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Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 9:55pm On Aug 11, 2015
This is a list of the most beautiful Nigerian female writers who are doing it big in literature.

Cc
Lalasticlala
Ishilove

Source: Jaxera
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 9:56pm On Aug 11, 2015
Chinelo Oparanta



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Chinelo Okparanta is a Nigerian-American writer. Born and raised in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, she emigrated to the United States with her family at the age of 10

She was educated at Pennsylvania State University, Rutgers University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She has published short stories in publications including Granta, The New Yorker, Tin House, The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, TriQuarterly, Conjunctions, Subtropics and The Coffin Factory, and has held fellowships or visiting professorships at The University of Iowa, Colgate University and Purdue University.

Her debut short story collection,Happiness, Like Water( Granta Books), was longlisted for the 2013 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, shortlisted for the 2014 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and won the 2014 Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction. She has been nominated for a United States Artists Fellowship and was a finalist for the 2014 Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiativein Literature. Other honors include the 2013 Society of Midland AuthorsAward (finalist), the 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing(finalist), and a 2014 O. Henry Award.
Happiness, Like Waterwas an Editors' Choice for The New York Times Book Reviewon September 20, 2013. It was also listed as one of The Guardian's Best African Fiction of 2013, and in December 2014 was announced as being on the shortlist for the Etisalat Prize for Literature.

Her debut novel, Under the Udala Trees, is slated for future publication
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 9:57pm On Aug 11, 2015
Helen Oyeyemi







Helen Olajumoke Oyeyemi(born 10 December 1984) is a British novelist. In 2013 she was included in the Granta Best Of Young British Novelists list.

Oyeyemi wrote her first novel,The Icarus Girl, while still at school studying for her A levels at Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School. While studying social and political sciences at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, two of her plays,Juniper's Whitening and Victimese, were performed by fellow students to critical acclaim and subsequently published by Methuen.

In 2007 Bloomsbury published Oyeyemi's second novel, The Opposite House, which is inspired by Cuban mythology. Her third novel,White is for Witching, described as having "roots in Henry James and Edgar Allan Poe" was published by Picadorin May 2009. It was a 2009 Shirley Jackson Awardfinalist and won a 2010 Somerset Maugham Award. A fourth novel,Mr Fox, was published by Picador in June 2011, and a fifth,Boy, Snow, Birdin 2014.

In 2009 Oyeyemi was recognized as one of the women on Venus Zine’s"25 under 25" list. Oyeyemi was a judge on the Booktrust Independent Foreign Fiction Prizefor 2015, and is serving as a judge for the 2015 Scotiabank Giller Prize.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:00pm On Aug 11, 2015
Chimamanda Adichie



[img]http://www.that1960chick.com/wp-content/uploads/Chimamanda+Ngozi+Adichie+Half+Yellow+Sun+Premiere+lO8Q1Sy9bDvl.jpg[/img]



Chimamanda Adichie (born 15 September 1977) is a Nigeriannovelist, nonfiction writer and short story writer. She has been called "the most prominent" of a "procession of critically acclaimed young anglophone authors [that] is succeeding in attracting a new generation of readers to African literature".
Personal life and education
Adichie, who was born in the city of Enugu, grew up the fifth of six children in an Igbofamily in the university town of Nsukkain southeastern Nigeria, where the University of Nigeriais situated.

Adichie studied medicine and pharmacy at the University of Nigeria for a year and a half. During this period, she edited The Compass, a magazine run by the university's Catholic medical students. At age 19, Adichie left Nigeria for the United States to study communications and political science at Drexel Universityin Philadelphia; she transferred to Eastern Connecticut State Universityto be near her sister, who had a medical practice in Coventry. She received a bachelor's degree from Eastern, with the distinction of summa cum laudein 2001.

In 2003, she completed a master's degree in creative writingat Johns Hopkins University. In 2008, she received a Master of Arts degree in African studies from Yale University.
Adichie was a Hodder fellow at Princeton University during the 2005–06 academic year. In 2008 she was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. She has also been awarded a 2011–12 fellowship by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.
Adichie divides her time between Nigeria, where she teaches writing workshops, and the United States.

Adichie published a collection of poems in 1997 (Decisions) and a play (For Love of Biafra) in 1998. She was shortlisted in 2002 for the Caine Prize for her short story "You in America".
In 2003, her story "That Harmattan Morning" was selected as a joint winner of the BBC Short Story Awards, and she won the O. Henry prizefor "The American Embassy". She also won the David T. Wong International Short Story Prize 2002/2003 (PEN Center Award).
Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus(2003), received wide critical acclaim; it was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction(2004) and was awarded the Commonwealth Writers' Prizefor Best First Book (2005).

