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The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book - Literature (6) - Nairaland

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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 3:06pm On Sep 26, 2018
obehiD:


The next chapter should be out on Friday morning.
ok na, Friday is almost here
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:37am On Sep 27, 2018
@Fazemood hahaha don't wait oh! Sleep, when you wake up it'll be loading grin

@Peaceyw Thank you and welcome to the message board!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:20am On Sep 28, 2018
Chapter Fifteen
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St. Luke’s, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
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Osezele took one last longing look at the cup, before placing it on the table and pushing it towards Tolani. Tolani glanced dismissively at it and returned to what had become her favorite past-time over the last week: staring despondently into space. Osezele felt out of her depths. She’d never seen Tolani act this way. Her best friend was pragmatic, sometimes to a fault. She didn’t get depressed and she certainly didn’t starve herself to death. But there was no hiding what Tolani was doing, which was exactly all the things Osezele had thought her incapable of.

Osezele followed Tolani’s example, sitting back in her bench and looking forward at the board hoping for inspiration, when a boy from SS1C walked into the class. He took one look at the cup filled with the delicious treat Osezele had put in front of Tolani and he couldn’t look away. The boy kept looking back at the cup even when he walked past their desk, until he walked into the wall on the other side of the room.

Osezele tore her laughing gaze from the boy and took it back to the sullen Tolani. She didn’t even stop to contemplate the possibility of the boy reporting her to the principal for breaking the school rules by having provisions. She just kept staring at Tolani, watching the look on her face and wondering what she could do to take that pain away.

“You have to eat Tolani.” Osezele spoke calmly, trying to cajole her friend into eating the treat. “You haven’t eaten anything today and you only had breakfast yesterday when Victor forced you to eat.” When that didn’t work, Osezele changed tactics. “Can’t you see this delicious thing I made for you. Garri, sugar and milk with groundnut! Do you know what I went through to get the milk and groundnut for you?”

Tolani shrugged. “You told Victor to buy them.” She replied nonchalantly, still staring into space.

Osezele chuckled. Even depressed, Tolani was still funny. Then she remembered why Tolani was so depressed and the smile quickly went away. Part of her was happy that she hadn’t known Elliot as well as the other students had, she couldn’t imagine how she would feel if someone she knew and loved died. Then she took a look at Tolani and sighed, imagining she’d fill just as bad as Tolani did if not worse.

“Please Tolani, eat. Please, you have to eat something, do it for me.” Osezele begged, pushing the cup of creamy garri towards her best friend, hoping the sight of it would entice her.

Tolani didn’t even look at the cup. “I’m not hungry.” She stated flatly.

Osezele sighed in exasperation. “If you don’t eat,…” Osezele broke off as she tried to think of a threat dire enough to break Tolani out of her depression. She didn’t have to think too long. “If you don’t eat, I’ll report you to Lami!” Osezele was almost excited at the prospect. If anyone could make Tolani eat it would be Lami.

Tolani scoffed. “You think Lami cares about anyone but Moji? Have you seen her around? Lami is even worse than I am. Goodluck trying to get her out of her funk.”

Osezele smiled, claiming a small victory in the interest she’d heard in Tolani’s voice and the length of time she’d spoken. Her Tolani wasn’t gone, just buried. If she couldn’t go to Lami, who else was there? She thought about going to Vic again, but he didn’t have the kind of relationship with Tolani that he had with her. When he’d forced Tolani to eat the day before, she’d eaten, but she hadn’t spoken to Osezele for the rest of the day. Osezele sighed. Who else was there?

“Hello beautiful ladies. What’s up?” Rick’s voice broke into Osezele’s contemplation. She smiled reservedly at the handsome white boy. She didn’t know him very well; they were seatmates, but he was a lot closer to Tolani. Osezele’s smile widened as inspiration struck.

“I’m fine.” She said, raising her eyes up to his. He smiled back at her, but his smile was just as reserved as hers had been, the smile of strangers with a mutual acquaintance. “But Tolani is starving herself.”

Rick stopped smiling. “What?” he demanded, walking closer to their seat. It was a Saturday afternoon, the only day in the week where the students didn’t have prep, so the classrooms were usually empty. Rick hurried over to the seat he shared with the girls. He walked into the slot between the desk and bench behind them and sat on the table. Then, he sidled closer to where Tolani sat, and leaned his back against the window frames. He put his arm around Tolani’s shoulder, but kept his attention on Osezele when he asked, “how long?”

“She at least picked at her meals last week, but she just stopped eating on Thursday.” Osezele didn’t have to say why Thursday was important, they both knew it was the one-week anniversary of Elliot’s death.

Rick inclined his head towards the cup. “What’s that?” he asked.

“Garri, sugar and milk with groundnut.” Osezele replied enthusiastically. When the confused look on Rick’s face didn’t clear she clarified, “It’s a very popular Nigerian snack.”

“Oh.” He said. “Do you eat it like that, or is it like cereal?”

“You can eat it like that, or you can add water like cereal.”

Rick nodded. “Could you go get some water for her?” he asked.

Osezele frowned at him. She heard what he was saying, and she heard behind the words. He was trying to get rid of her, to be alone with Tolani, as if he knew her best friend better than she did. Osezele was about to tell him to go get the water himself, when she glanced at Tolani. She saw the look of pain in her best friend’s face and she nodded. It didn’t matter who got through to her as long as someone did.

Rick waited for Osezele to leave the class before he jumped down to the bench and took her place sitting beside Tolani. “Danny won’t eat too.” Rick stated sadly. Tolani’s attention broke from her sullen contemplation of the ether and moved to Rick. Rick didn’t stop talking, he didn’t even look at her. “I didn’t really know Elliot, but he seemed like a cool dude. I wish I’d known him better though, there aren’t that many people who can inspire this kind of love in others.” Rick stopped talking, but he still didn’t look at Tolani, he just let the silence grow.

Finally, Tolani spoke. “I didn’t really know him too. That’s the worst part, I could have known him, I could have, maybe, even loved him, but now I’ll never know.”

Rick nodded. He turned then to face her and smiled slightly when he saw that she was watching him, staring at him with unshed tears in her eyes. “Danny knew him very well, he’s told me a lot about Elliot. He was a good guy. That’s how I know that he wouldn’t want either of you to go on like this. He wouldn’t want you to kill yourselves mourning him.”

“I just feel so useless. It’s like everyone else has moved on, but I can’t move on. I can’t pretend that he didn’t die, I can’t pretend…” Tolani broke off as tears slid down her face. Rick grabbed her and pulled her into his arms. He stroked her back as she cried. “I don’t know how to move on.” Tolani cried brokenly into his neck. “I don’t know how.”

Rick just kept petting her. He nodded in encouragement and listened to the words she said while she cried and then he waited till she pulled away from him. “Danny doesn’t know how either. Maybe the two of you can help each other out. Maybe you can find a way through this together. It’s worth a shot isn’t it?” he asked and held his breath as he waited for Tolani to reply. He was desperate for her to say yes, because he wasn’t sure what he would do if she didn’t. It was actually quite selfish. He needed Danny to eat, he couldn’t bear to watch Danny skulk around anymore, and unlike Tolani, Danny hadn’t eaten a single thing since Elliot died. Getting him to drink water was a battle.

