo/
2. Finance: Nigeria made financial contributions to the ANC. These monies came from the Nigerian government and from donations made by the Nigerian people. Yes, the money got to the ANC. Others who made financial contributions included Muammar Ghadaffi of Libya.
3. Scholarship: Nigeria granted scholarship to many South African students to study at Nigerian universities. A good number of them were also employed as teachers and in other positions. Some other Africa countries like Ghana also did this.
4. Economy: Nigerians were encouraged to boycott anything made by companies that did business with the apartheid government.
Nigeria also granted residence and Nigerian passports to many freedom fighters who were exiled from their country and denied passports.

However, for all of Nigeria’s contribution, the country that suffered most for its efforts against apartheid was Mozambique. ANC bases in the country were often attacked by Pretoria’s commandos and its president Samora Machel, a fine gentleman, was killed in a plane crash believed to have been orchestrated by the apartheid’s government’s intelligence agents. Other African countries, including Zambia, Angola and Tanzania also made useful contributions although some of them were a bit of late comers having not gained independence until the late 70’s and 80’s. Uganda also played a role, especially under Museveni.

Why should Nigerians assist African countries in difficulties? For example, South Africa.
If you are in the sitting room and you hear sounds of someone being murdered in the bedroom, what would you do? You would spontaneously stand up and rush to the scene to try to help. Apartheid was a horrendous episode of evil. It was an affront to all right thinking people. It was an insult and a slap on the face of every non-white person alive since it was the ultimate case of institutionalization of white supremacy. We had a responsibility to do something. Everyone did. It is very likely that Freetown would have been razed to the ground during the RUF invasion of 1999 were it not for the efforts of Brigadier (then colonel) Maxwell Kobe. Were it not for Nigeria the RUF would have taken over Sierra Leone completely and turned it into a state of nature. We saved tens of thousands of lives, possibly hundreds of thousands – that is the satisfaction we get.

Nigeria is the most populated country in Africa and has immense resources, including one of the continent's largest armed forces. We should be involved in the CAR at the moment to prevent the situation degenerating completely, as that will cost us more. Ditto for South Sudan. Involvement does not always involve putting boots on the ground. Our diplomats should be more involved.

Why do Nigerians respect Mandela so much? He did nothing for us. He helped free his country, so what?
See the above response. Apartheid was our problem – all of us. People like Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King deserve the global respect they get. And we should start giving the same regard to other heroes and liberators – Samora Machel, Kenneth Kaunda, Julius Nyerere, Franz Fanon, Amilcal Cabral, Augustinho Neto, Sam Nujoma, John Garang, Albert Lutuli, Steve Biko, Walter Sisulu, Winnie Mandela and others - instead of going on about Mohandas Gandhi and Winston Churchill. Mandela may have been the face of South Africa’s struggle but he did not work alone. There were many others.

Why do Nigerians feel superior to other Africans?
The myth of the super black has been around for quite some time. It is found mainly among Nigerians, South Africans and African-Americans. African-Americans feel they are the super blacks just because they live in the great USA and not Africa which is worse than death itself. One of them even said he was happy his forebears jumped on a slave ship. South Africans feel they are the super blacks because they live on the European patch of the continent. Nigerians feel they are the super blacks because – well, because they are from Nigeria, the “giant of Africa” (who invented this terrible phrase, for Christsakes?). The myth of the super black man is foolish.

Why do South Africans hate Nigerians?
South Africans don’t hate Nigerians. There are many Nigerian businesses in RSA and no one has ever tried to organize a boycott of them or impose special taxes on them. There are Nigerian professionals and no one has tried to stop South Africans hiring them. Many Nigerian men are happily married to South African women.

What exists is a considerable amount of suspicion of Nigerians – and, yes, this sometimes manifests as hatred. But the suspicion is understandable – even Nigerians are suspicious of Nigerians and you usually have to prove yourself first before you are trusted. At the end of apartheid, many Nigerians went to the country. Unfortunately, there were a good number of them with criminal intentions.

Why are South Africans xenophobic?
Anti-immigrant sentiments are fairly common reaction in countries that get a large influx of economic migrants. Britain is retching things up. Every European country now has its anti-immigrant party doing well at elections. Japan doesn’t take in up to a couple of hundred a year. The people often feel that foreigners are taking their jobs. This is often not entirely true but it’s the common belief. Under the same circumstances, many Nigerians would react the same way. Remember Ghana must go?

Why are so many foreigners perpetrating crime in South Africa?
Most of the crime in South Africa is perpetrated by South African nationals. Unfortunately, apartheid nurtured a culture of violence. Add that to a large number of people who did benefit from formal education and you have the present situation.

Why is not Nigeria not respected?
Nigeria is disrespected because of its failed leadership and reputation for corruption, decay and crime. The present state of Nigeria is not only a shame to thinking Nigerians, but all thinking people of black skin. Anything South Africa achieves will always be seen as the achievement of white people. The only way black people are going to be respected globally is when Nigeria gets it right. But our leaders put their interest before that of the people and siphon money to foreign accounts while poverty spreads. Intelligent and capable Nigerians have to either leave the country or grovel before idiots to get crumbs or eke out what they can out of stone. This is what gives Africans the right to be mad at Nigeria. Unfortunately, this is often expressed emotionally – as you can see in the other thread - rather than constructively.

