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Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' - Politics - Nairaland

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Nigerian Elections: What If Buhari Wins? By Max Siollun / Col. Ben Gbulie, One Of The 1966 Coupists Speaks On The Coup And Awo / Buhari Coup Was Done In Ignorance- Lar (2) (3) (4)

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Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Afaukwu: 9:22pm On Aug 03, 2009
http://maxsiollun.wordpress.com/my-book/

Nigeria’s Military Coup Culture (1966-1976) – “The Best Book on the Period So Far”
After a long hard slog, my book is finally available.

The book can be purchased from: http://www.amazon.com/Oil-Politics-Violence-Nigerias-1966-1976/dp/0875867081/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243780456&sr=1-1



“What is the book about?” I hear you say. Well, read on….

Review One: By Ohsee of Toronto, Canada.

In the West, considerations of truth and objectivity in history are seen in some quarters as marks of a lack of sophistication. In Nigeria, however, they are matters of life and death. People there die as a result of history forgot, of lessons not learned. Many people die.

Such questions loom large in Nigeria’s violent political history of the first two decades after independence. The most problematic have been, what really happened during the first two coups and the resultant civil war? It is here that Nigerians need to know the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, because such reliable knowledge has proved useful in the past. But most Nigerian histories of those turbulent times, are often clouded by the malodorous presence of ethnic chauvinism and hatred of the Other, and the need for self-aggrandizement.

Many readers despaired of ever seeing an unbiased history from Nigerians themselves, and sought such objectivity from outsiders who often had little understanding of the subtleties of the Nigerian political milieu.

Thus Mr. Siollun’s book about the first four coups (1966-1976) must be considered something of a miracle. Unlike prior writers on the topic from that country, the Nigerian-born historian successfully checked at the door the ethnic biases he surely must have, in order to combine the dispassionate objectivity of the outsider with the nuanced knowledge of the insider. The result is a truly insightful book that is highly accessible to the general reader. The book also has enough new information to serve as a starting point for future investigators who wish to tackle some of the issues in greater detail.

Mr Siollun, whose essays about the first two coups are familiar to those who visit Nigerian websites, has tackled the four coups sequentially, and shown how they are related in terms of personnel involved and lessons to be learned. For instance, some of the participants in the second coup—such as Babangida, Abacha, Yaradua, and Buhari—dominated Nigerian coup-making culture for thirty years. Mr. Siollun shows how failing to punish murderous putschists can and did come back to bite coup beneficiaries in the arse, since “unpunished coup plotters will re-offend. The coup plotters behind Nigeria’s military regimes were repeat offenders—often with fatal consequences for themselves. They were men who lived life on the edge, snacked on danger and dined on death. For them, coup plotting was in the blood.”

Mr. Siollun’s summary of the pre-coup political situation is concise and lucid, and looks at the events in new ways. For instance, most people probably do not see the Nzeogwu coup as the second attempt at overthrowing the Balewa government by force. While many followers of Nigerian history may know that Awolowo—leader of the Action Group, one of the opposition parties in the First Republic—was jailed for treason in 1964, few are aware that it was not a trumped up charge, and that three decades later, Action Group General Secretary, S.G. Ikoku, confirmed that there was a genuine AG plot to topple the federal government.

Mr. Siollun is at his strongest where he skillfully cuts away the myths that have grown weed-like around the more controversial of those 1966 events. One of the more pernicious of these is the lie that the January 15 1966 coup was an effort at Igbo domination organized by the Igbos. Mr. Siollun demonstrates that there is a very strong case for seeing January 15 as an UPGA (United Progressive Grand Alliance) coup, or in other words, a second attempt by the South or southern political parties to wrest power from the North. By examining the national character of the Igbos, and the stereotypes that grew around their business activities, he carefully shows us the historical process via which the Igbos became the national scapegoat; we see how one section of the country practiced what he calls “transferred malice,” where the Igbos were singled out for punishment during troubles in which they only played a bit part.

