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The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book - Literature (5) - Nairaland

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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 2:17pm On Sep 07, 2018
Here I was thinking Osezele could have done some magic, but now Elliott is dead. How I wish someone could whip Beddie.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 3:02am On Sep 08, 2018
One chapter a week it is then. Thanks everyone, for understanding!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 9:06am On Sep 08, 2018
So so painfu DAT Elliot died. Pls pls someone should put beedie in his place.

1 Like

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by izicky(m): 9:19pm On Sep 08, 2018
i don't know if am the only one? but i wish Nosa could kill Beddie.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by phoenixchap: 5:49pm On Sep 10, 2018
ObehiD.... Nice work neatly crafted and a masterpiece, I think Beedie is a pain in the neck and as such should be corrected, he thinks everything he has done is in the interest of all the school but he's exposing them to greater danger. Ehi and Ose I hope they don't kill the coroner and the assistant not further complicate issue and hope they help restore order in the school as well.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 5:03am On Sep 14, 2018
@spixytinxy I agree it is really painful that he died. I was hoping Osezele could somehow do something to save him but when she didn't cry...so sad. About Beedie...well, I'm not his biggest fan right now, but he might deserve some slack, who knows...

@izicky kill!? That's harsh oh. I guess we'll have to wait and see what Nosa does.

@phoenixchap thank you!!! I definitely agree, Beedie is too proud. I don't know if it's his natural state of being or if he's overcompensating and trying too hard to be like Emeka, but something needs to happen because I'm starting to fear for the pack. As for Ehi and Ose...well, let me just say that we'll see cheesy
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 5:05am On Sep 14, 2018
Chapter Thirteen
---------------------------------------------------------
The Community, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
---------------------------------------------------------

Standing beside him, Odion watched her uncle Omoruyi as he stood with his arms crossed against his chest, leaning against a stone pillar. Then she took her attention back to the view in front of her. It had been years since her family had lived here, years she’d watched with relish as she filled the holes in her memory for the first six years of her life. Still, every time she walked into the courtyard and looked at the mansion she’d grown up in from this angle, she was dumbstruck by the sheer opulence of it. The courtyard was an open space with beautiful green grass and blooming flower beds, both products of her mother’s mark. There were still holes in Odion’s memory, like how they’d gone from this to a family living in the single room squalor she’d seen in her first vision of the past. And she was so ravenous for the information to fill the holes in her memory that she barely went out of her visions. If it wasn’t for Oare, she would completely forget that she was human, and needed to sustain herself to keep living. But there was so much information and so little time to absorb it. She was starting to understand the elements now, starting to understand what they wanted her to see. Only her apparition spoke to her, and only sparingly, but as she watched the past she began to reclaim parts of herself, the parts that had been hidden by her ignorance.

Omoruyi took a step into the courtyard and his movements pulled Odion out of her musings. Still standing in the roofed corridor bordering the courtyard, she let her eyes scan over the parts of her home which she could see from where she stood. The house itself was a mastery in architecture, with spiral staircases connecting the courtyard to each of the three floors. Each floor had a railed balcony looking out into the courtyard in the middle of the building. From a past vision she knew that this house was a gift from her grand-mother, the God-born, to her son’s family. She’d bought it and had it renovated within a month of their exile from their family home. The God-born had had them moved in without saying a word to her son. Odion had chosen to stay with the baby her when her mother had gone to confront the God-born about it. She didn’t know exactly what happened during that meeting, but they’d moved in when Itohan, her mother, got back. It took the God-born months to come around and visit them, and only then, Odion suspected, because she couldn’t stand staying away from her grand-children. True to her word, the God-born still hadn’t forgiven Ejehmen for what he did, although she’d started talking to him after a year.

“Uncle Uyi!” Idemudia screamed. He dropped the ball he’d been playing with and ran over to his uncle. Omoruyi scooped him up into a bear hug as soon as he got close enough.

“How’s one of my favorite nephews doing?” Omoruyi asked, holding Idemudia up in his left arm. Odion moved closer, studying the man’s face as he spoke. She knew too much to trust him, too much to stop the instinctive doubt that came to her mind whenever she saw him. But the emotions she saw in his face whenever he held them, his nephews and even the nieces he’d almost had killed, the emotions were genuine. He loved them, she knew that for a fact.

Omoruyi threw the nine-year-old Idemudia up in the air, caught him, and then put him back on his feet. “I’m fine uncle. Eroms is teaching me how to play bolokhon. Come and see.” Idemudia excitedly grabbed onto Omoruyi’s hand, pulling him towards the discarded ball, and the twelve-year-old boy standing by it.

Eroms walked towards Omoruyi and stretched out his hand. “Good afternoon uncle.” He said as he waited for Omoruyi’s hand.

Omoruyi looked at the little hand extended formally to him and burst out laughing. “Haven’t your parents taught you how we greet?” he only slightly scolded.

Eroms pulled his hand back and crossed his arms. “I will not uphold the customs of a family that threw us out like trash!” he yelled back. Odion beamed with pride. From the first time she’d seen her elder brother, when he was just six and playing with the God-born, she’d grown increasingly proud of him.

Omoruyi frowned. “You’re a descendant of the Enikaro Eroms, an Ehizokhae, you won’t always be outside our ancestral grounds. You and your siblings will come back home one day, and when you do you have to know all the customs and traditions, especially how to greet.” This wasn’t the first time Odion had heard Omoruyi say something like this to one of them, inferring that he was determined to see them restored to the position he’d stolen from them. Odion wasn’t inclined to believe him, but then, after she’d watched him lobby to kill her and her twin sister Akhere, he could say the sky was blue and she’d still be skeptical.

