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"David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React - Religion (8) - Nairaland

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Apostle Suleman Clashes With South African Over Xenophobic Attacks On Nigerians / Re: Apostle Johnson Suleman's Claim That David's Mother Was A Harlort / "My Mother Was Arrested" - Stephanie Otobo Speaks From Canada (2) (3) (4)

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Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Sanchez01: 10:54am On Apr 25, 2017
PianoWizard:
He wasn't,, she was sarah's maid.
Sarah gave haggai to Abraham.
Sarah never 'gave'. She only asked that Abraham sleeps with 'her slave', which Abraham didn't hesitate to do. A man could sleep with another woman voluntarily, that does not take out the fact that adultery has been committed, whether the wife approves or not.

So explain again how it is not adultery, using the dictionary definition below.

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by PianoWizard: 10:54am On Apr 25, 2017
Shafiiimran99:
That does not mean she is not Abraham legal wife since it was Sarah that give her to Abraham willingly
I may likely agree with you.

but according to the bible Abraham had two wives..
Sarah and keturah(after sarah died).
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Sanchez01: 10:56am On Apr 25, 2017
dragonking3:
The apostle is right. We all know that David mum is Nitzevet but she was a prostitute that's why David was despite by brothers and his own father.

http://www.chabad.org/theJewishWoman/article_cdo/aid/280331/jewish/Nitzevet-Mother-of-David.htm
Do you mind listing and explaining how many men she slept with that made her a prostitute
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by JACOBJK: 10:56am On Apr 25, 2017
what the man of God said is very correct..........we should please make good research into history...... so read my post below so that i can elighten you the more that he was actually born in adultary...........

King David’s big, dark secret

written by Dean Smith]

There was a big, dark secret in
David’s life that few people are aware of. It’s
not that David tried to keep it secret, but many
of us simply fail to connect the dots.
When we study David’s life, there are a
number of Biblical passages that at first read
seem quite puzzling. One such passage is 1
Samuel 16:1-13.
God had just rejected Saul as king of Israel and
commissioned the prophet Samuel to anoint
one of the sons of Jessee of Bethlehem as the
next king (v 1). Samuel approached the elders
of Bethlehem and arranged the meeting. Once
Jessee and his sons had gathered, Samuel
quickly realized none of the boys standing
before him was the one God had chosen.
Puzzled, Samuel asked if there were any other
sons and was told the youngest, David, was
attending the flock. Samuel ordered David
brought before him and anointed the young
shepherd boy as the next king of Israel.
I was always curious as to why David was not
initially included. Traditionally, most believe
David was omitted because he was the
youngest, but I don’t believe this theory holds
up under closer scrutiny of the Biblical
account.
When Samuel first approached Bethlehem’s
elders, the Bible tells us they were
“trembling” (v 4). They were terrified of the
prophet. When he said jump, the only
pertinent question was how high.
So when Samuel requested a special meeting
with Jessee and his sons, all were expected to
show up. There must have been some
convincing reason not to extend an invitation
to David.
Why was David excluded?
I believe David actually provides the answer to
this question in Psalm 51 penned in the chaotic
aftermath of his adulterous affair with
Bathsheba.
In verse 5, King David wrote: “Behold I was
brought forth in iniquity and in sin my mother
conceived me.”
So what was David trying to tell us in this
verse?
Traditionally, most believe David was
explaining his affair was due to the sin nature
that plagues all mankind because of Adam and
Eve’s original sin. However, this does not
explain why David committed adultery (though
all humans have the same sin nature, not all
commit adultery).
Setting all fancy theological interpretations
aside, we need to interpret verse 5 simply as it
reads — “in sin my mother conceived me”
means exactly what it says — David’s mother
conceived him in an act of sin. She committed
adultery and David was the byproduct of this
infidelity.
This explains why David was not initially
included in the meeting with Samuel as
technically it could be argued David was not a
true son of Jessee. However, God did include
David as part of Jessee’s family much in the
same way Jesus was considered a son of
Joseph though conceived by the Holy Spirit.
Who was David’s mother?
This is where it gets interesting. No where in
scripture is David’s mother mentioned by
name. This is a bit unusual, as mothers of
several ancient prophets and patriarchs are not
only mentioned, but many times written about,
as they often played a significant role in the
upbringing of their children — such as Moses’
mother Jochebed (Exodus 6:20) and Samuel’s
mother Hannah (1 Samuel 1:1-20).
However, David’s mother was different — as a
wife who committed adultery, she brought
shame upon Jessee and his family and it’s not
surprising her name was excised from the
Biblical account.
I think the most likely scenario is that David’s
mother was a prostitute. It was not uncommon
for children born from such an illicit
relationship to live with the father.
In the book of Judges, we have a story about
Jephath who was conceived when his father
Gilead had sexual relations with a prostitute.
Though conceived through this illicit
encounter, Jephath nevertheless grew up in
Gilead’s house who took responsibility for
raising the child.
But Jephath’s arrival created a tremendous
tension with the sons born of the true mother.
They eventually drove Jephath out of the
family to prevent him from receiving any of
his father’s inheritance (v 2 ).
If David’s mother was also a prostitute it
would explain why she wasn’t mentioned and I
suspect it was the brothers who pushed not to
have David included when Samuel called for a
meeting with the sons of Jesse.
David’s miserable early life
David refers to his mother one more time in
Psalm 69 which — next to Psalm 22 — is the
most quoted Psalm in the New Testament. It is
generally believed Psalm 69 covers David’s
early life prior to his anointing by Samuel.
In verse 8, David writes: “I have become
estranged from my brothers, And an alien to
my mother’s sons.”
This verse reveals David was ostracized from
his own family and was considered an alien or
an outcast by his brothers. Notice how David
refers to his brothers as his mother’s sons —
not his father’s — reflecting they shared the
same mother but not the same father.
According to Strong’s dictionary, the Hebrew
word for estranged “zur” means to “turn one
aside from lodging” and can also refer to an
individual who has come from “adultery – to
come from another man.” In fact, the word is
rooted in the Hebrew word “mamzer” which
means bastard or illegitimate.
Zur intimates David was not included in
regular family activities such as meals. In fact
this may be what verse 21 suggests when
David says they gave me “gall for food” and
“vinegar to drink.” It appears the brothers
made David’s life miserable.
One thing oddly missing in Psalm 69 is any
mention of David’s relationship with Jessee.
Not once did David point to Jessee as the
source of his misery. Neither do we see any
hint of conflict when Jessee asked David to
take food to his brothers who were fighting
the Philistines, but as soon as David showed
up at the army camp, you immediately see the
animosity between David and his brothers (1
Samuel 17: 28-29).
The conflict between David and his half-
brothers indicates it may have been the
brothers who demanded David not be included
in the meeting with Samuel.
Psalm 69 also addresses the misery David
endured growing up. Because of his mother’s
sin, David’s childhood was full of loneliness
and rejection. In verse 3, he speaks of hours
spent crying because of the rejection (v 3). He
explains his frustration of being punished for a
sin he did not commit (v 4) – his mother’s sin.
Worse, he became the object of mockery as
the drunkards sang about his plight (v 26).
David’s life also became a byword or proverb
— literally a living warning — of what happens
to those whose mother commits adultery.
What was particularly hurtful was those who
“sit at the gate” used him as an example (v 12)
of what happens when people sin. The term
“sit at the gate” refers to the elders of the city
who sat at the gates and made judgment on
cases (see Proverbs 31:23; Deut 21:19; 22:15).
These would be the same elders of Bethlehem
who did not think it necessary to include David
when Samuel wanted to meet with Jessee and
his sons.
David then adds he carried the personal shame
of his mother’s sin.
No one cared that David was the innocent
byproduct of his mother’s sin. It was Jewish
belief children could be punished for the sins
of the parents. We see a hint of this in the
gospels, when the disciples — after stumbling
upon on a blind man — asked Jesus if he was
being punished for the sins of his parents or
his own sins (John 9:2,3).
Though despised and rejected by his family
and humiliated by those in his home town,
God saw David’s heart and how he responded
to the rejection and the ugliness that filled his
childhood and chose this boy as the next king
of Israel .
Through this we gain a keen insight in the
redemptive nature of God, who will use
anyone despite their background and heritage
as long as they have a heart for God.//