Her second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun, named after the flag of the short-lived nation of Biafra, is set before and during the Nigerian Civil War. It received the 2007 Orange Prize for Fictionand the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. Half of a Yellow Sunhas been adapted into a film of the same titledirected by Biyi Bandele, starring BAFTA winner and Academy Awardnominee Chiwetel Ejioforand BAFTAaward-winner Thandie Newton, and was released in 2014. [

Her third book, The Thing Around Your Neck(2009), is a collection of short stories.
In 2010 she was listed among the authors of The New Yorker′s "20 Under 40" Fiction Issue. Adichie's story, "Ceiling", was included in the 2011 edition of The Best American Short Stories.

Her third novel, Americanah(2013), was selected by theNew York Timesas one of The 10 Best Books of 2013.
In April 2014 she was named as one of 39 writers aged under 40 in the Hay Festivaland Rainbow Book Club project celebrating Port Harcourt UNESCO World Book Capital
In 2015, she was co-curator of the PEN World Voices Festival.

Adichie says on feminism and writing, "I think of myself as a storyteller, but I would not mind at all if someone were to think of me as a feminist writer... I'm very feminist in the way I look at the world, and that worldview must somehow be part of my work."
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by priscaoge(f): 10:01pm On Aug 11, 2015
Nice. That Chinelo is pretty n young.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:02pm On Aug 11, 2015
Karen king Aribasala







Karen Ann King-Aribisala(born Guyana) is a Nigerian novelist, and short story writer. Her collection of stories,Our Wife and Other Stories won the 1991 Commonwealth Writers' Prize, Best First Book Africa, and her novel The Hangman's Gamewon 2008 Best Book Africa.
She is Associate Professor of English at the University of Lagos. She won grants from the Ford Foundation, British Council, Goethe Institute, and the James Michener Foundation.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:03pm On Aug 11, 2015
Sarah Ladipo Manyika





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Sarah Ladipo Manyika (born 7 March 1968) is an Anglo-Nigerian writer.

Sarah was born and raised in Nigeria. She has also lived in Kenya, France, and England. Her father is Nigerian and her mother is British. Sarah inherited her maiden name (Ladipo) from her father who was born in Ibadan(South West Nigeria) in the late 1930s. Sarah's father met and married her mother in the UK in the late 1960s. She spent much of her childhood in Lagosand the city of Josin Plateau State.
As a young teenager, Sarah lived for two years in Nairobi, Kenya, before her family moved to the UK.

She studied at the Universities of Birmingham(UK), Bordeaux(France), and Berkeley (California). She was married in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1994 and now divides her time between San Francisco (where she teaches literature at San Francisco State University), London and Harare. Her writing includes published essays, academic papers, book reviews and short stories. Sarah's first novel, In Dependence, was published by Legend Pressin 2008. Her short story "Mr Wonder" appeared in the 2008 collectionWomen Writing Zimbabwe.
Sarah's novel In Dependence was chosen by the UK's largest bookstore chain as its featured book for Black History Month. In 2009,In Dependence, was published by Cassava Republic, a literary press based in Abuja, Nigeria, with a stable of authors that includes Teju Cole and Helon Habila.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:08pm On Aug 11, 2015
Ukamaka Olisakwe





Ukamaka Olisakwe(born 24 October 1982) is a Nigerian feminist author, short-story writer, and screenwriter.

She was born and raised in Kano State, Northern Nigeria and her parents are from Eastern Nigeria. She completed her secondary education in Northern Nigeria and subsequently earned a degree in Computer Science.
She is married to George Nwanosike Olisakwe and they live in Eastern Nigeria with their three children.

Olisakwe's debut novel,Eyes of a Goddess, was published in 2012.
She has written numerous short stories and articles, most of which have appeared in blogs and online journals, including Saraba, Sentinel Nigeria and Short Story Day Africa. Her essays have appeared in various magazines including the Nigerian Telegraph and African Hadithi.
She wrote the screenplay forThe Calabash, a television series produced and directed by Obi Emelonyeand premiered in January 2015 on Africa Magic Showcase.

