₦airaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / LOGIN! / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 2,254,768 members, 4,935,693 topics. Date: Tuesday, 21 May 2019 at 02:09 PM

Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant - Travel (85) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Travel / Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant (249929 Views)

Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 / Living In The Uk/life As A UK Immigrant / Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant (2) (3) (4)

(1) (2) (3) ... (82) (83) (84) (85) (86) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Alphadoor: 10:00am On May 09
trastar:

On the issue of handwritten letter, that thing is still making me wonder. did they really write that themselves?
When they hand me the flyer to vote, i want to tell them i cant vote abeg. no waste your flyer on me.
I believe they wrote it themselves to show genuity and made coloured copies of it
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ourhumanity: 10:18pm On May 10
Hello House, I need advise on Australia attempt relocation. I was nominated via TSS sub Class 482 and I submitted EOI form sent to me. I was sent a list of requirements and e-visa and advised to contact ABF case Officer for assessment, clearance a ND work permit. I have since sent a mail to the email provided but I am yet to hear from them after 48hrs.

pls how do I get a response from them and what do I send to them to elicit a response
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 2:17am On May 11
ourhumanity:
Hello House, I need advise on Australia attempt relocation. I was nominated via TSS sub Class 482 and I submitted EOI form sent to me. I was sent a list of requirements and e-visa and advised to contact ABF case Officer for assessment, clearance a ND work permit. I have since sent a mail to the email provided but I am yet to hear from them after 48hrs.

pls how do I get a response from them and what do I send to them to elicit a response

Who nominated you?
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 12:17am On May 12
Happy Mother's Day to all mothers in the house. Thanks for juggling work with care for hubby, kids, home in a country where hiring a housemaid is near impossible.

4 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 6:16am On May 12
NIGERIAN PASSPORT RENEWAL PROCESS

Hi Guys,

Permit me to drop this here as I have seen many questions about this as a google map local guide.

I recently renewed my passport and want to share my experience to help others who may need to do so.

So what you need to do is go here

https://portal.immigration.gov.ng/pages/welcome

Apply for e-passport. Follow the steps and it will take you to the INNOVATE1 SERVICES website where you will fill the application form and make payment of about AU $160.

After payment you will need to print the payment confirmation/slip, and application forms.

A dummy appointment date will be given to you but ignore that. You will need to send the payment receipt and application form to the Nigerian Consular via email to give you an appointment. The email address is nhc.passport@gmail.com. You may be issued an unfavourable date which you can appeal if you want it faster. You will need to write them stating the reasons you need this quicker and attaching any relevant documents that might help. For my case, an initial appointment for July 23 was changed to April 24, which was more favourable.

They will schedule an appointment and send you further details about what you need to do or bring along.

Please do not bother about a guarantor if you are renewing your old e-passport as this must have been done for the current passport you have.

You will need to travel to Canberra for the appointment. Although I heard they do some sort of visit to different states once a year but I am not sure about this and this may not be the best if you want it faster. The process at the consulate may be just 30 minutes like mine if there are no hassles or issues with your documents. Although you may not get the passport same day. Hence a major requirement is for you to come with a prepaid express envelope which they will use to post it.

I received my passport about 2 weeks after the appointment date.

Hope this helps.

3 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 6:35am On May 12
Lemme share some images of Canberra, The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) sha

Image 1 - The plan of Canberra
Image 2 - The different names proposed to name the ACT
Image 3 - The parliament house
Image 4 - The treasury

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 6:37am On May 12
More...

The senate
House of reps
Inside the parliament

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 6:40am On May 12
More...

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 6:41am On May 12
more...

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Alphadoor: 7:15am On May 12
gcey2k:
NIGERIAN PASSPORT RENEWAL PROCESS



Hope this helps.

Thanks for sharing this.

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by edkai: 10:09am On May 12
mctowel01:
Gbam! what a thread... I don't want ro delay my story, so sit, relax and enjoy the good, bad and ugly.
.