2 Likes

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by ebenezf: 10:57am On Apr 25, 2017
This man is full of heresy and dry messages.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by PianoWizard: 10:57am On Apr 25, 2017
Sanchez01:

Sarah never 'gave'. She only asked that Abraham sleeps with 'her slave', which Abraham didn't hesitate to do. A man could sleep with another woman voluntarily, that does not take out the fact that adultery has been committed, whether the wife approves or not.

So explain again how it is not adultery, using the dictionary definition below.
You see why I say you lack knowledge of scriptures. Even at that it wasn't a sin because there was no law. Law came through moses not Abraham.

Stop coming to display your ignorance go acquire biblical knowledge.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by JACOBJK: 10:58am On Apr 25, 2017
what the man of God said is very correct..........we should please make good research into history...... so read my post below so that i can elighten you the more that he was actually born in adultary...........

King David’s big, dark secret

written by Dean Smith]

There was a big, dark secret in
David’s life that few people are aware of. It’s
not that David tried to keep it secret, but many
of us simply fail to connect the dots.
When we study David’s life, there are a
number of Biblical passages that at first read
seem quite puzzling. One such passage is 1
Samuel 16:1-13.
God had just rejected Saul as king of Israel and
commissioned the prophet Samuel to anoint
one of the sons of Jessee of Bethlehem as the
next king (v 1). Samuel approached the elders
of Bethlehem and arranged the meeting. Once
Jessee and his sons had gathered, Samuel
quickly realized none of the boys standing
before him was the one God had chosen.
Puzzled, Samuel asked if there were any other
sons and was told the youngest, David, was
attending the flock. Samuel ordered David
brought before him and anointed the young
shepherd boy as the next king of Israel.
I was always curious as to why David was not
initially included. Traditionally, most believe
David was omitted because he was the
youngest, but I don’t believe this theory holds
up under closer scrutiny of the Biblical
account.
When Samuel first approached Bethlehem’s
elders, the Bible tells us they were
“trembling” (v 4). They were terrified of the
prophet. When he said jump, the only
pertinent question was how high.
So when Samuel requested a special meeting
with Jessee and his sons, all were expected to
show up. There must have been some
convincing reason not to extend an invitation
to David.
Why was David excluded?
I believe David actually provides the answer to
this question in Psalm 51 penned in the chaotic
aftermath of his adulterous affair with
Bathsheba.
In verse 5, King David wrote: “Behold I was
brought forth in iniquity and in sin my mother
conceived me.”
So what was David trying to tell us in this
verse?
Traditionally, most believe David was
explaining his affair was due to the sin nature
that plagues all mankind because of Adam and
Eve’s original sin. However, this does not
explain why David committed adultery (though
all humans have the same sin nature, not all
commit adultery).
Setting all fancy theological interpretations
aside, we need to interpret verse 5 simply as it
reads — “in sin my mother conceived me”
means exactly what it says — David’s mother
conceived him in an act of sin. She committed
adultery and David was the byproduct of this
infidelity.
This explains why David was not initially
included in the meeting with Samuel as
technically it could be argued David was not a
true son of Jessee. However, God did include
David as part of Jessee’s family much in the
same way Jesus was considered a son of
Joseph though conceived by the Holy Spirit.
Who was David’s mother?
This is where it gets interesting. No where in
scripture is David’s mother mentioned by
name. This is a bit unusual, as mothers of
several ancient prophets and patriarchs are not
only mentioned, but many times written about,
as they often played a significant role in the
upbringing of their children — such as Moses’
mother Jochebed (Exodus 6:20) and Samuel’s
mother Hannah (1 Samuel 1:1-20).
However, David’s mother was different — as a
wife who committed adultery, she brought
shame upon Jessee and his family and it’s not
surprising her name was excised from the
Biblical account.
I think the most likely scenario is that David’s
mother was a prostitute. It was not uncommon
for children born from such an illicit
relationship to live with the father.
In the book of Judges, we have a story about
Jephath who was conceived when his father
Gilead had sexual relations with a prostitute.
Though conceived through this illicit
encounter, Jephath nevertheless grew up in
Gilead’s house who took responsibility for
raising the child.
But Jephath’s arrival created a tremendous
tension with the sons born of the true mother.
They eventually drove Jephath out of the
family to prevent him from receiving any of
his father’s inheritance (v 2 ).
If David’s mother was also a prostitute it
would explain why she wasn’t mentioned and I
suspect it was the brothers who pushed not to
have David included when Samuel called for a
meeting with the sons of Jesse.
David’s miserable early life
David refers to his mother one more time in
Psalm 69 which — next to Psalm 22 — is the
most quoted Psalm in the New Testament. It is
generally believed Psalm 69 covers David’s
early life prior to his anointing by Samuel.
In verse 8, David writes: “I have become
estranged from my brothers, And an alien to
my mother’s sons.”
This verse reveals David was ostracized from
his own family and was considered an alien or
an outcast by his brothers. Notice how David
refers to his brothers as his mother’s sons —
not his father’s — reflecting they shared the
same mother but not the same father.
According to Strong’s dictionary, the Hebrew
word for estranged “zur” means to “turn one
aside from lodging” and can also refer to an
individual who has come from “adultery – to
come from another man.” In fact, the word is
rooted in the Hebrew word “mamzer” which
means bastard or illegitimate.
Zur intimates David was not included in
regular family activities such as meals. In fact
this may be what verse 21 suggests when
David says they gave me “gall for food” and
“vinegar to drink.” It appears the brothers
made David’s life miserable.
One thing oddly missing in Psalm 69 is any
mention of David’s relationship with Jessee.
Not once did David point to Jessee as the
source of his misery. Neither do we see any
hint of conflict when Jessee asked David to
take food to his brothers who were fighting
the Philistines, but as soon as David showed
up at the army camp, you immediately see the
animosity between David and his brothers (1
Samuel 17: 28-29).
The conflict between David and his half-
brothers indicates it may have been the
brothers who demanded David not be included
in the meeting with Samuel.
Psalm 69 also addresses the misery David
endured growing up. Because of his mother’s
sin, David’s childhood was full of loneliness
and rejection. In verse 3, he speaks of hours
spent crying because of the rejection (v 3). He
explains his frustration of being punished for a
sin he did not commit (v 4) – his mother’s sin.
Worse, he became the object of mockery as
the drunkards sang about his plight (v 26).
David’s life also became a byword or proverb
— literally a living warning — of what happens
to those whose mother commits adultery.
What was particularly hurtful was those who
“sit at the gate” used him as an example (v 12)
of what happens when people sin. The term
“sit at the gate” refers to the elders of the city
who sat at the gates and made judgment on
cases (see Proverbs 31:23; Deut 21:19; 22:15).
These would be the same elders of Bethlehem
who did not think it necessary to include David
when Samuel wanted to meet with Jessee and
his sons.
David then adds he carried the personal shame
of his mother’s sin.
No one cared that David was the innocent
byproduct of his mother’s sin. It was Jewish
belief children could be punished for the sins
of the parents. We see a hint of this in the
gospels, when the disciples — after stumbling
upon on a blind man — asked Jesus if he was
being punished for the sins of his parents or
his own sins (John 9:2,3).
Though despised and rejected by his family
and humiliated by those in his home town,
God saw David’s heart and how he responded
to the rejection and the ugliness that filled his
childhood and chose this boy as the next king
of Israel .
Through this we gain a keen insight in the
redemptive nature of God, who will use
anyone despite their background and heritage
as long as they have a heart for God.//
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Dindondin(m): 10:58am On Apr 25, 2017
femi4:
read the link or read the bible?

