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Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 / Living In The Uk/life As A UK Immigrant / Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by maternal: 10:47pm On Jul 31, 2018
DadR:
Nothing really, peradventure it's the easiest way to immigrate to through PNP.



I was under the impression you have to be fluent in French to get the PNP ? If not, do what you have to do, to get to Canada. As for your questions, it can be challenging but I know there are English companies in Montreal. I have English speaking friends who live and are successful in Montreal. But if you go to a Quebec city for example; forget it.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by maternal: 10:48pm On Jul 31, 2018
veleta:
@Joo2018,whoever advised your sister about practicing in Uk was right,chances of foreign trained doctors practising in Canada is very slim.I know some Canadian citizens who had to come to Uk to do their residency in Uk and obviously after their training will go back to practice in Canada especially in Family Physician as their training is recognised in Canada.
Even if express entry changes along the line,your Uk training is recognised also in Australia.
She can still get her pursue her PR in Canada then wait until she qualifies for a citizen then move to Uk and get her post graduate training there.All the best to her

So come to Canada first to get her citizenship, or UK ?
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Akingsqueen: 11:07pm On Jul 31, 2018
Meehn I'm liking you more. You are always on point with your replies. I'd take my chances too if I were her. Hustle it out and get what I want. I know some doctors prefer to go to UK, work and save up before coming to Canada (you need money for all those exams afterall) but she can be making her plans for UK while following up with express entry. When she gets the PR, she can do a soft landing, tidy up in UK and then come over finally. Except if she plans to do a training program there to which I would say go for it, get the Royal College and come over to Canada. She would not have to go through the rigours of residency matching in Canada. She can do that alongside express entry/PR application. When she gets it, she can then be visiting Canada to fulfill the required number of days in a year to retain one's PR status at least until she finishes with her program.

maternal:


I don't know if that advice was wrong. I've never been in her situation nor am I a professional. But my father always taught me not to use short cuts in life, as it will always comeback to haunt you. I've also learned that nothing is guaranteed in life. How long is a while in the UK ? How much "easier" would it be practicing in Canada ? How do you even know when she's ready to come to Canada they'll be an immigration avenue for her available ? If she can migrate through EE, I'd come here, then start the process on becoming a doctor here. In the meantime my stay in Canada would count towards my inevitable citizenship. I'd also know that the program I'm doing will go towards me being a doctor in Canada eventually. I don't like what if's, or 50/50. I need to know if I do X, I'll be guaranteed to get X. If that was my sister, I'd tell her to bite the bullet, come to Canada, and do what you need to do to achieve her goals.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Babyvet: 11:40pm On Jul 31, 2018
Akingsqueen:
Meehn I'm liking you more. You are always on point with your replies. I'd take my chances too if I were her. Hustle it out and get what I want. I know some doctors prefer to go to UK, work and save up before coming to Canada (you need money for all those exams afterall) but she can be making her plans for UK while following up with express entry. When she gets the PR, she can do a soft landing, tidy up in UK and then come over finally. Except if she plans to do a training program there to which I would say go for it, get the Royal College and come over to Canada. She would not have to go through the rigours of residency matching in Canada. She can do that alongside express entry/PR application. When she gets it, she can then be visiting Canada to fulfill the required number of days in a year to retain one's PR status at least until she finishes with her program.


But why go to the UK if she plans to live in Canada in the long run? The Uk and Canada are different run two different health care systems. She would still have to go through a lengthy process , may not as bad coming from Nigeria, but its still hard.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by maternal: 11:41pm On Jul 31, 2018
Akingsqueen:
Meehn I'm liking you more. You are always on point with your replies. I'd take my chances too if I were her. Hustle it out and get what I want. I know some doctors prefer to go to UK, work and save up before coming to Canada (you need money for all those exams afterall) but she can be making her plans for UK while following up with express entry. When she gets the PR, she can do a soft landing, tidy up in UK and then come over finally. Except if she plans to do a training program there to which I would say go for it, get the Royal College and come over to Canada. She would not have to go through the rigours of residency matching in Canada. She can do that alongside express entry/PR application. When she gets it, she can then be visiting Canada to fulfill the required number of days in a year to retain one's PR status at least until she finishes with her program.