Then Tolani nodded. “Okay.” She said. “I think Elliot would want that.”

Rick sent a quick thanks to Elliot wherever he was, before ushering Tolani and the Nigerian snack, which he couldn’t quite remember what it was called, to Danny.

Osezele smiled.

She’d left the class, but she’d stayed close to the door listening to the conversation just in case Rick couldn’t get through. She couldn’t deny the jealousy she’d felt when Rick had succeeded, but now all she felt was joy. Tolani was going to eat! Osezele suddenly felt parched. She ran down the stairs and stopped. No, she forced her legs to keep moving, and her mind to pretend that she hadn’t seen him sitting there with Victor. So, she walked down the last two steps and went in the direction of the tap, and she didn’t even look back once! She congratulated herself on that as she opened the tap and bent to drink the water coming from the faucet.

With each swallow she could feel his eyes on her, watching her. She had to remind herself to breathe and drink. When she got tired of pretending that she was drinking water, she stood up and closed the tap. She wiped at the drops of water running down her face and then turned in the opposite direction, away from them, away from him.

Osezele kept walking, her eyes forward, refusing, absolutely refusing, to look back, not even for one quick peek at his face. She remained adamant in her trajectory, walking until she got behind the extended walls which hid her from his view and then she stopped, leaning back against the wall. She suddenly felt exhausted. Her heart was pounding uncontrollably, as if she’d just run a 400m race, and she couldn’t get cool enough. She started fanning herself, using her hands to push air towards her heating face, but when that didn’t work, she used the front of her shirt.

Osezele couldn’t stop her heart from pounding, or her face from overheating, or her legs from standing. She realized then why her body was acting so strangely, and she laughed at herself. She was waiting for him! She couldn’t believe it, couldn’t believe her own gall. The boy had made it clear in every way imaginable that he didn’t have any feelings for her. Except for when their eyes met, and he looked at her as if he felt everything she felt. Just thinking about those eyes, made her head tilt back to rest against the wall behind her, and her lips draw up in a smile. What was it about him that made her feel this way?

Osezele knew she was being ridiculous. She knew he wasn’t going to come, and all of this was for nothing. Still, even though she knew that, she couldn’t get her feet to move. One more minute, she promised her racing heart, one more minute and we’ll go. And so, she had one minute, one whole minute to indulge in the fantasy of Nosagie. She just had to close her eyes and she’d see him standing in front of her smiling and calling her princess.

“Princess.” She heard Nosa’s voice in her head.

“Yes.” She replied dreamily, her lips drawn in a wide smile as she wondered what the Nosa in her head would say next. Maybe he would tell her she was beautiful like he’d done before or say the whole thing with Binta was a mistake, a misunderstanding, because she was the only one for him. She sighed with contention, happy with her dreams.

“Whatever you’re thinking, please keep thinking it.” Nosa’s voice in her head was low. There was something very unusual about the voice, unusual in how it made her feel. Her heartbeat got even more erratic and the heat spread from her face down to the rest of her body. Then she heard him chuckle. “You’re so beautiful.” Nosa’s voice said.

Osezele shook her head. She couldn’t take it anymore, it was torture! She was torturing herself with words she would never hear, at least not from him. So, she opened her eyes.

Osezele screamed in shock.

She pressed her back closer to the wall as her eyes widened. The voice hadn’t been in her head! It was him. He was standing there, in front of her, smiling and looking at her like…she didn’t know what it was like, but she liked it.

Osezele gulped nervously. She turned to her right and then her left and saw that he’d braced his hands on the wall beside her, locking her in with his arms. Her heart was beating so fast now, she worried she’d die from a heart attack.

And then he started moving even closer towards her.

“What are you doing?” she asked. Her voice sounded strange, very strange. If the words hadn’t been the exact ones she’d meant to say, she wouldn’t have believed the sound had come from her.

Nosa stopped. He shook his head and pulled back, moving away from her. It was the smile. He’d walked here and found her smiling to herself and that smile had enchanted him, pushed him beyond the bounds of reasonable thought. He’d wanted to kiss her, needed to. Now the moment was gone, her words had cleared his mind, reminding him of why he came.

“You lied to me princess.” He accused. He was angry with her, furious! So why was he smiling?

“I did?” asked Osezele. She couldn’t understand why she suddenly felt so cold. She’d wanted him to pull back, hadn’t she?

Nosa nodded. “You told me you like Victor.”

Osezele frowned. “That wasn’t a lie, I like Victor.”

Nosa just shook his head. “Not the way you like me.” He stated confidently.

Osezele smiled. “No.” she replied shyly. “Not the way I like you.”

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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:22am On Sep 28, 2018
Nosa inhaled sharply. This was what made her special, he thought, who else would make a confession like that without worrying about somehow looking smaller because of it? When other people used lies as a shield, Osezele left herself defenseless. How could he not love that? In Nosa’s mind, the matter was settled.

In Osezele’s it wasn’t. Osezele frowned, as pieces began forming in her head. “Is that why you stopped talking to me, why you started dating Binta? You thought I liked Victor like that?” she asked.

Nosa’s head dropped slightly with shame. Why did she have to bring up Binta? “You told me you liked him a lot more than you liked me.” He replied defensively.

Osezele smiled. “You don’t stop to listen, do you? I was drowning in emotions I couldn’t control, and Victor was being kinder to me than you were. So, I said I liked him more than I liked you at that moment. It wasn’t a lie. I thought you left me because you were afraid of my commune mark.”

Nosa shook his head. “I could never be afraid of you.” He promised. That settled, he leaned in, moving his face closer to hers.

“What are you doing?” Osezele asked nervously, inching back towards the wall. The heat she’d felt was coming back, warming her all over again. And her heart was starting to pound.

Nosa smiled. He let his gaze lower meaningfully to her lips and then he bit his lower lip. As he released it, his eyes rose slowly back to hers. “I’m trying to kiss you. Will you let me?”

Osezele couldn’t name or even describe all the feelings and emotions coursing through her. She couldn’t think of anything to do or say so she just stood there, frozen to the spot, waiting what seemed like an eternity for Nosa to get closer. She’d dreamt of this moment for years, ever since the first time she saw him. And the first time he’d spoken to her in the refectory, she’d wanted him to kiss her and now here he was, about to do it. And she wanted it so badly, but it felt wrong.

Nosa was so close, he just had to bend his head and he would be kissing her, kissing the girl he loved, the girl of his dreams. Then she shook her head, and something in him broke. It was like a cartoon moment, he could hear the glass shatter, but he wasn’t sure what it was. Was it his mind or was it his heart? He thought about ignoring her. She wanted this, it was in her body language, in the way she held her breath, the way her eyes locked with his. She’d even said she liked him, she wouldn’t be angry, she’d like it, he knew she would. But he didn’t want her to settle for this kiss, he wanted the desire for it to consume her the way it did him.

