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Yoruba Hebrew Heritage - Culture (9) - Nairaland

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Unanswered Questions On Yoruba's Hebrew Heritage / This Dictionary Proof Yoruba Are Speaking Original Hebrew Language Of The Torah. / Some Igbo Words That Are Same Meaning With Hebrew (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 2:35am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:


Hehe. Some of the words you put up there have forms in Yoruba and Igbo that clearly share a common root.

Igbo nwoke/nwoko, oke/oko is cognate with Yoruba oko. They both mean male.

The common Igbo word for female/woman nowadays is nwanyi/nwanya, but there is an even more archaic Igbo word for adult woman which is hardly used today. That word is Ibili/Ibiri or Ibiri achi, which is cognate with Yoruba obirin.

Slave in Igbo is Oru/Ohu. Slave in Yoruba is Eru. They are possibly cognate terms.

The Igbo way of saying 'here' is to say 'This place'. Place in Igbo is 'Ebe' or in some parts 'Ibe'. This is cognate with Yoruba 'Ibi.'

We would be silly to expect languages that have existed apart for such a long time to have 100% or even 60% relatedness. Languages evolve; words fall out of use and new words are either innovated or taken up from immediate neighbours.

But if you have even ever tried to do a cursory study, you would have found a large number of shared roots between Yoruba and Igbo.

Imi (Igbo) - Imu (Yoruba) - Nose (English)
Onu (Igbo) - Enu (Yoruba) - Mouth (English)
Nti (Igbo) - Eti (Yoruba) - Ear (English)
Agba (Igbo) - Agbo (Yoruba) - Jaw (English)

Ogwu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Medicine (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Twenty (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Fight/Battle/War (English)

Ala/Ali/Ani/Ana (Igbo) - Ale/Ile (Yoruba) - Land (English)
Ulo (Igbo) - Ulue (Ohafia Igbo) - Ule/Ile (Yoruba) - House (English)

Agwa/Egwa (Igbo) - Ewa (Yoruba) - Beans (English)

Owu (Igbo) - Owu (Yoruba) - Cotton (English)
Gini (Igbo) - Kini (Yoruba) - What? (English)

Following the pattern of K changing to G or G changing to K, suggests that:
Agu/Egu (Igbo) - Ekun (Yoruba) - Leopard (English)

Be (Igbo) - Be (Yoruba) - Slice/Cut (English)
Ewu (Igbo) - Ewure (Yoruba) - Goat (English)
Okuko (Igbo) - Akuko Adire (Yoruba) - Fowl/Male rooster (English)
Akpa (Igbo) - Apo (Yoruba) - Bag (English)

Mili/Mmiri/Mini (Igbo) - Omi (Yoruba) - Water (English). (I remember a Yoruba gentleman telling me once that Awori still uses miri for water. In Moremi stories we hear of a stream called Esinmirin which is just too close to the Igbo word for river osimiri.)

Akika (Igbo) - Ikan (Yoruba) - White ant (English)
Ufufu (Igbo) - Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam (English)
Oka (Igbo) - Oka (Yoruba) - Corn (English - probably originally used for Guinea corn, before the coming of the american maize in the 16th century)
Afo (Igbo) - Ifun (Yoruba) - Bowels (English - and by extension, used by the Igbo to refer to stomach too).
Mbenbe (Igbo) - Obonbon (Yoruba) - Beetle (English)

Moo/Mo/Muo (Igbo) - Imole (Yoruba) - Primordial or territorial spirits (English - Yoruba 'Imole' probably breaks up into Imo + ile, i.e., earth spirits)

THE LIST LITERALLY GOES ON AND ON.

I wouldn't have to make a list if you could just do a little research of your own. Read the book by Aremo that Macof has mentioned. I don't think all the cognates he mentioned in that book are true cognates, however; but in general his view is solid and echoes what linguists have been saying since forever.


Afo ifun good.. good combination
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 2:51am On Sep 15, 2018
Olu317:
As I have said, you dont need to proof anything tp me because there is alternative for cultivate in Iboland but non in yorubaland.In which it showed that Ibo borrowed the word because it is not universal in Igboland as seen in Yoruba land . Go back and ask for the alternative in Ibo land. Once such exist,then clearly it means it is a borrowed word. After all ,Àso Èbi is acknowledge in Iboland as Yoruba's . Is Aso Ebi of Ibo origin?

They are now claiming aborigine of yoruba land..i need to know the time frame when we split from the ibos there is never point in yoruba history when we are Unclad people ..patron of white cloth obatala is over 10000yrs .. you people are ibos not igbos..you people were called ibos first now igbo

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by RedboneSmith(m): 2:52am On Sep 15, 2018
Obalufon:


we are not ibos.

This statement of yours was really necessary because the point of my comment was that Yorubas are Ibos. *sarcastic eyeroll*

As for the other things you wrote, I do not think you know what 'core vocabulary' means and how they are resistant to replacement by borrowing; and how recently borrowed words do not undergo the sound shifts observable in the true cognates such as in the examples in my comment. So you are welcome to keep believing that Igbo people borrowed words for such very basic items as 'nose', 'mouth', 'ear', 'cut', etc.


'Oka' in both languages (as well as in the other YEAI-NOI languages) is one of the lexical items that supports the theory that the ancestors of the YEAI speakers originally lived, not in the rainforest, but in the savanna country around the Niger-Benue confluence area in the Middle Belt where they grew both cereals (not just guinea corn,,but probably a type of millet as well) and tubers in addition to tending palm and kola trees. They knew the guinea corn before they moved south into the forest. Subsequently, the guinea corn largely dropped out of their diet except for those who lived on the northern fringe of the rainforest zone.

In the 16th century when American corn came, they applied the old term for guinea corn/millet to the new cereal, and in the case of the Yoruba, they would appear to have also come up with an additional new term for the new cereal - agbado.

A similar thing happened in England, by the way. Before maize came to England, the word 'corn' already existed in the English language. It was applied to the cereals like barley that the Europeans were already familiar with. When maize came, they took this old term and gave it to maize, too.

Read, it will not kill you.

I will not even respond to your insinuation that the Igbo did not know cotton. If at your age you think that because the precolonial Igbo (especially the children and unmarried women) were largely unclad or scantily clad, they knew nothing of cotton cloths, then it is best to leave you with that ignorance. Just this morning I was at the library looking at the report written by Mr Shaw of the archaeological work he did at Igbo-Ukwu. There are pictures in that report of excavated uniquely woven cloth used in 9th-century Igboland. Akwete was exporting cloth to the Ijo. Crowther found Igbo-made cotton cloths exported as far north as Idah and the confluence. The cloth came from Aku and neighbouring villages in Nsukka who were not only excellent weavers, but excellent dyers too. Missionaries and explorers reported about Igbo farmers who planted cotton on their farms after harvest, as it was believed to have soil-rejuvenating qualities. The cotton was, of course, spinned and woven. That Igbo dressing was not elaborate doesn't mean it was completely absent. But you are welcome to not read anything that will actually increase your knowledge, except the apeshit-throwing comments on Nairaland.

