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Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 1:42pm On Sep 25, 2021
Olu317:
It is igbà = time.
And not only ìgbà without any dictionary evidence to proof yours. Mine own has proof shown in the screenshot.
ìgbà is garden egg

Proof yours..

Ìgbà is time

Garden egg is ìgbá in fact to write it correctly you'll have to write ìgbáá as the last syllable would be stressed, anyway your brain can't carry this as it seems too complex for your low kilobyte brain cell

2 Likes

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 1:49pm On Sep 25, 2021
Olu317:
It is igbà = time.
And not only ìgbà without any dictionary evidence to proof yours. Mine own has proof shown in the screenshot.
ìgbà is garden egg

Proof yours..

Can you take a little time to study your silly dictionary? You can see in the second line that the igba was written without any diacritics, this shows that your useless and silly dictionary is not reliable

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 2:01pm On Sep 25, 2021
rhektor:

Àmì is not àmi

Àmì = Mark, sign etc
Àmi? I don't know what this means as it does not sound intelligible to any Yorùbá speaker, anywhere cheesy
You keep bursting yourself
Àmì = do-do (low-low tone)
Àmi = do-re (lọ-mid tone)
Guy go and show this to any Yorùbá teacher and come here to tell us what they say to you
Lmaoo. Post a dictionary to aid your view and stop being an encyclopaedia grin wink cheesy because you are not. It is that simple..
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 2:49pm On Sep 25, 2021
Olu317:
If you say so but clarify the sound on these two,
"igbá or ìgbá-calabash and ìgbá - garden egg" as you had posited , because both do not sound as homophone to me.


Both are homophones to some extent in that they have exactly the same spellings. But proper homophones occur when you have ambiguity. Ìgbá and igba are not ambiguity, they are homophones.

Let's assign the term homophones loosely to words with the same pronunciations but different meaning, Yoruba for garden egg and Calabash for example.

Let's ascribe ambiguity to words that is the exactly the same sound but used differently, like "saw" mill and "saw" meal, that would give us perfect ambiguity.

Now let's demonstrate it "iya n ro omo re", that "ro" is an ambiguity, even if you read me right, it takes me to tell you exactly what I mean. If I leave it the way it is, you can't tell what I mean.

I could say, the woman is force-feeding her child, the woman is encouraging her child, the woman is leaning on her child, the woman is de-radicalising her child. Thus "ro" is ambiguity.


Let's simplify the rhythm

Diacritics is as simple as abc, doremi, ajoke, good. So, the closest to the rhythm, doremi in our igba is remi, joke, igbá. So, Calabash rhymes in diacritics with Joke.

On the other hand, igba, (garden egg) also called ikan (not ikan o, termite, no. And not short for one) goes with Domi, Saka, ìgbá, baba, oga, Egbon, boda, efo, Oyo. These have the same rhymes.



However, I flow with the accents that point to ìgbáà (fall-rise-fall) as garden egg. Alternatively "ìgbáà",which differs from "igba"(200).


Bro, you don't just have to stress the readers. You can't write ìgbá like that as long as you are not the one who adopted the Latin alphabets for Yoruba.

You follow Akoto ede Yoruba, don't be a spoilt brat ooo cheesy cheesy just obey the diction rules once and for all, it's very easy, practice music and rhyming similar sounds.

If you want to proof your diction as the agbedegbeyo, substitute the middle à for ' but still, such effect is unnecessary stress and new confusion is created. So it's better to go with the Yoruba rule of diction.



Take a look at these syllable, i gb a (aa)- the gbá is to sweep,gbà to recieve. Moreso, ABIDI comes to mind.


Abidi is mimimi, rise, rise, rise. Abd olope. Don't stretch any Yoruba vowel sounds, it's uncalled for, it's a needless effort. Except in aha, haa, or where two words join with the same vowel at the last and first of a conjoined word, e.g., alaagbaa.

Even the Yoruba will compress it to ala'gba, you can't possibly be caught trying to spell every sound you come across to your readers. You will get them tired of reading your fine ideas.



The dictionary I use is not outdated one. Not at all. Beside, it has been revised even up till 2010 and beyond, which is the most used Yoruba dictionary. The organisation which produced remains intact.