“I am an Omorodion.” Eroms stated flatly. Then he turned around and walked over to the discarded ball. He picked it up and began joggling it on his knees. He bounced the ball around fifteen times on both knees, then fifteen times exchanging between both knees, then fifteen times on each foot, before kicking it up in the air and starting to run around with it.

“He will be a great bolokhon player someday.”

Odion turned around at the sound of that voice. She smiled. He couldn’t see her, she knew it, but the voice had become very familiar to her, especially now that the visions were prompting her memory. She remembered him singing her and Akhere to sleep, telling them bedtime stories, teaching them how to brush their teeth, and always doing it with a smile, as if there was nothing he loved doing more. Sighing, she watched with a sad smile as her father put his briefcase down by the pillar and walked into the courtyard.

“Uyi.” He greeted, clasping his brother in a hug. Odion felt the familiar urge to run over and pull him away, to shield him from the brother who’d cost him so much.

“I was just having an interesting conversation with Eroms.” Omoruyi said, after they hugged.

“Oh?”

“I told him that he needs to learn our cultures and traditions because he is an Ehizokhae. But he insists he’s an Omordion.”

Ejehmen chuckled. “And what prompted this conversation.”

“A certain boy’s inability to greet.”

The smile faded from Ejehmen’s face. “Eromosele!” He bellowed, calling out to his son with a snap in his voice. Eroms came running as he always did whenever their father used that tone. “Greet your uncle.”

“I greeted him already.” Eroms replied defensively. He held his hands behind his back and looked down at the floor. The only times she’d seen her brother look unsure was when he was being scolded by either of their parents. Ejehmen reached for Eroms chin and tipped it upward, forcing his son’s eyes to his.

“Did you greet him the way I taught you?”

Eroms frowned but he refused to answer. His lips formed into a stubborn line.

“Eromosele.” The warning in Ejehmen’s voice was enough to break him. Eroms shook his head in answer to the previously asked question. Then he took a step back from his father and said, “Good afternoon uncle.” While bowing at the waist.

Idemudia, who worshiped his brother and was eager to do everything he did, followed suit. He bowed at the waist and greeted, “Good afternoon uncle Uyi.” Then he turned to his father and did the same thing. “Good afternoon daddy.” Then he stood straight and ran to embrace their father. “Welcome!”

Ejehmen knelt so he was on a better level with his son and wrapped his arms around him. “Thank you.” He said. “But you shouldn’t greet me the way you greet your uncle.”

Idemudia pulled back and looked at his father. “Why?” he asked.

“Because that’s the greeting of a descendant of the Enikaro to an obo. I’m not an obo, your uncle is.”

While Idemudia processed that, Ejehmen walked over to Eroms and pulled him in for a hug. Eroms was stiff for a while and then he gave in and hugged their father. “Welcome home daddy. I’m sorry if I disappointed you.”

“You can never disappoint me.” Ejehmen promised. He bent to place a kiss on his son’s head and then walked back to his brother. “Continue practicing your bolokhon, your uncle and I will come back and play with you after we talk. Eroms.”

Eromosele turned to face Ejehmen. “Yes sir?”

“Watch over your brother.”

Eroms nodded. It was something Odion heard him say all the time to Eroms, only to Eroms. Whenever he left one of them alone with him, Ejehmen would remind Eroms to watch over them, as if he was reminding him that he was their elder brother and so it was his duty to protect them. Every time Eroms nodded gravelly and watched over his charge like a hawk.

Satisfied, Ejehmen nodded and led Omoruyi out from the courtyard, back into the house. They’d only just opened the door leading to the kitchen when Omoruyi said, “I cannot believe you chose a woman over securing their future.”

Ejehmen sighed. This was another conversation Odion had heard so many times over the years. “What kind of future would they have had with a memory like that, of their mother and sisters being slaughtered? No.” Ejehmen stated, shaking his head. “I chose love and I don’t regret it.”

The disgust plainly showed on Omoruyi’s face. “Remember what father used to say about love?”

Ejehmen’s responding smile was tight, like it always got when he discussed his father. It was obvious from his expressions that they hadn’t gotten along. “Love is for poets and fools.”

“You’re not a poet.” Omoruyi stated.

Ejehmen turned to stare at Omoruyi, then he burst out laughing. “Come inside Uyi.” He said, between chuckles. Odion didn’t understand why he was laughing. Her father had a peculiar reaction to Omoruyi. It was obvious what his brother had meant by that, he was clearly calling him a fool. But her father laughed. It was as if he loved his brother too much to be offended by him. Then again, from what she now knew of her father, it took a lot to annoy him.

Odion walked into the kitchen behind both men. Somehow, the large granite counters and the sparkling island in the middle, no longer awed her as much as it had the first time she’d been here.

Both men stopped, their conversation halted by the much more serious one already taking place in the kitchen. There were two women leaning against the counters. To the left was her mother, and to the right the woman who had become her mother’s best friend, Toju. Toju wore leather now, just as Omoruyi wore red and white velvet. The clothing was a symbol of their status in a society built to worship them. Odion knew that she should hate the idea, hate the concept of the monarch rule as she’d been taught to by the council which ruled the real world, the world she lived in. But there was something about having her memories returning, something about learning who she was, that didn’t just lead her to accept the power of the monarchy but made her ache to control it. With each new memory, each second she recovered, she felt a gentle beating in her heart, a desire to punish every single person who’d claimed the right to reduce her family to what it had become. She didn’t know who they were yet, but she would find out, and when she did, there would be a reckoning. Then the Ehizokhae family would resume their rightful place, they would rule again, they would wear the velvet and they would crush anyone who opposed them.