Got in here last week of june, was picked by Jamson and Iceberg. May I mention that these guys have been really kind and wonderful. I stayed in the second room in jamson's place and did a forklift course within my first week of arrival and got a job after a week of arrival which was good to pay bills and savings.
thanks for this info bro. Please I'd like to learn more about this forklift job.
1. Is it possible for an international student to get this job
2. What does the job entails
3. Apart from course, are there any other things required to get the job
4. Lastly, can give more details about your experience on the job? You said something about hating the job as time went by. What was the reason for this?

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 10:24am On May 12
Alphadoor:


Thanks for sharing this.

Welcome
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ideamaster(m): 4:12pm On May 12
rinzylee:


Hope no one is arrested for running over kangaroos? Just thinking �

Australians love their animals and they don't want to see you hurt an animal intentionally.

No one sets out to intentionally hit a kangaroo. In most cases, you might be driving at 100km per hour and they just jump out in front of you giving you between 1 and 3 seconds to react.

Government websites like this https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/stayingsafe/drivers/animalsoncountryroads/index.html would tell you to drive safely at dawn and dusk, slow down if there are animals on the side of the road, apply your brakes safely and most importantly, don't swerve. It's better to hit the animal after slowing down a bit than to swerve and lose control of your car. People have died from trying to swerve at high speeds. Another thing is damage to your car. Hit an average size kangaroo at slow speeds and you would be looking at smash repairs on your bonnet, changing headlight, bumper and maybe radiator. If you are travelling at a higher speed, obviously there would be greater damage. And I hear once your air bags deploy, they write off your car. That means they wouldn't even attempt to repair it.

What can get you charged is intentionally running over animals especially if you also choose to record yourself doing it. Like the guy who was arrested because he ran over some emus, recorded a video and sent it to his friends.

Another thing you wouldn't want to do is beating or hurting your pet - dog or cat or whatever pet you have. Someone may be watching or recording and before you know it, Rspca would come looking for you.



DoDirtsLikeWorm:


Are they eatable? Or is there a law attached to them?

Most indigenous people would tell you they love kangaroo meat. I am not sure about this but I think indigenous people are the only ones permitted to hunt kangaroo for their meat or whatever. Sometimes you find kangaroo meat in grocery shops.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by rinzylee(m): 4:29pm On May 12
Great explanation here. Thank you.. Cos I couldn't wrap my head around someone arresting me over a situation I couldn't control. As per beating my pet... Make I no talk... I still dey Naija


[quote author=ideamaster post=78330417]

Australians love their animals and they don't want to see you hurt an animal intentionally.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 6:47am On May 13
Australian Experience

One of the biggest challenges new immigrants will face while trying to secure their first job in Australia is the issue of Australian work experience. This one thing has forced many people to abandon their chosen profession for the so-called survival jobs. Others have given up and forced to relocate back to wherever they came from. Can you really blame them?
Savings are getting depleted, bills are there pilling up in a strange land with no family or real friends to fall back on. What do you do? It can be quite frustrating as it is scary. It is worse if you do not come from a wealthy background. Even if you did, you do not want to perpetually rely on them. If you manage to get someone to send N250,000 from Nigeria, that is just a paltry $1000. It cannot even pay your monthly rent! Who will give you N250k in present day Nigeria? So, if it is your intention to migrate to Australia, you really need to come up with a plan and a strategy that will outlive the period of joblessness.

A lot has been said and written on the much-dreaded Australian Experience. Let’s analyse it one more time.
In fairness to the requirement for Australian work experience, there are jobs that indeed require the knowledge of local experience. Majority of them are regulated professions. That’s understandable as a professional who just migrated might truly not fit or perform well on the job if he gets it. He is unfamiliar with codes, standards, bye-laws, etc of the profession which in some instances are country specific. If you are therefore a professional in a regulated industry, you may want to adequately plan for the period when you have to update your skills, write exams, do internship.