The one I saw in your last post is the work of an indomie generation typist who typed for people who produced a dictionary that is not vetted by a professional or even a Yoruba reader before it went to press.

Take time to repeat the tonisofa, you don't just have ear for beats but you can learn it. I don't too, but Yoruba language has been my favorite subject from childhood.

We keep learning till we die.

Happy weekend boss.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 3:17pm On Sep 25, 2021
Olu317:
I can not place where your statement is coming from! Seriously, I am a bit confuse. Anyway, I did not posit ọrọ̀ as word which,means wealthy. While I emphasise on ọ̀rọ as word,or converse etc.

I know pumpkin as elégede, though there synonymous names for things in Yoruba language as done also elsewhere.

The fact, is that every diacritics signs used in Yoruba came through Roman-Latin to affix the mindset of the reader so as to be able to have the idea of the probable pronounciation, so I do not fancy the usage of musical tone alone to know how the pattern flow in the order of mi-high tone,re-mid tone and do-low tone(mi-re-do)

So, let us not footdrag the accurate form of writing yoruba language because there is no such as superior Yoruba dialect.

Change your Dictionary, sorry for the digressions, you are actually right about how I took the opening part, the wild pumpkin I mean is also called pandoro if I'm right. It's from it you have Oro alagogo. Not elegede.

You know it's not possible to view picture entry when you want to make a post, so I took your entry for another word which I dealt with.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 4:07pm On Sep 25, 2021
macof:


grin grin as I said... schizophrenic

https://www.nairaland.com/6771353/pastor-shaibu-butchered-death-muslim

Check front page, mallam. That's revenge you possibly seeks on the "Abrahamic attack" as you love to put it.

Nobody speaks in that hateful language here but you. Their reason is similar to your comment on the Yoruba Hebrew tribe thread.

You don't negotiate with wild animals in the jungle, you will be killed is you will be killed.

1 Like 2 Shares

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by macof(m): 4:39pm On Sep 25, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


[s]https://www.nairaland.com/6771353/pastor-shaibu-butchered-death-muslim

Check front page, mallam. That's revenge you possibly seeks on the "Abrahamic attack" as you love to put it.

Nobody speaks in that hateful language here but you. Their reason is similar to your comment on the Yoruba Hebrew tribe thread.

You don't negotiate with wild animals in the jungle, you will be killed is you will be killed.[/s]

More manifestation of schizophrenia
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 5:40pm On Sep 25, 2021
macof:


More manifestation of schizophrenia

Look at a self acclaimed historian.

"What concerned Oduduwa of Ife with Robin law of Oyo?"
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 5:58pm On Sep 25, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


Both are homophones to some extent in that they have exactly the same spellings. But proper homophones occur when you have ambiguity. Ìgbá and igba are not ambiguity, they are homophones.

Let's assign the term homophones loosely to words with the same pronunciations but different meaning, Yoruba for garden egg and Calabash for example.

Let's ascribe ambiguity to words that is the exactly the same sound but used differently, like "saw" mill and "saw" meal, that would give us perfect ambiguity.

Now let's demonstrate it "iya n ro omo re", that "ro" is an ambiguity, even if you read me right, it takes me to tell you exactly what I mean. If I leave it the way it is, you can't tell what I mean.

I could say, the woman is force-feeding her child, the woman is encouraging her child, the woman is leaning on her child, the woman is de-radicalising her child. Thus "ro" is ambiguity.


Let's simplify the rhythm

Diacritics is as simple as abc, doremi, ajoke, good. So, the closest to the rhythm, doremi in our igba is remi, joke, igbá. So, Calabash rhymes in diacritics with Joke.

On the other hand, igba, (garden egg) also called ikan (not ikan o, termite, no. And not short for one) goes with Domi, Saka, ìgbá, baba, oga, Egbon, boda, efo, Oyo. These have the same rhymes.



Bro, you don't just have to stress the readers. You can't write ìgbá like that as long as you are not the one who adopted the Latin alphabets for Yoruba.

You follow Akoto ede Yoruba, don't be a spoilt brat ooo cheesy cheesy just obey the diction rules once and for all, it's very easy, practice music and rhyming similar sounds.