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Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 3:26am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:


This statement of yours was really necessary because the point of my comment was that Yorubas are Ibos. *sarcastic eyeroll*

As for the other things you wrote, I do not think you know what 'core vocabulary' means and how they are resistant to replacement by borrowing; and how recently borrowed words do not undergo the sound shifts observable in the true cognates such as in the examples in my comment. So you are welcome to keep believing that Igbo people borrowed words for such very basic items as 'nose', 'mouth', 'ear', 'cut', etc.


'Oka' in both languages (as well as in the other YEAI-NOI languages) is one of the lexical items that supports the theory that the ancestors of the YEAI speakers originally lived, not in the rainforest, but in the savanna country around the Niger-Benue confluence area in the Middle Belt where they grew both cereals (not just guinea corn,,but probably a type of millet as well) and tubers in addition to tending palm and kola trees. They knew the guinea corn before they moved south into the forest. Subsequently, the guinea corn largely dropped out of their diet except for those who lived on the northern fringe of the rainforest zone.

In the 16th century when American corn came, they applied the old term for guinea corn/millet to the new cereal, and in the case of the Yoruba, they would appear to have also come up with an additional new term for the new cereal - agbado.

A similar thing happened in England, by the way. Before maize came to England, the word 'corn' already existed in the English language. It was applied to the cereals like barley that the Europeans were already familiar with. When maize came, they took this old term and gave it to maize, too.

Read, it will not kill you.

I will not even respond to your insinuation that the Igbo did not know cotton. If at your age you think that because the precolonial Igbo (especially the children and unmarried women) were largely unclad or scantily clad, they knew nothing of cotton cloths, then it is best to leave you with that ignorance. Just this morning I was at the library looking at the report written by Mr Shaw of the archaeological work he did at Igbo-Ukwu. There are pictures in that report of excavated uniquely woven cloth used in 9th-century Igboland. Akwete was exporting cloth to the Ijo. Crowther found Igbo-made cotton cloths exported as far north as Idah and the confluence. The cloth came from Aku and neighbouring villages in Nsukka who were not only excellent weavers, but excellent dyers too. Missionaries and explorers reported about Igbo farmers who planted cotton on their farms after harvest, as it was believed to have soil-rejuvenating qualities. The cotton was, of course, spinned and woven. That Igbo dressing was not elaborate doesn't mean it was completely absent. But you are welcome to not read anything that will actually increase your knowledge, except the apeshit-throwing comments on Nairaland.


what year were you people exporting cotton ? keep deceiving yourself .little cotton exposed to you was from the northern part igala to cover your groin area ,majority were Unclad using raffia to cover up ..people that witness the period are still alive today.. why do you think yoruba called you awon oni ihooho"" .little civilization exposed to you people was through igala and possibly onicha settlers from Benin and other part i won't mention .....you people are hostile to strangers haven't evolved to state of governance... well known cannibals. ..secluded people... i am not doubting igala and yoruba because we have oral history tying us together ..
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 3:44am On Sep 15, 2018
we both use oka guinea corn for maize simultaneously blood is thicker than water ...also garri interesting


imi is imu ... onu ..is enu ...se e mo oruko ti enu je ni ..?
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 6:46am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:


Hehe. Some of the words you put up there have forms in Yoruba and Igbo that clearly share a common root.

Igbo nwoke/nwoko, oke/oko is cognate with Yoruba oko. They both mean male.

The common Igbo word for female/woman nowadays is nwanyi/nwanya, but there is an even more archaic Igbo word for adult woman which is hardly used today. That word is Ibili/Ibiri or Ibiri achi, which is cognate with Yoruba obirin.

Slave in Igbo is Oru/Ohu. Slave in Yoruba is Eru. They are possibly cognate terms.

The Igbo way of saying 'here' is to say 'This place'. Place in Igbo is 'Ebe' or in some parts 'Ibe'. This is cognate with Yoruba 'Ibi.'

We would be silly to expect languages that have existed apart for such a long time to have 100% or even 60% relatedness. Languages evolve; words fall out of use and new words are either innovated or taken up from immediate neighbours.

But if you have even ever tried to do a cursory study, you would have found a large number of shared roots between Yoruba and Igbo.

Imi (Igbo) - Imu (Yoruba) - Nose (English)
Onu (Igbo) - Enu (Yoruba) - Mouth (English)
Nti (Igbo) - Eti (Yoruba) - Ear (English)
Agba (Igbo) - Agbo (Yoruba) - Jaw (English)

Ogwu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Medicine (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Twenty (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Fight/Battle/War (English)

Ala/Ali/Ani/Ana (Igbo) - Ale/Ile (Yoruba) - Land (English)
Ulo (Igbo) - Ulue (Ohafia Igbo) - Ule/Ile (Yoruba) - House (English)

Agwa/Egwa (Igbo) - Ewa (Yoruba) - Beans (English)

Owu (Igbo) - Owu (Yoruba) - Cotton (English)
Gini (Igbo) - Kini (Yoruba) - What? (English)

Following the pattern of K changing to G or G changing to K, suggests that:
Agu/Egu (Igbo) - Ekun (Yoruba) - Leopard (English)

Be (Igbo) - Be (Yoruba) - Slice/Cut (English)
Ewu (Igbo) - Ewure (Yoruba) - Goat (English)
Okuko (Igbo) - Akuko Adire (Yoruba) - Fowl/Male rooster (English)
Akpa (Igbo) - Apo (Yoruba) - Bag (English)

Mili/Mmiri/Mini (Igbo) - Omi (Yoruba) - Water (English). (I remember a Yoruba gentleman telling me once that Awori still uses miri for water. In Moremi stories we hear of a stream called Esinmirin which is just too close to the Igbo word for river osimiri.)