To non-regulated professions, several factors contribute to the reasons why Australian work experience is gradually becoming the bane of getting the first employment.
The biggest culprit is recruiting process/structure. Company A needs a Data Analyst and therefore approaches a generalist recruiting agency B. Recruiting agency B has beautiful ladies and guys who know nothing about Data Analysis. The nice, sweet talking lady picks up the CV and starts to look for keywords! She wants to see Australian experience at all cost. After 2mins, she does not see anything Australian, she tosses it into the bin and writes a polite feedback that it has been saved in the database.
Compare that to a scenario where the internal HR department of company A handles the recruitment process. Because they are a Data Analyst Company, the recruitment specialist already understands the concept of data Analysis, though not in-depth. She knows a good CV when she sees one as compared to the robotic generalist whose only skill is reliance on scanning software, keywords and Australian local experience.
What is the lesson here? Target companies directly. When you see job ads from companies, give the application 100% of yourself.
Some companies specifically write it on their job ads that they will not entertain applications from recruiting agencies. I have seen many people bypass the Australian local experience thing by targeting companies as against focusing on recruiting agencies.


Secondly, the Australian experience thing can also be a polite way of expressing reluctance to hire applicants the recruiter perceives may have poor communication skills, especially poor knowledge of oral and written English language. The potential employer is unfairly doubtful of the communication skill level of an applicant whose entire work experience is acquired in a place like Nigeria. Do not forget we are dealing with people whose mind and perception are clouded by media projection of Africa. They have forgotten that outside western Europe, N. America, Australia and N. Zealand, the next place where English is widely spoken is Africa. It is more or less our first language. I cringe at times when I read emails from so called native English speakers. Having said that, making an impression that one’s communication skill is advanced is a first step to crushing that prejudice. A good place to start is the CV. Let your sentences be full, correct and expressive. Avoid typos. A recruiter who sees our complex Nigerian name is already prejudiced, he will be much more when he sees typos. His prejudiced brain would not see errors as mistakes, rather it would be interpreted as poor knowledge of English. Read and re-read your CV. There were instances I discovered errors on my CV after it had been used a thousand times. I would be like, OMG! How in this world did I miss this?
I personally think it is the responsible of the sender to make sure the receiver understands the message he (sender) is passing across. So, considering this, effort should be directed to writing with minimal typos. Orally, efforts should be made to learn correct pronunciation of words.
A speaker who pronounces words correctly will be easily understood even though he speaks with a non-native English accent. Spend more time learning pronunciation rather than accent.
Some people soften their naija accent by trying to speak like oyinbo. That on its own isn’t wrong. Do not mind our people back home who laugh at fake accent. If they had seen your sorry look struggling to be understood in a boardroom full of white men, they would not be there laughing at accent. What is the essence of communication if the recipient of the message cannot understand what you are saying and if there is a way to make them understand, do it.
A friend once told me about his embarrassing interview. He couldn’t hear what the interviewers were saying, and they also couldn’t hear what he was saying. He kept saying “pardon me?” They also kept saying “pardon me?”
Fake it if you have to. To oyinbos, you aren’t faking it, you are communicating well. That is why a Chinese who relocated to Australia 5 years ago speaks clearly with a stint of Aussie Accent and a Nigerian who relocated 15 years ago is still struggling to get understood.
Don’t worry, your naija accent is still intact. Use it when you see fellow Nigerians or when you are back home… hahaha
Lesson here is: improve your communication skill. Employers might overlook Australian Work experience requirement if you write and speak well.


Thirdly, the concept of local experience has been slightly watered down to mean different things and the term and usage are often loosely used. To some, it is a filter for lack of Australian qualification, to others, it is a filter for lack of Australian work experience indeed. To some people, it is a sieve to disqualify people with deficiency in oral and written communication.
Knowing that fact, anything that will make one’s CV speak “Australian” will be helpful.
Start now by looking at courses you can do online before you arrive. There are heaps of cheap online Australian education providers. Try short courses too, if you can afford them. Be prepared to do volunteer work if need be but be very careful it does prevent you from attending interviews or any other activities that could land you your proper job.


Fourthly, read up and apply for jobs through the various inclusion programs and trainings. One of such inclusion programs is the Jesuit Social Services. They offer trainings, internships and workplace inclusion programs. Many Africans, especially ladies got their first jobs through the program. Here is the link:

https://jss.org.au/what-we-do/education-training-and-employment/workplace-inclusion-programs/.

https://www.nab.com.au/about-us/corporate-responsibility/our-people/african-australian-employment

Fifthly, this one is quite intuitive. Another way to bypass the Australian work experience requirement is to specifically target jobs in the same profession but at a lower level. For example, if you are a senior data analyst, apply for junior data analyst or just data analyst jobs. The interviewer/employer might waive the Australian job requirement for a solid overseas experience if you are willing to start from a lower level. This in my opinion is a fair trade off.