If you want to proof your diction as the agbedegbeyo, substitute the middle à for ' but still, such effect is unnecessary stress and new confusion is created. So it's better to go with the Yoruba rule of diction.



Abidi is mimimi, rise, rise, rise. Abd olope. Don't stretch any Yoruba vowel sounds, it's uncalled for, it's a needless effort. Except in aha, haa, or where two words join with the same vowel at the last and first of a conjoined word, e.g., alaagbaa.

Even the Yoruba will compress it to ala'gba, you can't possibly be caught trying to spell every sound you come across to your readers. You will get them tired of reading your fine ideas.



The one I saw in your last post is the work of an indomie generation typist who typed for people who produced a dictionary that is not vetted by a professional or even a Yoruba reader before it went to press.

Take time to repeat the tonisofa, you don't just have ear for beats but you can learn it. I don't too, but Yoruba language has been my favorite subject from childhood.

We keep learning till we die.

Happy weekend boss.
Anyway thanks. But the dictonary is not an Idomie one o grin cheesy.. I shall send the cover page but it will be sent to later. It is one of the oldest written Dictionary in Yorubaland. The first advance publication was done 1911-1913.


Secondly, the Abidi I actually made reference to was the mid tone "A", and not all the abidi samples.


Cheers
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 7:38pm On Sep 25, 2021
Olu317:
Anyway thanks. But the dictonary is not an Idomie one o grin cheesy.. I shall send the cover page but it will be sent to later. It is one of the oldest written Dictionary in Yorubaland. The first advance publication was done 1911-1913.


Secondly, the Abidi I actually made reference to was the mid tone "A", and not all the abidi samples.


Cheers

Is it the dictionary from Bishop Ajayi Crowder?

That one is the oldest o, I learnt that the manuscript got burnt and the piece they were able to salvage is what becomes the dico.

The one you share before na yawa o. Thanks for looking into it, more grace.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 10:32am On Sep 26, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


Is it the dictionary from Bishop Ajayi Crowder?

That one is the oldest o, I learnt that the manuscript got burnt and the piece they were able to salvage is what becomes the dico.

The one you share before na yawa o. Thanks for looking into it, more grace.
Yes it is from Rev. Samuel Ajayi Crowther's account which was published in 1843, which his fellow Yoruba writers contributed to the compilation of the wider one in 1911. So, it is one of the best you can lay your hand.

The alternative one being used in scholarly reference is Abraham 1958 R. C. Abraham. Dictionary of Modern Yoruba. London: University of London Press.

In 1892, Rev. Lijàdù wrote Ẹ̀làà (hightone) which is another name for Ọ̀rúnmìẹ̀làà and you expect me to change it to Ọ̀rùnmìelà-Ọ̀rúnmìlà ? I won't do that sir.I follow the path of the older order because legendary fathers such Rev. E. M. Lijadu, Abímbọ́lá Wánde Abímbọ́lá (still alive) Adélékè Adéẹ̀kọ́(still alive) etc followed it.

The 19th Century Yorubas are even more sound in Yoruba language and its dictions than mid 20th and 21st century Yoruba scholars except those who keyed in to the past. So permit do things the way my ancient ancestors did when it was well with them in the era of Alara, Arẹsà, Olúgbọn.... And not write like a foreigner to my accent.

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 12:34pm On Sep 26, 2021
Olu317:
Yes it is from Rev. Samuel Ajayi Crowther's account which was published in 1843, which his fellow Yoruba writers contributed to the compilation of the wider one in 1911. So, it is one of the best you can lay your hand.

The alternative one being used in scholarly reference is Abraham 1958 R. C. Abraham. Dictionary of Modern Yoruba. London: University of London Press.

In 1892, Rev. Lijàdù wrote Ẹ̀làà (hightone) which is another name for Ọ̀rúnmìẹ̀làà and you expect me to change it to Ọ̀rùnmìelà-Ọ̀rúnmìlà ? I won't do that sir.I follow the path of the older order because legendary fathers such Rev. E. M. Lijadu, Abímbọ́lá Wánde Abímbọ́lá (still alive) Adélékè Adéẹ̀kọ́(still alive) etc followed it.