Well said. One can do both. Maybe she can be returning to Canada during her summer holidays to meet residency requirements. But she'd have to do her research on the requirements. Me personally I wouldn't play with getting Canadian PR and eventually citizenship with the state of Nigeria right now. We're talking about securing your kids, kids, generation. Medical school comes 2nd over Canadian PR as far as I'm concerned. The schools aren't going anywhere.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by salford: 11:42pm On Jul 31, 2018
Babyvet:
na wa ohh. This Canada seems tuff and expensive. Thankfully, this forum is available to those living back home to give them insight. For those chasing professional courses like medicine , I would advise to train in the country that you plan to live in. Reason being is because the country is training their graduates to work in their own system. For example, even. though Canada and U.S are similar, it would be still hard for a medical professional from the US to go over to Canada because of all of the hassles that may not even be worth it.
Every year, thousands of Canadians go to the US, the Carribeans and the UK to study medicine. A very high percentage of them never come back to practice in Canada as they would be classified as IMGs with all the residency matching wahala. It would be nice if their residency in the UK is recognized as you mentioned. A lot of cities in Canada are in extreme shortage of farmily docs.

Luckily, a high percentage of the Canadian IMGs end up practicing in the US with better wages. I have church members whose kids were born in Canada studying medicine in the Carribeans, and they are aware it might be tough for them to practice in Canada if they return here.

I also have a friend that landed as a PR but is now completing a residency in the US. He had to pass the qualifying exams down there in addition to his MPH from a US uni. Not sure if the MPH from helped him in landing a residency, but I am very sure his Canadian PR helped him.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Babyvet: 11:49pm On Jul 31, 2018
salford:

Every year, thousands of Canadians go to the US, the Carribeans and the UK to study medicine. A very high percentage of them never come back to practice in Canada as they would be classified as IMGs with all the residency matching wahala. Luckily, a high percentage of them end up practicing in the US with better wages. I have church members whose kids were born in Canada studying medicine in the Carribeans, and they are aware it might be tough for them to practice in Canada if they return here.

I work with a lot of medical residents in the US. A lot of the ones I work with, come from the neighboring schools in the town. Even US citizens going outside of the country to study medicine find it difficult when they return. You see when schooling here, your suppose to use that period to network and gain some experience in the field through externships. Like I said, I like Canada for their immigration but when it comes to job opportunity I highly prefer the US.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by salford: 11:56pm On Jul 31, 2018
Babyvet:


I work with a lot of medical residents in the US. A lot of the ones I work with, come from the neighboring schools in the town. Even US citizens going outside of the country to study medicine find it difficult when they return. You see when schooling here, your suppose to use that period to network and gain some experience in the field through externships. Like I said, I like Canada for their immigration but when it comes to job opportunity I highly prefer the US.
You are right. The schooling period helps in building networks and solid references to use when they apply for matching. Some even publish lots of journals before grad in a specialization they intend to get into for residency. All these helps in their matching applications.

You could read the tragic case of Robert Chu.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Babyvet: 12:02am On Aug 01, 2018
salford:

Every year, thousands of Canadians go to the US, the Carribeans and the UK to study medicine. A very high percentage of them never come back to practice in Canada as they would be classified as IMGs with all the residency matching wahala. It would be nice if their residency in the UK is recognized as you mentioned. A lot of cities in Canada are in extreme shortage of farmily docs.

Luckily, a high percentage of the Canadian IMGs end up practicing in the US with better wages. I have church members whose kids were born in Canada studying medicine in the Carribeans, and they are aware it might be tough for them to practice in Canada if they return here.

I also have a friend that landed as a PR but is now completing a residency in the US. He had to pass the qualifying exams down there in addition to his MPH from a US uni. Not sure if the MPH from helped him in landing a residency, but I am very sure his Canadian PR helped him.