In this absorbing and fascinating work, there is a good deal of new and startling information: who knew that in private moments, the genial Ironsi, the first military ruler, liked to refer jokingly to his fellow Igbos by the pejorative Northern term “Nyamiri?” We learn of the enormous family pressures on Northern officers and men after January 15 demanding vengeance for the Northern officers killed. The blood relationships between Northern People’s Congress (NPC) politicians, and some of the July 1966 plotters are revealed—Inua Wada, defence minister in the Balewa government during the First Republic, was Murtala Muhammed’s cousin, for example. We begin to understand the Machiavellian Ibrahim Babangida—military president from 1985 to 1993—better when we find out his closest friends were among the Dimka coup plotters of Feb 1976, a coup in which those very friends marked him for liquidation. We learn that Gen. Obasanjo wept when the poisonous chalice of leadership would not pass him by. Such brief character and biographical sketches of principal players inject life into the narrative, and make the historical protagonists more than just names on a paper.

The book of course has its flaws, some quite minor and perhaps fixable in later editions. The footnoting seems somewhat haphazard and sparse. To some, this may be considered a benefit, but it could be frustrating to the reader or researcher who wants to learn more by exploring sources. And one of the more vexatious things is that the footnoting, like Carlyle’s History, “is silent where you most wish her to speak.”

More egregious are the omissions and failures to explore some controversial areas. We do not know the extent of Lt. Col Adekunle Fajuyi’s involvement in January 15 even though Mr. Siollun was involved a few years back in a debate about it with someone on the Internet who went by the moniker “Arthur Unegbe”. Perhaps there is nothing to know or find out, but Mr. Siollun’s complete silence—no discussion of rumours, or analysis of possibilities—is troubling. Also surely we could learn from a brief exploration of the contradictions in the public statements of Gowon’s apologists and the actions of the man that suggest some foreknowledge of the July horrors? However, in light of the importance and intelligence of this work, it would be churlish to carp about these matters.

I admit to being skeptical before reading this work, expecting the typical tendentious and ethnically jaundiced approach that colours most Nigerian commentaries on the coups of 1966. What Mr. Siollun has given us rather is a deft, measured, and just examination of those tragic events, all done in very accessible prose. All Nigerians owe him a debt of gratitude. I wish I could find a way to get a copy into the hands of every educated Nigerian.

The book can be purchased from: http://www.amazon.com/Oil-Politics-Violence-Nigerias-1966-1976/dp/0875867081/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243780456&sr=1-1

Review Two: by Iwedi Ojinmah for Nigerian Village Square

Once in while there comes a book that makes us either sit up straight or reflect on our lives… past and present. It is even more appreciated and of importance when such a book is a serious one and about a subject matter, that even 4 decades after it engulfed Nigeria in arguably Africa’s most vicious war pitching suspicious cousin against each other , it is still rife with so much controvesy and emotional debate that one can seriously question if true National reconcilation has not remained deferred.

Max Siollun, has produced such a wonder in Oil Politics and Violence: Nigeria’s Military Coup Culture (1966-1976) Algora Pub Hardcover : $33.95 Softcover $23.95

Right out the gates the English born Nigerian but US based Professor, separates himself from the rest of the pack of historians that have feebly tackled early Nigerian Politics with his pronounced objectivity and absolutely impeccable research. In a detailed chronological sequence of events he locks the door on many a propagated myth and exposes among others how for instance the Igbo’s became political scapegoats not by choice but by default. He also amazingly shows how for the better part of 3 decades it was pretty much “old wine in new bottles” as the same vagabonds in power continued -just like some morbid spoke of a wheel- to keep in place Nigeria’s wobbly and corrupt coup culture.

Each of the 268 pages is saturated with such intricate fact that you often have to pinch yourself back into reality to realize again that all this stuff really did occur, and is not the draft of an up till now unknown Shakespearean tragedy. The man really names names and one has to virtually munch on a mint to supress the subsequent but delicious bite.

Things Fell Apart and Have Never Been the Same Since

However while his book will serve hopefully as salve on the deep festering wound inflicted on Nigeria, it does not address the more dangerous and ever present infection that lingers on still robbing her of her full potential; because it summates just ten years out of almost 45 years. Since there is an undeniable thread linking the past to the present and vice versa ; we salivate at the possibility……NO I take that back …, “ we implore” the absolute need of a part 2 that will continue to explore the murky dysfunctional rot that is Nigerian Politics. The story after 1976 must also be examined with as equal objectivity and openness and till then we will remain hungry at the table like guests denied of a spectacular entrée after being treaded to array of amazing o’dourves….pounding our forks and just like Twist – asking for more.