My reference is the bible. Any thing contrary is nonesense
Is every actions that you take stated in the Bible? Is every thing a Christian now do stated in the Bible? How wide do you understand the Bible?

The link I posted was a Jewish link. If you don't know, Bible was a summary of the things that happened from Adam's time till Jesus's time. Have you read anything about the book of Torah?
Google it.
Cos some of you now go to church & feel you v read Genesis - Revelation & know your right and that ll make you to form Daddy Freeze or Kemi Olunloyo. Those ones needs devine encounter.
Read & understand Jewish culture & this Bible passage Psalm.69 Vs 8 and the whole of Psalm 69 Vs 1 to the end.

Remember, I m just a Bible scholar, not Suleman's defender.

1 Like

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Princefrankie1(m): 10:59am On Apr 25, 2017
Jacksonville:
Nigerians! Don't be too quick to cast your stones. Some hidden truths are known only through revelation. Take it or leave it.

It's normal ponder on this, as it isn't written where David's mum was a "harlot", but this is coming from a man of revelations. Some truths are revealed to those whom God trusts. It's left for the receiver to tell the world or not.


#Mytake

I plead to the Heavens on your behalf, and also on behalf of those who saw sense in your nonsense and liked your post.

The Son of Man shall set you free, and you shall be free indeed!!

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Sanchez01: 11:01am On Apr 25, 2017
felixomor:


You are the only illiterate kid here
I agree, I'm a kid, yes. As a matter of fact, I'm only 17. But do you mind dedicating just about 3MB out of the 10MB you have as you watch the video again Precisely, do well to start from 1:38 on the video.

Send me a PM if you don't have data, yeah?
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Bagehot: 11:03am On Apr 25, 2017
Jacksonville:
Nigerians! Don't be too quick to cast your stones. Some hidden truths are known only through revelation. Take it or leave it.

It's normal ponder on this, as it isn't written where David's mum was a "harlot", but this is coming from a man of revelations. Some truths are revealed to those whom God trusts. It's left for the receiver to tell the world or not.


#Mytake

Wanna hide stuff from a black man? Hide it in a book, tell him something different, and add an air of mystique and spirituality to your charlatan claims.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by asksteve(m): 11:03am On Apr 25, 2017
D bold voice of silence by Chana Weisberg
King David's mother.
Save me, O
G‑d, for the waters threaten to engulf me . . .
I am wearied by my calling out, and my throat is dry. I’ve lost hope in waiting . . .
More numerous than the hairs on my head are those who hate me without reason . . .
Must I then repay what I have not stolen?
Mighty are those who would cut me down, who are my enemies without cause . . .
O G‑d, You know my folly, and my unintended wrongs are not hidden from You . . .

It is for Your sake that I have borne disgrace, that humiliation covers my face.
I have become a stranger to my brothers, an alien to my mother’s sons.
Out of envy for Your House, they ravaged me; the disgraces of those who revile You have fallen upon me . . .
Those who sit by the gate talk about me. I am the taunt of drunkards . . .
Disgrace breaks my heart, and I am left deathly sick.
I hope for solace, but there is none; and for someone to comfort me, but I find no one.
They put gall into my meal, and give me vinegar to quench my thirst . . . (Psalm 69)

1
This psalm describes the life of a poor, despised and lowly individual, who lacks even a single friend to comfort him. It is the voice of a tormented soul who has experienced untold humiliation and disgrace. Through no apparent cause of his own, he is surrounded by enemies who wish to cut him down; even his own brothers are strangers to him, ravaging and reviling him.

Amazingly, this is the voice of the mighty
King David, righteous and beloved servant of G‑d, feared and awed by all.
King David had many challenges throughout his life. But at what point did this great individual feel so alone, so disgraced, and so undeserving of love and friendship?

What caused King David to face such an intense ignominy, to be shunned by his own brothers in his home (“I have become a stranger to my brothers”), by the Torah sages who sat in judgment at the gates (“those who sit by the gate talk about me”) and by the drunkards on the street corners (“I am the taunt of drunkards”)? What had King David done to arouse such ire and contempt? And was there no one, at this time in his life, who would provide him with love, comfort and friendship?

This psalm, in which King David passionately gives voice to the heaviest burdens of his soul, refers to a period of twenty-eight years, from his earliest childhood until he was coronated as king of the people of Israel by the prophet
Samuel.
David was born into the illustrious family of Yishai (Jesse), who served as the head of the sanhedrin (supreme court of Torah law), and was one of the most distinguished leaders of his generation. Yishai was a man of such greatness that the Talmud (Shabbat 55b) observes that “Yishai was one of only four righteous individuals who died solely due to the instigation of the serpent”—i.e., only because death was decreed upon the human race when Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge at the serpent’s instigation, not due to any sin or flaw of his own. David was the youngest in his family, which included seven other illustrious and charismatic brothers.
Yet, when David was born, this prominent family greeted his birth with utter derision and contempt. As David describes quite literally in the psalm, “I was a stranger to my brothers, a foreigner to my mother’s sons . . . they put gall in my meal, and gave me vinegar to quench my thirst.”
David was not permitted to eat with the rest of his family, but was assigned to a separate table in the corner. He was given the task of shepherd because “they hoped that a wild beast would come and kill him while he was performing his duties,”

2
and for this reason was sent to pasture in dangerous areas full of lions and bears.