MPH from US uni definitely helped him probably over the PR status. In the long run, Canadian citizens still have to go through the Immigration channels that other immigrants have to go through when coming to the US. People really don't talk about them but there is sizable amount of illegal immigrants that are Canadian citizens.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Babyvet: 12:12am On Aug 01, 2018
salford:

You are right. The schooling period helps in building networks and solid references to use when they apply for matching. Some even publish lots of journals before grad in a specialization they intend to get into for residency. All these helps in their matching applications.

You could read the tragic case of Robert Chu.

Also what happened to Robert Chu , was unfortunate but it was not worth work taking his life over. Life is unfair and the same thing happens in the US as well. That is one thing that I like about immigrants, we tend to be resilient even when we face push backs.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by salford1: 12:36am On Aug 01, 2018
Babyvet:


Also what happened to Robert Chu , was unfortunate but it was not worth work taking his life over. Life is unfair and the same thing happens in the US as well. That is one thing that I like about immigrants, we tend to be resilient even when we face push backs.
Yeah. It was terrible, but he didn't die in vain. The guardians of the residency system have now sort of agreed to listen to recommenations on how to increase the number of residency allocations for Canadian trained grads.
The residency slot should be increased for all qualified docs. As at June, over 50,000 people in Nova Scotia are without family docs.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-s-doctor-waitlist-hits-50-000-1.4694542
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by michael1(m): 1:04am On Aug 01, 2018
Dear @Geebaby10 & @A555 and all

Good evening, my family just got our PPR today and our story is exactly like yours, initially planning to have our baby in US, however post receipt of PPR today, everything has changed.

Please I will really appreciate any help at settling down. My wife is EDD is late Sept/early Oct. We do have a someone in Sask but also willing to rent an apartment if that does not work out since we are looking at giving birth in Canada.

Please we will appreciate if you can kindly avail us your email address to aid us through this period.

Thank you


A555:


Our experience for Calgary was quite straightforward.

Arrived in Calgary 6 weeks before the baby was due. Went to registry to sign up for health care and asked for the Alberta healthcare number immediately, so we had it written down while waiting for the card to arrive in the post within a week (I think it was actually just a couple of days later).

Went straight to sign up with a regular family doctor (walk-in) who immediately made the referral. Scans and tests were requested because the medical report from Nigeria was insufficient. The family doctor did a lot of the initial work. Called various hospitals & maternity clinics till he found one to take us straightaway. In fact, he referred us to the maternity clinic for the same day, and then called us in the evening to confirm we had seen the doctor. At the maternity clinic, they simply booked us in to see a doctor the following week.

Due to the proximity to the due date, at the maternity clinic, doctor asked that we schedule weekly visits. So after every appointment, we scheduled a follow up for the following week. Everything went smoothly, and honestly it was the best experience ever. If you're coming into Alberta, I doubt you will have much to worry about.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by sparkle2k3: 1:21am On Aug 01, 2018
joo2018:
Ok. Thanks.
The whole thing is just frustrating. My sister has to put the Canada dream on hold and is pursuing a UK program instead.


Your sister's current specialty /training also matters.
If she has two years of family medicine training she has a shot at practising after passing the Canadian licensing exams in some provinces.
Different provinces have their requirements for IMGs. It might be a long route but not an impossible one.


She can come to Canada, stay a couple of years, start the processes to licensure and get her citizenship.

The UK route I guess is do private practise for a (good) while, then residency, become a fellow before coming to Canada. How long do you think that will take? I'm sure in those years she might have completed Canadian requirements with added citizenship.

There was a special immigration program for doctors from UK /US... But I'm not sure it's still on.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by sistaj: 2:15am On Aug 01, 2018

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by checkpoint(m): 4:06am On Aug 01, 2018
Please where can I do medicals in lag
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by 40manlappy: 5:22am On Aug 01, 2018
DadR:
Dear Seniors, trust you are all doing fine.

Please would you advise a non-french speaker to reside and work in Quebec? What are the prons and cons?

Also, if one gets to immigrate to Quebec via PNP, can one leave for another province after staying in Quebec for a while and for how long can one stay before leaving?

Any thoughts please?

cc: Salford1, maternal, azed1, 40manlappy et all

Maybe if you lay all the cards on the table, you may get a more robust response.