Olisakwe administers the blog for the "Writivism Mentorship Programme", a project of the Centre for African Cultural Excellence, and was a co-facilitator at the Lagos Workshop.
She was a guest and panel member at the 2014 Ake Arts and Books Festival and the Hay Festival.
She was selected as one of the 39 most promising writers under the age of 40 from Sub-Saharan Africaand the diaspora, in the Africa39 project – a Hay Festivaland Rainbow Book Club initiative in celebration of the UNESCO World Book Capital 2014. Olisakwe's Africa39entry,This Is How I Remember it, was described by one reviewer as "a clear-eyed account of a girl's romantic awakening in Nigeria" and a story "so good it leaves us wanting more". Another reviewer described her entry as a "gripping story about adolescent romance, deception and yearning"
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:10pm On Aug 11, 2015
Amina Mama



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Amina Mama (born 19 September 1958) is a Nigerian-British writer, feminist and academic. Her main areas of focus have been post-colonial, militarist and gender issues. She has lived in Africa, Europe, and North America, and worked to build relationships between feminist intellectuals across the globe.
Background
Mama was born in northern Nigerian in 1958 in a mixed household. Her father is Nigerianand her mother is English.
According to Mama, her eclectic family background and upbringing has shaped her worldview.

In 1992 she married to Nuruddin Farah, with whom she has two children.
She grew up in Kaduna, an ethnically and religiously diverse town in northern Nigeria. Her ancestral roots on her paternal side trace back to Bida. Several members of Mama's family were involved in the development of the post-colonial local educational system. In 1966, she left her community in Nigeria due to anti- Muslimriots.

Mama moved from Nigeria to the UK and pursued further education at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland(1980, Bachelor of Science, with Honours, in Psychology), at the London School of Economics and Political Science, University of London(1981, Master of Science in Social Psychology) and at Birkbeck College, University of London, where in 1987 she received her doctorate in organizational psychologywith her thesis entitled "Race and Subjectivity: A Study of Black Women". Some of her early work involves comparing the situations of British and Nigerian women.

In 2008, Mama accepted a position at Mills Collegein Oakland, California, United States. After moving, she commented: "I have learned America isn't just a big, bad source of imperialism." Professor Mama became Barbara Lee Distinguished Chair in Women's Leadership at Mills—the first person to hold this position. She co-taught a class called "Real Policy, Real Politics" with Congresswoman Leeon topics concerning African and African-American women, including gender roles, poverty, HIV/AIDS, and militarism. She is also Chair of the Department of Gender and Women Studies at the University of California, Davis.

She is the Chair of the board of directors for the Global Fund for Women, and advises several other international organisations. She has sat on the board of directors of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development.
One of her best known works is Beyond the Masks: Race, Gender and Subjectivity. She is also involved in film work. In 2010, she co-produced the movieThe Witches of Gambagawith Yaba Badoe.

Mama describes herself as a feminist and not a womanist, arguing that feminism originates in Africa and that white feminism "has never been strong enough to be 'enemy'—in the way that say, global capitalism can be viewed as an enemy". She has criticised discourses of women in developmentfor stripping gender studies of politically meaningful feminism. She has also argued that African universities continue to show entrenched patriarchy, in terms of both interpersonal sexism and institutional gender gaps.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by zyzxx(m): 10:14pm On Aug 11, 2015
Beautiful
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by yrret: 10:15pm On Aug 11, 2015
And they all succeeded in their quest.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:17pm On Aug 11, 2015
Taiye Selasi



Taiye Selasi (born 2 November 1979) is a writer and photographer of Nigerian and Ghanaian origin.
Selasi was born in London, England, and raised in Brookline, Massachusetts, the elder of twin daughters in a family of physicians. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappawith a BA in American Studies from Yale, and earned her MPhil in International Relations from Nuffield College, Oxford.

Renowned for her advocacy of children's rights, she sits on the board of United Way. Selasi's father, Dr. Lade Wosornu, is a surgeon in Saudi Arabia. Considered one of Ghana's foremost public intellectuals, he has published numerous volumes of poetry.
Selasi's parents split when she was an infant. She met her biological father at the age of 12.

In 2005 The LIP Magazinepublished "Bye-Bye, Babar (Or: What is an Afropolitan?)", Selasi's seminal text on Afropolitans. The same year she penned a play, which was produced at a small theatre by Dr. Avery Willis, Toni Morrison's niece.
In 2006 Morrison gave Selasi a one-year deadline; she wrote "The Sex Lives of African Girls" to meet it. The story, published by UK literary magazine Grantain 2011, appears inBest American Short Stories 2012.
In 2010 Ann Godoff at Penguin Pressbought Selasi's unfinished novel.Ghana Must Go was published in 2013 to much critical acclaim. Selected as one of the 10 Best Books of 2013 by the Wall Street Journaland The Economist, it has been sold in 22 countries as of 2014.