Osezele saw the look of pain in his eyes, and her hand went up. She laid her palm against his cheek, stroking his face as she tried to show him everything she couldn’t say. He must have understood, because he smiled. He leaned down till their foreheads touched and asked a simple question, “why?”

“It’s not right. I’ve waited for this for too long to spoil it. You’re still dating Binta. I can’t share you Nosa.”

Nosa felt the shattered glass coming back together again. Could she be any more perfect? He’d completely forgotten about Binta. Nosa pulled back from Osezele, smiling when he saw the heartbroken look on her face. His rejection hurt her, which meant she wanted him just as badly as he did her. “Just wait here.” Nosa said. “Don’t move.”

Osezele’s sad expression turned to one of confusion. “Why?” she asked.

“Because I’m going to break up with Binta.” He replied. Nosa turned around to run towards the hostels, then he turned back. Before she could stop him, he leaned in and kissed her on her forehead. It wasn’t what he wanted, but the smile on her face was all the reward he needed. No one had ever looked at him like that before. No one. “Thank you.” He said, even though what he really meant was ‘I love you’. He turned around then and ran towards the hostels. He was in so much of a hurry, he didn’t even notice that he’d started running faster than any normal human could. All he thought about as he ran was the way Osezele looked at him when he’d kissed her on her forehead. He felt foolish for ever leaving her, stupid for abandoning her when she needed him the most, but he didn’t berate himself for it, not when he would have so much time to make it up to her.

Nosa stopped on the slab with a smile on his face as he sent a junior girl to the hostels to get Binta. There were a number of secluded spots around the school, one of which was behind a new building under construction. That spot was one he’d been in with Binta a number of times, so he knew she would meet him there without being told. Nosa went there to wait for her as he dreamt about Osezele. Osezele’s smile, Osezele’s face, Osezele’s lips. He groaned. Where is Binta? He thought with exasperation.

Binta knew exactly where he was. She got the message and she took her time making him wait. Makeup wasn’t allowed in St. Luke’s, much to her chagrin, so she had to work with what she had. Of course, she didn’t need much makeup, she was beautiful without, gorgeous in fact. She knew it. Still, it wouldn’t hurt to make sure Nosa appreciated just how lucky he was to be dating her. Binta sighed. Nosagie, she thought with a smile, she hadn’t seen him coming. She’d dated three other boys before coming to St. Luke’s, all celebrities, two models and one actor, but none of them had ever made her feel the way he did. Binta combed her eyelashes and lined her eyebrows. She rubbed some brown powder on her face and put on a bit of colored lip-gloss, then she left. She stopped to admire herself in the mirror, smiling at her image because she knew what Nosa saw when he looked at her, a celebrity, a girl who was so far above him, and in most ways, she was. Still, she loved him. She didn’t know why.

Binta made her way towards their special spot, smiling at the catcalls from passing boys and winking at the marked ones. They were the popular ones, the prefects. Why would she waste her time with anyone else? Finally, she got to the back of the building, their secret spot. “Yes babe.” She called out, making herself known as she walked closer towards him. He turned to face her and Binta smiled at the shocked expression on his face, he always looked at her this way. If only he knew how much power her beauty gave her over him.

Nosa smiled sadly at her. He waited till she got closer and then he drew a finger down her face. “I keep telling you, you don’t need this. You’re beautiful without all the extra things that you do.” He stated as he rubbed the powder between the pad of his thumb and finger.

Binta’s smile widened. She lifted her eyes to meet his. “I know.” She replied. “So, did you just call me to tell me that I’m beautiful?” She teased.

Nosa exhaled deeply. He tore his eyes from hers, looking away because he couldn’t bear to see the hurt he knew would be there. Not that she would be heartbroken, no, Nosa was too practical to think that she loved him. No, the pain would be from hurt pride and nothing more. Nosa cleared his throat. “You know I respect you Binta, as a person and as a girl.”

Binta frowned, a little confused by Nosa’s choice of words. “Yes, I know that.” She finally said. “And I respect you too.” She added the last part in a light note, trying to inject a bit of humor into the conversation.

Nosa smiled, but the smile didn’t reach his eyes. “That’s why I need to break up with you.” He stated flatly, choosing to just rip off the band-aid.

Binta gasped. “What?”

Nosa turned his head then so that their eyes met. He wasn’t surprised by the emotions he read on her face. “I’m in love with someone else.” He confessed. “I think I fell in love with her the first time I saw her. I can’t explain it, there’s just something about her, something about us, that feels inevitable, like we were meant to be together. I should never have started dating you, not knowing how I feel about her. But I was hurt, and you and I, we just happened. I’m sorry Binta.”

Binta shook her head, refusing to hear the words he said. Where was this coming from? She’d just seen him this morning. Yes, he’d been in a mood, but he’d been down since Elliot died. Binta felt a stab of pain in her chest. How dare he! Who did he think he was? Binta was so furious she barely kept the emotions from showing in her face. She’d been around too many wolves to give herself away so easily. Instead, she asked calmly, “who is she?”

Nosa hesitated. But when he couldn’t think of any reason to keep it from her, he shrugged and replied. “Osezele.”

“Osezele Omorodion!” Binta spat the words out with disbelief and condescension. “You think you’re going to break up with me for Osezele Omorodion.”

Nosa frowned. His jaw clenched. “Yes.” His voice rang with gentle authority and the undercurrents of a warning.

Binta got the message, and she knew. She’d been so blind to it, ignoring Oluchi’s offhand comments and Fatima’s caustic remarks, and here it was, staring her in the face. Nosa was truly in love with that girl. Binta couldn’t think of a single remarkable thing about Osezele, besides her marks that is, but those couldn’t be enough. No, Binta couldn’t name one thing that would make Nosa choose Osezele over her. Yet, here he was, breaking her heart and having the gall to tell her that he was doing it for Osezele.

Binta fought against the wave of tears that threatened to devour her. She knew she should never have allowed herself to fall in love with him, she knew it. Now, he was dumping her and the only thought in her mind was that she couldn’t let it happen. Binta panicked. “You can’t!” she exclaimed.

“Can’t what?” asked Nosa.

“Can’t break up with me!” Binta replied with desperation. She refused to cry, not even when the tears were so insistent they threatened to come out on their own. Binta knew that when it came to boys, there was a time for tears, and with Nosa this wasn’t it.

Nosa sighed. Now that he’d gotten the hard part over with, he just wanted to get back to Osezele. Back to the way she smiled at him, back to the warmth he felt coming off her skin, back to her nervous pounding heart. “Of course, I can.” Nosa almost walked away then, but he held himself back knowing that he owed her more than that. So, he smiled, appealing to her pride as he spoke. “You’re Binta Gambari, you were always too good for me, and you’re definitely too good to be in a relationship with someone who’s just admitted to being in love with someone else.”

“You think I don’t know that.” Binta snapped. “You still can’t break up with me.”