Akika (Igbo) - Ikan (Yoruba) - White ant (English)
Ufufu (Igbo) - Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam (English)
Oka (Igbo) - Oka (Yoruba) - Corn (English - probably originally used for Guinea corn, before the coming of the american maize in the 16th century)
Afo (Igbo) - Ifun (Yoruba) - Bowels (English - and by extension, used by the Igbo to refer to stomach too).
Mbenbe (Igbo) - Obonbon (Yoruba) - Beetle (English)

Moo/Mo/Muo (Igbo) - Imole (Yoruba) - Primordial or territorial spirits (English - Yoruba 'Imole' probably breaks up into Imo + ile, i.e., earth spirits)

THE LIST LITERALLY GOES ON AND ON.

I wouldn't have to make a list if you could just do a little research of your own. Read the book by Aremo that Macof has mentioned. I don't think all the cognates he mentioned in that book are true cognates, however; but in general his view is solid and echoes what linguists have been saying since forever.
You see, I know the antic of yours and many people that claimed the same things as you do. Let me even agree,we share the same words together as you claim but have you forgotten some words were borrowed from one group to the other? After all, what you listed as having link to Yoruba words were Mid 18th century fabricated words.This is because Rev. Samuel Ajayi Crowther helped shaped the Ibos alphabets grin . The same Edo have words linked with Yorubas. Today,Edo use ,‘omo', as Yoruba do but do have alternative for ,‘omo',which is,‘oviedo'. But in Yoruba word list,there is no alternative.

Ofcourse, there is no iota of doubt in some shared word ,which you mentioned and quickly ,lemme dissect them in precept,what seem right in yours ,so as for you to realise this things as follows:


Imi (Igbo) √
Imu (Yoruba) - Nose (English)

Onu (Igbo) √
Énu (Yoruba) -Mouth (English)

Nti (Igbo) √
Eti (Yoruba) - Ear (English)

Agba (Igbo) √
- Agbo (Yoruba à'gbón) - Jaw (English)

Ogwu (Igbo) √
Ogun (Yoruba) - Medicine (English) oogún

Ogu (Igbo) √
Ogun (Yoruba) - Twenty (English)

Ogu (Igbo) √
Ogun (Yoruba) - Fight/Battle/War (English)

Ala/Ali/Ani/Ana (Igbo)× . Ala is also ‘down'- in Ibo
Ale/Ile (Yoruba) - Land (English)×

Yorubas do have one word for this ,which mean't it is different from yours and borrowed: À'là : create a ‘path',cut through,etc. It is Yoruba, ‘Ùlé-Ìlé'

- Ulue (Ohafia Igbo) ×
Yoruba: Ùlù,Ìlù- Town
Ùlè/Ìlè (Yoruba) - House (English)

if Ibo pronunciation is followed in the manner the Yoruba pronounce,then they are different

Agwa/Egwa (Igbo) √
- Ewa (Yoruba) - Beans (English)

Owu (Igbo) √
- Owu (Yoruba) - Cotton (English)

Gini (Igbo) √
- Kini (Yoruba) - What? (English)

Following the pattern of K changing to G or G changing to K, suggests that:

Agu/Egu (Igbo)× ah and e dont fit
Ekun (Yoruba) - Leopard (English)

Be (Igbo) √
Bée(gè) (Yoruba) - Slice/Cut (English)

Ewu (Igbo)√
Ewure (Yoruba) - Goat (English)

Okuko (Igbo) √
Akuko Adire (Yoruba) - Fowl/Male rooster (English)

Akpa (Igbo) √
Apo,Apà,laban,idóhó,sáaká etc–Bag (English)

Mili/Mmiri/Mini (Igbo)√
- Omi (Yoruba) - Water (English). (I remember a Yoruba gentleman telling me once that Awori still uses miri shocked for water. In Moremi stories we hear of a stream called Esinmirin which is just too close to the Igbo word for river osimiri.) grin

Akika (Igbo) √
Ikan (Yoruba) - White ant (English)

Ufufu (Igbo) ×
- Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam (English)× (modern)

Oka (Igbo) √
- Oka (Yoruba) - Corn (English - probably originally used for Guinea corn, before the coming of the american maize in the 16th century)

Afo (Igbo) ×
Inu (Yoruba)bowel
Ifun(Yoruba)( English) intestine
Ikun((Yoruba)(English) stomach

Mbenbe (Igbo)
Obonbon (Yoruba) - Beetle (English)

Moo/Mo/Muo (Igbo)√
Imole (Yoruba) - Primordial or territorial spirits (English - Yoruba 'Imole' probably breaks up into Imo + ile, i.e., earth spirits) grin

Now do the needful to the following in Ibo language as I have done to this modern day lexicon connection. And they are :
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by RedboneSmith(m): 7:20am On Sep 15, 2018
LOL. Crowther introduced those words to Igbo. Okay. It's too early to be doing this with you people. Your 'dissection' shows you have no understanding of what historic linguists call semantic change, by the way.

3 Likes

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 7:50am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:


Hehe. Some of the words you put up there have forms in Yoruba and Igbo that clearly share a common root.

Igbo nwoke/nwoko, oke/oko is cognate with Yoruba oko. They both mean male.

The common Igbo word for female/woman nowadays is nwanyi/nwanya, but there is an even more archaic Igbo word for adult woman which is hardly used today. That word is Ibili/Ibiri or Ibiri achi, which is cognate with Yoruba obirin.

Slave in Igbo is Oru/Ohu. Slave in Yoruba is Eru. They are possibly cognate terms.

The Igbo way of saying 'here' is to say 'This place'. Place in Igbo is 'Ebe' or in some parts 'Ibe'. This is cognate with Yoruba 'Ibi.'

We would be silly to expect languages that have existed apart for such a long time to have 100% or even 60% relatedness. Languages evolve; words fall out of use and new words are either innovated or taken up from immediate neighbours.

But if you have even ever tried to do a cursory study, you would have found a large number of shared roots between Yoruba and Igbo.

Imi (Igbo) - Imu (Yoruba) - Nose (English)
Onu (Igbo) - Enu (Yoruba) - Mouth (English)
Nti (Igbo) - Eti (Yoruba) - Ear (English)
Agba (Igbo) - Agbo (Yoruba) - Jaw (English)

Ogwu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Medicine (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Twenty (English)
Ogu (Igbo) - Ogun (Yoruba) - Fight/Battle/War (English)

Ala/Ali/Ani/Ana (Igbo) - Ale/Ile (Yoruba) - Land (English)
Ulo (Igbo) - Ulue (Ohafia Igbo) - Ule/Ile (Yoruba) - House (English)

Agwa/Egwa (Igbo) - Ewa (Yoruba) - Beans (English)

Owu (Igbo) - Owu (Yoruba) - Cotton (English)
Gini (Igbo) - Kini (Yoruba) - What? (English)

Following the pattern of K changing to G or G changing to K, suggests that:
Agu/Egu (Igbo) - Ekun (Yoruba) - Leopard (English)

Be (Igbo) - Be (Yoruba) - Slice/Cut (English)
Ewu (Igbo) - Ewure (Yoruba) - Goat (English)
Okuko (Igbo) - Akuko Adire (Yoruba) - Fowl/Male rooster (English)
Akpa (Igbo) - Apo (Yoruba) - Bag (English)

Mili/Mmiri/Mini (Igbo) - Omi (Yoruba) - Water (English). (I remember a Yoruba gentleman telling me once that Awori still uses miri for water. In Moremi stories we hear of a stream called Esinmirin which is just too close to the Igbo word for river osimiri.)