The book can be purchased from: http://www.amazon.com/Oil-Politics-Violence-Nigerias-1966-1976/dp/0875867081/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243780456&sr=1-1
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by maxsiollun: 2:16am On Aug 20, 2009
Afaukwu, many thanks for posting this review.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Ibime(m): 9:21am On Aug 20, 2009
Im gonna start copping all of Max's books.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by maxsiollun: 1:56am On Jul 13, 2010
No self promotion here, but another review of the book was very kindly written by Kaye Whiteman, whom many of you will recognise as the former Editor of the esteemed magazine ‘West Africa’. He is one of the leading writers on West Africa and has also written for the UK’s Guardian newspaper.

Unpacking the Past

As we approach the great stock-taking of the fiftieth anniversary of Nigerian independence (which is going to be continuing all year), there is going to be a growing consideration of the history of these past fifty years. This is bound to include a re-examination of the coups and civil war of the 1960s. If this decade brought to a head the post-independence trauma of national identity, as a shakedown of the British-engineered independence settlement, it made a profound mark on subsequent decades.

There are so many aspects of Nigeria’s recent history that cannot be studied without reference to the 1960s – for example, the onset and collapse of the idea of military rule; or the effect on society, economy and political culture of the ‘curse of oil’, a central factor in the war for Nigerian unity. There was the phenomenon of the creation of states, initiated with the first twelve states of May 1967, mainstay of fiscal federalism, and the campaign for local resource control. Behind lay the scourge of corruption, and the electoral fraud whose worst manifestation in the Western Region led to the January 15 coup of 1966.

These thoughts arise from a book titled Oil Politics and Violence: Nigeria’s Military Coup Culture (1966-76) by Max Siollun (published in New York this year by Algora publishing). For those interested in a detailed and objective study of these particularly sensitive moments, I cannot commend this book too highly.

For an old-timer like myself, who was partly around at the time, [b]this book is a revelation. [/b]For this is a period which, for understandable reasons, has all too often been buried. After the books written by journalists at the time, and Professor Tamuno’s official history published in the 1980s, it has not been a subject that has been much written about, other than in a series of memoirs, or lately in novels such as Half of a Yellow Sun. This shows that the interest is there in unpacking the hidden legacy.

Siollun’s is not a full history of the crisis and the war, however. He restricts himself very much to the military, and although you cannot escape the politics, his self-imposed framework is sometimes a limitation. July 29 has to be seen in the context of the massacres in the North which lasted from May to October. Again, the important neutrality of Major General Welby-Everard in the 1964 federal elections (who now recalls that there was still a Brit commanding the Nigerian army at that time?) perhaps benefits from being seen in a more fully described political setting.

The author’s military priority does permit him, however, to go into his subject matter with a great depth of detail. He is also able to mobilise a spectacular range of sources, some of which your columnist was not aware of, and would love to have in his own collection of Nigeriana. There are tables of which officer was where and when, and many potted biographies, although only of members of the armed forces. Space does not permit exploring further subjects such as the “classmate syndrome” or the theory that January 15 was an “UPGA coup”, and there are odd little details from exceptional sources, like Welby-Everard’s eulogistic commendation of Brigadier Ogundipe.

In such an amazing mastery of detail,
it is not surprising that there are the occasional minor errors – for example he says there was but one Igbo among the civil servants that took part in the July 29-31 negotiations in Ikeja barracks, but from his own list there are three. It may be that those that participated personally in these events will find more to quibble with – just as he already pinpoints some of the controversies that have been raised in the memoirs of the period that have emerged.