“I can’t explain it Ito,” Toju was saying. “it’s just a feeling I have. How I wish the elements would speak to us!” she cried out in exasperation.

“They speak to Efua, don’t they?” Itohan asked in reply.

Toju sighed. “Not as they should, not like they did with the last Iwebo. But maybe that would change now.”

Itohan frowned. “What has happened, why would it change now?” Odion smiled at the interest in her mother’s face and words. There’d once been a time when her mother despised the idea of the monarchy, she’d even tried to run away and take Ejehmen with her. But she’d stayed. Odion still didn’t know why. Just as she didn’t know why her mother had stopped hating the monarchy and instead accepted them. It had been another result of the night she’d confronted the God-born. Her mother had come back different.

Toju turned around then. She noticed Ejehmen and she smiled. Then her gaze moved slowly over to Omoruyi and the smile went away. Her spine stiffened. There was a moment when the both of them stared at each other, and Odion could feel the tension in that stare. Then Omoruyi arched an eyebrow and Toju fell to her knees. She bowed till both hands touched the floor and greeted, “Menovie.”

Omoruyi waited a bit longer than Odion thought was necessary, but then he finally said. “Stand up.” He waited till Toju was standing, her head still bent in deference before ordering, “Continue.”

Toju nodded. She turned back to Itohan and gave her a tight smile. Itohan turned to Omoruyi then and let her disdainful eyes scan over his clothes in a way that made it clear what she thought of his position, and then she took her attention back to Toju. Her mother may have accepted the ancestry and their right to rule, but she had never forgiven Omoruyi for that night. She didn’t even know the full extent of the role he played, but she knew he’d been ready to kill her daughters if it meant he could kill her too. For some reason Odion couldn’t imagine, her mother had kept Omoruyi’s actions that night from her father.

Toju kept talking, but her tone wasn’t quite as jovial as it had been before she’d seen Omoruyi. “The elements have renamed her.”

“I don’t understand.” Itohan stated.

Toju smiled. “It still surprises me how little you know. A descendant of the Enikaro becomes a member of the clan of rulers only after the elements name them. The elements do this through one of two people, Nature’s elect or Nature’s best. Nature’s elect is a title reserved for the high priest of Duraya, but Nature’s best is something entirely different. It is a title given to one whom the elements feel deserves it. An elemental witch descendant of the Enikaro who the elements believe to be pure, good, and trustworthy. The position in the clan comes from Duraya himself, he decides which descendant joins the clan of rulers. But the title of Nature’s best can only be conferred by the elements. There is only one in the clan at any period of time.”

Toju’s words pulled out one of Odion’s memories. She was still in the kitchen, still listening to Toju speak, but in her mind, she heard the words proclaimed by her apparition the first time they met. “Greetings Omorodion one, descendant of the God-born, Nature’s elect, Obo the third, Odion. We know who you are, we who are of you who are of us acknowledge your presence.” She knew enough now to know that her apparition was of the elements, some sort of combination of them all. So, going by Toju’s words, she’d been named. Nature’s elect, that meant that she was now in Efua’s shoes, now Iwebo, high priest of Duraya. Then it hit her, she’d been named, she was a descendant of the Enikaro and she’d been named, which could only mean one thing, she was now a member of the clan of rulers. An obo, a prince. Odion wanted to spend some time thinking about what this all meant, but she couldn’t. If there was anything she was learning, it was that she had to pay attention, she had to watch, to listen, because if the elements chose to show this to her, it was important.

“Do you remember the obo that went missing before Omoruyi was named?” asked Toju.

“I remember hearing about it.” Itohan replied nodding.

“Well that obo was the first amongst the conclave of princes and he was Nature’s best. We believed he was dead, and that was why Omoruyi was named. Now we’re not so sure, because this morning the elements renamed Efua obo the first and Nature’s best. If they were planning on conferring the title on her, why wait till now? Unless the previous holder was still alive.”

“What could have happened to him?” Ejehmen asked, speaking up for the first time.

“That’s what worries me.” Toju replied. “There is a remem, a re-incarnate recall, who the God-born trusts fully. She sent him to the InCoSeM headquarters to find out what he could about how they plan to attack us. He’s young, too young to be taken seriously unless you know he’s a remem. Well she hadn’t heard from him for a long time, until he returned, without notice, a week before the obo went missing. He told the God-born that InCoSeM didn’t mean the ancestry any harm, he said that they just needed to speak with us, to form an alliance of sorts. The God-born believed him and he talked her into sending the obo back with him. It was a risk, we all knew that, especially sending an elemental to foreign soil where he’s not bound to the elements. He took as much of our elements as he could of course, but a gallon of water is nothing compared to a sea. Neither the remem nor the obo were ever heard from after. InCoSeM claimed that the obo died of natural causes and sent their condolences. As if in confirmation, the elements named Omoruyi right after. Efua did her prayers and asked pointed questions, but she wasn’t told anything that would lead her to believe the obo had been murdered. Then again, the elements didn’t really say anything to the contrary. It was the God-born’s visions that decided it, or rather her lack of troubling visions. She accepted InCoSeM’s explanation and moved on. But now that we suspect the obo only just died, we have to re-evaluate everything. It would mean that InCoSeM lied about his death, choosing to keep him alive for some other reason, and that the elements either went along with it or chose to remain neutral. The God-born is no longer confident in her visions. She now accepts that there is a lot which remains unseen, too much. I just have this nagging feeling that something is coming, and whatever it is, it’s coming for the elementals first.”
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 9:35am On Sep 14, 2018
This is real serious...Awaiting your next update ObehiD. I can't wait to get the full grasp of this update.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 9:32pm On Sep 14, 2018
Is Duraya different from the Elements? Can he control them or not? And obehiD can you drop your good reads link here?
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 6:07am On Sep 15, 2018
@Fazemood yes oh, the scenes from the past are about to get very serious, but they are going to be quite spaced out. I think the next one is back in St. Luke's, still working on it so we'll see.