In the 90’s Nigeria stuck out its neck for Liberia. It lost many soldiers. At a point, Nigeria’s foreign minister Tom Ikimis’ aircraft was landing, frequently too, at Monrovia airport with the aid of a torchlight in his bid to bring peace to that country. Some would expect that Liberian streets would today be named after people like Ibrahim Babangida, Sani Abacha, Tomi Ikimi, John Iniengar, Victor Malu and others. Not so. They don’t even mention their names. When it comes to expressing gratitude Madam Johnson-Sirleaf would rather thank the United States for bringing peace to her country. What the United States did? My memory fails me.

South African companies contribute nothing to Nigeria’s economy and milk people of their money
South African companies contribute a lot to Nigeria’s economy. Businesses exist to make money. It is the responsibility of the government to ensure that in doing so, rights are respected. The South African companies in Nigeria operate within the law. If the laws are inadequate or not enforced that is the fault of the government. Imagine what would have happened in 2001 if MTN had not come in. There were no Nigerian companies ready at the time and having only Econet would have caused us a nightmare. There are Nigerian companies in South Africa too (President Mbeki encouraged Nigerian businesses to come in a lot) and they operate within the law, making their contributions to the socioeconomic development of the country.

Where is Nigeria headed?
In the absence of good leadership, anything can happen, but it’s most likely to continue tottering as it is. If a good leader comes, the country still has enough materials and people to make it one of the world’s top ten.

Where is South Africa headed?
The ANC has Nigeria to learn from but it seems it has not done this yet. Although corruption is a major problem in the country, it has not got anywhere near Nigerian proportions yet. They don’t yet have government officials conniving with thieves to loot their mines on a large scale or evidence being presented against a minister for buying two cars for N255m and the president winks at her to carry on. Their former police chief is serving a long jail term for taking a mere $200,000 in bribes. Our own police chief got a slap on the wrist for billions of naira. Their institutions still function – recently a government person investigated Zuma’s house. That doesn’t happen in Nigeria. But with the way things are going, the signs are ominous – they already axed the Scorpions (their EFCC). If the ANC does not move to talk tough on corruption and reign it in, it’s mene mene tekel upharsin and the country could end up like Nigeria.
I concur
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by joaquin64(m): 8:19pm On Dec 19, 2013
I am still trying to understand the point of this write up or frequently asked questions. First of all, who is even frequently asking them in the first place? And in the end, aren't most or even all your response already frequently answered answers?

We are well aware of the facts already. As much as I appreciate you for your well wikipedia-ered responses, let those that see fit to answer them emotionally be. Politics in the end would always boil down to the power of raw emotions and the irrationality and unpredictability of human behavior.

Leave here.
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by mixzy: 8:24pm On Dec 19, 2013
south africans are always sentimental south africa is the last place i wil go in this world fuckin hate the country wit passion cos of what dey did Bleep nelson Bleep mandela Bleep south africa

1 Like

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Peterjosh: 8:29pm On Dec 19, 2013
If only we could all see the peace radiating in this piece
Op I give it to u... I have learnt a lot from us post

2 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by adeoladrg(m): 8:30pm On Dec 19, 2013
...
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Shezzman: 8:34pm On Dec 19, 2013
Lovely piece man!
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Dannylux: 8:36pm On Dec 19, 2013
Step-G:
I concur

Na why you quote all the post? just to concur? Kai!
@Post
Our population and diversity in all ramifications make us the Giants of Africa.
Someone gotta take that title ya know wink

3 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by adeoladrg(m): 8:38pm On Dec 19, 2013
Anything South
Africa achieves will always be seen as the
achievement of white people. The only way black
people are going to be respected globally is
when Nigeria gets it right.

Mandela said this too.. Where are the Ghanaian sycophants.. I'm pained men.

4 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by Nobody: 8:42pm On Dec 19, 2013
sweetcheecks:

Hayi, there we go again nyani. WTF?

WHO THE HELL IS THIS GUY?
ON WHAT AUTHORITY IS HE SPEAKING FROM?
WHERE ARE HIS SOURCES? NOT NIGERIAN GOSSIP NEWSPAPERS THAT LACK CREDEBILITY
WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF THE PEOPLE YOU GAVE SCHOLARSHIP TO WHO STUDIED AND WORKED IN YOUR COUNTRY? I AM SURE A GOVERNMENT SHOULD HAVE ARCHIVES OF SUCH.
HAS HE EVER BEEN TO SA?
WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF NIGERIAN COMPANIES IN SA?
WHAT DO THEY OFFER THAT WE DO NOT HAVE?
WHO ARE THE MAJOR DRUG DEALERS IN SA?
DOES HE EVEN KNOW WHAT EFFECT DO DRUGS HAVE ON CRIME?

MR GO SITDOWN JOOR BEFORE SOUTH AFRICANS TAKE YOU TASK FOR EVERY SENTENCE YOU MAKE! PEOPLE GO TIRE FIGHTING RUBBISH DAY AND DAY OUT. lipsrsealed

MSHWEEEEEEEW! AND JUST LEAVE SOUTH AFRICA ALONE ASSEBLIEF!
let me spread my mat here grin. I hope you are ready to take what you are asking for.

4 Likes

Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by soilsista(f): 8:46pm On Dec 19, 2013
Tjo! Obsession fela mo
Re: Nigeria- South Africa F A Q s by SoloAtna(m): 8:48pm On Dec 19, 2013
Nigeria is the gaint of Africa, no matter what.

4 Likes

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