There are also mysteries that not surprisingly he is unable to solve, and myths that he cannot penetrate, although I would have liked him to have examined more thoroughly the legend that it was Captain Dickson (who does get a brief reference) who led the Middle Belt rank-and-file objection to Murtala as leader of the coup, and ended up as the self-styled airport commandant, carrying on for months before his final removal. Was it Dickson who indicated that power must go to Gowon, or else…? This is tantalising, because the author does describe the absolutely historic moment when Murtala abandoned his ambitions and suddenly says to Gowon “you are the senior, go ahead”, and is most instructive on the extent of secessionist sentiment among the far-northerners (although the raising of the flag of the north at Ikeja was Biafran myth-making).
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 4:27pm On Jul 13, 2010
Afaukwu:


Mr. Siollun is at his strongest where he skillfully cuts away the myths that have grown weed-like around the more controversial of those 1966 events. One of the more pernicious of these is the lie that the January 15 1966 coup was an effort at Igbo domination organized by the Igbos. Mr. Siollun demonstrates that there is a very strong case for seeing January 15 as an UPGA (United Progressive Grand Alliance) coup, or i[b]n other words, a second attempt by the South or southern political parties to wrest power from the North[/b]. By examining the national character of the Igbos, and the stereotypes that grew around their business activities, he carefully shows us the historical process via which the Igbos became the national scapegoat; we see how one section of the country practiced what he calls “transferred malice,” where the Igbos were singled out for punishment during troubles in which they only played a bit part.




  And, lemme start by asking the poster to lay off the crack-pipe! u coming on here pasting something from the internet that u deem favorable to your cause will serve u none!

    What do u call predominantly Ibo officers murdering only the Wetern and Northern Premiers on the same day. After murdering them, they go chill with the Eastern Premeir; why didnt they kill him also? Then they kill the most Senior Northern military officers! What do u call that?lol. Try as u may u cant change the truth! The Jan.1966 coup was an Ibo one and the July.1966 "rematch" was  Northern one; end of story! Why arent the Northerners denying that the July 1966 coup was not an "Hausa" coup! You guys and this victim mentality!

P.S: Mr Siollun has also stated that the events of September 11, 2001 was not an Arab affair. Since the human race has been traced back to Africa, those terrorists can be correctly deemed black/African, thus, Mr Siollun has properly stated that it is wrong to blame Arabs for the hijackings even though all the culprits were Arab.

       Man get the hell outta here! angry

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 5:38pm On Jul 13, 2010
OP

Isn't it disingenuous of you to conclude about the contents of a book from the reviews given by others and use that to title your thread? They could be retards for all we know. Also, did Max Sillon lay out what he perceives to be facts and leaves the reader to reach his/her own conclusion or did he reach that conclusion at the end of the book?
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by AndreUweh(m): 10:29pm On Jul 13, 2010
What sort of power or position do Ndigbo want in 1966, which they did not have, to warrant a conspiracy by way of a coup to achieve?.
In 1966, the president of Nigeria, Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe was an Igbo, the president of the senate, Dr. Nwafor Orizu was an Igbo. The Geeral officer commanding the Nigerian army, Lt Gen Aguiyi Ironsi was an Igbo.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Onlytruth(m): 11:26pm On Jul 13, 2010
Andre Uweh:

  What sort of power or position do Ndigbo want in 1966, which they did not have, to warrant a conspiracy by way of a coup to achieve?.
In 1966, the president of Nigeria, Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe was an Igbo, the president of the senate, Dr. Nwafor Orizu was an Igbo. The Geeral officer commanding the Nigerian army, Lt Gen Aguiyi Ironsi was an Igbo.

Andre don't mind these people. Soon they'll allege a baseless "Igbo greed" for the coup.
Believe me I have learned everything I need about what really happened in 1966. I believe you already know as well. Our jobs as informed Igbo elite is to constantly remind our people about the unrepentant treachery that persist in Nigeria; to basically remind them of the people they are dealing with.

Anytime you argue with these people here, always bear in mind to communicate to the Igbo youths who are being deceived (one of them called Ikengawo just started a ridiculous thread about tribalism  existing only on nairaland undecided). Shape your comments to reach such people, to properly educate them.

Ignore these holocaust deniers because I wouldn't expect them to acknowledge that they have blood of millions of innocent Easterners in their hands.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by EzeUche(m): 11:58pm On Jul 13, 2010
Andre Uweh:

What sort of power or position do Ndigbo want in 1966, which they did not have, to warrant a conspiracy by way of a coup to achieve?.
In 1966, the president of Nigeria, Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe was an Igbo, the president of the senate, Dr. Nwafor Orizu was an Igbo. The Geeral officer commanding the Nigerian army, Lt Gen Aguiyi Ironsi was an Igbo.