@tunjilomo yes, Duraya is very different from the elements. I realize I never shared this from the last book, so I'll put this here. I don't know how helpful it will be in understanding the elements/Duraya, but I'll let you all be the judge of that. It's not a full explanation, that is still to come, but it might make a difference. As to if he/she/it/they can control them, that is a bit of a complicated question to which the short answer is yes, and the long answer is that I don't know what the long answer is yet, but I know it's more complicated than just control. The link to my goodreads page (which only really has the first book in the series) is: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17030420.Obehi_Dibua

And the excerpt from the last book:

There are five of us, five at least known and accepted.
Seliat is the pure, the water, the cleansing.
Sedum is the hard, the earth, the support.
Sabin is the quick, the air, the driven.
Sorat is the burn, the fire, the purpose.
Sehinom is the lord, the all, the complete.
It is often said that there is a sixth,
Sinehk, we call it, the forbidden.
We are the servants of Nature,
The messengers of Duraya.
Some of us date back to the very foundation,
To the start of life,
The creation of the marked.
While others are the life, at least the remnants of it.
At our inception, we were unbiased, unified.
We did not draw lines based on the land that birthed us.
We did not bequeath our loyalty to some more than others.
But even servants have minds,
Even creatures such as we who all life may not see
We think,
We watch the injustice that is human kind
And we pick sides.
Our loyalty always lies with Nature first
We are after all, at the heart of us, servants.
But what happens when a servant is allowed a life before?
Even though our memories no longer exist,
Some of us still know what it means to be human,
Some of us are bound to the lands of our birth
And we watch our descendants.
We may not know them by name,
But they are of us as we are of them.
Some will die and become Nature
Their voices will be heard,
They are the living gods
But the majority will join us, their memories will be taken
And they will be what we are:
The elements, the watchers of those who live

4 Likes

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Bluehaven(m): 7:15am On Sep 15, 2018
obehiD:
There are five of us, five at least known and accepted.
Seliat is the pure, the water, the cleansing.
Sedum is the hard, the earth, the support.
Sabin is the quick, the air, the driven.
Sorat is the burn, the fire, the purpose.
Sehinom is the lord, the all, the complete.
It is often said that there is a sixth,
Sinehk, we call it, the forbidden.
We are the servants of Nature,
The messengers of Duraya.
Some of us date back to the very foundation,
To the start of life,
The creation of the marked.
While others are the life, at least the remnants of it.
At our inception, we were unbiased, unified.
We did not draw lines based on the land that birthed us.
We did not bequeath our loyalty to some more than others.
But even servants have minds,
Even creatures such as we who all life may not see
We think,
We watch the injustice that is human kind
And we pick sides.
Our loyalty always lies with Nature first
We are after all, at the heart of us, servants.
But what happens when a servant is allowed a life before?
Even though our memories no longer exist,
Some of us still know what it means to be human,
Some of us are bound to the lands of our birth
And we watch our descendants.
We may not know them by name,
But they are of us as we are of them.
Some will die and become Nature
Their voices will be heard,
They are the living gods
But the majority will join us, their memories will be taken
And they will be what we are:
The elements, the watchers of those who live [/i]
The above seem like a poem.
I believe it inspired your anecdote.
Nonetheless, you're making it look like NON-FICTION.
Hmmm...keep it up ObehiD.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 5:00am On Sep 16, 2018
Bluehaven:

The above seem like a poem.
I believe it inspired your anecdote.
Nonetheless, you're making it look like NON-FICTION.
Hmmm...keep it up ObehiD.

Thank you! And it is a poem, good catch cheesy

1 Like

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by phoenixchap: 7:10am On Sep 16, 2018
Thank you ObehiD
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:28am On Sep 21, 2018
phoenixchap:
Thank you ObehiD

You're welcome grin
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:31am On Sep 21, 2018
Chapter Fourteen
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St. Luke’s, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
-----------------------------------------------------

Nosa sat on the raised platform which extended from the back of the senior classrooms. He held the red heart-shaped gem in his hand and studied it. He traced the protrusions with his thumb and tested the weight by lifting it in his hand. It looked different from the last time he’d studied it. It wasn’t as bright as it had been. A third of it appeared to have broken off and was now a much darker color than the other part. That was the reason he hadn’t yet done as he’d intended, as he’d silently promised Elliot he would. That was the only reason he hadn’t thrown it away, flung it far off into a space where no one would find it. At least that was the only reason he allowed himself to think of. He refused to ponder on her smile or analyze the sudden desperation he felt to not throw away a part of her, the only part of his princess which, at least for a time, belonged solely to him. But that thought felt like a betrayal to Elliot’s memory.

As he sat, bent over and studying the gem, his mind filled with images of Elliot. Elliot bowing to him and calling him alpha. “I’m not going to let my alpha walk into danger by himself.” Elliot had said, and he’d died proving it. He’d stood by Nosa till the end, given his trust to an alpha who couldn’t defend it. And now he was gone.