Akika (Igbo) - Ikan (Yoruba) - White ant (English)
Ufufu (Igbo) - Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam (English)
Oka (Igbo) - Oka (Yoruba) - Corn (English - probably originally used for Guinea corn, before the coming of the american maize in the 16th century)
Afo (Igbo) - Ifun (Yoruba) - Bowels (English - and by extension, used by the Igbo to refer to stomach too).
Mbenbe (Igbo) - Obonbon (Yoruba) - Beetle (English)

Moo/Mo/Muo (Igbo) - Imole (Yoruba) - Primordial or territorial spirits (English - Yoruba 'Imole' probably breaks up into Imo + ile, i.e., earth spirits)

THE LIST LITERALLY GOES ON AND ON.

I wouldn't have to make a list if you could just do a little research of your own. Read the book by Aremo that Macof has mentioned. I don't think all the cognates he mentioned in that book are true cognates, however; but in general his view is solid and echoes what linguists have been saying since forever.
Let me dissect it and if I find variant of it,then I nullify it because Yoruba only have difference in pronunciation but same word.

Imi (Igbo) √
Imu (Yoruba) - Nose (English)

Onu (Igbo)√
Enu (Yoruba) - Mouth (English)

Nti (Igbo) -√
Eti (Yoruba) - Ear (English)

Agba (Igbo)√
Agbon(Yoruba) - Jaw (English)

Ogwu (Igbo)√
Ogun (Yoruba) - Medicine (English)

Ogu (Igbo)√
Ogun (Yoruba) - Twenty (English)

Ogu (Igbo) √
Ogun (Yoruba) - Fight/Battle/War (English)


Ala/Ali/Ani/Ana (Igbo) ×
Ale/Ile (Yoruba) - Land (English)

Ulo (Igbo) √
Ulue (Ohafia Igbo) - Ule/Ile (Yoruba) - House (English)

Agwa/Egwa (Igbo)√
Ewa (Yoruba) - Beans (English)

Owu (Igbo)√
Owu (Yoruba) - Cotton (English)

Gini (Igbo)√
Kini (Yoruba) - What? (English)

Following the pattern of K changing to G or G changing to K, suggests that:

Agu/Egu (Igbo) × (ah and e don't match)
Ekun (Yoruba) - Leopard (English)

Be (Igbo)√
Be (Yoruba) - Slice/Cut (English)

Ewu (Igbo)√
Ewure (Yoruba) - Goat (English)

Okuko (Igbo) ×
Àdié/Àdiyé(Yoruba) - English Male (rooster)and Female (fowl)
Traditionally Yoruba don't acknowledge Àkuko as such. In proverbs and ritual word,Àdie/Àdiyé(À-dú-ìyé) is used more often. And the etymology of Àkuko(À-kú-kó) was borne out of when,‘rooster crow'.

Akpa (Igbo)√
Àpà,Àpo,Sàakà,ìdoho,laban,etc (Yoruba) - Bag (English)

Mili/Mmiri/Mini (Igbo) √
- Omi (Yoruba) - Water (English). (I remember a Yoruba gentleman telling me once that Awori still uses miri shocked for water. In Moremi stories we hear of a stream called Esinmirin which is just too close to the Igbo word for river osimiri.)
Which part of Awori people use miri?

Akika (Igbo)√
- Ikan (Yoruba) - White ant (English)

Ufufu (Igbo) ×
Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam (English)×

Oka (Igbo)√
Oka (Yoruba) - Corn (English - probably originally used for Guinea corn, before the coming of the american maize in the 16th century)

Afo (Igbo)×
Ìfún (Yoruba) - intestine (English - a
Ìkún (Yoruba) stomach(English)
Ìnú(bowel)
As you can see,they are not the same!

Mbenbe (Igbo) - Obonbon (Yoruba) - Beetle (English)

Moo/Mo/Muo (Igbo) ×
Imole (Yoruba) -Primordial or territorial spirits (English)
The above method of spiritual aren't the same because Imolé is a society


As you can see, most of what you and others usually post online are not up to 200 years old words being shared.
Kindly blow my mind on the following words by interpreting them in Ibo language as you believe that Yoruba and shared same words with Ibos. And they are:

Àba /Ba/Uba/Aba:father
Aiyè:world
Àayè: living
Àki/Àkin: brave
Akó: male
Abó:female
Âfin:Palace
Àalá:dream
Àalà:white
Âala:demication
Âarin:middle (in between)
Àará:thunder
Arà:wonder
Âajo:travel
Ajé:witch
Aanu:mercy
Alujonú:spirit
Adè:crown
Aasalè : late evening evening/ late at night
Ajèji: stranger
Alèejo=visitor
Atíjó: ancient
Éshí: previous year
Bàalé:usband
Bàalè:duke
Baba=grandfather or ancestor
Babatunde: reincarnated birth of one's grandfather
Dá:create
Dè:arrive
Dé:hunt
Éebi=relative/relation
Èejí=rain
Ojo:rain
Éerín:laugh
Èri: testify
Ésún:allege some one of a crime
Béer:fear/Afraid
Éyì= this one
Èyikèyi=any–one
Énì:mat
Éní:anybody/this person/person
Énikéni:anyone
Étan: deceive
Éebo: sacrifice
Ípata:notorious
Jigi:mirror
Òdé:hunter
Oorún:heaven
Ájá: the heavenly place one goes after death /above
Éeni:person/one(human) and not numerical
Oojúmó: break of dawn
Oojó: daily
Òjó: day
Owuró/Àaró:morning
Osàn:noon time
Irolé/urolé:evening
Jùbá:pay homage
Jagún: engage in war
Ofà: arrow
Óokó:cano
Okè: up/mountain/hill
rán : bright
rá: decay
Rò: stand
Ràará:dwarf
Rà:buy
Irà:swamp
Èwè:leaf
Îgi: tree
Iji: hurricane
Ijo/jo: dance
Ìwín:forest spirit
Okunrin:man
Obinrin:woman
Ólé:lazy
Olé:thief
Ólòshà:robber
Ki:salute


Proof the above and let me doff my hat in humility to you if 75% has same cognate with Ibos.But if not ,stop this forceful language connection.