That is true. We had it all! How the (we) mighty have fallen in the midst of batte. It makes me angry! We were once the Lords of Nigeria! angry In all in an instant, we have fallen from glory. But we shall rise again!

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Onlytruth(m): 12:13am On Jul 14, 2010
EzeUche:

That is true. We had it all! How the (we) mighty have fallen in the midst of batte. It makes me angry! We were once the Lords of Nigeria! angry In all in an instant, we have fallen from glory. But we shall rise again!

We lost it because some young and idealistic Igbo officers (much like some nairaland posters who still think tribe does not matter in Nigeria) had a dream about how to improve the country.
That is why I will do everything I can to educate young and naive Igbo kids on this forum, because their actions and words could still cost us more. And when sh**t hits the fan, innocent folks who just happen to be Igbo pay for it. angry undecided

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by MrFire: 12:27am On Jul 14, 2010
Yes, Andre, Igbo had no reason to seek power, something they already had in quantum
First president
First Senate president
First GOC
First House speaker -Jaja Nwachukwu
Most ministers during the first republic were Igbos. Despite Tafawa Balewa, Igbos were effectively in charge all by MERIT. So what else will anyone accuse them of seeking?
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 8:30pm On Jul 14, 2010
Andre Uweh:

What sort of power or position do Ndigbo want in 1966, which they did not have, to warrant a conspiracy by way of a coup to achieve?.
In 1966, the president of Nigeria, Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe was an Igbo, the president of the senate, Dr. Nwafor Orizu was an Igbo. The Geeral officer commanding the Nigerian army, Lt Gen Aguiyi Ironsi was an Igbo.

“The slave begins by demanding justice and ends by wanting to wear a crown.” - Albert Camus
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by EzeUche(m): 8:33pm On Jul 14, 2010
Katsumoto:

“The slave begins by demanding justice and ends by wanting to wear a crown.” - Albert Camus

grin grin grin grin

You are walking on thin ice with that quote.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 8:38pm On Jul 14, 2010
EzeUche:

grin grin grin grin

You are walking on thin ice with that quote.


cheesy
But I hope you get the quote and how it applies.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by MrFire: 8:41pm On Jul 14, 2010
Katsumoto:

“The slave begins by demanding justice and ends by wanting to wear a crown.” - Albert Camus
Katsumoto:

cheesy
But I hope you get the quote and how it applies.

Mr Fire:

Yes, Andre, Igbo had no reason to seek power, something they already had in quantum
First president
First Senate president
First GOC
First House speaker -Jaja Nwachukwu
Most ministers during the first republic were Igbos. Despite Tafawa Balewa, Igbos were effectively in charge all by MERIT. So what else will anyone accuse them of seeking?

These were factual positions held by Igbos b4 the war. So if anything, the civil war spoiled the show for ndigbo. By now they would have ''completely'' taken over the entire govt and that by merit.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 8:50pm On Jul 14, 2010
Mr Fire:

These were factual positions held by Igbos b4 the war. So if anything, the civil war spoiled the show for ndigbo. By now they would have ''completely'' taken over the entire govt and that by merit.

It appears that you do not understand the quote; an assignment for you. Try and figure out what the quote is about. When you do, come back.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Nobody: 8:58pm On Jul 14, 2010
For those who will wallow in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos. All I say is Nigeria is 50 this year. Have we made any progress as we should have?
Is Nigeria as it is the utopia of your dreams?

If yes carry on with your good work, if No then has it been worth it?

My Grand-dad (May his soul rest in peace) always told a proverb while I was growing up. - He says

"He who restles the tourtoise to the ground is holding himself down"

Go figure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Nobody: 9:00pm On Jul 14, 2010
[size=18pt]OJI MBE NA ALA JI ONWE YA[/size]
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 9:05pm On Jul 14, 2010
mikeansy:

For those who will wallow in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos. All I say is Nigeria is 50 this year. Have we made any progress as we should have?. is Nigeria is 50 this year. Have we made any progress as we should have?
Is Nigeria as it is the utopia of your dreams?