Nosa clenched his jaw, swallowing down the now constant wave of misery that washed over him whenever he thought of Elliot. It had only been a week since Elliot died, but Nosa didn’t know how to live with it anymore. He couldn’t stand himself. He couldn’t look at his image in the mirror without feeling ashamed. He couldn’t be in the presence of other wolves without feeling lacking. His classmates wanted him to step up to the bat, to be the alpha Elliot had called him, the alpha Elliot had died convinced he was. They wanted revenge, they wanted to see Beedie suffer and die the way Elliot had. And he wanted…he wasn’t sure what he wanted. To wish for revenge on Beedie, would be putting the blame for everything that happened on Beedie’s shoulders, and he wasn’t ready to exonerate himself like that. Not when he had so much fault in it.

The other SS2 wolves hadn’t been there. They hadn’t seen how unstable Beedie got. They hadn’t seen the furious anger which took over Elliot, which took over all of them. He’d been the only one decently calm. He’d felt the anger, the bloodlust, the rage, but then he’d also been in control and it wasn’t because he was a better alpha, it was because of the gem in his hand. The same gem that made him weak, that caused Elliot’s death.

Decision made, Nosa rose his hand preparing to throw it away. Even though he was quite a distance away from the wall, he’d easily get it over with his werewolf strength. Once that gem was gone, he’d know that he’d honored Elliot’s memory by sacrificing something which meant so much to him. Maybe then when he closed his eyes he’d stop seeing Elliot’s last smile or hearing the way his heart slowed. Maybe he’d finally be able to look at himself in the mirror without cringing.

Then a coin dropped in his lap.

Nosa’s hand went down, the loved gem still resting in the fold of his hand, but only for now, he reminded himself, this was just a reprieve. He picked up the coin with his other hand. It was the color of copper, with the number 1 emblazoned, on the side he held up facing him, in between two connected towers. And underneath the towers was the word, ‘kobo’. It had been a while since he’d seen this coin. Too long, he thought sadly.

He held his breath as the bearer of the coin walked the few steps separating them and then sat down by him. He knew what the kobo meant. It was their shorthand for ‘penny for your thoughts’. Struck by a momentary inspiration, Victor had changed the foreign penny to their more indigenous kobo and had said, ‘kobo for your thoughts’. The kobo, though not widely used, was the smallest unit of Nigerian currency. Instead of ‘kobo for your thoughts’, Nosa had changed it to, ‘should I find a kobo?’. Then after one school break, Victor had come back to St. Luke’s with a kobo coin. Since then, whenever either of them wanted to buy the other’s thoughts, they exchanged the coin.

To Nosa’s surprise he found himself talking, prompted by the familiar tradition. “I was just about to throw this away.” He said, without looking up at Victor. Where had all the anger he’d felt towards his best friend gone? All the hate? Even more surprising was the lack of tension. Since that night, the night Mr. Danladi died, he felt tense whenever he was around other wolves. It was that tension which had made him suspect Ricardo’s mark. But now he felt nothing. Was it because of the friendship they’d shared? He doubted that, he’d been friends with Elliot too. The thought brought back the pang of sorrow.

“What is it?” Victor asked.

“It’s the reason Elliot is dead.”

“Can I see it?”

Nosa shrugged. He stretched out his hand, but he didn’t hand it over to him, he didn’t let him take it. He suddenly felt very possessive of the gem, especially with him. Victor had gotten the girl, all Nosa had left of her was this gem and he refused to give it to him too.

“Do you even know what that is?” Victor asked quietly.

Nosa’s head jerked upwards as his gaze fixed on Victor’s face. There was knowledge in those eyes, knowledge that in Nosa’s estimation, confirmed every nasty thing he’d thought about the relationship between his princess and Victor. Why couldn’t Victor be satisfied with Lami, why did he have to take Osezele too? Nosa closed his hand, pulling the heart-shaped gem back to him. He refused to respond to Victor’s question.

Then Victor chuckled. Nosa was so shocked he allowed himself to look at Victor for one hate-free second, then the hatred came back and he looked away. Victor noticed but he didn’t respond, he just became more somber. For the first time since his friend had mysteriously stopped speaking to him, he hoped that he could finally understand why. Mimi had had some thoughts on the subject, but Victor refused to believe them. “So that’s what Elliot meant when he said you keep Osezele’s heart close to yours.” Victor had meant it to sound more teasing, but it just came out as dry. He wasn’t surprised when Nosa remained silent.

“It’s a scarlet diadem.” He said finally.

That piqued Nosa’s interest. “A what?” he asked, turning to stare back at Victor.

Victor didn’t gloat at having the answer, he just smiled sadly at the brother he’d somehow lost. “A scarlet diadem. Pure power, I believe she called it. It’s a commune gem, it allows them to do anything. How did you get it?”

Nosa’s attention turned back to the gem in his hand. A scarlet diadem. He smiled, instantly liking the name. A diadem for a princess. It seemed fitting. Commune gem…that thought made him frown. He’d thought it was his imagination, but with what he knew now and the fact that after that day the gem had changed, he wasn’t so sure. He could have sworn he’d done something, somehow used the pieces of the commune Ebo which were left in him, when Beedie’s venom had gone into Elliot. He’d felt the way he had when he’d withstood Osezele’s pain to carry her off the street. Ngozi had said his eyes had been a combination of gold and red. He’d laughed her off then, but now…

“Nosa.” Victor called out, pulling Nosa from his thoughts. “How did you get it?”