The 19th Century Yorubas are even more sound in Yoruba language and its dictions than mid 20th and 21st century Yoruba scholars except those who keyed in to the past. So permit do things the way my ancient ancestors did when it was well with them in the era of Alara, Arẹsà, Olúgbọn.... And not write like a foreigner to my accent.

Oro naa de ti wa fe sumi bayi o, but mo mo pe o ye awon agbagba meta to modi eeta sa. Nothing spoil. You can't go back but forward, however, you can bring up the rear.

But on Orunmila, ifaodu, there's nothing I can do about your idiosyncrasies. You want to mark the presence of Ela in Yoruba invocation of the name Orunmila. Na religion be that.

I'm okay as long as I can comprehend your contributions, I'm not here that anyone might please me or to please anyone either, just to exhibit the best of my findings with like minds.

How do you pronounces Orunmila, is it Orunmila or orunmiela? I go with the former, it's the way I heard it in Yoruba, and I believe it's the way it's written down, Orunmila.

Can you share the pics of the source of Orunmiela? Just assuming if it comes from a source other than you. And really there was many consultation and editing during the adoption of the Latin alphabets by Crowder.

The "Abrahamics" (apology to mallam) adopted the Latin alphabets for Yoruba language and the Bishop did a lot to see the Yoruba language grow and spread it's tentacles.

Crowther encountered a lot of insights from the translation of Bible to the Yoruba language that made him conclude that the Yoruba were a Hebrew people.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 4:34pm On Sep 26, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


Oro naa de ti wa fe sumi bayi o, but mo mo pe o ye awon agbagba meta to modi eeta sa. Nothing spoil. You can't go back but forward, however, you can bring up the rear.

But on Orunmila, ifaodu, there's nothing I can do about your idiosyncrasies. You want to mark the presence of Ela in Yoruba invocation of the name Orunmila. Na religion be that.

I'm okay as long as I can comprehend your contributions, I'm not here that anyone might please me or to please anyone either, just to exhibit the best of my findings with like minds.

How do you pronounces Orunmila, is it Orunmila or orunmiela? I go with the former, it's the way I heard it in Yoruba, and I believe it's the way it's written down, Orunmila.

Can you share the pics of the source of Orunmiela? Just assuming if it comes from a source other than you. And really there was many consultation and editing during the adoption of the Latin alphabets by Crowder.

The "Abrahamics" (apology to mallam) adopted the Latin alphabets for Yoruba language and the Bishop did a lot to see the Yoruba language grow and spread it's tentacles.

Crowther encountered a lot of insights from the translation of Bible to the Yoruba language that made him conclude that the Yoruba were a Hebrew people.
Ordinarily, people seemingly imagined that Ọ̀rúnmi-Ọrúmi and the last part Ẹ̀làà who is identified as Ẹ̀làà gbogili Olúawo Ọọrún(Odù Irete) are different . Far from it. But, Can you see the difference in the movement of the tone?

The "Ọ̀" and "Ọ ", something happened which
shows some form of assumed differences between Ọrún and Ọ̀rún-mi based on semanic rhetoric grin

When awo memorise odù in ifáodù,he tends to misunderstood the knowledge of the master creator in Ẹ̀làà due to some certain challenges that ravages part of Yoruba history which political aspect of it in the hierarchical manner of the arrangement of kingly lineage in Yoruba land.


Nevertheless, there is orderliness when ifa priest chants which begins as Elaa 3ce and cast lot for patient to seek further knowledge on problem.

Now, on the aspect of the account which identified Ẹ̀làà in that era even till now was also accepted as the second in command to Èlédùmárè, by Rev. Lijadu who challenged the Ifa priests of those era because they were the actual elite of that era even till.

The missionary christians motives were to challenged the authority of the God who they had thought, is superior to Ẹ̀làà but unfortunately, Rev. Lijadu could not do much because he realised there are two personalities in the Yoruba religion who are Eledumare and Elaa(Ọ̀rúnmilà) .

Even if Rev.Lijadu didnt realise there is also Ẹ̀làà who is the voice and spirit that must be called thrice. But he went far to know some fact about Yoruba religion.