“Why?” Nosa asked.

‘Because I love you!’ Binta thought, but she said, “Because I’m pregnant.”

Nosa’s heart stopped beating.

He froze.

Then he paced. He had to remind himself to breathe, allowing logic to take over. She was lying, she had to be lying. “How can you be pregnant?” he demanded.

“When a boy releases…” Binta began in a dry note.

“I know how babies are made.” Nosa snapped, cutting her off. “But it’s not possible, we only had sex once.”

“It only takes one time.”

“Isn’t it too soon to know?”

“Not for an augur.” Binta replied. She knew that would convince him, an augur’s vision was never wrong, especially not about matters like this. But to be sure, she added. “And my period is late. My period is never late, it’s almost freakish in its consistency.”

Nosa continued his pacing. He felt cornered, trapped. How was this happening to him? He couldn’t be having a baby at sixteen, sixteen. He felt as if his entire life was over. And to think that only a few minutes ago he’d had everything he wanted so close he could have touched it, could have kissed her. Now…now what?

Nosa stopped pacing.

This didn’t change anything, not really. He could still be with Osezele, he could still have his dream. Boys his age had kids all the time. He walked back to Binta then. “I won’t abandon you.” He promised. “Even though I’m with Osezele, I’ll still be here for you. The fact that we’re having a baby doesn’t mean that we have to stay together.”

Binta gasped. “How can you be so callous?” she screamed at him. “You want to leave me to deal with the repercussions of trusting you enough to sleep with you, while you go off and be with someone else.” Binta let the tears drop then, she gave them free rein, saying in between sobs, “I thought you at least cared about me. But now I know you couldn’t have, you couldn’t have cared about me and said the words you just said. I trusted you and you were just using me.”

Nosa turned around. He couldn’t face her, couldn’t let her see the impact her words had on him. For the second time that afternoon he felt guilt and shame, most of all because of the accuracy of her words. He had used her. He’d used her to get over Osezele, used her to ignore the heart break, and now she was pregnant. He didn’t doubt it, couldn’t, not after she’d mentioned her augur mark. Augurs didn’t lie about their visions. It was their code. A code he believed too strongly in to even allow his mind to go there. So, there was nowhere else to go.

Nosa tilted his head back, looking despondently into the sky. He felt water run down his face, and his chest was so constricted he worried the water was from him, tears from a heart that couldn’t connect the despair he felt now with the promise he’d had just a few moments ago, the promise in a princess’s eyes. Then the water began to drop on his forehead, drop after drop, as if the heavens could feel his pain and wept with him. Was the first water a tear or had it been a raindrop? He’d never know.

Nosa turned back around and walked back to meet Binta. He pulled her into his arms and hugged her. “How could you ever think that I don’t care about you? I won’t leave. We’re in this together.” He promised. Just for that moment, he let himself remember the look which had been in Osezele’s eyes after he’d kissed her on her forehead. He knew that he would never see that look again, not when fate had made a liar out of him.

Back in the school block Osezele stood under the pouring rain. She didn’t know how long it had been raining, or how long she’d been standing there, but she knew one thing, she knew that Nosa wasn’t coming back.

1 Like

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by GeoSilYe(f): 8:49am On Sep 28, 2018
ObehiD whyyy nawww

How can you do this to us, to Osezele and I?

sad

"..she knew that would convince him.."

I hope it's just a lie to keep Nosa for herself though.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 9:11am On Sep 28, 2018
Exactly, how I predicted this event to turn out. Girls, women always emotionally blackmailing and trapping one with issues like this. Poor Osezele, same for Nosa, they won't get to enjoy this newfound bliss they both experienced.
Hardluck Nosa, Binta did what every desperate and prideful person would do. Rather than concede defeat, they rig the game. E.g : APC grin
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 11:03am On Sep 28, 2018
Ahn ahn, wakanda torture us dis bikonu, osazele has gone through enough fa. Thanks for dis wonderful update. More inspiration
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Peaceyw(m): 11:56am On Sep 28, 2018
ObehiD u better make sure binta is lying, chai i can never imaging myself in nosa's situation, i will just die.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Richykemzy: 12:32pm On Sep 28, 2018
awww osezele sorry! binta jas wanna tie nosa down wif d pregnancy
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 6:50pm On Sep 28, 2018
Eew! This is one hell of a... complication.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by phoenixchap: 10:45pm On Sep 29, 2018
Wow
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 3:34am On Sep 30, 2018
@GeoSilYe what did I do? I didn't do anything oh! I'm just a humble writer writing what they tell me to. It's their story after all grin. I don't know if Binta is lying...I guess we'll have to wait and see.

@Fazemood hehehe, you don't know why Binta said what she said oh. Maybe she's lying, maybe she's not...I agree that she's very proud though. Still, since they sowed the seed together, they should reap it together, hahaha

@spixytinxy Thank you! I'm really feeling for Osezele...young love is the sweetest.

@Peaceyw Ahah, I'm only writing the lives they're living oh, I don't know if Binta is lying or not cheesy Nosa is capable sha, I'm sure he will figure it out.

@Richykemzy Really, I feel bad for Osezele. And she just stayed there under the rain too...

@tunjilomo 'complication', I like that. It really is a very big complication.

@pheonixchap I'm so happy I was able to leave you speechless wink
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Peaceyw(m): 7:34am On Sep 30, 2018
Everybody come and see ObehiD oh, hw will she be telling me see is just writing there lives. Hope no be autobiography we they read.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 11:47pm On Sep 30, 2018
Peaceyw:
Hope no be autobiography we they read.

hahaha, well, I'll let you be the judge of that. I find it very flattering that you think the story is real enough to be an autobiography...very flattering indeed haha
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by DzTzl(f): 10:15am On Oct 01, 2018
It wont be nice if i dont commend your writing skills, you are absolutely superb i was glued to my phone all night relieving secondary school memories with a supernatural element's touch. You are Good, really really Good! Happy new month and please we want Independence dinner
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by jupitre(m): 2:31pm On Oct 01, 2018
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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by jupitre(m): 2:31pm On Oct 01, 2018
It's nice to be back on this thread... obehiD couldn't even ask about me...
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Richykemzy: 7:34pm On Oct 01, 2018
Yes obehid drop sth for independence be����
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 8:14pm On Oct 01, 2018
@DzTzl Thank you and welcome to the message board!

@jupitre sorry oh. How far na? Where have you been?

@Richkemzy ...well, we all agreed to one chapter a week and the next chapter isn't ready yet. But for independence day, I'll share the first page.

Happy independence day!


**************************************************
Chapter Sixteen
-----------------------------------------------------
St. Luke’s, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
-----------------------------------------------------

The raindrops pelted against the loose soil, creating grooves in the sand. The air brimmed with the choking smell of rain, and the almost suffocating feeling which accompanied it. The water hit forcefully against the ground, sending the loose soil flying against her feet. The raindrops drummed against her bent back, beating a chaotic rhythm against the base of her head covered by her low-cut hair, but Osezele was oblivious to it all. She was indifferent to the little pool forming around her feet, apathetic to the pelting of the rain against her back and completely unbothered by the chill beginning to form inside her. Those things were all bothersome, but they didn’t hold a torch to the searing pain in her heart.