3
Only one individual throughout David’s youth was pained by his unjustified plight, and felt a deep and unconditional bond of love for the child whom she alone knew was undoubtedly pure.
This was King David’s mother, Nitzevet bat Adael, who felt the intensity of her youngest child’s pain and rejection as her own.
Torn and anguished by David’s unwarranted degradation, yet powerless to stop it, Nitzevet stood by the sidelines, in solidarity with him, shunned herself, as she too cried rivers of tears, awaiting the time when justice would be served.
It would take twenty-eight long years of assault and rejection, suffering and degradation until that justice would finally begin to materialize.
David’s Birth
Why was the young David so reviled by his brothers and people?
To understand the hatred directed toward David, we need to investigate the inner workings behind the events, the secret episodes that aren’t recorded in the prophetic books but are alluded to in Midrashim.

4
David’s father, Yishai, was the grandson of Boaz and Ruth. After several years of marriage to his wife, Nitzevet, and after having raised several virtuous children, Yishai began to entertain personal doubts about his ancestry. True, he was the leading Torah authority of his day, but his grandmother Ruth was a convert from the nation of Moab, as related in the book of Ruth.

During Ruth’s lifetime, many individuals were doubtful about the legitimacy of her marriage to Boaz. The Torah specifically forbids an Israelite to marry a Moabite convert, since this is the nation that cruelly refused the Jewish people passage through their land, or food and drink to purchase, when they wandered in the desert after being freed from Egypt.

Boaz and the sages understood this law—as per the classic interpretation transmitted in the “Oral Torah”—as forbidding intermarriage with converted
male Moabites (who were the ones responsible for the cruel conduct), while exempting female Moabite converts. With his marriage to Ruth, Boaz hoped to clarify and publicize this Torah law, which was still unknown to the masses.

Boaz died the night after his marriage with Ruth. Ruth had conceived and subsequently gave birth to their son Oved, the father of Yishai. Some rabble-rousers at the time claimed that Boaz’s death verified that his marriage to Ruth the Moabite had indeed been forbidden.

Time would prove differently. Once Oved (so called because he was a true oved , servant of G‑d), and later Yishai and his offspring, were born, their righteous conduct and prestigious positions proved the legitimacy of their ancestry. It was impossible that men of such caliber could have descended from a forbidden union.
However, later in his life, doubt gripped at Yishai’s heart, gnawing away at the very foundation of his existence. Being the sincere individual that he was, his integrity compelled him to action.

If Yishai’s status was questionable, he was not permitted to remain married to his wife, a veritable Israelite. Disregarding the personal sacrifice, Yishai decided the only solution would be to separate from her, no longer engaging in marital relations. Yishai’s children were aware of this separation.

After a number of years had passed, Yishai longed for a child whose ancestry would be unquestionable. His plan was to engage in relations with his Canaanite maidservant.
He said to her: “I will be freeing you conditionally. If my status as a Jew is legitimate, then you are freed as a proper Jewish convert to marry me. If, however, my status is blemished and I have the legal status of a Moabite convert forbidden to marry an Israelite, I am not giving you your freedom; but as a
shifchah k’naanit , a Canaanite maidservant, you may marry a Moabite convert.”

The maidservant was aware of the anguish of her mistress, Nitzevet. She understood her pain in being separated from her husband for so many years. She knew, as well, of Nitzevet’s longing for more children.

The empathetic maidservant secretly approached Nitzevet and informed her of Yishai’s plan, suggesting a bold counterplan.

“Let us learn from your ancestresses and replicate their actions. Switch places with me tonight, just as Leah did with
Rachel,” she advised.

With a prayer on her lips that her plan succeed, Nitzevet took the place of her maidservant. That night, Nitzevet conceived. Yishai remained unaware of the switch.

After three months, Nitzevet’s pregnancy became obvious. Incensed, her sons wished to kill their apparently adulterous mother and the “illegitimate” fetus that she carried. Nitzevet, for her part, would not embarrass her husband by revealing the truth of what had occurred. Like her ancestress Tamar, who was prepared to be burned alive rather than embarrass
Judah,

5
Nitzevet chose a vow of silence. And like Tamar, Nitzevet would be rewarded for her silence with a child of greatness who would be the forebear of
Moshiach.

Unaware of the truth behind his wife’s pregnancy, but having compassion on her, Yishai ordered his sons not to touch her. “Do not kill her! Instead, let the child that will be born be treated as a lowly and despised servant. In this way everyone will realize that his status is questionable and, as an illegitimate child, he will not marry an Israelite.”

From the time of his birth onwards, then, Nitzevet’s son was treated by his brothers as an abominable outcast.

6
Noting the conduct of his brothers, the rest of the community assumed that this youth was a treacherous sinner full of unspeakable guilt.

On the infrequent occasions that Nitzevet’s son would return from the pastures to his home in Beit Lechem (Bethlehem), he was shunned by the townspeople. If something was lost or stolen, he was accused as the natural culprit, and ordered, in the words of the psalm, to “repay what I have not stolen.”

Eventually, the entire lineage of Yishai was questioned, as well as the basis of the original law of the Moabite convert. People claimed that all the positive qualities of Boaz became manifest in Yishai and his illustrious seven sons, while all the negative character traits from Ruth the Moabite clung to this despicable youngest son.
Anointing King David

We are first introduced to David when the prophet Samuel is commanded to go to Beit Lechem to anoint a new king, to replace the rejected King Saul.
Samuel arrives in Beit Lechem, and the elders of the city come out to greet him, nervous at this unusual and unexpected visit, since the elderly prophet had stopped circulating throughout the land. The elders feared that Samuel had heard about a grievous sin that was taking place in their city.

7
Perhaps he had come to rebuke them over the behavior of Yishai’s despised shepherd boy, living in their midst.
Samuel declared, however, that he had come in peace, and asked the elders, and Yishai and his sons, to join him for a sacrificial feast. As an elder, it was natural for Yishai to be invited; but when his sons were inexplicably also invited, they worried that perhaps the prophet had come to publicly reveal the embarrassing and illegitimate origins of their brother.
Unbeknownst to them, Samuel would anoint the new king of Israel at this feast. All that had been revealed to the prophet at this point was that the new king would be a son of Yishai's.

As Samuel laid his eyes on Yishai’s eldest son, he was certain that this was the future king of Israel. Tall, handsome and distinguished, Eliav was the one whom Samuel was ready to anoint, until G‑d reprimanded Samuel to look not at the outside but at the inside.

8
No longer did Samuel make any assumptions of his own, but he waited to be told who was to become the next king. All the seven sons of Yishai had passed before Samuel, and none of them had been chosen.

“Are these all the lads?” Samuel asked. Samuel prophetically chose his words carefully. Had he asked if these were all Yishai’s sons, Yishai would have answered affirmatively, that there were no more of his sons , since David was not given the status of a son.