Lastly, Australian work experience is just what it means, work experience. The job ad says you must have local experience. My advice is, do not let that discourage you. What happens if they cannot get anyone locally? They will either have to headhunt a resource oversees or source for one locally. The former is more expensive. So ignore the Australia work experience requirement and apply for the job joo.

27 Likes 4 Shares

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by edkai: 10:20am On May 14
GoodMemory:
Australian Experience

One of the biggest challenges new immigrants will face while trying to secure their first job in Australia is the issue of Australian work experience. This one thing has forced many people to abandon their chosen profession for the so-called survival jobs. Others have given up and forced to relocate back to wherever they came from. Can you really blame them?
Savings are getting depleted, bills are there pilling up in a strange land with no family or real friends to fall back on. What do you do? It can be quite frustrating as it is scary. It is worse if you do not come from a wealthy background. Even if you did, you do not want to perpetually rely on them. If you manage to get someone to send N250,000 from Nigeria, that is just a paltry $1000. It cannot even pay your monthly rent! Who will give you N250k in present day Nigeria? So, if it is your intention to migrate to Australia, you really need to come up with a plan and a strategy that will outlive the period of joblessness.

Thank you so much for this write-up. Very enlightening, I must confess. My question is this; what kind of jobs should someone studying and unable to work full-time target? Are there additional strategies or approaches an international student should employ in order to land theses jobs?
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by 2baga(m): 5:01pm On May 14
Mzally:
Hello house,

My family and I have our PR and we are planning to relocate in Dec. For those living in Sydney how easy is it to secure a good school for kids of age 6 and 8 years. Wouldn't it be too late to get a good school assuming we arrive in December 15th.

I would like to have a word with you please
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by extraterestrial: 3:56am On May 15
GoodMemory:
Australian Experience




Orally, efforts should be made to learn correct pronunciation of words.
A speaker who pronounces words correctly will be easily understood even though he speaks with a non-native English accent. Spend more time learning pronunciation rather than accent.
Some people soften their naija accent by trying to speak like oyinbo. That on its own isn’t wrong. Do not mind our people back home who laugh at fake accent. If they had seen your sorry look struggling to be understood in a boardroom full of white men, they would not be there laughing at accent. What is the essence of communication if the recipient of the message cannot understand what you are saying and if there is a way to make them understand, do it.
A friend once told me about his embarrassing interview. He couldn’t hear what the interviewers were saying, and they also couldn’t hear what he was saying. He kept saying “pardon me?” They also kept saying “pardon me?”
Fake it if you have to. To oyinbos, you aren’t faking it, you are communicating well. That is why a Chinese who relocated to Australia 5 years ago speaks clearly with a stint of Aussie Accent and a Nigerian who relocated 15 years ago is still struggling to get understood.
Don’t worry, your naija accent is still intact. Use it when you see fellow Nigerians or when you are back home… hahaha
Lesson here is: improve your communication skill. Employers might overlook Australian Work experience requirement if you write and speak well.


Beautiful write-up as always Goodmemory. Just to touch on the subject of accent and fine tuning it, i have heard opposing views as to changing your accent. Some people perceive it as a sign of self esteem issues. Now i am not for or against it. i really just want to know what the majority think. Initially when i got here, i tried doing that, so i could be heard properly. Honestly i felt stupid sometimes and then i just switch back to my regular accent because i am thinking, why should i be the only one making effort to be heard, why don't they adjust for me also. we had a seminar at my church and a lady touched on the subject and i personally tried to research on it to understand if it is encouraged or not. i didn't see so much info that was helpful. Right now i speak with my mood, if i don't care to be understood i just speak the way i am used to but in really important meetings especially with clients and senior people i try to adjust. i studied in the UK sometime back and it was never really an issue for me at the time. i would speak Naija-British and be feeling like the Queen with myself but now i have become quite self conscious and i am not sure why it bothers me now. Also i listen to the Indians and the Chinese, most of them just speak with no effort whatsoever to adjust their accent, especially the Indians at my office and those from middle east. please can we comment on our views. Thanks!