Osezele sat in the rain crying. She didn’t know how long she’d been sitting there, or when she’d decided to sink to the floor, ignoring the stain this would put on her uniform skirt. The only thing she knew, the only thing she could remember was the moment she felt the first drop of rain fall on her. She’d just been contemplating, wondering how anyone could choose her over Binta Gambari, doubting that she could mean that much to Nosa when she felt it, and that single drop of rain had seemed like a message from the universe. A strong sign that Nosa wasn’t coming. But still she’d kept hoping, ignoring the doubt in her heart, until it became perfectly clear that he wasn’t going to leave Binta for her. That was when she started crying, when she’d become oblivious to everything else around her.

Pain was a strange concept. Osezele had been flogged with a wire, so harshly, that her back would always bear those scars. She’d been stabbed by three merged imps, had a migraine severe enough to make her nose bleed, and cut herself with an arrow blade. Still, she’d never felt pain like this. This was something else. It was pain mixed with despair and bottled in misery. It was the agony of having everything you’ve ever wanted a breath away and then watching it get taken before you could even touch it. It was indescribable, pain in such overwhelming amounts she wished desperately for it to go away, to get washed away like every other negative emotion, but it persisted. It was like being cut or stabbed over and over again. Even if you had the incredible ability to heal, you would still feel each cut as it was made.

Osezele closed her eyes, using the back of her hands to wipe at tears that wouldn’t stop falling. When her efforts were proven futile by another stream of tears, she opened her eyes.

Then she frowned.

She was sure she’d only closed her eyes for a second, two at most, but somehow she’d gone somewhere else. Osezele stood, jumping to her feet to examine the unfamiliar surroundings, her pain forgotten in the face of a new fear. The fear went away as quickly as it came, as quickly as her pain left as soon as she’d gotten distracted by her new surroundings. She smiled sadly at her own analogy. She’d been right, she’d been feeling the pain continuously like stabs in her heart over and over again, but not because it wasn’t going away, because she kept hurting herself by thinking of him. As soon as she stopped, the pain, like all the other emotions, went away.

She looked up and to her right, still frowning as her confusion continued to grow. She’d never been to this part of it, never seen it from this angle, but she would recognize the incomplete building anywhere. She was outside the school, right outside the gate, behind the incomplete building she’d almost burned down when the imps merged. How had she gotten here? She swerved around, looking from left to right and trying to trace her steps. The last thing she remembered was sitting by the school block.

Osezele walked forward, hoping to jog her memory. She’d never been behind the incomplete building, so she was surprised by how much space there was between the back of the building and the wall. She walked into the incomplete building, walking through it to the other much more familiar side. As she walked, she remembered another time when she’d been in one place at one moment and somewhere else at the next. The last time that had happened was when she’d been with Ebo. He’d used his mark to draw power from Nosa’s pain which allowed the three of them to teleport. Had she done the same thing? She could still remember all the pain she’d been in when Nosa hadn’t come back. Had she used that pain to teleport? Had she found the secret to getting her commune mark back? That thought almost made the pain worth it. Then she frowned. If she was going to teleport, why would she bring herself here?

Then she saw it. Or rather, more accurately, she saw him. No, it first and then him, although it all happened so quickly she doubted how much she could trust it. Still, looking forward, distracted by her contemplations, Osezele almost missed the mist as it fizzled off, disappearing into thin air. But she didn’t stretch her neck to look for the mist, because there was a man standing in its place. A man walking right towards her, to where she stood under the shade of the building roof.

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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 9:55pm On Oct 01, 2018
Chai, I want more. Happy independence day all. Thanks for did wonderful update. Hope it won't shorten Friday's update
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 10:12pm On Oct 01, 2018
ObehiD I thank you for this update, it was unexpected. Happy Independence to you too
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 11:02pm On Oct 01, 2018
Happy Independence Day.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:19am On Oct 05, 2018
Chapter Sixteen
----------------------------------------------------
St. Luke’s, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
----------------------------------------------------

The raindrops pelted against the loose soil, creating grooves in the sand. The air brimmed with the choking smell of rain, and the almost suffocating feeling which accompanied it. The water hit forcefully against the ground, sending the loose soil flying against her feet. The raindrops drummed against her bent back, beating a chaotic rhythm against the base of her head covered by her low-cut hair, but Osezele was oblivious to it all. She was indifferent to the little pool forming around her feet, apathetic to the pelting of the rain against her back and completely unbothered by the chill beginning to form inside her. Those things were all bothersome, but they didn’t hold a torch to the searing pain in her heart.

Osezele sat in the rain crying. She didn’t know how long she’d been sitting there, or when she’d decided to sink to the floor, ignoring the stain this would put on her uniform skirt. The only thing she knew, the only thing she could remember was the moment she felt the first drop of rain fall on her. She’d just been contemplating, wondering how anyone could choose her over Binta Gambari, doubting that she could mean that much to Nosa when she felt it, and that single drop of rain had seemed like a message from the universe. A strong sign that Nosa wasn’t coming. But still she’d kept hoping, ignoring the doubt in her heart, until it became perfectly clear that he wasn’t going to leave Binta for her. That was when she’d started crying, when she’d become oblivious to everything else around her.

Pain was a strange concept. Osezele had been flogged with a wire, so harshly, that her back would always bear those scars. She’d been stabbed by three merged imps, had a migraine severe enough to make her nose bleed, and cut herself with an arrow blade. Still, she’d never felt pain like this. This was something else. It was pain mixed with despair and bottled in misery. It was the agony of having everything you’ve ever wanted a breath away and then watching it get taken before you could even touch it. It was indescribable, pain in such overwhelming amounts she wished desperately for it to go away, to get washed away like every other negative emotion, but it persisted. It was like being cut or stabbed over and over again. Even if you had the incredible ability to heal, you would still feel each cut as it was made.

Osezele closed her eyes, using the back of her hands to wipe at tears that wouldn’t stop falling. When her efforts were proven futile by another stream of tears, she opened her eyes.

Then she frowned.

She was sure she’d only closed her eyes for a second, two at most, but somehow she’d gone somewhere else. Osezele stood, jumping to her feet to examine the unfamiliar surroundings, her pain forgotten in the face of a new fear. The fear went away as quickly as it came, as quickly as her pain left as soon as she’d gotten distracted by her new surroundings. She smiled sadly at her own analogy. She’d been right, she’d been feeling the pain continuously like stabs in her heart over and over again, but not because it wasn’t going away, because she kept hurting herself by thinking of him. As soon as she stopped, the pain, like all the other emotions, went away.

She looked up and to her right, still frowning as her confusion continued to grow. She’d never been to this part of it, never seen it from this angle, but she would recognize the incomplete building anywhere. She was outside the school, right outside the gate, behind the incomplete building she’d almost burned down when the imps merged. How had she gotten here? She swerved around, looking from left to right and trying to trace her steps. The last thing she remembered was sitting by the school block.