Nosa’s anger was instantaneous. Who did Victor think he was to ask that? As if he had any right to know. Then Nosa remembered that Victor knew what it was, which meant Osezele told him. Maybe he did have the right after all. “I watched her throw it away after she walked out of the fire, the day that Moji left with Oare. She spoke to us, waited till she thought everyone was gone, and then threw it away. I saw the look in her eyes when she did. I knew one day she’d regret it, so I picked it up. I was going to give it back to her, use it as an excuse to get back into her life. Then I touched it and it felt like it was calling to me. It sounds stupid, but I felt something and so I held on to it. I know it was selfish. I just wanted, I needed to have a part of her.” A voice in his head suggested apologizing, but he shot it down with alacrity.

“I see.” Victor’s voice was level, devoid of any emotions which could tell Nosa how he felt. “And when I asked earlier what it was, you said it’s the reason Elliot is dead. What did you mean by that?”

Nosa sighed. “It makes me weak.” Which to him was ironical, but maybe that was how life worked. The one thing which made you smile and gave you hope, could be the same thing which robbed you of strength, as if the former was paid for by the latter.

“I don’t understand.” Victor stated.

Nosa scoffed. How very Victor to just come out and say he didn’t understand without any anger or self-doubt. Would he have been like Victor if he’d been born an omega instead?

“It keeps me from losing control. I don’t know if you’ve noticed it, but since the night Mr. Danladi died, the wolves have been different. Bloodlust, rage, and it only seems to be getting worse. Somehow, this gem calms me, helps me to remain in control.”

“And you’re going to throw it away?” Victor asked, his confusion plain now.

Nosa shot to his feet and turned on Victor with a wrathful rage powered by the guilt he felt. “If I didn’t have this on, Elliot wouldn’t be dead!” Nosa yelled.

Victor remained composed, calmly indifferent to Nosa’s anger. “I can see your reasoning. You are a strong alpha. So, let’s play this game. Let’s say you didn’t have the gem. How do you think it would have gone?”

“What?” Nosa’s rage gave way to curiosity.

“Tell me how you think it would have gone if you didn’t have the gem.”

“I would have beaten Beedie, and he would have left us alone.” Nosa stated simply.

“Is that what would have happened?” Victor asked sarcastically, then forged on without waiting for a reply. “Bloodlust, rage, those were your words. You know what doesn’t exist with bloodlust and rage? Reason.” Victor stated, answering his own question. “Once you got into that rage, once the bloodlust took effect, you would have torn through everything in your sight. And if Elliot had so much as looked at you the wrong way, you might have him killed him too. Five dead students, and that’s assuming you were able to shake it off before leaving the auditorium and also assuming you can actually beat Beedie. If he beat you, you would be dead. The way I see it, that gem is the only reason that things didn’t end up worse. One out of control alpha, is one too many.”

Nosa heard the logic in Victor’s words and, to some extent, understood it. But he couldn’t accept it. At least the SS2 boys blamed Beedie. Beedie could be punished. Victor blamed the bloodlust, and bloodlust couldn’t pay for its crimes. Instead, Nosa said stubbornly, “So, you agree that Beedie was out of control.”

Victor sighed wearily. “Do you want to be a good pack alpha Nosa?”

Nosa frowned. “What has that got to do with anything?”

“Can you answer the question please?”

Nosa grudgingly nodded.

“Pack alphas make decisions and pass judgement. A good pack alpha passes fair judgement and makes sure that the punishment is proportionate to the crime committed. If you want to be a good pack alpha, then you need to learn to put yourself in others’ shoes instead of putting them in yours. Try to imagine what you would have done if you were in Beedie’s place and you didn’t have the scarlet diadem keeping you in control. It may boggle your imagination but try anyway.”

Nosa’s jaw clenched. He knew Victor well enough to know when he was being insulted. He also knew Victor well enough to not take it too personally. Victor was smarter than the rest of them, at least he liked to think he was. He took perverse pleasure in pointing out just how smart natural born omegas were compared to the mere alphas and betas. Nosa found himself smiling. Maybe Victor was right. He could still remember how close he’d gotten to killing Elliot the night Mr. Danladi died. If Elliot hadn’t bowed, hadn’t given him his complete trust as beta to alpha…he didn’t want to boggle his imagination to the point of thinking of what would have happened. Would things have been different if he’d just bowed to Beedie and said the words he’d demanded? He would have lost his pride, become a laughing stock amongst the SS3 boys, and probably lost some of Elliot’s respect. But Elliot would have lived. It really was all his fault.

Nosa sat back on the pavement next to Victor feeling emotionally drained. “But the way Beedie handled it.” He said, attacking the last point no one could argue against. “I don’t even want to think of how he forced Osezele into changing that boy’s memory and making him take the blame. I understand that he may not have known what he was doing to Elliot, but after he knew. He was in full control when he set up the scene to shirk responsibility for what he’d done. If it had been me who made that kind of mistake, I’d accept the responsibility for what I did. How will the pack ever respect him again after the way he handled things?”

Victor smiled. He could sense that he’d eased most of Nosa’s tension. But it wouldn’t be gone, not completely, until he had someone to blame. Victor knew Nosa was undoubtedly blaming himself. “Beedie is clinical. He thinks steps in advance, which makes him a…unique alpha. He’s smart, and he’s able to hide his emotions very well. Say what you want about Beedie, but you know Emeka, you knew him better than anyone else in the pack. Emeka loved this pack, he wouldn’t have left us with an incapable alpha.” Victor paused, waiting for his words to sink in before continuing in a less sever tone. “You value your pride over anything else and that makes you very arrogant and like almost every other natural born alpha. You would have done the ethical thing and turned yourself in the way Lami gave up Moji, if for no other reason than to keep the respect of your pack. But with Moji at least we had some type of guarantee through Osezele’s uncle that the prowl wouldn’t be at our gates. If Beedie had turned himself in, we wouldn’t be sitting here right now. We would be in the community, our parents would be in jail, Tolani and anyone else who suspected what we are, would be in jail. St. Luke’s would be closed down, maybe burnt to the ground, just one more horror story of the viciousness of the prowl. We would have become examples of why unknowns should be in the community. And maybe we should be.” Victor shrugged. “But at this point we can’t change where we are, or what we’ve done, or what has been done to us. We can only try our best to make sure it doesn’t happen again, or all of this would have been for nothing.”