Instead, Yishai answered, “A small one is left; he is taking care of the sheep.” David’s status was small in Yishai’s eyes. He was hoping that Samuel would allow David to remain where he was, out of trouble, tending to the sheep in the faraway pastures.

But Samuel ordered that David immediately be summoned to the feast. A messenger was dispatched to David who, out of respect for the prophet, first went home to wash himself and change his clothes. Unaccustomed to seeing David home at such a time, Nitzevet inquired, “Why did you come home in the middle of the day?”
David explained the reason, and Nitzevet answered, “If so, I too am accompanying you.”

As David arrived, Samuel saw a man “of ruddy complexion, with red hair, beautiful eyes, and handsome to look at.” David’s physical appearance alludes to the differing aspects of his personality. His ruddiness suggests a warlike nature, while his eyes and general appearance indicate kindness and gentility.

9
At first Samuel doubted whether David could be the one worthy of the kingship, a forerunner of the dynasty that would lead the Jewish people to the end of time. He thought to himself, “This one will shed blood as did the red-headed
Esau.”

10
G‑d saw, however, that David’s greatness was that he would direct his aggressiveness toward positive aims. G‑d commanded Samuel, “My anointed one is standing before you, and you remain seated? Arise and anoint David without delay! For he is the one I have chosen!” 11
As Samuel held the horn of oil, it bubbled, as if it could not wait to drop onto David’s forehead. When Samuel anointed him, the oil hardened and glistened like pearls and precious stones, and the horn remained full.

As Samuel anointed David, the sound of weeping could be heard from outside the great hall. It was the voice of Nitzevet, David’s lone supporter and solitary source of comfort.

Her twenty-eight long years of silence in the face of humiliation were finally coming to a close. At last, all would see that the lineage of her youngest son was pure, undefiled by any blemish. Finally, the anguish and humiliation that she and her son had borne would come to an end.
Facing her other sons, Nitzevet exclaimed, “The stone that was reviled by the builders12 has now become the cornerstone!” (Psalms 118:22)

Humbled, they responded, “This has come from G‑d; it was hidden from our eyes” (ibid., verse 23).

Those in the hall cried out in unison, “Long live the king! Long live the king!” Within moments, the once-reviled shepherd boy became the anointed future king of Israel.
Nitzevet’s Legacy

King David would have many more trials to face until he was acknowledged by the entire nation as the new monarch to replace King Saul. During his kingship, and throughout his life, up until his old age, King David faced many ordeals.

King David possessed many great talents and qualities which would assist him in attaining the tremendous achievements of his lifetime. Many of these positive qualities were inherited from his illustrious father, Yishai, after whom he is fondly and respectfully called ben Yishai, the son of Yishai.

But it was undoubtedly from his mother that the young David absorbed the fortitude and courage to face his adversaries. From the moment he was born, and during his most tender years, it was Nitzevet who, by example, taught him the essential lesson of valuing every individual’s dignity and refraining from embarrassing another, regardless of the personal consequences. It was she who displayed a silent but stoic bravery and dignity in the face of the gravest hardship..

It is from Nitzevet that King David absorbed the strength, born from an inner confidence, to disregard the callous treatment of the world and find solace in the comfort of one’s Maker. It was this strength that would fortify King David to defeat his staunchest antagonists and his most treacherous enemies, as he valiantly fought against the mightiest warriors on behalf of his people.

Nitzevet taught her young child to find strength in following the path of one’s inner convictions, irrespective of the cruelty that might be hurled at him. Her display of patient confidence in the Creator that justice would be served gave David the inner peace and solace that he would need, over and over again, in confronting the formidable challenges in his life.

Rather than succumb to his afflictions, rather than become the individual who was shunned by his tormentors, David learned from his mother to stand proud and dignified, feeling consolation in communicating with his Maker in the open pastures.

She demonstrated to him, as well, the necessity of boldness while pursuing the right path. When the situation would call for it, personal risks must be taken. Without her bold action in taking the place of her maidservant that fateful night, the great soul of her youngest child, David, the forebear of Moshiach, would never have descended to this world.

The soul-stirring psalms composed by King David in his greatest hours of need eloquently describe his suffering and heartache, as well as his faith and conviction.

The book of Psalms gives a voice to each of us, and has become the balm to soothe all of our wounds, as we too encounter the many personal and communal hardships of life in galut (exile).
As we say these verses, our voices mesh with Nitzevet’s, with King David’s, and with all the voices of those past and present who have experienced unjustified pain, in beseeching our Maker for that time when the “son (descendant) of David” will usher in the era of redemption, and true justice will suffuse creation.
.

1 Like

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by delighteaners2: 11:06am On Apr 25, 2017
View won slip picture for your Gratification, Light tomorrow with todays effort.View won slip photo for your Gratification, Light tomorrow with todays affort.

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Shafiiimran99: 11:07am On Apr 25, 2017
PianoWizard:
I may likely agree with you.

but according to the bible Abraham had two wives..
Sarah and keturah(after sarah died).
That is a lie or a contradiction Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai. And Sarai Abram's wife took Hagar her maid the Egyptian, after Abram had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan, and gave her to her husband Abram to be his wife. And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived: and when she saw that she had conceived, her mistress was despised in her eyes (Genesis 16:1-4).
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Sanchez01: 11:09am On Apr 25, 2017
PianoWizard:
You see why I say you lack knowledge of scriptures. Even at that it wasn't a sin because there was no law. Law came through moses not Abraham.

Stop coming to display your ignorance go acquire biblical knowledge.
I saw this coming, O wise one. Most of you don't waste time in using Google just in a bid to sound intelligent. Let me submit to you that THERE WAS NEVER A LAW THAT DISCOURAGED ADULTERY (on men's part) EVEN WHEN THE LAW CAME. In other words, the then LAW ERA favoured men to do whatever they willed with women, while women were subjected to the law. Perhaps you would say what Cain did to Abel was not murder because the law had not been established at the time.

So, do me a favour, and Google again. While you are at it, kindly explain again, how Abraham's act is not Adultery.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Goke7: 11:09am On Apr 25, 2017
Jaideyone:
he's right? pls show me where it was stated in the bible.

The apostle himself quoted psalm 51:5. David saying in sin my mother conceived me which has made a lot of bible scholars believe David was a product of an illicit affair which also shows in the way his brothers maltreated him which also happens in our society today.

Am no fan of the Apostle and am one of his heavy critics but on this one, he got the revelation spot on.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Shafiiimran99: 11:09am On Apr 25, 2017
Sanchez01:

Sarah never 'gave'. She only asked that Abraham sleeps with 'her slave', which Abraham didn't hesitate to do. A man could sleep with another woman voluntarily, that does not take out the fact that adultery has been committed, whether the wife approves or not.