Cheers
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 8:17am On Sep 15, 2018
Obalufon:


They are now claiming aborigine of yoruba land..i need to know the time frame when we split from the ibos there is never point in yoruba history when we are Unclad people ..patron of white cloth obalara is over 10000yrs .. you people are ibos not igbos..you people were called ibos first now igbo
Don't mind this bunch of liars that claim what they are not. Yoruba were never any stock that broke away from Ibos. Ibo language is older than Yoruba's. But Yoruba became a chosen people because God picked Yorubas.
Here is a link that dissected Ibo language by linguists. Instead for them to understudy the raised issue, they will rather propagate a quack theory . Especially their Yoruba apologists.... I laugh at them all .

check this http://www.faculty.ucr.edu
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by RedboneSmith(m): 9:36am On Sep 15, 2018
LOL. This one is still looking for 100% cognacy before he accepts what every linguist in the world now knows to be a fact. But it only takes a handful of 'false cognates' to convince y'all that Yoruba is Semitic. LOL.

Anyway, I spotted no less than 10 words in your new list that have cognatic relationship with Igbo words, despite some semantic shifts. But no, I can't continue doing this with you. My patience isn't as bountiful as Macof's or ObalufonII's. Mine is quite thin. I can't do this with someone who doesn't have a fundamental grasp of historical linguistics and one who is a low-key 'tribe smearer' to boot.

2 Likes 1 Share

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 10:35am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:


This statement of yours was really necessary because the point of my comment was that Yorubas are Ibos. *sarcastic eyeroll*

As for the other things you wrote, I do not think you know what 'core vocabulary' means and how they are resistant to replacement by borrowing; and how recently borrowed words do not undergo the sound shifts observable in the true cognates such as in the examples in my comment. So you are welcome to keep believing that Igbo people borrowed words for such very basic items as 'nose', 'mouth', 'ear', 'cut', etc.


'Oka' in both languages (as well as in the other YEAI-NOI languages) is one of the lexical items that supports the theory that the ancestors of the YEAI speakers originally lived, not in the rainforest, but in the savanna country around the Niger-Benue confluence area in the Middle Belt where they grew both cereals (not just guinea corn,,but probably a type of millet as well) and tubers in addition to tending palm and kola trees. They knew the guinea corn before they moved south into the forest. Subsequently, the guinea corn largely dropped out of their diet except for those who lived on the northern fringe of the rainforest zone.

In the 16th century when American corn came, they applied the old term for guinea corn/millet to the new cereal, and in the case of the Yoruba, they would appear to have also come up with an additional new term for the new cereal - agbado.

A similar thing happened in England, by the way. Before maize came to England, the word 'corn' already existed in the English language. It was applied to the cereals like barley that the Europeans were already familiar with. When maize came, they took this old term and gave it to maize, too.

Read, it will not kill you.

I will not even respond to your insinuation that the Igbo did not know cotton. If at your age you think that because the precolonial Igbo (especially the children and unmarried women) were largely unclad or scantily clad, they knew nothing of cotton cloths, then it is best to leave you with that ignorance. Just this morning I was at the library looking at the report written by Mr Shaw of the archaeological work he did at Igbo-Ukwu. There are pictures in that report of excavated uniquely woven cloth used in 9th-century Igboland. Akwete was exporting cloth to the Ijo. Crowther found Igbo-made cotton cloths exported as far north as Idah and the confluence. The cloth came from Aku and neighbouring villages in Nsukka who were not only excellent weavers, but excellent dyers too. Missionaries and explorers reported about Igbo farmers who planted cotton on their farms after harvest, as it was believed to have soil-rejuvenating qualities. The cotton was, of course, spinned and woven. That Igbo dressing was not elaborate doesn't mean it was completely absent. But you are welcome to not read anything that will actually increase your knowledge, except the apeshit-throwing comments on Nairaland.

cut the crap stop sticking your nose into our forum leave yoruba alone i knew my comment would hit a nerve .. i'm here to learn let the brother preach . The same white people that wrote and come up with the Benue Volta Niger Congo language family idea also wrote about yoruba link with Hebrews, there is nothing like absolute truth. my mind is flexible to learn new things knowledge is not static . .i want to learn .. if 84 yoruba monarch could claim Sudan has his source who am i to disprove his claim.. i'm strongly attached to my ancestors the way the Muslims or Christians do without using their rational mind to debunk some supernatural claim .. I believe ile-ife is cradle of humankind and source of all yoruba people
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 10:56am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:
LOL. This one is still looking for 100% cognacy before he accepts what every linguist in the world now knows to be a fact. But it only takes a handful of 'false cognates' to convince y'all that Yoruba is Semitic. LOL.

Anyway, I spotted no less than 10 words in your new list that have cognatic relationship with Igbo words, despite some semantic shifts. But no, I can't continue doing this with you. My patience isn't as bountiful as Macof's or ObalufonII's. Mine is quite thin. I can't do this with someone who doesn't have a fundamental grasp of historical linguistics and one who is a low-key 'tribe smearer' to boot.
..History written by who?..if you studied anthropology 40yrs ago you need to go back to school because all you've been thought is outdated most books you are quoting from is outdated telling me about YEIA. a scheme by our colonial master to deprive us of our greatness that is the main reason the whole Africa is generalize as being a primitive people . later come up with subSahara to exclude the northern Africa
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 11:04am On Sep 15, 2018
RedboneSmith:
LOL. This one is still looking for 100% cognacy before he accepts what every linguist in the world now knows to be a fact. But it only takes a handful of 'false cognates' to convince y'all that Yoruba is Semitic. LOL.