A non-French speaker can reside in Quebec but you may need French for most jobs. I learned that there is a sizeable English-speaking population in Montreal which is not surprising due to its cosmopolitan nature. I have met a few people who moved from Montreal to Ontario side in search of jobs; maybe due to language limitation. If you intend to work in Quebec, IMO, you will do better if you can speak French.

Quebec is different from the rest of Canada in most things. If you immigrate through "Quebec PNP", you will be given a Certificat de sélection du Québec (CSQ – Québec selection certificate). If I recollect correctly, you will have a moral obligation to stay in Quebec for 2 years during which you are expected to undergo "Francisation" program which includes learning French for at least 1 year. You will be given some funds to take care of your transport, etc. I don't think you can work during this period but that may not be a source of worry if you have your POF intact + financial support from Quebec government.

Housing, childcare and insurance costs are cheaper in Quebec but the sales and income tax are higher. In the end, it is entirely up to you taking into consideration what you really want and your long-range plans.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by DadR: 5:39am On Aug 01, 2018
Thanks a bunch for the feedback boss.

maternal:


I was under the impression you have to be fluent in French to get the PNP ? If not, do what you have to do, to get to Canada. As for your questions, it can be challenging but I know there are English companies in Montreal. I have English speaking friends who live and are successful in Montreal. But if you go to a Quebec city for example; forget it.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by DadR: 5:43am On Aug 01, 2018
Thanks for the heads up baba. Will weigh all available options.

40manlappy:


Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Nobody: 7:50am On Aug 01, 2018
veleta:
@Joo2018,whoever advised your sister about practicing in Uk was right,chances of foreign trained doctors practising in Canada is very slim.I know some Canadian citizens who had to come to Uk to do their residency in Uk and obviously after their training will go back to practice in Canada especially in Family Physician as their training is recognised in Canada.
Even if express entry changes along the line,your Uk training is recognised also in Australia.
She can still get her pursue her PR in Canada then wait until she qualifies for a citizen then move to Uk and get her post graduate training there.All the best to her
Seconded!!!
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by joo2018: 8:15am On Aug 01, 2018
Thanks to everyone for the feedback.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Merovingian: 1:06pm On Aug 01, 2018
Blessedluvdfavd:
The last applicants just withdrew so we applied and signed the lease today long story short. They took 4 months rent upfront and this was much better than the person requesting 12months upfront from us! Phew! Thank God the house phase is over.
Congrats on securing an apartment.

1. Is the upfront payment made in cash or post dated cheque?
2. Can you sub lease or its part of the agreement not to? Asking incase one finds a better job out of city and have to leave.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Oben209(f): 1:33pm On Aug 01, 2018
Please house I’m at a cross road right now , I’m usin two degrees for WES and I’m required to send the certificate of both. Can I send them together or it has to be separate mails, the amount I’m seeing for separate mails is about 55k with dhl..
please house can I just send the two in one single mail, has anyone been in this kinda situation
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by hayor2014(m): 1:55pm On Aug 01, 2018
Oben209


why not just FAX it to WES free of charge with WWW.HELLOFAX.COM , Wes Fax number is 416-972-9004

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Merovingian: 2:05pm On Aug 01, 2018
Oben209:
Please house I’m at a cross road right now , I’m usin two degrees for WES and I’m required to send the certificate of both. Can I send them together or it has to be separate mails, the amount I’m seeing for separate mails is about 55k with dhl..
please house can I just send the two in one single mail, has anyone been in this kinda situation

You should be able to send them together. But why are you sending them via dhl and not faxing There are free online fax, myfax or faxzero and many ppl are using them. Save yourself the expense and fax. You should follow this thread to get more responses.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Kayma2000: 2:10pm On Aug 01, 2018
Oben209:
Please house I’m at a cross road right now , I’m usin two degrees for WES and I’m required to send the certificate of both. Can I send them together or it has to be separate mails, the amount I’m seeing for separate mails is about 55k with dhl..
please house can I just send the two in one single mail, has anyone been in this kinda situation

Please use hellofax.com
So easy, free and fast.
In two days, WES would acknowledge that they have received it.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by veleta: 4:15pm On Aug 01, 2018
Family physician residency done in Uk is recognised in Canada and it takes 3 years.For doctors migrating to Canada,your best shot is to pursue your residency training in U.K. so you can practice in Canada.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by vcole: 5:12pm On Aug 01, 2018
As regards IMGs and practicing in Canada.