“And how do we do that?”
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:32am On Sep 21, 2018
Victor turned to face Nosa. “You have a decision to make. Right now, you have to choose between your pack and your pride. Whatever is happening here, and something is happening, you have the burden of control, which means you get to make a choice.”

“Bow to Beedie and lose face with my classmates or keep antagonizing him and tear the pack apart.” Nosa scoffed. It really wasn’t a choice. If he’d known how things would end up with Elliot, he would have bowed to Beedie. He didn’t like him, in fact he was sure now that he hated him, but his pride couldn’t come before another person’s life. Nosa nodded. “I’ll bow to him.”

Victor wanted to smile, to breathe out in relief, but he didn’t dare shatter this tenuous truce they’d accomplished. So, he kept his face straight as he spoke. “Good. In that case, you need to keep the scarlet diadem. You need it more than she does. And we can start focusing on the real villain.”

Nosa had already decided to keep the gem the minute he gave up something just as important to him, his pride. Now he had sacrificed in Elliot’s memory and he liked to think Elliot would be proud. But he still needed to avenge his friend, he just didn’t know how. Then Victor mentioned a villain and he perked up. “Villain?”

“Wolves don’t just lose control like this Nosa. Someone is doing this. My first thought would be a commune, but it is too wide spread and covering too many emotions. I’ve heard rumors of something they call an aerie which is a sort of marked bond between all the types in a single class of marked. So, in theory a commune aerie would have the power to affect all our negative emotions, but they wouldn’t be able to keep it selected to wolves, they wouldn’t be able to affect us in our marks, and it would take a lot of them to do it with this many of us. This has to be something more. The only thing more I can think of is a quintise.”

Nosa frowned. “Who would send a quintise to St. Luke’s?”

Victor shrugged in response. “Who would have Moji turned into a medium to randomly kill St. Luke’s students?”

“You think they’re related.”

“They have to be. We know there’s still an agent in St. Luke’s…”

“An agent in St. Luke’s?”

“We’re keeping it under wraps. Just a few of us know. It could be anyone amongst the marked. But there is an agent, and the agent was controlling Moji.”

Nosa’s lips hung open. How much were they keeping from him and who were the few people who knew? He’d thought he was in the inner circle but apparently he was wrong. “So, we have to find the agent?”

“We’ve been trying, but we don’t even know where to start. It could be someone who’s been in school with us since we started, someone in our group, or it could be someone with a hidden mark who’s not in our group. There are too many people and no good way of questioning them.”

“How can I help?” Nosa asked.

“You can help by keeping the pack together and stopping Beedie from losing control and killing anyone else.”

Nosa nodded. He smiled. He felt free, released. There was an enemy, a villain who would pay for Elliot’s death, and he was bowing to Beedie as his own penance for the role he played. Only Beedie wasn’t suffering. Even though he understood everything Victor said, he couldn’t let Beedie go untouched by his crime. He had to pay for losing control, even if it wasn’t his fault. It hadn’t been Moji’s fault, but she’d still been taken away. Yes, Nosa nodded to himself, when things were more settled, he would make Beedie pay. Till then he had to keep the pack together, for Emeka, for Elliot.

Nosa looked up and turned to face Victor, ready to begin the process of mending fences, and then he saw her. She walked down the last two stairs and jumped off the pavement walking in the direction of the tap. The ends of her pink skirt flapped about in the wind exposing a bit of her thighs. Then she put her hand on the tap, turned the handle and cupped her palm into a channel, underneath the faucet, allowing the water to flow from her fingers to her palm. She bent so that she was drinking from the small water reservoir in her palm.

Nosa stared transfixed. He went partially into his mark, letting his eyes turn golden, and he could see her throat moving as she drank the water. Then she stood, and before she turned her back to him, he could see the drops of water running down her face.

“Nosa.” Nosa heard Victor and went out of his mark. The combination of Osezele and Victor did what it always did, it made him angry and resentful of his best friend. He stood up, prepared to leave when he heard Victor call his name again. This time when he looked at Victor his eyes were filled with loathing.

Victor shook his head. If he hadn’t seen the change which came over Nosa he wouldn’t have believed it. Mimi had been right, this whole break in their friendship was because of Osezele. “Do you want to talk about it?” Victor asked.

Nosa shook his head. He wanted to walk away, to walk back to the life he’d created for himself after losing them. A life which included a beautiful celebrity and none of the anguish that came with love. But just for a few moments he’d had his best friend back and he wasn’t so eager to lose that again. “Just tell me why it had to be her. You already have Lami, you know how I feel about Osezele, so why?”

“I don’t know what you’re talking about Nosagie.”

“You know I hate it when you use my full name.” Nosa snapped, irritated by Victor’s condescension.

“You know I hate it when you’re evasive.” Victor replied in kind, fighting the urge to smile. So much time spent not talking and all because Nosa didn’t simply ask. Well he wasn’t going to make it any easier on him.

“Why did you take Osezele from me?” Nosa asked pointedly. He clutched the gem in his hand as he stood there waiting for Victor’s response.