Anyway, I spotted no less than 10 words in your new list that have cognatic relationship with Igbo words, despite some semantic shifts. But no, I can't continue doing this with you. My patience isn't as bountiful as Macof's or ObalufonII's. Mine is quite thin. I can't do this with someone who doesn't have a fundamental grasp of historical linguistics and one who is a low-key 'tribe smearer' to boot.
As usual with flimsy excuses. If you dont know much on something,kindly do research instead of unnecessary and unbacked theories. Ibo kó yánmírín ní. You better click on the above link to see your Ibo language being dissected through phonomes. Atkinson research team posited that language originated in the Western part of Sub-Saharan Africa and supports Acholonu Catherine thesis of an Igbo origin of languages because Igbo language is based in the Western part of Sub-Saharan Africa. Also the conclusion that this ancient mother-language left Africa during the earliest ‘Out of Africa’ migrations is the same as our own conclusions that Homo Erectus left Africa with a Language and a Culture intact, and not, as animal-like ‘primitive man’. The thesis is that the San (Khoisan) Bushmen of the Kalahari were among the earliest carriers of this Proto-Proto-Igbo mother tongue, was also confirmed in the Atkinson research findings.
Therefore, Igbo scholars worldwide ought to seize upon this added scientific evidence provided by Dr. Atkinson’s research but instead ,they deny as usual. Kindly do the needful by listing the coganate of Ibo words with the above yorubas,if you are sure. Ko má wáà fíìfíì ìdí koko kírí.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by OlaoChi: 11:08am On Sep 15, 2018
Obalufon:


borrowed words from the igalas. ..you should add egusi and garri too please... we are not ibos . who dash ibos owu cotton.. oka for corn . liars .. maize is not up to 3 hundred years .. guinea corn is grown in the savanna region, where were the leafs , what do they want to do with guinea corn ....Ufufu (Igbo) - Ifofo (Yoruba) - Foam great connection .. ibos are bantu their lineage can be traced back to south Africa region
. Who said Yoruba are igbos?

Jeez, you Hebrew wannabes lack common sense

Yoruba and Igbo split 3000 years ago doesn't mean Yoruba are igbos, it means they have a common origin

Igbos are not Bantu, Bantu people speak a Bantu language and Igbo speak a Volta-Niger language

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 11:36am On Sep 15, 2018
Every yoruba word has wider meaning ...what is the meaning of Obirin?..
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by 0balufonlll: 11:38am On Sep 15, 2018
Olu317:
Well, your nos 1 and 2 will be dealt with the year the work will be complete at the right time in your lifetime and all others who want to see the glory of Yorubas from the past through the test of time till now.

I see, you cannot state your methods here in a few lines? Cool.

On the man you mentioned,who intend to portray opinion as compared to my research work need lay claim to aboriginal status of Yoruba because that is bis focal strength but instead use Japanese people that reside and indigenous to Asia .How does it fit ? In as much ,you are a scholar,then you need understand narrowing down to West Africa ought be his area of concentration because that is HIS BASE!

You and Olaochi did the same thing. You - Yoruba language/Hebrew; Olaochi - Yoruba - Japanese. I posted a screenshot here in which someone did the same thing between Yoruba & Fula, French, German, Ibo & so on. This in addition to what Olaochi did goes to show your theory has no framework & methodology because when what you did is applied to any other language it yields the same result - that Yoruba is connected with virtually every culture including Japan. I need-not have to explain, I suppose you are well read enough to know studies are not carried out without methodologies/framework because people have to test your hypothesis individually to agree with you.

On Gambari, I didnt say Fulani were precisely Gambari but a kind of group that yoruba classifed as the same as Fulanis . After all, Gambaris came from Mahli to Yoruba land and not directly from Hausa Land . Perhaps they were part of the Moors? Altbough I havent done any research to support that perspective. Beside, Alimi was claimed to be of Arab's colour i.e light skin(Fulani) by the account of ,‘ The Yoruba from the Earliest Time,which was written by Samuel Johnson.Funny enough, the Emir of Ilorin still has his name attached to Gambari. And I am yet to see an Hausa man that bears,‘Gambari', as a name.

In Ilorin, there is a reason Balogun Yoruba heads Yoruba; Balogun Fulani heads Fulani & Balogun Gambari heads the Hausa quarters before Emir Kolapo had it as his name.

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 11:44am On Sep 15, 2018
OlaoChi:
. Who said Yoruba are igbos?

Jeez, you Hebrew wannabes lack common sense

Yoruba and Igbo split 3000 years ago doesn't mean Yoruba are igbos, it means they have a common origin

Igbos are not Bantu, Bantu people speak a Bantu language and Igbo speak a Volta-Niger language


You are a marauder Damn 3000yrs ago ibo slit with the pygmies Bantu scientifically proven not yoruba ..i will show you 5000yrs relics in Ife
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 11:45am On Sep 15, 2018
Hmmmm
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 11:45am On Sep 15, 2018
Dem dem Ibo apologists continue grin in their ignorance...split kó ,divide ní embarassed. If Ibo split from Yoruba, why did Catherine Acholonu thesis counter it ? The same manner Atkinson said about language in west Africa as the place of its origin. Funny enough yoruba language was already in existence 3000 years ago. And this language was spoken in Egypt. Infact 3000 years ago was less 700 years before Jesus christ. grin cheesy. Kikikiki

Confuse set of people,who are bent in lumping my yoruba ancestors with Ibos' ancestors. As usual,they are here with incoherent statement of denying their claim that, ‘Ibos splitted from Yoruba and Yoruba are not Ibos'. cheesy grin cheesy. Confusion grandeur.


Below is a screenshot of kemet word present in Yoruba word list over 3000 years ago.......... grin

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 12:00pm On Sep 15, 2018
Olu317:
Dem dem Ibo apologists continue grin in their ignorance...split kó ,divide ní embarassed. If Ibo split from Yoruba, why did Catherine Acholonu thesis counter it ? The same manner Atkinson said about language in west Africa as the place of its origin. Funny enough yoruba language was already in existence 3000 years ago. And this language was spoken in Egypt. Infact 3000 years ago was less 700 years before Jesus christ. grin cheesy. Kikikiki

Confuse set of people,who are bent in lumping my yoruba ancestors with Ibos' ancestors. As usual,they are here with incoherent statement of denying their claim that, ‘Ibos splitted from Yoruba and Yoruba are not Ibos'. cheesy grin cheesy. Confusion grandeur.


Below is a screenshot of kemet word present in Yoruba word list over 3000 years ago.......... grin

ibos are later migrant from south African Congo region through Cameroon they are forest people hairy people and light skin due to the lack of sun.

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 12:14pm On Sep 15, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMrWh6s9pHI


ibos in 1949 colonial effort to cloth them and civilize them
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 12:16pm On Sep 15, 2018
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 1:36pm On Sep 15, 2018
0balufonlll:


I see, you cannot state your methods here in a few lines? Cool.



You and Olaochi did the same thing. You - Yoruba language/Hebrew; Olaochi - Yoruba - Japanese. I posted a screenshot here in which someone did the same thing between Yoruba & Fula, French, German, Ibo & so on. This in addition to what Olaochi did goes to show your theory has no framework & methodology because when what you did is applied to any other language it yields the same result - that Yoruba is connected with virtually every culture including Japan. I need-not have to explain, I suppose you are well read enough to know studies are not carried out without methodologies/framework because people have to test your hypothesis individually to agree with you.