Osezele walked forward, hoping to jog her memory. She’d never been behind the incomplete building, so she was surprised by how much space there was between the back of the building and the wall. She walked into the incomplete building, walking through it to the other much more familiar side. As she walked, she remembered another time when she’d been in one place at one moment and somewhere else at the next. The last time that had happened was when she’d been with Ebo. He’d used his mark to draw power from Nosa’s pain which allowed the three of them to teleport. Had she done the same thing? She could still remember all the pain she’d been in when Nosa hadn’t come back. Had she used that pain to teleport? Had she found the secret to getting her commune mark back? That thought almost made the pain worth it. Then she frowned. If she was going to teleport, why would she bring herself here?

Then she saw it. Or rather, more accurately, she saw him. No, it first and then him, although it all happened so quickly she doubted how much she could trust it. Still, looking forward, distracted by her contemplations, Osezele almost missed the mist as it fizzled off, disappearing into thin air. But she didn’t stretch her neck to look for the mist, because there was a man standing in its place. A man walking right towards her, to where she stood under the shade of the building roof.

The first thing she thought when she saw him was that he looked hard. His posture was rigid, his back straight, his feet slightly apart and his hands crossed behind his back. He had the bearing of a soldier. That was what he reminded her of, one of the soldiers she’d seen in the movies she’d watched. His face was…she couldn’t think of a better word than hard, unflinching. There was disapproval in the brown eyes which stared back at her. His lips were pulled in a straight line and she could swear he was irritated. Irritated and disappointed, but at what? She turned back to his face, to look at the cold eyes staring at her, and she got a sudden strong feeling that he was disappointed in her. But why? She didn’t even know him. She looked at him again, really taking her time to study his face. That was when she noticed something more than the hostile features. She thought she saw something familiar in that face. If he was smiling, he’d almost look like…she couldn’t remember exactly who it was, but it was someone she knew, someone she trusted. And so, she felt like she could trust him. It wasn’t a very logical feeling, not when she was beginning to come to the realization that he could teleport. Which meant that he was most likely the one who’d brought her here. Away from prying eyes, so that he could…she didn’t know what. Of course, she wasn’t feeling any of the fear she should have been feeling. So, she found herself smiling confidently at the strange man.

“Good afternoon sir.” She greeted. “Do you want something from me?”

The man eyed her speculatively. He stood straight as a pillar, with his cold eyes roving over her. Then finally, just when she’d given up hope of ever hearing him speak, he replied. “Why were you crying?” he asked.

Osezele felt a sudden urge to laugh. She didn’t know why, and she didn’t give in to it, but there was something in the way he spoke, his voice just as unbending as his posture, something familiar but at the same time foreign. She felt like she was meeting a different type of person. It was strange to think that she knew enough about people to sort them into groups, but while she may not know everything about people, she knew something about him. And something in this strange man, called to a piece of her she’d never known existed. The feeling didn’t last long, yet somehow she knew there was something auspicious about meeting him. She just didn’t know what it was.

Osezele realized how much time she’d spent thinking through things that didn’t make any sense and ignoring his question. “I’m sorry sir.” She rushed to reply and then she stopped. What would she say? The truth. She didn’t know this man, didn’t know a single thing about him, yet she found herself trusting him because of the familiarity of his face. “I was crying over a boy. He broke my heart, tore a hole through it. It literally felt like he shot an arrow through my heart.”

The man scoffed with disgust. Osezele heard it, but she ignored it, her mind was too far away to pay attention to the strange man. ‘An arrow through my heart’. Her words suddenly rekindled a memory. It was the memory of a strange man in a strange place riding a strange giant squirrel. A man who’d called her ‘blood of my blood’ and promised to show her a thing from the future. She’d seen Nosa shooting an arrow through her heart and she remembered thinking that it didn’t hurt, in fact it seemed to have made her stronger. Lie! She almost screamed out to the strange man from the strange place who’d said the strange words. It had hurt, hurt more than a million arrows.

“Osezele.” The other strange man, the one who was standing in front of her, called out her name. That brought Osezele out of her thoughts. She looked up at the man, surprised to see his expressionless face, not so expressionless. He was frowning now, but it wasn’t a mean frown, it was one of confusion. “Where did you go?” he asked.

The question should have confused her, but it didn’t. What confused her was this strange man’s ability to tell that she’d left him. Sure, her body had been there, but her mind had gone back to the day Elliot died, to the nothingness which granted her three visions. “To the nothingness.” She mumbled in reply, her focus still mainly on her thoughts.

The man’s eyebrows lifted as his eyes widened and he inhaled sharply. “Did you say the nothingness?” he asked, fighting to keep himself calm.

Osezele’s mind cleared then. Her focus returned to the strange man sharing the shade of the roof with her. She’d missed his comical look of surprise, and so was not shocked when his face was just as it had been before. “Yes.” She said nodding.

“That’s impossible.” He spat out.

“It is?” Osezele asked frowning. Was it impossible? It was strange, she admitted that. Seeing white creatures riding horse ghosts, and an almost translucent man with a sharp frog’s tongue and a magical whip, riding a giant squirrel. It did seem fake. But she’d disappeared, Tolani had confirmed it. “No.” Osezele stated, replying her own question. “It isn’t. The place was black, barren and black. And there were these creatures who called themselves…” she broke off, fighting to retrieve the memory. “Yes!” she yelled when she did. “The wardens of Sada, the keepers of time and destiny, the guardians of the annals of life. Then there was a man with a whip who told me that the nothingness will grant me visions. That was when I saw Nosa shooting an arrow into my heart. I guess that one came true.”

The man was too baffled to speak.

Osezele didn’t know this. She assumed he thought she was crazy, and she was starting to rethink trusting him. Maybe she was crazy. What type of person trusted a man because he looked familiar? It was more than that, she knew that, there was more to it, it was an instinctive trust. The only other time she’d felt that was with uncle Oare.

Aha! Osezele almost jumped and clapped in joy. That was why he looked so familiar! He had to be related to uncle Oare. “You’re uncle Oare’s brother?” she asked.

He was baffled yet again. For a crying teenage brat, she sure baffled him a lot. “How did you guess?” he asked. Had Oare somehow told her he was coming? Perhaps a warning like ‘look out for my odious brother’. That thought almost made him smile.

“You look like him, and somehow I just know that I can trust you. It was the same way when I met him.”

Ehi grudgingly gave her a point for identifying him. “My name is Ehi, Ehi Adun. I’m Oare’s younger brother.”

“Good afternoon uncle Ehi.” Osezele smiled. “How is uncle Oare?”