In his summary, his experience was at the end summed up that the Yorubas have knowledge of God grin cheesy ,whom they called Eledumare and the one who is the second in command is Ẹ̀làà. But differs on other ground by accusing the priests of abuse of office and that itis not Godly to use sacrifice etcInterestingly, three personalities are the ry of God in one. And these are as following :
Ẹlẹdá-Èlédùmárè(owner of everything)
Ẹ̀làà(ọ̀rúnmilàà-creator)
Ẹ̀làà (voice) .

I will post the page where Lijadu made that statement
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 6:08pm On Sep 26, 2021
Olu317:
Ordinarily, people seemingly imagined that Ọ̀rúnmi-Ọrúmi and the last part Ẹ̀làà who is identified as Ẹ̀làà gbogili Olúawo Ọọrún(Odù Irete) are different . Far from it. But, Can you see the difference in the movement of the tone?

The "Ọ̀" and "Ọ ", something happened which
shows some form of assumed differences between Ọrún and Ọ̀rún-mi based on semanic rhetoric grin

When awo memorise odù in ifáodù,he tends to misunderstood the knowledge of the master creator in Ẹ̀làà due to some certain challenges that ravages part of Yoruba history which political aspect of it in the hierarchical manner of the arrangement of kingly lineage in Yoruba land.


Nevertheless, there is orderliness when ifa priest chants which begins as Elaa 3ce and cast lot for patient to seek further knowledge on problem.

Now, on the aspect of the account which identified Ẹ̀làà in that era even till now was also accepted as the second in command to Èlédùmárè, by Rev. Lijadu who challenged the Ifa priests of those era because they were the actual elite of that era even till.

The missionary christians motives were to challenged the authority of the God who they had thought, is superior to Ẹ̀làà but unfortunately, Rev. Lijadu could not do much because he realised there are two personalities in the Yoruba religion who are Eledumare and Elaa(Ọ̀rúnmilà) .

Even if Rev.Lijadu didnt realise there is also Ẹ̀làà who is the voice and spirit that must be called thrice. But he went far to know some fact about Yoruba religion.

In his summary, his experience was at the end summed up that the Yorubas have knowledge of God grin cheesy ,whom they called Eledumare and the one who is the second in command is Ẹ̀làà. But differs on other ground by accusing the priests of abuse of office and that itis not Godly to use sacrifice etcInterestingly, three personalities are the ry of God in one. And these are as following :
Ẹlẹdá-Èlédùmárè(owner of everything)
Ẹ̀làà(ọ̀rúnmilàà-creator)
Ẹ̀làà (voice) .

I will post the page where Lijadu made that statement

Revd Moses Lijadu. That should be 1930s, Egba Reverend and Yoruba traditional religion (Ifa) enthusiast. I saw his book at CSS bookshop, Marina. I will get the book ASAP.

The last part is his "Christianity" perspective of Yoruba tradition. I don't think there's any "metalokan" in Yoruba language and culture and if there's any, it must be available to validate the Christian version for further review.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 11:17pm On Sep 26, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


Revd Moses Lijadu. That should be 1930s, Egba Reverend and Yoruba traditional religion (Ifa) enthusiast. I saw his book at CSS bookshop, Marina. I will get the book ASAP.

The last part is his "Christianity" perspective of Yoruba tradition. I don't think there's any "metalokan" in Yoruba language and culture and if there's any, it must be available to validate the Christian version for further review.
1892 precisely. I sent you a pdf of reference to him on his finding about Ifaodu and comparison with Christianity. Meanwhile ẹtaokò is in ifáodù but in pattern

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 11:47pm On Sep 26, 2021
rhektor:


Ìgbà is time

Garden egg is ìgbá in fact to write it correctly you'll have to write ìgbáá as the last syllable would be stressed, anyway your brain can't carry this as it seems too complex for your low kilobyte brain cell
Lmaoo!
So it is same or close pronunciation with your ìgbá+á grin grin ? Tell me, has these tones not altered the suppose meaning of the word ?
You have been able to write ìgbáá- grin cheesy (priest calabash) doremifasolati grin Perhaps a locust tree. Let me posit here that your "ì" is just the only alphabet I support. See I had rewritten it as ìgbàá which is seemingly better than yours...hoin grin
Ì-gbà-do ( corn), cheesy grin
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by TAO11(f): 5:03pm On Sep 27, 2021
rhektor:
Can you take a little time to study your silly dictionary? You can see in the second line that the igba was written without any diacritics, this shows that your useless and silly dictionary is not reliable
Not reliable for diacritics.