In Ilorin, there is a reason Balogun Yoruba heads Yoruba; Balogun Fulani heads Fulani & Balogun Gambari heads the Hausa quarters before Emir Kolapo had it as his name.
His work sucks without any scriptural backing nor historical.So let him start from Japan's oral history as the following:

1. As he claimed, I expect him to mention people in west Africa with whom the yorubas shared same lexicons with and not South East Asia's Japan. grin

2 I have proven through biblical passages that Ancient Hebrews were blacks cool.

3. Hebrews lived in Africa for thousands of years

4. Hebrews married a lot of Nubians and Ethiopians(dark skin people)

5.There were historical account for the lost tribe of Israel.

6. I have provided etymology of words of ancient Hebrew and ther semitic,with screenshots. So ,I don't need any thing else to prooof anymore.Unless,you want me to post all my research work,which is not possible.

On Gambari, the link I posted did mentioned Gambari. I thought you saw it. So Sulu Kolapo Gambari, only acknowledged his patrilineal side to his name. Mind you,Alimi was said to be a kind Fulani-Fula man.I also mentioned the man's history through the first widely explosive written book on Yoruba ethnicity.

Furthermore, there is inconsistency in his forceful unholy alliance because I want him mentioned the tribes or ethnicity Yoruba are related with ,who share same language with yorubas in West Africa.

Finally, scholars and readers alike do have their views om this issue and I don't expect you to be different. But certainly, you don't have anything else to substanciate on Oke Ora,in Nigeria's southwest , where it is ccontroversially claimed to be the birth place of Osi-n because every mortal exist with biological parents.Perhaps, you know all the fathers and mothers of these great men and women who lived Oke ora. Kindly share and if you or any one else can't, then,my perspective as with the previous researchers stands.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 1:44pm On Sep 15, 2018
Obalufon:



we have nothing to do with ibos....Yoruba is yoruba ..ibo is ibo we have nothing in common . .. igala is not ibos . Yoruba and igala possible were one people at one point but split up .
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 1:49pm On Sep 15, 2018
macof:
you have not even proven your stance... Your entire stance is shaky.. You have not provided one evidence.. Just one
have you forgotten you have not answered my questions?

Should I repost them so you can answer?

Or you don't have answers?
I have answered you all and even went further to post books that can help understand word list of ancient Hebrews.

And, if you don't understand the oral account,kindly visit Moba Town or google Otun Ore history.
And on Igala history, I have answered you because Attah Igala also claimed that Yoruba also settled down in their midst.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 2:05pm On Sep 15, 2018
Another word ,that you cant find in pealim.com

Hebrew:re
Meaning: Friend,companion

Yoruba: Óré
Meaning: Friend, companion



Oga from Japan,come post your own friend grin cheesy cool too and let people reading the posts continue to laugh at your inconsistency. Ibo apologists I,mock at your ignorance.


....

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by 0balufonlll: 2:24pm On Sep 15, 2018
Olu317:
His work sucks without any scriptural backing nor historical.So let him start from Japan's oral history as the following:

1. As he claimed, I expect him to mention people in west Africa with whom the yorubas shared same lexicons with and not South East Asia's Japan. grin

2 I have proven through biblical passages that Ancient Hebrews were blacks cool.

3. Hebrews lived in Africa for thousands of years

4. Hebrews married a lot of Nubians and Ethiopians(dark skin people)

5.There were historical account for the lost tribe of Israel.

6. I have provided etymology of words of ancient Hebrew and ther semitic,with screenshots. So ,I don't need any thing else to prooof anymore.Unless,you want me to post all my research work,which is not possible.

There are so many problems with everything you typed above but I’ll list a few.

1. In History writing, Bible is not consider a source. Be it primary or secondary. It has been mostly proven and agreed that data in the Bible is largely mythical. For example, see this:



So you can not start your work using Bible as the groundwork. Sorry.

2. Everything you wrote up here is not a methodology for working cognates in Linguistic and neither is it credible in History. Your idea is on extremely shaky grounds. If you started the abstract or introduction of your paper with this Biblical foundations, academics will throw it in the bin after skiming through couples lines. Your work is best suited for the masses, folks who are poorly educated and are not likely to ask questions.

3. I understand that you want Olaochi to give you historical connections between Japan & Yoruba. But do you understand that the angle you are exploring is the Yoruba Mecca angle which in itself is not history but a myth relegated to the people of Oyo/Katunga only?

4. Actually, you have a lot to prove as far as etymology goes. Etymology is done using a lot of procedures, a lot. With lexicostatistics included. Your posts do not include these steps for anyone to take them serious.

On Gambari, the link I posted did mentioned Gambari. I thought you saw it. So Sulu Kolapo Gambari, only acknowledged his patrilineal side to his name. Mind you,Alimi was said to be a kind Fulani-Fula man.I also mentioned the man's history through the first widely explosive written book on Yoruba ethnicity. Furthermore, there is inconsistency in his forceful unholy alliance because I want him mentioned the tribes or ethnicity Yoruba are related with ,who share same language with yorubas in West Africa.

The link you posted was: https://www.ilorin.info/ it shows links to news. I had to use the drop down menu & went to ‘about’. So I don’t know what you meant about seeing Gambari there. How about a screenshot? Also, I do not know why Oba of Ilorin’s name is ‘Gambari’ but Yoruba’s understanding/use of the term is for the Hausa people.

Finally, scholars and readers alike do have their views om this issue and I don't expect you to be different. But certainly, you don't have anything else to substanciate on Oke Ora,in Nigeria's southwest , where it is ccontroversially claimed to be the birth place of Osi-n because every mortal exist with biological parents.Perhaps, you know all the fathers and mothers of these great men and women who lived Oke ora. Kindly share and if you or any one else can't, then,my perspective as with the previous researchers stands.

Like I said, can you provide names of all the fathers & mothers of Luusi your ancestor? We can start from there.

No one said Olofin was born at Oke Ora but he was known to have lived there with his folks like several other people who lived on hill settlements in what is now Ile-Ife.

Also, Eluyemi Omotoso the Apena in Ile-Ife during his days was an archeologist who got the permission to excavate Oke Ora. He retrieved stone axes & several other relics which were taken to Europe for dating.

Do you understand that for a work to be agreed on, a community of that discipline would have critiqued the work and agreed to it, right? If you do know this then also know that Eluyemi’s excavations were assessed by a community of archeologists locally & internationally vis a vis the Idio family’s historical records of Oke Ora before it was agreed to in the research.