So explain again how it is not adultery, using the dictionary definition below.
Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai. And Sarai Abram's wife took Hagar her maid the Egyptian, after Abram had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan, and gave her to her husband Abram to be his wife. And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived: and when she saw that she had conceived, her mistress was despised in her eyes (Genesis 16:1-4).
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by gazilion: 11:09am On Apr 25, 2017
wellmax:
Behold, I was shapen in iniquity, etc. We are not to suppose that David here reflects upon his parents as the medium of transmitting to him the elements of moral evil; and that by the introduction of the doctrine of original sin he intended to extenuate the enormity of his own crimes. On the contrary, we are to regard him as afflicting himself by the humbling consideration that his very nature was fallen, that his transgressions flowed from a heart naturally at enmity with God; that he was not a sinner by accident, but by a depravity of purpose extending to the innermost desires and purposes of the soul; and that there was "a law in his members, warring against the law of his mind, and bringing him into captivity to the law of sin and death" Romans 7:23

Please always Quote your source! It becomes Plagiarism when you lift comments from other people's write up and present it as yours!!
You lifted your comment from this source -

http://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/treasury-of-david/psalms-51-5.html

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Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by joeace2020(m): 11:11am On Apr 25, 2017
Joagbaje:
Apostle was not wrong Rahab the harlot who saved the spies was the great grand mother of David . She Gave birth to Boaz ,boaz gave birth to salmon ,salmon gave birth to David father jessee. And I sure the apostle didn't say it to put David down but rather to glorify God that it doesn't matter your background God can change your story

You people are irredeemable. So since your grandfather was a criminal...It essentially means you are a criminal. Religious fanatism is the gateway to intellectual death!
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Goke7: 11:11am On Apr 25, 2017
wellmax:


Scripturally HE IS WRONG.
That teaching is error from the pit of HELL.
BEWARE

There are a lot of bible commentaries on this matter with different views and opinions so you can't just conclude that it is an error!
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by kpaofame: 11:12am On Apr 25, 2017
femi4:
We were all conceived from sin. Whether your parent were legally married or not cos we carried the adamic nature

That i know but deeper understanding of that scripture about david might mean alot....Because David was goodly yet despised by his family (He was not presented by his Dad when Samuel asked for his sons)etc a typical scenario of treatment meted to children born by mothers not properly married....
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Sanchez01: 11:14am On Apr 25, 2017
Shafiiimran99:
Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai. And Sarai Abram's wife took Hagar her maid the Egyptian, after Abram had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan, and gave her to her husband Abram to be his wife. And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived: and when she saw that she had conceived, her mistress was despised in her eyes (Genesis 16:1-4).
1 Now Sarai, Abram’s wife, had borne him no children. But she had an Egyptian slave named Hagar; 2 so she said to Abram, “The Lord has kept me from having children. Go, sleep with my slave; perhaps I can build a family through her.”

Abram agreed to what Sarai said. 3 So after Abram had been living in Canaan ten years, Sarai his wife took her Egyptian slave Hagar and gave her to her husband to be his wife. 4 He slept with Hagar, and she conceived. (Genesis 16:1-4 NIV)

I hope you understand now
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Bishop(m): 11:16am On Apr 25, 2017
majekdom2:
and it wasn't revealed to apostle Paul or the Pope grin

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by femi4: 11:16am On Apr 25, 2017
JACOBJK:
what the man of God said is very correct..........we should please make good research into history...... so read my post below so that i can elighten you the more that he was actually born in adultary...........

King David’s big, dark secret

written by Dean Smith]

There was a big, dark secret in
David’s life that few people are aware of. It’s
not that David tried to keep it secret, but many
of us simply fail to connect the dots.
When we study David’s life, there are a
number of Biblical passages that at first read
seem quite puzzling. One such passage is 1
Samuel 16:1-13.
God had just rejected Saul as king of Israel and
commissioned the prophet Samuel to anoint
one of the sons of Jessee of Bethlehem as the
next king (v 1). Samuel approached the elders
of Bethlehem and arranged the meeting. Once
Jessee and his sons had gathered, Samuel
quickly realized none of the boys standing
before him was the one God had chosen.
Puzzled, Samuel asked if there were any other
sons and was told the youngest, David, was
attending the flock. Samuel ordered David
brought before him and anointed the young
shepherd boy as the next king of Israel.
I was always curious as to why David was not
initially included. Traditionally, most believe
David was omitted because he was the
youngest, but I don’t believe this theory holds
up under closer scrutiny of the Biblical
account.
When Samuel first approached Bethlehem’s
elders, the Bible tells us they were
“trembling” (v 4). They were terrified of the
prophet. When he said jump, the only
pertinent question was how high.
So when Samuel requested a special meeting
with Jessee and his sons, all were expected to
show up. There must have been some
convincing reason not to extend an invitation
to David.
Why was David excluded?
I believe David actually provides the answer to
this question in Psalm 51 penned in the chaotic
aftermath of his adulterous affair with
Bathsheba.
In verse 5, King David wrote: “Behold I was
brought forth in iniquity and in sin my mother
conceived me.”
So what was David trying to tell us in this
verse?
Traditionally, most believe David was
explaining his affair was due to the sin nature
that plagues all mankind because of Adam and
Eve’s original sin. However, this does not
explain why David committed adultery (though
all humans have the same sin nature, not all
commit adultery).
Setting all fancy theological interpretations
aside, we need to interpret verse 5 simply as it
reads — “in sin my mother conceived me”
means exactly what it says — David’s mother
conceived him in an act of sin. She committed
adultery and David was the byproduct of this
infidelity.
This explains why David was not initially
included in the meeting with Samuel as
technically it could be argued David was not a
true son of Jessee. However, God did include
David as part of Jessee’s family much in the
same way Jesus was considered a son of
Joseph though conceived by the Holy Spirit.
Who was David’s mother?
This is where it gets interesting. No where in
scripture is David’s mother mentioned by
name. This is a bit unusual, as mothers of
several ancient prophets and patriarchs are not
only mentioned, but many times written about,
as they often played a significant role in the
upbringing of their children — such as Moses’
mother Jochebed (Exodus 6:20) and Samuel’s
mother Hannah (1 Samuel 1:1-20).
However, David’s mother was different — as a
wife who committed adultery, she brought
shame upon Jessee and his family and it’s not
surprising her name was excised from the
Biblical account.
I think the most likely scenario is that David’s
mother was a prostitute. It was not uncommon
for children born from such an illicit
relationship to live with the father.
In the book of Judges, we have a story about
Jephath who was conceived when his father
Gilead had sexual relations with a prostitute.
Though conceived through this illicit
encounter, Jephath nevertheless grew up in
Gilead’s house who took responsibility for
raising the child.
But Jephath’s arrival created a tremendous
tension with the sons born of the true mother.
They eventually drove Jephath out of the
family to prevent him from receiving any of
his father’s inheritance (v 2 ).
If David’s mother was also a prostitute it
would explain why she wasn’t mentioned and I
suspect it was the brothers who pushed not to
have David included when Samuel called for a
meeting with the sons of Jesse.
David’s miserable early life
David refers to his mother one more time in
Psalm 69 which — next to Psalm 22 — is the
most quoted Psalm in the New Testament. It is
generally believed Psalm 69 covers David’s
early life prior to his anointing by Samuel.
In verse 8, David writes: “I have become
estranged from my brothers, And an alien to
my mother’s sons.”
This verse reveals David was ostracized from
his own family and was considered an alien or
an outcast by his brothers. Notice how David
refers to his brothers as his mother’s sons —
not his father’s — reflecting they shared the
same mother but not the same father.
According to Strong’s dictionary, the Hebrew
word for estranged “zur” means to “turn one
aside from lodging” and can also refer to an
individual who has come from “adultery – to
come from another man.” In fact, the word is
rooted in the Hebrew word “mamzer” which
means bastard or illegitimate.
Zur intimates David was not included in
regular family activities such as meals. In fact
this may be what verse 21 suggests when
David says they gave me “gall for food” and
“vinegar to drink.” It appears the brothers
made David’s life miserable.
One thing oddly missing in Psalm 69 is any
mention of David’s relationship with Jessee.
Not once did David point to Jessee as the
source of his misery. Neither do we see any
hint of conflict when Jessee asked David to
take food to his brothers who were fighting
the Philistines, but as soon as David showed
up at the army camp, you immediately see the
animosity between David and his brothers (1
Samuel 17: 28-29).
The conflict between David and his half-
brothers indicates it may have been the
brothers who demanded David not be included
in the meeting with Samuel.
Psalm 69 also addresses the misery David
endured growing up. Because of his mother’s
sin, David’s childhood was full of loneliness
and rejection. In verse 3, he speaks of hours
spent crying because of the rejection (v 3). He
explains his frustration of being punished for a
sin he did not commit (v 4) – his mother’s sin.
Worse, he became the object of mockery as
the drunkards sang about his plight (v 26).
David’s life also became a byword or proverb
— literally a living warning — of what happens
to those whose mother commits adultery.
What was particularly hurtful was those who
“sit at the gate” used him as an example (v 12)
of what happens when people sin. The term
“sit at the gate” refers to the elders of the city
who sat at the gates and made judgment on
cases (see Proverbs 31:23; Deut 21:19; 22:15).
These would be the same elders of Bethlehem
who did not think it necessary to include David
when Samuel wanted to meet with Jessee and
his sons.
David then adds he carried the personal shame
of his mother’s sin.
No one cared that David was the innocent
byproduct of his mother’s sin. It was Jewish
belief children could be punished for the sins
of the parents. We see a hint of this in the
gospels, when the disciples — after stumbling
upon on a blind man — asked Jesus if he was
being punished for the sins of his parents or
his own sins (John 9:2,3).
Though despised and rejected by his family
and humiliated by those in his home town,
God saw David’s heart and how he responded
to the rejection and the ugliness that filled his
childhood and chose this boy as the next king
of Israel .
Through this we gain a keen insight in the
redemptive nature of God, who will use
anyone despite their background and heritage
as long as they have a heart for God.//
We should be careful of taking literature from internet and believing in them without asking questions.