4 Likes

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 5:56pm On Sep 27, 2021
TAO11:
Not reliable for diacritics.
Kikikiki you try. Anyway kini me cheesy mọ̀ ? Yoruba diacritics masters? Lmaoo grin cheesy
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 7:34am On Sep 28, 2021
Olu317:
Lmaoo!
So it is same or close pronunciation with your ìgbá+á grin grin ? Tell me, has these tones not altered the suppose meaning of the word ?
You have been able to write ìgbáá- grin cheesy (priest calabash) doremifasolati grin Perhaps a locust tree. Let me posit here that your "ì" is just the only alphabet I support. See I had rewritten it as ìgbàá which is seemingly better than yours...hoin grin
Ì-gbà-do ( corn), cheesy grin

@Olu, if you stress the last a and put opposing tone, you get a new sound. Egbàá naira, egbewa naira, igba ilopo mewa naira, N2000 naira.

ÀÁ means that the second A will do whatever is next in the sentence: agbatan n làá gbole, báa daso fole a paá laro.

Check the sentence and observe the diacritics. Like rhektor said, if you must stress the word and retain the meaning, it should be the same diacritic, leave politics now, follow the sound.

Igbàá naira will be a misnomer. My advice is, ogbon o digi, okun lafií soó. Subscribe to the standard accent. It's still the Yoruba accent.

Should an imperial Briton write you in Elizabethan English in this age and time, would you have a good time reading it?

But no problem if you won't. It will always cost you the burden of proof.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 8:25am On Sep 28, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


That's pleasing you.

If you don't understand what you want, how would you understand Yoruba history?

Say that to your friend who read and never understand what he read hence make untrue statements about words and even try to rewrite words to suit his ill-conceived meaning and narratives

2 Likes 1 Share

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 8:25am On Sep 28, 2021
TAO11:
Not reliable for diacritics.

Thank you for the correction

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 8:31am On Sep 28, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


@Olu, if you stress the last a and put opposing tone, you get a new sound. Egbàá naira, egbewa naira, igba ilopo mewa naira, N2000 naira.

ÀÁ means that the second A will do whatever is next in the sentence: agbatan n làá gbole, báa daso fole a paá laro.

Check the sentence and observe the diacritics. Like rhektor said, if you must stress the word and retain the meaning, it should be the same diacritic, leave politics now, follow the sound.

Igbàá naira will be a misnomer. My advice is, ogbon o digi, okun lafií soó. Subscribe to the standard accent. It's still the Yoruba accent.

Should an imperial Briton write you in Elizabethan English in this age and time, would you have a good time reading it?

But no problem if you won't. It will always cost you the burden of proof.

Probably somebody here is still using his brain and not too arrogant to know and accept what is right, meanwhile Ogbeni Olu317 will still destroy the language with his seemingly correct dictionary
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 10:08am On Sep 28, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


@Olu, if you stress the last a and put opposing tone, you get a new sound. Egbàá naira, egbewa naira, igba ilopo mewa naira, N2000 naira.

ÀÁ means that the second A will do whatever is next in the sentence: agbatan n làá gbole, báa daso fole a paá laro.

Check the sentence and observe the diacritics. Like rhektor said, if you must stress the word and retain the meaning, it should be the same diacritic, leave politics now, follow the sound.

Igbàá naira will be a misnomer. My advice is, ogbon o digi, okun lafií soó. Subscribe to the standard accent. It's still the Yoruba accent.

Should an imperial Briton write you in Elizabethan English in this age and time, would you have a good time reading it?

But no problem if you won't. It will always cost you the burden of proof.
Not contesting the accented ìgbà or igbà as someone else tries to do.

I am only illustrating the diacritic closeness between the ìgbà-do and ìgbàá which seemingl y altered by the last "A" which is "high tone."