P.S: the Oke Ora knowledge was however buried again to prevent people going there. It is a pilgrim site for the Ooni coronation only. There’s another Oke that holds importance during coronation but I’ll keep that out of NL.

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Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by macof(m): 2:45pm On Sep 15, 2018
Obalufon:

ibos are bantu their lineage can be traced back to south Africa region
smh. I had wanted to ignore this trolling but some stupid talk cannot be left without being called out lest it spreads


http://www.cbold.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/Lgs/LgXRefs.html
here is a complete list of all Bantu languages... most of them i had no idea even existed

Clearly there is no Ibo there


Here is Igbo being placed with Yoruba as a Volta-Niger language


here are Bantu languages(Bantoid) placed in Benue-congo group of language - a separate group from Volta-Niger

in case that is still too complicated for you.. here is a picture in colours clearly differentiating Igbo from the Bantu languages


stop making a mess of yourself.. faceless forum or not it is utterly stupid to go around trolling
so stop trolling and go get a life..you are obviously still very young

p.s I will not reply you again.. I hate trolls

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by macof(m): 3:09pm On Sep 15, 2018
Olu317:

As usual with flimsy excuses. If you dont know much on something,kindly do research instead of unnecessary and unbacked theories. Ibo kó yánmírín ní.





You better click on the above link to see your Ibo language being dissected through phonomes. Atkinson research team posited that language originated in the Western part of Sub-Saharan Africa and supports Acholonu Catherine thesis of an Igbo origin of languages because Igbo language is based in the Western part of Sub-Saharan Africa. Also the conclusion that this ancient mother-language left Africa during the earliest ‘Out of Africa’ migrations is the same as our own conclusions that Homo Erectus left Africa with a Language and a Culture intact, and not, as animal-like ‘primitive man’. The thesis is that the San (Khoisan) Bushmen of the Kalahari were among the earliest carriers of this Proto-Proto-Igbo mother tongue, was also confirmed in the Atkinson research findings.
Therefore, Igbo scholars worldwide ought to seize upon this added scientific evidence provided by Dr. Atkinson’s research but instead ,they deny as usual. Kindly do the needful by listing the coganate of Ibo words with the above yorubas,if you are sure. Ko má wáà fíìfíì ìdí koko kírí.

Are you mad or something? the person you say doesnt know something is obviously well educated.. and must have taken the subject of West African history seriously for some years in an academic environment

What's up with this total disregard for what people study?

btw, I asked you before what 'western world higher college'(your words) did you attend? what country?



The New York Times (Apr. 2011) has published an article by Nicholas Wade, reviewing a new research, which maintains that all languages developed from a common mother-language from Sub-Saharan Africa that was carried to other parts of the world by Homo erectus African migrants over 100,000 years ago during the Out of Africa migrations. The linguistic research was said to have been conducted by Dr Quentin Atkinson, a biologist. Though I find it hard understand the practice of linguistics by a Biologist, yet this research supports our thesis, nevertheless.

This is what I got out of a quick search of Atkinson research
It's interesting how a biologist and a science journalist are experts on African languages while the actual linguists are overlooked
its no wonder that most of what the article says comes without any evidence

Then again, when we look at the so called research it claims Igbo is the mother of all languages...what point does this make to prove your stance?
How does this play on to Yoruba having Hebrew origin?
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by RedboneSmith(m): 3:41pm On Sep 15, 2018
macof:


Are you mad or something? the person you say doesnt know something is obviously well educated.. and must have taken the subject of West African history seriously for some years in an academic environment

What's up with this total disregard for what people study?

btw, I asked you before what 'western world higher college'(your words) did you attend? what country?





This is what I got out of a quick search of Atkinson research
It's interesting how a biologist and a science journalist are experts on African languages while the actual linguists are overlooked
its no wonder that most of what the article says comes without any evidence

Then again, when we look at the so called research it claims Igbo is the mother of all languages...what point does this make to prove your stance?
How does this play on to Yoruba having Hebrew origin?

Please, pay this guy no heed. Anytime I am trying to have a serious discussion about Igbo or West African history with people and they mention Catherine Acholonu's works, I just stop responding to them because it would just be time-wasting and painful to me.

Catherine was neither a historian nor an archaeologist nor a linguist. The woman read literature, and then decided that what she wanted to do with her life was history, archaeology and historical linguistics. Someone who was serious would have at least tried to educate themselves a little about their chosen 'hobby', but not Catherine.

If you read this woman's work you will wonder whether she was on some kind of perpetual high. She claimed the city of Heliopolis in Ancient Egypt was actually in Igbo-Ukwu. There was literally no depth of ridiculosity that Catherine Acholonu did not sink to in her 'scholarship'. It is no wonder that none of her works appear in peer-reviewed journals and none of her books was published by a university press. Scholars do not quote her work; many scholars in fact completely ignore her works. Only amateurs on the internet and people with no historical training reference her.

She was fond of doing collaborations with people whose discipline have nothing to do with history, because she could not get actual historians to collaborate with her. For instance her book "They came Before Adam" (Where she claimed the Igbo language is the oldest language in the world) was written with an Indian computer scientist! A computer scientist of all people! grin

Another thing you should know: Catherine Acholonu mastered the art of quoting people out of context. Dr Quentin Atkinson, the biologist being mentioned here, had his work completely misquoted by Catherine.

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 4:22pm On Sep 15, 2018
macof:
smh. I had wanted to ignore this trolling but some stupid talk cannot be left without being called out lest it spreads


http://www.cbold.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/Lgs/LgXRefs.html
here is a complete list of all Bantu languages... most of them i had no idea even existed

Clearly there is no Ibo there


Here is Igbo being placed with Yoruba as a Volta-Niger language


here are Bantu languages(Bantoid) placed in Benue-congo group of language - a separate group from Volta-Niger

in case that is still too complicated for you.. here is a picture in colours clearly differentiating Igbo from the Bantu languages


stop making a mess of yourself.. faceless forum or not it is utterly stupid to go around trolling
so stop trolling and go get a life..you are obviously still very young

p.s I will not reply you again.. I hate trolls
this bullshit you posted was done by your white master to undermine african and create class base on phenotype. it has caused more war in Africa .anthropology is fraud and conspiracy to push white supremacy agenda.. I need to measure your skull index
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Obalufon: 4:40pm On Sep 15, 2018
Yeah i am younger at heart and wise enough to stay off what doesn't concern me.. lot of forum created by ibo hebrew jewish community go there and preach to them start from there first...Pls dont discorage the brother on this forum let him preach

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