“Why did you let me?” Victor replied.

Nosa almost punched him, almost. “You and I are done. There’s nothing between us anymore.” He stated with finality.

“Why?” Victor asked. “Because I stepped in and helped the girl you love when you were too blind to see that she needed you? Because I gave her an outlet for her pain? Because I didn’t abandon her the way everyone else did? Tell me what I did for her that you won’t have done for Lami?”

“You made her fall in love with you!” Nosa accused.

Victor shrugged. “And what’s wrong with that? Don’t you love Lami?”

“Not like that?”

“Like what?” Victor asked playing dumb, a role he wasn’t very familiar with playing.

“Like you want to sleep with her.”

Victor was taken aback. He frowned. “Are you having sex with Binta?”

“What does Binta have to do with this?” Nosa asked in exasperation.

“Before you started dating her, the only thing you thought about with girls was making out. If I’d asked you the same question before, you would have said, ‘like you want to kiss her’ not ‘like you want to sleep with her.’ It’s not a good idea Nosa.”

Nosa scoffed. “Why not? Like you don’t do it. You’re such a hypocrite.”

“It’s not the same thing. Binta is in SS1, you’re in SS2 and the both of you just met this semester. Lami and I are both in SS3 and we’ve known each other for years, long enough to know we were each other’s firsts. We know how to use protection. Do you even have a condom?”

“It’s none of your business. Who do you think you are? My father?”

“Your friend Nosa. Your best friend, your brother, who loves you and has a little more experience.”

Nosa frowned. How could he get angry at that? He couldn’t. Nosa sighed giving in. “We only did it once, and it just happened. We didn’t plan it or anything. Is that okay daddy or do you want more details?”

Victor shook his head. “I’ll pass.” He chuckled. “Just be careful. Last piece of fatherly advice, you shouldn’t be doing anything with Binta when you’re obviously in love with Osezele.” Victor frowned. “Although, now that I know you’re having sex, I don’t think I want you and your hormones anywhere near Osezele.”

“And why should I care what you want?”

“Because I love her. She’s like a sister to me now, my baby sister. I will hurt you if you hurt her.”

“You can try.” Nosa found himself smiling. “And does she love you as a brother?” he couldn’t hide the uncertainty in his voice.

“Only as a brother.” Victor promised. “The girl is in love with you.” Victor was sure that in his entire time knowing Nosa he had never seen him smile that widely. Then he saw Nosa turn abruptly in the direction of the tap. “Where are you going?”

“To have a long overdue conversation with my princess.” Nosa stopped. “I guess it’s my turn to hold onto this.” He said slipping the kobo into his pocket. It was the tangible sign of their friendship, by keeping it he was telling Victor that he planned to use it.

Victor got the message and he smiled too.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by GeoSilYe(f): 9:45am On Sep 21, 2018
Finnnaallllyyy things will be good again between Nosa and Osezele!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 11:12am On Sep 21, 2018
Me too I yam smiling d way nosa did. Thanks for d update. More ink to ur pain. Next week should do and come fast fast
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 11:48am On Sep 21, 2018
Wow ObehiD, this episode is a 'wow'. Truly, Victor is smart and wise. He did a great job there. Thanks cheesy
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Richykemzy: 12:27pm On Sep 21, 2018
Next week kum fast o wanna see osezele nd nosa ironing finz out! nd progress in finding d villain! obehid well-done ���
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by phoenixchap: 4:13pm On Sep 21, 2018
Nice work obehiD but the update is coming quite late.. I Victor is too smart, love the way you paint him and I also hope Lami understands him...
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 2:38am On Sep 22, 2018
@GeoSilYe, yay! I'm happy I'm not the only one watching Nosa and Osezele like this grin

@spixytinxy thank you!

@Fazemood thanks! I'm so glad you enjoyed it!!! Victor is a best-friend goal...haha.

@Richykemzy Thank you! I will just say that finding the villain is going to be a progressive escapade.

@phoenixchap Thank you. Late? The posts are once a week, and this is almost exactly a week after the last post. Yeah, I love Victor too.

1 Like

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Dranoid: 8:33pm On Sep 22, 2018
Its been so looongg!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:00am On Sep 23, 2018
Dranoid:
Its been so looongg!

I know! I thought you'd abandoned us cry cheesy
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 11:25am On Sep 23, 2018
Scarlet Diadem, Quintise, Aerie, and making up between Nosa and Osezele. This chapter got it all.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Dranoid: 7:08pm On Sep 23, 2018
obehiD:


I know! I thought you'd abandoned us cry cheesy

i wouldn't even dream of it

i'm coming lemme go and catch up with you guys
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by izicky(m): 12:21pm On Sep 24, 2018
thank God Nosa and Victor are back together. now am looking forward to seeing Nosa and Osezele in action together.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 2:07am On Sep 26, 2018
@tunjilomo yeah, I loved this chapter too!

@Dranoid okay catch up! I'll be waiting here for your feedback cheesy

@izicky I'm looking forward to them too!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 11:28am On Sep 26, 2018
Obehid wen should we b expecting update
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 12:26pm On Sep 26, 2018
spixytinxy:
Obehid wen should we b expecting update

The next chapter should be out on Friday morning.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 1:17pm On Sep 26, 2018
obehiD:


The next chapter should be out on Friday morning.

You have said it ObehiD, FRIDAY MOORNNINGG by 12:00am Sharp! wink I'll be waiting. smiley
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Peaceyw(m): 2:40pm On Sep 26, 2018
I was a ghost reader of this story starting from the prequel, dis story gara gan ooo.weldone

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