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by afosahid: 6:26am On May 15
Great topic and thanks for opening up this conversation. The bottom line with the need to use an accent or not boils down to effective communication. First impressions matter, and the way you sound over the phone could be the difference between you getting an invite for an interview or having your application tossed. Strong communication is one of the major barriers that hinders people from getting some roles. I always tell whoever cares to listen, Your knowledge of the job is not enough to get you a job or even help you keep at the job. Effective communication, as well as attitude and other attributes are very important. A guy with an average knowledge of the job and excellent communication skills, stands a better chance of getting the job or even climbing up the ladder than the guy with deeper knowledge but poor communication skills.

I strongly believe that what gave me a shot at my 1st professional role here was my communication skills. I could speak with a clear american accent and my naija accent sef no bad. Recruiter called (I been dey construction site that time grin) and said he has gone through my CV and finds me quite overqualified for the role he has and I also do not have any local experience. Omo, I speak ''fone'' die for this guy. Convinced him that all he had to do was to get me an interview with the hiring manager. He not only did, he went as far as putting a word ahead with the hiring manager telling him I had strong communication skills even though I didn't have any local experience.

For the new guys, if it's 'fone' that will let them understand you, please speak the 'fone' grin. You'll most likely not be given a chance if you can't be heard properly especially for roles with plenty applications.



extraterestrial:

Beautiful write-up as always Goodmemory. Just to touch on the subject of accent and fine tuning it, i have heard opposing views as to changing your accent. Some people perceive it as a sign of self esteem issues. Now i am not for or against it. i really just want to know what the majority think. Initially when i got here, i tried doing that, so i could be heard properly. Honestly i felt stupid sometimes and then i just switch back to my regular accent because i am thinking, why should i be the only one making effort to be heard, why don't they adjust for me also. we had a seminar at my church and a lady touched on the subject and i personally tried to research on it to understand if it is encouraged or not. i didn't see so much info that was helpful. Right now i speak with my mood, if i don't care to be understood i just speak the way i am used to but in really important meetings especially with clients and senior people i try to adjust. i studied in the UK sometime back and it was never really an issue for me at the time. i would speak Naija-British and be feeling like the Queen with myself but now i have become quite self conscious and i am not sure why it bothers me now. Also i listen to the Indians and the Chinese, most of them just speak with no effort whatsoever to adjust their accent, especially the Indians at my office and those from middle east. please can we comment on our views. Thanks!

3 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by tyosho: 7:34am On May 15
gcey2k:
NIGERIAN PASSPORT RENEWAL PROCESS

Hi Guys,

Permit me to drop this here as I have seen many questions about this as a google map local guide.

I recently renewed my passport and want to share my experience to help others who may need to do so.

So what you need to do is go here

https://portal.immigration.gov.ng/pages/welcome

Apply for e-passport. Follow the steps and it will take you to the INNOVATE1 SERVICES website where you will fill the application form and make payment of about AU $160.

After payment you will need to print the payment confirmation/slip, and application forms.

A dummy appointment date will be given to you but ignore that. You will need to send the payment receipt and application form to the Nigerian Consular via email to give you an appointment. The email address is nhc.passport@gmail.com. You may be issued an unfavourable date which you can appeal if you want it faster. You will need to write them stating the reasons you need this quicker and attaching any relevant documents that might help. For my case, an initial appointment for July 23 was changed to April 24, which was more favourable.

They will schedule an appointment and send you further details about what you need to do or bring along.

Please do not bother about a guarantor if you are renewing your old e-passport as this must have been done for the current passport you have.

You will need to travel to Canberra for the appointment. Although I heard they do some sort of visit to different states once a year but I am not sure about this and this may not be the best if you want it faster. The process at the consulate may be just 30 minutes like mine if there are no hassles or issues with your documents. Although you may not get the passport same day. Hence a major requirement is for you to come with a prepaid express envelope which they will use to post it.