Ehi frowned at the girl. Out of everything he’d seen, starting with the unforgettably irritating picture of her sitting in the rain and crying, which, now that he was on that subject, was just a disgraceful thing for her to do, and for a boy? He’d almost teleported and left right then, right when she’d said she’d been crying in the rain over a boy, a boy. Even now, the thought of it made him so angry he had to fight the urge to yell at her. Not that he would, he was all too aware of what he was to them, even if she wasn’t. Still, she didn’t make it easy to respect her. What a pitiful, disgraceful, excuse for a descendant of the Enikaro. But all of that aside, even the picture of her sitting in the rain hadn’t annoyed him as much as her calling him ‘uncle’. She was mocking him, he knew she was. But what could he do about it? “I’m not your uncle.” He snapped. “I’m not related to you by blood, and if Oare told you he is, he lied.”

Osezele’s mouth hung open. Why was he angry with her? For calling him uncle? But she called everyone uncle. “It’s a sign of respect.” She said lamely, shocked by his anger.

“And why should you respect me?” Ehi’s voice was filled with loathing.

Osezele thought it was obvious. She looked at him, making a point of looking all the way up at him, since he was quite a bit taller than she was. Then she replied. “Because you’re older than me. Uncle Oare told me that he knows something about my family, was he lying?”

Ehi grudgingly shook his head.

“Then you and uncle Oare are the closest things I have to uncles.”

Ehi almost corrected her, but he didn’t. His irritation wasn’t a good enough reason to disobey a direct order. His father had trained him too well for that. Still, he couldn’t have the girl ‘uncle-ing’ him every time they were together. “Just call me Ehi.” He stated flatly. He knew now that she wasn’t mocking him, so he couldn’t find it in him to be as caustic as he had before.

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Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 4:20am On Oct 05, 2018
Osezele shook her head. “Uncle, I can’t call you by your name. I can call you sir, or brother, if that makes you feel better.”

“No, it does not!” Ehi was back to snapping. He knew why he felt so strongly about it, why he couldn’t take it, couldn’t take the deference, the respect, the admiration. It was all because one day she’d learn who she really is and when that day came it would all go away, all the respect, and all the admiration. Only a fool would put himself in that position. “Aren’t you curious about your family? Oare told you he knows something about your family and you didn’t wheedle him for more details?”

Osezele shrugged. “I asked him once, but he said he couldn’t tell me, not then. What does it really matter where my great-great-grandmother came from? I have my mother and my aunty and that’s all I need. Uncle Oare told me to trust him and so I did. He’ll tell me if he thinks I need to know.”

Ehi was flabbergasted. How could he make sure his mind wasn’t playing tricks on him, telling him things she wasn’t saying? He changed the subject again, accepting that it had been foolish and petty to bring it up. He’d been trying to hurt her, to make her want something so badly the promise of it would make her agree to not, never, call him uncle again. But that was a dangerous game to play, too dangerous, because one day she’d know. “When was the bijoutise formed?” he asked instead.

Osezele blinked in confusion. “The what?”

“The bijoutise Osezele, when was it formed?” Ehi barely kept the irritation out of his voice.

Osezele shook her head. “Uncle, I don’t know what you’re talking about.”

Ehi’s jaw clenched. He felt a flash of outrage course through him, so fast it was only his training that kept him from releasing it. It was always outrage with him. He wondered why. Outrage wasn’t a very common commune emotion, but, at least when he was alone, it was his drug of choice. He could use all the others, of course, but it was this that came first even though it wasn’t his primary, his source. He shrugged that thought off, chastising his wandering mind. He ignored the ‘uncle’ and forged on. “How does the air feel?”

Osezele frowned. She looked around, paying particular attention to the air. It was raining, so it smelled strange, but she wasn’t sure what she was supposed to be feeling. “Normal.” She replied.

Ehi frowned. In addition to all her shortcomings he was going to have to add terrible with her mark. How could anyone be so powerful and so inadequate? Imagine a tri-marked warlock sitting and crying in the rain because a boy broke her heart. “Go into your commune mark.” He ordered.

Osezele’s head bent slightly in shame. After a while, she rose it back up and confessed, “I can’t.”

“What do you mean you can’t?”

“I think I lost it.” She replied.

“A mark isn’t a set of keys, you don’t just lose it.” He snapped. He was starting to feel the pull of his thrall, which meant he had to leave soon. Thinking of thralls reminded him of the boy, the wolf Oare had brought to them, for Osezele’s sake. They, the three siblings, created thralls all the time, that was one of the true joys of commune magic, complete control over someone else. Of course, they never forced anyone to enthrall themselves, and as long as they created them, they could release them. Releasing the boy from the commune they called Ebo had been tricky. They’d botched that for sure. Good thing they had their secret ingredients if not the boy would be dead. He wondered how the boy was now? A spotter, wasn’t he? Ehi cleared his mind, returning to the issue at hand.

“Listen Osezele, there is quintise magic surrounding your school…”

“Uncle, what is a quintise?” Osezele jumped in immediately, glad to have someone fill in that blank. She’d been curious to know since Elliot’s death.

Ehi’s jaw clenched at the ‘uncle’. He managed to ignore it. “A quintise is a blood bond of a warlock coven. They all have five members. One augur, one commune and three witches, of which one must be a second strata. Now,…”

“Second strata?” Osezele asked.

Ehi sighed. “Witches are broken up into the first and second strata. First strata are the common witches, the healers, the memoirs and the verdants. Second strata are the superior witches, the less common ones, the celestials, the scripts and the elementals. Depending on exactly how a quintise is made, what marks are in it, the quintise has varying degrees of strengths and capabilities. But because there is always a commune in the quintise, a powerful commune can always sense quintise magic.” Ehi frowned at her. “You are a tri-marked warlock, you’re supposed to be a powerful commune.”

Osezele’s shoulders sagged. “I’m sorry uncle. I’m trying to get it back, I just don’t know what happened.” She frowned then. “Is this quintise magic you say is around the school the reason why Beedie bit Elliot?”

Ehi was able to read between the lines. He nodded. “This magic is called bijoutise. It’s quintise magic made possible through bijou dust. It’s very powerful, but it’s not complete. The elements in this school are…unique.” He refrained from mentioning how big of a role she had to play with the ‘unique’ elements. “When they are strong or motivated enough, they fight commune magic.” This went back to the founding, fights between existences which he didn’t really care to understand and so he didn’t. “But, it’s bijoutise, eventually the quintise magic will win. If that happens before we take the necessary steps to prepare for it, the marked wolves will slaughter every single person in this school.”

Osezele gasped. “How can I stop it?” she asked, confident that she could.

Ehi almost laughed in her face. Well, he thought, he could give her another point for self-confidence. He kept his face straight as he replied. “You can’t.” he stated flatly. “I’ll go and make the necessary arrangements. I need to find a commune aerie powerful enough to read the quintise magic. Once I find one, I’ll know what the next steps are. I’ll most likely need to find another quintise, one much more powerful, probably with all second strata witches and a pain or anger commune. InCoSeM is too smart to let us have any of those here, which means I’ll have to leave the continent.” Ehi sighed. He’d been talking more to himself, but then his attention went back to her. “And while I’m gone I need you to do something for me.”