If yes carry on with your good work, if No then has it been worth it?

My Grand-dad (May his soul rest in peace) always told a proverb while I was growing up. - He says

"He who restles the tourtoise to the ground is holding himself down"

Go figure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

How did you arrive at that conclusion? Can you read any comments where anyone is wallowing in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos?
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 9:10pm On Jul 14, 2010
Mr Fire:

Yes, Andre, Igbo had no reason to seek power, something they already had in quantum
First president
First Senate president
First GOC
First House speaker -Jaja Nwachukwu
Most ministers during the first republic were Igbos. Despite Tafawa Balewa, Igbos were effectively in charge all by MERIT. So what else will anyone accuse them of seeking?


Onlytruth:

We lost it because some young and idealistic Igbo officers (much like some nairaland posters who still think tribe does not matter in Nigeria) had a dream about how to improve the country.
That is why I will do everything I can to educate young and naive Igbo kids on this forum, because their actions and words could still cost us more. And when sh**t hits the fan, innocent folks who just happen to be Igbo pay for it. angry undecided





And if u really "had it all", wouldnt u think it woulda been foolhardy for Ibo officers to try to overthrow the Govt of the time?! Exactly! Bottom-line: Mr Azikiwe, seeing that he was about to lose it all decided to bring in the military; they refused his orders. Then, a lil while later, his cousin carried out a coup that killed all important non-Ibo Politicians and military officials! Onlylies: Teach your kids anything, BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY TRY TO TEACH THEM THE TRUTH, U BITTER LYING MONKEY!


7. Constitutional crisis of January 1965:

Following the controversial Federal Election of December 1964, ceremonial President Azikiwe of the NCNC, urged by radical intelligentsia, refused to invite Prime Minister Balewa of the NPC to form a government and issued orders mobilizing the Army to enforce his authority to suspend the government, annul the elections and appoint a temporary interim administrator to conduct elections. However, the oath of allegiance of the officer corps was not only to the Commander in Chief but also to the government of Nigeria. [/b]
The Army Act (#26 of 1960) and the Navy Act (#9 of 1960) were also clear on lines of authority and control.While the Army and Navy were "under the general authority" of the Defence Minister in matters of "command, discipline and administration", the authority for operational use and control was vested in the Council of Ministers and the Prime Minister. President Azikiwe and the service chiefs were so advised by the Chief Justice and Attorney General of the Federation.
Thus the Navy Commander, Commodore Wey politely told the President that the Navy (under him), the Army (under Major General Welby-Everard) and the Police (under Louis Edet) had decided to refuse his orders. After a week of cliff hanging tension, in which the military stood aside, a political compromise was eventually reached and a government of "national unity" formed under Prime Minister Balewa.

http://www.umuahiaibeku.com/Death-of-Genironsi.html


P.S: Also note that Mr Azikiwe was the FIRST PERSON IN NIGERIAN HISTORY TO ILLEGALLY ANNUL AN ELECTION JUST BECAUSE IT WASNT GOING HIS WAY!!!
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by MrFire: 9:17pm On Jul 14, 2010
^^^^^
This is not your turf. You know where yoou belong: in the land of the hateful.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 9:19pm On Jul 14, 2010
Mr Fire:

^^^^^
This is not your turf. You know where yoou belong: in the land of the hateful.

Dude, stop shiyyting from ur mouth! If u got something to contradict wut I put on there, do so, otherwise go suck on Billy-Goat balls!
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 10:19pm On Jul 14, 2010
Onlytruth:

We lost it because some young and idealistic Igbo officers (much like some nairaland posters who still think tribe does not matter in Nigeria) had a dream about how to improve the country.

No! U lost it cus ure the epitome of the word "GREED"!. U lost "it", cus, just as yall are want to do (even in your everyday lives) u were selfish! u never know when to stop! U think everything's gotta be "aggression" or "force"!!! U lost it cus yall have not learned the art of sharing! U lost it cus u DO NOT HAVE A CONSCIENCE! U lost it cus u do not believe in justice! Deceive urself all u want, but the truth is wut I've written above is wut the rest of the world believes (rightfully) about u guys! Dude, why is everyone else not sympathetic to yall cause? Isnt that a cause for concern??! Think about it!