In the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the name "Rahab" mentioned emphatically. It was also stated that she was a harlot in the old testament. I don't think if we have more than one harlot in the genealogy of Jesus Christ, it won't have been stated.

2. How can "In sin my mother conceived me" means my mother wasva harlot and it wasn't referring to our Adam in nature.

We have to be careful with the wind of doctrine in this age so that even the elect will not be deceived
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by JACOBJK: 11:16am On Apr 25, 2017
the man of God is correct in this lets make good research before we coments or castigate any post... for emphasis you can read below

King David’s big, dark secret
written by Dean Smith]

There was a big, dark secret in
David’s life that few people are aware of. It’s
not that David tried to keep it secret, but many
of us simply fail to connect the dots.
When we study David’s life, there are a
number of Biblical passages that at first read
seem quite puzzling. One such passage is 1
Samuel 16:1-13.
God had just rejected Saul as king of Israel and
commissioned the prophet Samuel to anoint
one of the sons of Jessee of Bethlehem as the
next king (v 1). Samuel approached the elders
of Bethlehem and arranged the meeting. Once
Jessee and his sons had gathered, Samuel
quickly realized none of the boys standing
before him was the one God had chosen.
Puzzled, Samuel asked if there were any other
sons and was told the youngest, David, was
attending the flock. Samuel ordered David
brought before him and anointed the young
shepherd boy as the next king of Israel.
I was always curious as to why David was not
initially included. Traditionally, most believe
David was omitted because he was the
youngest, but I don’t believe this theory holds
up under closer scrutiny of the Biblical
account.
When Samuel first approached Bethlehem’s
elders, the Bible tells us they were
“trembling” (v 4). They were terrified of the
prophet. When he said jump, the only
pertinent question was how high.
So when Samuel requested a special meeting
with Jessee and his sons, all were expected to
show up. There must have been some
convincing reason not to extend an invitation
to David.
Why was David excluded?
I believe David actually provides the answer to
this question in Psalm 51 penned in the chaotic
aftermath of his adulterous affair with
Bathsheba.
In verse 5, King David wrote: “Behold I was
brought forth in iniquity and in sin my mother
conceived me.”
So what was David trying to tell us in this
verse?
Traditionally, most believe David was
explaining his affair was due to the sin nature
that plagues all mankind because of Adam and
Eve’s original sin. However, this does not
explain why David committed adultery (though
all humans have the same sin nature, not all
commit adultery).
Setting all fancy theological interpretations
aside, we need to interpret verse 5 simply as it
reads — “in sin my mother conceived me”
means exactly what it says — David’s mother
conceived him in an act of sin. She committed
adultery and David was the byproduct of this
infidelity.
This explains why David was not initially
included in the meeting with Samuel as
technically it could be argued David was not a
true son of Jessee. However, God did include
David as part of Jessee’s family much in the
same way Jesus was considered a son of
Joseph though conceived by the Holy Spirit.
Who was David’s mother?
This is where it gets interesting. No where in
scripture is David’s mother mentioned by
name. This is a bit unusual, as mothers of
several ancient prophets and patriarchs are not
only mentioned, but many times written about,
as they often played a significant role in the
upbringing of their children — such as Moses’
mother Jochebed (Exodus 6:20) and Samuel’s
mother Hannah (1 Samuel 1:1-20).
However, David’s mother was different — as a
wife who committed adultery, she brought
shame upon Jessee and his family and it’s not
surprising her name was excised from the
Biblical account.
I think the most likely scenario is that David’s
mother was a prostitute. It was not uncommon
for children born from such an illicit
relationship to live with the father.
In the book of Judges, we have a story about
Jephath who was conceived when his father
Gilead had sexual relations with a prostitute.
Though conceived through this illicit
encounter, Jephath nevertheless grew up in
Gilead’s house who took responsibility for
raising the child.
But Jephath’s arrival created a tremendous
tension with the sons born of the true mother.
They eventually drove Jephath out of the
family to prevent him from receiving any of
his father’s inheritance (v 2 ).
If David’s mother was also a prostitute it
would explain why she wasn’t mentioned and I
suspect it was the brothers who pushed not to
have David included when Samuel called for a
meeting with the sons of Jesse.
David’s miserable early life
David refers to his mother one more time in
Psalm 69 which — next to Psalm 22 — is the
most quoted Psalm in the New Testament. It is
generally believed Psalm 69 covers David’s
early life prior to his anointing by Samuel.
In verse 8, David writes: “I have become
estranged from my brothers, And an alien to
my mother’s sons.”
This verse reveals David was ostracized from
his own family and was considered an alien or
an outcast by his brothers. Notice how David
refers to his brothers as his mother’s sons —
not his father’s — reflecting they shared the
same mother but not the same father.
According to Strong’s dictionary, the Hebrew
word for estranged “zur” means to “turn one
aside from lodging” and can also refer to an
individual who has come from “adultery – to
come from another man.” In fact, the word is
rooted in the Hebrew word “mamzer” which
means bastard or illegitimate.
Zur intimates David was not included in
regular family activities such as meals. In fact
this may be what verse 21 suggests when
David says they gave me “gall for food” and
“vinegar to drink.” It appears the brothers
made David’s life miserable.
One thing oddly missing in Psalm 69 is any
mention of David’s relationship with Jessee.
Not once did David point to Jessee as the
source of his misery. Neither do we see any
hint of conflict when Jessee asked David to
take food to his brothers who were fighting
the Philistines, but as soon as David showed
up at the army camp, you immediately see the
animosity between David and his brothers (1
Samuel 17: 28-29).
The conflict between David and his half-
brothers indicates it may have been the
brothers who demanded David not be included
in the meeting with Samuel.
Psalm 69 also addresses the misery David
endured growing up. Because of his mother’s
sin, David’s childhood was full of loneliness
and rejection. In verse 3, he speaks of hours
spent crying because of the rejection (v 3). He
explains his frustration of being punished for a
sin he did not commit (v 4) – his mother’s sin.
Worse, he became the object of mockery as
the drunkards sang about his plight (v 26).
David’s life also became a byword or proverb
— literally a living warning — of what happens
to those whose mother commits adultery.
What was particularly hurtful was those who
“sit at the gate” used him as an example (v 12)
of what happens when people sin. The term
“sit at the gate” refers to the elders of the city
who sat at the gates and made judgment on
cases (see Proverbs 31:23; Deut 21:19; 22:15).
These would be the same elders of Bethlehem
who did not think it necessary to include David
when Samuel wanted to meet with Jessee and
his sons.
David then adds he carried the personal shame
of his mother’s sin.
No one cared that David was the innocent
byproduct of his mother’s sin. It was Jewish
belief children could be punished for the sins
of the parents. We see a hint of this in the
gospels, when the disciples — after stumbling
upon on a blind man — asked Jesus if he was
being punished for the sins of his parents or
his own sins (John 9:2,3).
Though despised and rejected by his family
and humiliated by those in his home town,
God saw David’s heart and how he responded
to the rejection and the ugliness that filled his
childhood and chose this boy as the next king
of Israel .
Through this we gain a keen insight in the
redemptive nature of God, who will use
anyone despite their background and heritage
as long as they have a heart for God.//
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by NoToPile: 11:17am On Apr 25, 2017
horlumiday:

If David’s mother was a harlot, then David
would not be in the bloodline of Jessie, which is
the line Jesus is to be born from.


I don't know about the controversy surrounding Davids mother but whether halrlot or not God will use who he will use.

All the women that were mentioned in the geanology of Jesus except Mary were women that seemed to be of questionable character.

Tamar- tricked her father in law to sleep with her
Rahab- a prostitue
Ruth- a moabitess
Wife of Uriah- committed adultery with David.

These were all women that seemed not to be up to standard or morally right to be in the blood line of our Lord and saviour based on laws of Israel but it was through this same women Jesus came which tells us God will use who he will, regardless of how terrible our past was.

I just said this to correct the notion that if Davids mother was a harlot he wouldnot have been in the bloodline of Jesus . shown you four women in Jesus bloodline of which one was a known prostitute, going by your analogy, the customs of Israel and even the way we humans judge they are not qualified but God qualified them.

1 Like

Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by femi4: 11:20am On Apr 25, 2017
kpaofame:


That i know but deeper understanding of that scripture about david might mean alot....Because David was goodly yet despised by his family (He was not presented by his Dad when Samuel asked for his sons)etc a typical scenario of treatment meted to children born by mothers not properly married....
He was not presented cos he wasn't built like others. In fact the bible called him a boy. We have to be careful on how we twist the scripture.

Samuel's mission was clear, to select a warrior and not a boy. So Jesse had to exclude him
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by teepain: 11:22am On Apr 25, 2017
Jacksonville:
Nigerians! Don't be too quick to cast your stones. Some hidden truths are known only through revelation. Take it or leave it.

It's normal ponder on this, as it isn't written where David's mum was a "harlot", but this is coming from a man of revelations. Some truths are revealed to those whom God trusts. It's left for the receiver to tell the world or not.


#Mytake

Revelation 22:18
"For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, if any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book"

With the verse above God had foreclosed the permission to add to the scriptures by any so called Apostle, Pastor, Evangelist or 'man of revelations'. The punishment for such crime is expressly stated in the quoted verse.

CC femi4
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by Shafiiimran99: 11:23am On Apr 25, 2017
Sanchez01:

1 Now Sarai, Abram’s wife, had borne him no children. But she had an Egyptian slave named Hagar; 2 so she said to Abram, “The Lord has kept me from having children. Go, sleep with my slave; perhaps I can build a family through her.”

Abram agreed to what Sarai said. 3 So after Abram had been living in Canaan ten years, Sarai his wife took her Egyptian slave Hagar and gave her to her husband to be his wife. 4 He slept with Hagar, and she conceived. (Genesis 16:1-4 NIV)

I hope you understand now
The question is for u. Abraham did not commit adultery because Sarah willingly gave her slave to him to be his wife
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by donnie(m): 11:24am On Apr 25, 2017
Joagbaje:


David grandmother was Rahab the harlot .

The point of the apostle was on how God can bring beauty out of a man's life no matter your background . If you come to God he will change you. He only use David grandmother Rahab who was a harlot as illustration





Your explanation will not suffice for some, because their hearts are wicked.
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by easyzworld: 11:25am On Apr 25, 2017
Jacksonville:
Nigerians! Don't be too quick to cast your stones. Some hidden truths are known only through revelation. Take it or leave it.

It's normal ponder on this, as it isn't written where David's mum was a "harlot", but this is coming from a man of revelations. Some truths are revealed to those whom God trusts. It's left for the receiver to tell the world or not.


#Mytake
. Will you shut up!
Re: "David's Mother Was A Harlot" - Apostle Suleman. Funmi Iyanda & Nigerians React by ismart: 11:27am On Apr 25, 2017
dayus12:




Don't believe 'the so called truth' that is not or in-line with the bible. Everything God want us to know is in the bible...


NOT everything is in the bible. The 7 book of moses was removed because of the evil content.

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