I received my passport about 2 weeks after the appointment date.

Hope this helps.



Thank you.Just the info i needed

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 7:35am On May 15
extraterestrial:

Beautiful write-up as always Goodmemory. Just to touch on the subject of accent and fine tuning it, i have heard opposing views as to changing your accent. Some people perceive it as a sign of self esteem issues. Now i am not for or against it. i really just want to know what the majority think.


I quite identify with that feeling. It can be unsettling when you fake accent but as everything that requires sufficient time to learn, it can take a great deal of effort and practice. I also believe some people have the gift of effortlessly micking accent. Example is Trevor Noah.
I have listened to our own Chimamanda Adichie speak clearly in Nigerian accent and no one in her audience has complained about her accent. But you must realize Adichie, at her level will probably have 99.9% correct pronunciation rate.

So, to contribute, if you know it will require a great deal of effort to fake accent, I think you shouldn’t do it. I think that effort should be directed to correct pronunciation. Why fake accent when people do not have difficulty understanding you? “Why fix it if it ain’t broken?”

If you can fake it perfectly, without that feeling of uneasiness, try it. It might be your survival tactic
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by gcey2k(m): 9:41am On May 15
tyosho:




Thank you.Just the info i needed

Oh Nice! Good luck.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by edkai: 6:49pm On May 15
edkai:


Thank you so much for this write-up. Very enlightening, I must confess. My question is this; what kind of jobs should someone studying and unable to work full-time target? Are there additional strategies or approaches an international student should employ in order to land theses jobs?
hello Goodmemory. Please assist me with any information you have about those questions in the quoted comment. I've been awaiting your response. Thanks
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 11:56pm On May 15
edkai:
hello Goodmemory. Please assist me with any information you have about those questions in the quoted comment. I've been awaiting your response. Thanks

I think the same info applies to international students but because they do not have full work rights, they are somewhat limited in their choice of jobs. Most of the international students I have seen do Sales reps jobs, , customer service, care, waiter/waitress jobs.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Ozededes: 1:08pm On May 16
I am currently searching for schools in Australia to apply for, I want to do a course in I.t cyber security to be precise, but I have been looking for threads of international students who have walked this path but I haven't, I keep bumping into Europe, Canada, USA, none for Australia, this is per say the only Australian group I have come across, it will be nice to know the experience so one can prepare. thank you
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 1:37pm On May 16
Ozededes:
I am currently searching for schools in Australia to apply for, I want to do a course in I.t cyber security to be precise, but I have been looking for threads of international students who have walked this path but I haven't, I keep bumping into Europe, Canada, USA, none for Australia, this is per say the only Australian group I have come across, it will be nice to know the experience so one can prepare. thank you

https://www.nairaland.com/3786389/general-australian-student-visa-enquiries
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Ozededes: 3:53pm On May 16
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by edkai: 9:12pm On May 16
GoodMemory:


I think the same info applies to international students but because they do not have full work rights, they are somewhat limited in their choice of jobs. Most of the international students I have seen do Sales reps jobs, , customer service, care, waiter/waitress jobs.
thanks a lot. I really appreciate your response. God bless you.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ozonechrome: 9:43pm On May 18
.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ugsams(m): 9:07am On May 19
Hello Sydneysider's, if anyone is free for meetup or can help direct me to an African restaurant, I'll be grateful.

I came to Sydney yesterday and will be leaving tomorrow afternoon. I'm just at Sydney Harbour Marriott's at Pitt's street. Here is my number 0404 761 451
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Bossladyorigina: 1:06pm On May 19
ugsams:
Hello Sydneysider's, if anyone is free for meetup or can help direct me to an African restaurant, I'll be grateful.


Is there a WhatsApp group for "Sydneysiders"?

(1) (2) (3) ... (82) (83) (84) (85) (86) (Reply)

Uk Student Visa/tier 4 Pbs - Your Questions Answered / Italian Student Visa-help! / General U.s.a (student) Visa Enquiries-part3

Viewing this topic: ayoi

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2019 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 262
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.