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by AndreUweh(m): 11:09pm On Jul 14, 2010
You S.H.I. T lickers and Poo eaters, this is for you to figure. The author of the book '' why we struck'' Adewale Ademoyega (RIP), a Yoruba officer clearly stated that the January 15, 1966 coup was planned by young military officers Igbos and non-Igbos alike disgusted with the state of Nigerian Nation. He did not ascribe that coup to any particular ethnic group.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by 006(m): 11:41pm On Jul 14, 2010
Katsumoto:

How did you arrive at that conclusion? Can you read any comments where anyone is wallowing in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos?

Keep off Igbo topics, you demented bigot! I see your sidekick bk/babe97 is around.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 11:51pm On Jul 14, 2010
006:

Keep off Igbo topics, you demented bigot! I see your sidekick bk/babe97 is around. 

Igbo topics are Nigerian topics and as a Nigerian, I will comment upon any Nigerian topics that I deem fit to. I guess you don't like the truth. You hate it when someone punches holes in fairy tales that were handed down to you like when you said you were told as a little boy that Igbo warriors defeated Fulani jihadists.  grin

You can carry on with the insults; my arguments speak for themselves.

1 Like

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by 006(m): 11:55pm On Jul 14, 2010
Katsumoto:

Igbo topics are Nigerian topics and as a Nigerian, I will comment upon any Nigerian topics that I deem fit to. I guess you don't like the truth. You hate it when someone punches holes in fairy tales that were handed down to you like when you said you were told as a little boy that Igbo warriors defeated Fulani jihadists.  grin

You can carry on with the insults; my arguments speak for themselves.

. . ., then you shouldn’t complain when someone says that you’re wallowing in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos, because that’s what you do, not punching holes.



Who is the greatest promoter of the psycho bk/baby97? You!
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 11:58pm On Jul 14, 2010
Andre Uweh:

You S.H.I. T lickers and Poo eaters, this is for you to figure. The author of the book '' why we struck'' Adewale Ademoyega (RIP), a Yoruba officer clearly stated that the January 15, 1966 coup was planned by young military officers Igbos and non-Igbos alike disgusted with the state of Nigerian Nation. He did not ascribe that coup to any particular ethnic group.

 Sure, wuteva! predominantly Ibo officers carry out a coup, killing, essentially, anything non-Ibo whilst letting anything Ibo roam free = IBO COUP! Try to paint it however u deem fit in ur imaginary land; what the rest of the world sees is what we see!

  Ok, heres something for u, monkey! September 11 was carried out by mainly Saudis, right, with one or two each from Lebanon, Egypt, UAE ect! When we attacked Iraq instead of the Saudis, what was the whole world's cry? "Why dont you guys attack Saudi Arabia, at least, they, and not the iraqis attacked you on that (un)fateful day?!?!" Why didnt the world scream "Why dont you attack Lebanon instead of Iraq?". Or why didnt they say "Why are you attacking Iraq instead of UAE?". Why? BECAUSE THE HIJACKERS WERE OVERWHELMINGLY SAUDIS, THATS WHY!!!. So, twist like a snake all u want: THIS WAS AN IBO COUP, AND IS RIGHTFULLY CLASSIFIED AS SUCH!

   Why arent the Hausas denying that the July'66 "rematch" was not an Hausa coup; at least non-hausas took part in it! Liars!

2 Likes

Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by 006(m): 12:06am On Jul 15, 2010
bk/babe90:

 Sure, wuteva! predominantly Ibo officers carry out a coup, killing, essentially, anything non-Ibo whilst letting anything Ibo roam free = IBO COUP! Try to paint it however u deem fit in your imaginary land; what the rest of the world sees is what we see!