In 2013 Selasi was selected as one of Granta ′s 20 Best Young British Writers and in 2014 named to the Hay Festival's Africa39 list of 39 Sub-Saharan African writers under the age of 40 "with the potential and talent to define trends in African literature."
Selasi collaborates frequently with fellow artists. In 2012 she partnered with architect David Adjayeto create the Gwangju River Reading Room, an open-air library erected in 2013 as part of the Gwangju Biennale's Folly II. With director Teddy Goitom, founder of Stocktown, Selasi is Executive Producer of "Afripedia," a documentary series about urban African creatives. With producers Fernando Meirellesand Hank Levine ( City of God), Selasi is developing "Exodus," a feature documentary about global migration.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 10:21pm On Aug 11, 2015
Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani



Adaobi Tricia Obinne Nwaubani (born in 1976) is a Nigerian novelist, humorist, essayistand journalist. Her debut novel,I Do Not Come to you by Chance, won the 2010 Commonwealth Writers' Prizefor Best First Book (Africa), a Betty Trask First Book award, and was named by the Washington Postas one of the Best Books of 2009. Nwaubani is the first contemporary African writer on the global stage to have got an international book deal while still living in her home country.

Born in Enugu, Nigeria, to Chief Sir Chukwuma Hope Nwaubani and Dame Patricia Uberife Nwaubani in 1976, Nwaubani was raised by both parents in Umuahia, Abia State, among the Igbosof Eastern Nigeria. At the age of 10, she left home to attend boarding school at the Federal Government Girls College Owerri. She studied Psychology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria's premier university.
As a teenager, Nwaubani secretly dreamed of becoming a CIAor KGBagent. She earned her first income from winning a writing competition at the age of 13. Her mother is a cousin of Flora Nwapa, the first female African writer to publish a book.
Nwaubani was one of the pioneer editorial staff of Nigeria's now defunctNEXTnewspapers, established by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dele Olojede. She was the editor ofélan, the fashion and style magazine ofNEXT. She was later appointed to the position of opinion editor.

Nwaubani is the first writer in the history of world literature to capture the 419 scams phenomenon in a novel. She is also the first African writer to have got an international publishing deal while still living in her home country. She does not have any formal writing training.
In 2012, Nwaubani was selected as one of 15 emerging leaders in government, business and civil society from across West Africa, to attend a "Leadership for Change" training program sponsored by the Private Investors for Africa (PIA). Managed by the African Leadership Institute (AfLI), the program aims to create a network of "world class, pan-African, high potential, emerging leaders across all sectors, working in partnership as catalysts for change in Africa".
She lives in Abuja, Nigeria, where she works as a consultant.

I Do Not Come to You by Chance is Nwaubani's debut novel. It was published in 2009. Set in the intriguing world of Nigerian email scams, the book tells the story of a young man, Kingsley, who turns to his Uncle Boniface for help in bailing his family out of poverty. Boniface—aka Cash Daddy—is an exuberant character who suffers from elephantiasis of the pocket. He also runs a successful empire of email scams. But he can help. It is up to Kingsley to reconcile his passion for knowledge with his hunger for money, and to fully assume his role of first son. Publishers Weekly described Nwaubani's novel as "highly entertaining".The Washington Postdescribed it as "a lively, good-humored and provocative examination of the truth behind a global inbox of deceit." The Times said: “This is a fast, fresh, often hilarious first novel, by one of the remarkably talented young African writers who are rapidly making everyone else look stale.”

Nwaubani has expressed concern over the largely somber tone of African novels. She credits Irish-American writer Frank McCourt's Pulitzer-winning Angela's Ashes with showing her that she could write about serious issues in a humorous tone. She is also a great admirer of British humorist P. G. Wodehouse.

Nwaubani's articles often generate heated debate. Her frank opinions in The New York Times and The Guardian have been known to anger sections of the African public.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by OsoDupe(f): 10:37pm On Aug 11, 2015
Most of them are British Nigerian, born in Nigeria schooled in London. Where are the Nigeria Nigerians?

2 Likes

Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Nobody: 6:10am On Aug 12, 2015
I love them all. Great women
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 7:08am On Aug 12, 2015
OsoDupe:
Most of them are British Nigerian, born in Nigeria schooled in London. Where are the Nigeria Nigerians?