Yes, if you are a licensed consultant in Canada, UK or Australia, you can practice in all 3 countries.

At the moment, due to issues doctors had with the former UK health minister and extending call hours and less pay, a lot of UK docs moved to Australia to practice there seeing as they get better pay, work conditions and better hours. This has left a major gap in the availability of docs in the UK. Hence, obtaining a GMC license to work in the UK is the new hustle for foreign trained docs. You pass your exams and you get offered a job super fast. It's usually as an emergency physician but most people do that for a year or 2 and network properly and then get a family medicine residency spot. That takes 3 years and then they become consultants. Once this happens, said individual can move to Canada and work as a family physician.

So whoever advised joo2018's sister advised right. If she is interested in clinical medicine I would certainly advice her to do that, especially now because those UK jobs may not be available forever.

As regards Canadian migration, if I were her I would obtain Pr via EE now because immigration laws change all the time and you never know if she would qualify in the future. I would advice her to land after PR, go back to school for a post grad degree for 2yrs within which she would have met the requirement to renew PR after 5yrs. Then, move to the UK, finish residency, renew PR then move back to Canada if she so desires after she completes residency.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by veleta: 5:51pm On Aug 01, 2018
@Vcole,nice contribution but you don't need to work in Uk for a year or 2 years to get into post graduate training in Family Medicine. Once you get your GMC licence,you can take the Specialty Recruitment exams and if you pass,you start your training.Some guys work for 6 months to get Uk experience then sit for the exams so,it's not compulsory.
Though,some people say Aussie is better than Canada in terms of pay as well as work/life balance.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by joo2018: 6:19pm On Aug 01, 2018
Thanks @vcole
vcole:
As regards IMGs and practicing in Canada.

Yes, if you are a licensed consultant in Canada, UK or Australia, you can practice in all 3 countries.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by Rocorleone: 9:46pm On Aug 01, 2018
Good day everyone. It's been a while though.
Greetings to everyone @vcole, @adeballer, @ovie how are you?|

Okay I got a question to ask as this is the final step before I apply for my PR.
I wanted to take the IELTS but the last sit closer to my centre got filled up quickly. Now I am considering taking CELPIP.

What is your advise on taking the CELPIP instead of IELTS?

Please I need advise from experienced individuals
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by mhoreh: 11:14pm On Aug 01, 2018
EglintonWest:
I am new here,wish I came across this site sooner, I have an issue and I need advise on the best action to take,I putting my application for PR on the 5th of December 2017, I got my PR through the CEC on the 18th of February 2018 but before that, I went back to Nigeria and I did a court wedding Dec 26, 2017 thinking after application, status change won't matter and I can sponsor my wife (grave mistake)whenever I get my PR. Got PPR request on the 3rd and out of fear of what might happen, I did not declare my status has changed (dumb move) .
...

Please how did you resolve this. My friend is in a similar situation
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant by vcole: 1:05am On Aug 02, 2018
veleta:
@Vcole,nice contribution but you don't need to work in Uk for a year or 2 years to get into post graduate training in Family Medicine. Once you get your GMC licence,you can take the Specialty Recruitment exams and if you pass,you start your training.Some guys work for 6 months to get Uk experience then sit for the exams so,it's not compulsory.
Though,some people say Aussie is better than Canada in terms of pay as well as work/life balance.
i didn't say you "have" to work for 1 or 2yrs. I said most people work for 1 or 2yrs. Just saying in an attempt at keeping it realistic for anyone who may come across our discussions. Different factors play into that timeline. In most cases it is not exactly for the sake of specialty exams, it is for networking purposes in order to gain good references and acceptance into their intended spot. IMGs who get into a residency spot within 6 months of obtaining a GMC license are often the minority and not majority from what I have gathered. Then again, I may be wrong. I do agree with you about Oz and that "chill" lifestyle

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