  Ok, heres something for u, monkey! September 11 was carried out by mainly Saudis, right, with one or two each from Lebanon, Egypt, UAE ect! When we attacked Iraq instead of the Saudis, what was the whole world's cry? "Why dont you guys attack Saudi Arabia, at least, they, and not the iraqis attacked you on that (un)fateful day?!?!" Why didnt the world scream "Why dont you attack Lebanon instead of Iraq?". Or why didnt they say "Why are you attacking Iraq instead of UAE?". Why? BECAUSE THE HIJACKERS WERE OVERWHELMINGLY SAUDIS, THATS WHY!!!. So, twist like a snake all u want: THIS WAS AN IBO COUP, AND IS RIGHTFULLY CLASSIFIED AS SUCH!

   Why arent the Hausas denying that the July'66 "rematch" was not an Hausa coup; at least non-hausas took part in it! Liars!

It’s very obvious you’re not intelligent.
Saudis struck but America attacked Afghanistan instead because it wasn’t a Saudi attack and the whole world backed the Afghan attack. Do you get it? Same with the 1966 coup, it wasn’t an Igbo coup.

You just put the last nail on your coffin.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by Katsumoto: 12:06am On Jul 15, 2010
006:

. . ., then you shouldn’t complain when someone says that you’re wallowing in the triumphalism of victimising the Igbos, because that’s what you do, not punching holes.



Who is the greatest promoter of the psycho bk/baby97, you!

I guess you resort to lies when you have no argument. Why don't you post a link to a quote where I enjoyed the events of the 60s as it affected the Igbos negatively? Why don't you also post a link to where I was promoting bk/babe? He is a man and he is able to speak for himself, as you are. He has clearly demonstrated that he does not need anyone's support. I guess those without any credible arguments resort to childish tactics of name-calling, lying, and trying to defame others.

Someone started a thread, post your thoughts and arguments like a man or stand on the sidelines like a little boy.
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 12:20am On Jul 15, 2010
006:

It’s very obvious you’re not intelligent.
Saudis struck but America attacked Afghanistan instead because it wasn’t a Saudi attack and the whole world backed the Afghan attack. Do you get it? Same with the 1966 coup, it wasn’t an Igbo coup.

You just put the last nail on your coffin.


    Wow! You, my friend, are clearly an Id.iot! You are, undeniably, either an imbec.ile or a pathological liar! The latter, though, is what I'm guessing u most likely are (not that I dont think ure not imbe.c.ilic). I swear on everything I love, if u were to say the above to me in person, I wouldnt hesitate to disrespect u by putting my hands on you! Are u s.t.upid?!!? Did we attack Iraq or didnt we, falsely using Sept.11, 2001, supposed Nuclear weapons, supposed allegiance with Al-Qaieda, rescuing the Iraqi people from tyranny ect as excuses!??!? Did that happen or didnt it, u spawn of the devil?!?! Ok, we attacked Afghanistan. . . . WAS THERE ANY AFGHAN AMONG THE HIJACKERS?!?!? See why its a waste even arguing with u monkeys? your hate has made u so blind to the truth that u will lie at any given chance!

   Now, tell me who just nailed his coffin shut, beast!
Re: Max Siollun Unravels That The 1966 Coup Was Not Just An ''igbo Coup'' by bkbabe90(m): 12:32am On Jul 15, 2010
006:

It’s very obvious you’re not intelligent.
Saudis struck but America attacked Afghanistan instead because it wasn’t a Saudi attack and the whole world backed the Afghan attack. Do you get it? Same with the 1966 coup, it wasn’t an Igbo coup.

You just put the last nail on your coffin.


Typical Ibo hypocrite, he's quick to say "Saudis struck"! Why is it now a "Saudi" attack? Why? Did u forget the lone Lebanese and Egyptian? Ah! You did right? Why, cus it was predominantly Saudi Arabians, right? lol. So, with the Jan.1966, it was an IBO COUP BECUS IT WAS OVERWHELMINGLY IBOS DISHING OUT THE PUNISHMENT TO NON IBOS! GET IT, MR INTELLIGENT?!?!.


P.S: Ok, lemme help u out in a way I'd explain to my baby daughter: The Nigerian soccer team has (I think) one or two mullatoes playing for them (lets just say, for argument's sake, that one of them's parent is British). Why dont we say its not a just Nigerian soccer team becus a lone British citizen is playing for the team? Get it now, monkey?

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