Adaobi tricia.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Kitme(f): 7:26am On Aug 12, 2015
Oh my God....they are the real definition of beauty and brains.
I hope to be like them someday. smiley
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 7:57am On Aug 12, 2015
Cc Lalasticlala Ishilove
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Jaxera(m): 7:57am On Aug 12, 2015
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Akposb(m): 1:30pm On Aug 12, 2015
Thumbs up to them...believing more are in the offing.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by SunshineNYC(f): 4:26pm On Aug 12, 2015
This post just made me really excited to go out and buy books. I'm familiar with Chimamanda and Taiye, but there are so many more!
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by tpiar: 11:32pm On Mar 08, 2016
I should check them out.

btw, there are still many more who werent mentioned in your list, op.
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by joanee20(f): 9:06am On Mar 09, 2016
OsoDupe:
Most of them are British Nigerian, born in Nigeria schooled in London. Where are the Nigeria Nigerians?

I wonder o..

1 Like

Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by jezuzboi(m): 11:35am On Mar 09, 2016
OsoDupe:
Most of them are British Nigerian, born in Nigeria schooled in London. Where are the Nigeria Nigerians?
Jezuzboi
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by Switup: 11:14pm On Mar 09, 2016
Jaxera:
Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani



Adaobi Tricia Obinne Nwaubani (born in 1976) is a Nigerian novelist, humorist, essayistand journalist. Her debut novel,I Do Not Come to you by Chance, won the 2010 Commonwealth Writers' Prizefor Best First Book (Africa), a Betty Trask First Book award, and was named by the Washington Postas one of the Best Books of 2009. Nwaubani is the first contemporary African writer on the global stage to have got an international book deal while still living in her home country.

Born in Enugu, Nigeria, to Chief Sir Chukwuma Hope Nwaubani and Dame Patricia Uberife Nwaubani in 1976, Nwaubani was raised by both parents in Umuahia, Abia State, among the Igbosof Eastern Nigeria. At the age of 10, she left home to attend boarding school at the Federal Government Girls College Owerri. She studied Psychology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria's premier university.
As a teenager, Nwaubani secretly dreamed of becoming a CIAor KGBagent. She earned her first income from winning a writing competition at the age of 13. Her mother is a cousin of Flora Nwapa, the first female African writer to publish a book.
Nwaubani was one of the pioneer editorial staff of Nigeria's now defunctNEXTnewspapers, established by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dele Olojede. She was the editor ofélan, the fashion and style magazine ofNEXT. She was later appointed to the position of opinion editor.

Nwaubani is the first writer in the history of world literature to capture the 419 scams phenomenon in a novel. She is also the first African writer to have got an international publishing deal while still living in her home country. She does not have any formal writing training.
In 2012, Nwaubani was selected as one of 15 emerging leaders in government, business and civil society from across West Africa, to attend a "Leadership for Change" training program sponsored by the Private Investors for Africa (PIA). Managed by the African Leadership Institute (AfLI), the program aims to create a network of "world class, pan-African, high potential, emerging leaders across all sectors, working in partnership as catalysts for change in Africa".
She lives in Abuja, Nigeria, where she works as a consultant.

I Do Not Come to You by Chance is Nwaubani's debut novel. It was published in 2009. Set in the intriguing world of Nigerian email scams, the book tells the story of a young man, Kingsley, who turns to his Uncle Boniface for help in bailing his family out of poverty. Boniface—aka Cash Daddy—is an exuberant character who suffers from elephantiasis of the pocket. He also runs a successful empire of email scams. But he can help. It is up to Kingsley to reconcile his passion for knowledge with his hunger for money, and to fully assume his role of first son. Publishers Weekly described Nwaubani's novel as "highly entertaining".The Washington Postdescribed it as "a lively, good-humored and provocative examination of the truth behind a global inbox of deceit." The Times said: “This is a fast, fresh, often hilarious first novel, by one of the remarkably talented young African writers who are rapidly making everyone else look stale.”

Nwaubani has expressed concern over the largely somber tone of African novels. She credits Irish-American writer Frank McCourt's Pulitzer-winning Angela's Ashes with showing her that she could write about serious issues in a humorous tone. She is also a great admirer of British humorist P. G. Wodehouse.

Nwaubani's articles often generate heated debate. Her frank opinions in The New York Times and The Guardian have been known to anger sections of the African public.
I met this beautiful author in a rainbow book festival in Port Harcourt, 2010. she was amazing.... and that her book: I Do Not Come To You By Chance, it was #amazin, #authentic, n well #everythingNice....
Re: Meet The Most Beautiful, Successful Nigerian Female Writers by tpiar: 1:20am On Mar 10, 2016
OsoDupe:
Most of them are British Nigerian, born in Nigeria schooled in London. Where are the Nigeria Nigerians?

You can list some.

Its possible most female Nigerian authors are based outside the country, dunno.

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