Queen Elizabeth's English language is not as rich as Yoruba's cool linguistically. So no need for such comparison. Beside,English language is modern as compared to Yoruba language with its complication. Nevertheless, I know, the Yoruba language and her dialect differs in certain pronunciation on some part of speech even when all uses same words. The Pdf should give you some clue about my stance.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 10:11am On Sep 29, 2021
rhektor:


Probably somebody here is still using his brain and not too arrogant to know and accept what is right, meanwhile Ogbeni Olu317 will still destroy the language with his seemingly correct dictionary
Lol. Atleast, it is one of the oldest dictionary of Yoruba language in the world which its production was according to the laid foudation by Rev.Samuel Ajayi Crowther [b][/b] for his contribution. So,thank me later.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 10:16pm On Sep 29, 2021
Olu317:
Not contesting the accented ìgbà or igbà as someone else tries to do.

I am only illustrating the diacritic closeness between the ìgbà-do and ìgbàá which seemingl y altered by the last "A" which is "high tone."

Queen Elizabeth's English language is not as rich as Yoruba's cool linguistically. So no need for such comparison. Beside,English language is modern as compared to Yoruba language with its complication. Nevertheless, I know, the Yoruba language and her dialect differs in certain pronunciation on some part of speech even when all uses same words. The Pdf should give you some clue about my stance.

Right on point.

Let go of controversy, let the perfect wisdom find expression through you. In all this, what I've been able to learn is, whenever the phenomenon of opposing tones end a word, the last vowel is a syllable that cannot stand on its own.

Then underneath, another alternative phrase can also be used to convey the same meaning that has been economized in the last syllabic vowel. Example:

Oju kîí t'owo:
oju ko ki(í) nti owo
Oju ko níí ti owo

Check this instance, (í) acts as validator or affirmation. All the predicate you might use will support affirmation and maintain the same diacritic at the last vowel.

Igbayíîí: igba ti awà yí, this cluster of vowel can be stretched for their alternatives and the substitutes as we can see will key in with the diacritics of the syllables being replaced.


In a given Yoruba word, the last opposing vowel sound that is the same alphabet as the one before the last, is a suffix.

Thanks for helping me see this boss.

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Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by rhektor(m): 7:56pm On Sep 30, 2021
Olu317:
Lol. Atleast, it is one of the oldest dictionary of Yoruba language in the world which its production was according to the laid foudation by Rev.Samuel Ajayi Crowther [b][/b] for his contribution. So,thank me later.
LMAO who argue with you that your dictionary is not old? In fact, it is archaic, obsolete and not useful for teaching and learning about the language without proper supervision, know this know peace ✌️

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 1:12am On Oct 01, 2021
rhektor:

If one is to interpret what you wrote in the sentence lol
Ọ̀rọ grin grin = means nothing in Yorùbá not even in any of the Yorùbá dialect
Which school taught you tí write like this?
You even have to argue that ọ̀rọ̀ is wrong like what the f* is wrong with you? Olu317, I have said this before, "go back to school and learn proper use of diacritics in Yorùbá writing.


It is people like you who would argue Ọta and Otta, aiye and ayé ẹyẹ and ẹiyẹ etc

Cc
Macof TAO11
Lmao. ọ̀rọ means word

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by macof(m): 2:17am On Oct 01, 2021
Olu317:
Lmao. ọ̀rọ means word

Get your hands on proper Yoruba language books since you can't figure out diacritics on your own and stop arguing nonsense.
You can see the first screenshot avoids writing diacritics in almost every word there, the writer is not familiar with how to write proper Yoruba

A case of blind leading the blind

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by Olu317(m): 6:19am On Oct 01, 2021
macof:


Get your hands on proper Yoruba language books since you can't figure out diacritics on your own and stop arguing nonsense.
You can see the first screenshot avoids writing diacritics in almost every word there, the writer is not familiar with how to write proper Yoruba

A case of blind leading the blind
I hear you grin cheesy grin. Teacher teaching me falsehood is unacceptable. Kindly focus on ọ̀rọ and stop lamenting.

These are two different books from
different sources which use same word and can't be wrong together.