“Keep the wolves under control?” she asked, even as she tried to think of how to do that. She only knew two wolves in the pack and one of them she couldn’t talk to, not after this afternoon. Osezele shook her head then, thinking about how dumb that was. No, they were facing quintise magic. Since she went and somehow lost her commune mark, she’d have to find a way to keep the wolves calm. Even if it meant talking to Nosa. “I’ll do it.” She promised.

Ehi almost smiled at that. Yes, she was definitely self-confident. “Do what you can, but if the bloodlust sets in, run away…or….” Ehi got quiet for a moment, then his attention went back to her. “How’s your witch mark?” he asked.

“Fine, but useless.” She skulked.

Ehi tsked playfully at her skulking. Then he caught himself up and wiped the smile off his face. What was he thinking joking with her? “Only a fool would underestimate a witch mark. You’re an elemental, you don’t even know what you’re capable of. That leads me to my point actually, what I need from you.”

“What?” Osezele asked eagerly.

“Train.”

“What?” she frowned.

“When I leave, stay right where you are. You need to learn how to fight with a…”

“Cutlass.” She completed, another memory from the nothingness coming to the front of her mind. “The nothingness showed me that too. But in the vision I knew how to fight.”

“You really did see Sada.” Ehi asked amazed. How did a bi-marked, supposed ‘tri-marked’, warlock stumble upon the keys to a door that didn’t exist? “What else did the nothingness show you?”

“Just Nosa shooting me with an arrow and then I was fighting the merged imps with a cutlass like the one I used to kill one of the imps.”

Ehi scoffed at that remark. “An imp cannot be killed.” He corrected.

“I killed an imp. I fought the imp and then I pierced it with a cutlass made of my blue place and it shattered.” Osezele stated adamantly.

Ehi gawked at the girl. Imps could not be killed. Everyone knew that. “Impossible.” He stated with an air of finality.

“Then why did uncle Oare tell me to kill the imps?” she asked.

Ehi scoffed, but he did it with a tender smile on his face. “Oare is a fool.” He teased. “He actually listened to my father when he spoke. You see, my father is a very special bi-marked warlock, a commune and an augur, which gives him the ability to create a very powerful source called a scarlet diadem. But in order to do that, he had to open himself up and allow the imp to go into him. You can’t appreciate how difficult it is to fight the imp of a person you killed. My father defeated the imp, not by killing it, but by subjugating it, locking it away in a part of himself where it couldn’t break free and take control of him. That’s part of the price you pay when you try to get power from a scarlet diadem. You live with the imp of the person you stole it from. In a fit of fancy, our father told us that he killed the imps. I think he said it to prove to us how strong he was, and at the time we believed him. Then I grew older and learned the truth. I’m a commune, Oare is not, I know more about imps than he ever could, and imps cannot be killed.”

Osezele frowned. “So, does that mean the imp is still alive inside me? Did it come back together?” That thought didn’t make her panic as much as she should. Was that why she couldn’t feel her commune mark? As soon as she thought it, she spat the question out.

Ehi shook his head. “If you had an imp in you, you would know, and it would make your commune mark stronger not weaker.” Ehi stopped to listen to his own words, and he couldn’t believe the direction his thoughts were going in. “You don’t feel anything? You don’t fight against the imp’s emotions? You don’t struggle for domination of it every day?”

Osezele shook her head. “I killed one and released the other two. As soon as they left, the pieces of the dead one went from red to blue and it gave more strength to my blue place.”

“What is your blue place?”

“My witch marks.” Osezele replied, with the ghost of a smile on her face. It was a smile wrought from her memories of the dreadful day when it had all happened.

It’s impossible, he thought. Impossible! But she wasn’t feeling the imp, any of the imps. She’d released them! Commune-augurs couldn’t release imps after they’d stolen their lifeform. What imp would go? Then he allowed himself to remember everything Oare had told him. She didn’t kill those children, so maybe that was the difference? Maybe they could leave because they didn’t need to avenge their deaths on her. But wouldn’t they go looking for the real culprit? Imps were dogged in their revenge. He knew just how determined they could be. He knew too much about imps. So why had he not known that they could be killed? Because they couldn’t, it was impossible. Just like it was impossible to go to the fourth existence, for a human to see Sada and live to talk about it. Yet she’d somehow managed to do all these things. He looked at the girl standing in front of him, and he wondered what else she was capable of. He could still see her crying in the rain, but it didn’t annoy him as much as it had before. He’d train her, he’d just have to train her weaknesses out of her. But for the first time since he got the assignment, he didn’t resent it. In fact, he almost looked forward to it as he wondered what she could become. A girl with the power to kill imps and travel to existences people thought extinct, all without knowing the immensity of what she’d done. What would such a girl be with the right training? Unstoppable, undefeatable, a weapon, a killer, better than the others, definitely better than the others. Ehi smiled. Then he felt the pull of his thrall and knew he had to go.

“Wait here.” He repeated, ignoring the killing of imps and travelling to other existences for the moment. “You’ll meet your first trainer. I’ll take over your trainings when I get back.”

Osezele frowned at his cryptic words. What trainer? She thought. But before she could voice her questions the mist appeared, and he was gone.
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Fazemood(m): 9:16am On Oct 05, 2018
This is exasperating, mindblowing, explosively amazing! My God ObehiD, where do you get ur inspirations from. You toooo Good.
I need more...Can I bribe you for more? cheesy
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by tunjilomo(m): 10:08am On Oct 05, 2018
Seriously? Did you have to end this episode on this short note. Ah! Next week!
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Richykemzy: 12:14pm On Oct 05, 2018
cryHmmmmmm till next week
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by GeoSilYe(f): 3:09pm On Oct 05, 2018
Woooow
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by spixytinxy(f): 8:33pm On Oct 05, 2018
Did ur suspense will not kill someone ooo. Me I am yearning for more ooo
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by Peaceyw(m): 12:25pm On Oct 06, 2018
woooww!!! Dis episode deserves an 'abasimikipayang'
pls make d next episode longer ooo, u cannot cum and kill me with suspense i'm begging ooo
Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by obehiD: 1:31pm On Oct 07, 2018
@Fazemood Thank you, that's very flattering! My inspiration...for which part? Haha, there'll be more next Friday grin

@tunjilomo I'm sorry oh, I didn't think it was going to be so much of a suspense. Honestly, when I planned it out in my head, this chapter and the next were supposed to be one chapter, but they ended up being too long and this just felt like the natural ending of this one, so...but a bit of suspense is not too bad cheesy

@Richykemzy it'll be here sooner than you think smiley

@GeoSilYe Thank you! I always love it when I leave readers speechless grin

@spixytinxy don't worry, more is on the way. It'll soon be Friday smiley

@Peaceyw please I need a translation. What is 'abasimikipayang'? But this chapter was long na cheesy

1 Like

Re: The Marked:white Sight_the In Between_a Nigerian Paranormal Fantasy Fiction Book by sampz: 9:58am On Oct 08, 2018
front sit....
we die here

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