Abeg,post your own source or are you now Mr. encyclopedia ? Ride on with false statement

1 Like

Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 9:00am On Oct 01, 2021
Olu, you have a great spirit. Pay attention and follow what I've told you, earlier. There's a reason you are here again. The word òro is different from òrò. I will explain how.

Compare òwò as in eni òwò (Reverend) with òwo koko lafií wogi, òwò orisa lafií wafin. Two times, owo is used in the same proverb but different tonisofa why?

Because the first òwo is immediately followed by a word starting with a consonant and as such, the tone must maintain high pitch to achieve balance of speech.

Secondly, an agbedegbeyo should know that you have a case of aranpo in the òwo, ò has been eliminated and you are left with the suffix o. This morpheme "o" stands for "eyi ti nse ti".

Òwò, eyi ti nse ti koko lafií wogi. Can you be spelling out your intentions like this? No, you will go for "asunki", hence "òwo koko lafií wogi...", Òrò buruku ii bakun 'le" Get it?

Òwò orisha lafií wafin, now the diacritic follows the normal tone that the word will be set to in a dictionary. Since I've said it before, the last vowel sounds are a word on their own.

Some serves as verbs, some as pronoun and some like possessive pronoun fii, the last "I" is to replace ng, as in ...la fi ng, which is akin to geround (ing) in English.

Mo ng bo, I'm coming: the Yoruba places her geround before the verb, while English makes a suffix of her own to make verb morphology.

Again, your persistence shows how little your opponents know, they can't explain the apparent because they are blind to verb morphology in Yoruba.

Gbo is gbo, (listen), but "mo ngbo" is the same as I'm listening. Ngbo is verb morphology of gbo, as listening is to "listen". This example is apparent, but the one of Oro is intellectual.

It's compression of possessive noun upon a noun phrase that alter the diacritics in question, hence the author said "Otito ni òro Aliyu wipe alagbe I ku loyo".

If he intends to speak colloquial, he could have said "Otito òrò ni òrò ti..." Now we have two ways to speak vocabularies, eloquent speech and colloquial. You choose the best for the mood.

That foolish man brings down everything he doesn't understand.

Thanks very much boss.
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by absoluteSuccess: 9:34am On Oct 01, 2021
macof:


Get your hands on proper Yoruba language books since you can't figure out diacritics on your own and stop arguing nonsense.
You can see the first screenshot avoids writing diacritics in almost every word there, the writer is not familiar with how to write proper Yoruba

A case of blind leading the blind

You love to bring down anything you don't understand.

Sparingly using diacritics, and you don't observe the tone of the prose that the writer is an ardent, eloquent and a man versed in Yoruba linguistic aesthetics?

Closing with the kind of remarks at a piece of literature that's aa old as you can see implies that you are intellectually blurry, and neither Yoruba nor an expert.

*His work is not targeted at learners. It's not Alawiye.

*He only apply tone at a word that has some stress intellectual wise as easy guide.

*It's the ideal way to write for the elite Yoruba knowing that they are adept already.

*He's not Oxford University Press.

How could a bookworm and a researcher or critic miss this details?
Re: Yoruba Hebrew Heritage by macof(m): 10:09am On Oct 01, 2021
absoluteSuccess:


[s] You love to bring down anything you don't understand.

Sparingly using diacritics, and you don't observe the tone of the prose that the writer is an ardent, eloquent and a man versed in Yoruba linguistic aesthetics?

Closing with the kind of remarks at a piece of literature that's aa old as you can see implies that you are intellectually blurry, and neither Yoruba nor an expert.

*His work is not targeted at learners. It's not Alawiye.

*He only apply tone at a word that has some stress intellectual wise as easy guide.

*It's the ideal way to write for the elite Yoruba knowing that they are adept already.

*He's not Oxford University Press.

How could a bookworm miss this details?[/s]

Keep crying on my mentions. You and Olu are nothing but frauds. And time and time again you have exposed yourselves
All this is just damaga control, instead of admitting to his wrong, you are going through corners grin

What is there to understand or "not understand"?
That Olu doesn't know how to write proper Yoruba with diacritics? In your comment above, did you not just tell him he was wrong too?
Oh it's only you that can tell him when he is wrong, when I do it, I am bringing down what I don't understand??
You are a dishonest mad man

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