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10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by gimmehear(f): 5:01pm On Nov 02
10 grammatical jargon often used by Nigerians.



In Nigeria, people use a lot of grammatical jargon daily and most this jargon are/were/is believed to be correct when view in the English man’s way, but interestingly, most of this jargon often have no sensible meaning when searched for in the dictionary.

Below are some compiled words.

(1)Installmentally:

This “word” is a favourite of many Nigerians, but, sadly, it simply does not exist. You won’t find it any reputable dictionary. The correct thing to say when “installmentally” comes to your mind is in instalments or by instalments.

(2)Plumpy:

Nigerians use “plumpy” when they want to say that someone is chubby or slightly fat. The correct expression is plump.

(3)Disvirgin:



This particular “word” is used severally on a daily basis, especially by Nigerian men when they intend saying that a woman has lost her virginity to a guy. The correct word to use, however, is deflower, because “disvirgin” is not a word depicting that meaning.



(4)Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting



This is a favourite of Nigerian politicians and political analysts alike. They use it when they want to say that a politician has dumped his political party for another party, usually a rival party. The right terms to use when describing this scenario are party switching, defection and crossing the floor and not “cross-carpeting” or “crosscarpeting.”
Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not in the way Nigerians use it.

(5)A “go-slow,”

in the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a situation in which road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues. However, go-slow in the English language actually means an industrial tactic used by employees whereby they intentionally reduce activity, productivity and efficiency in order to press home some demands. When this happens, you say that work in the office, factory or organization is at a go- slow. The correct terms to use when road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues are traffic jam, traffic congestion, gridlock, and (less technically) hold-up, not “go- slow.”



(6)Cunny

“Cunny” is not found in authoritative dictionaries, but it can be found in some slang dictionaries. Over there, it is a slang used to refer to a woman’s v**ina. The correct term to use is cunning (which is used to describe someone that is being deceitful or crafty) and not “cunny.”

(7)Opportuned

There is nothing like “opportuned” anywhere in the English language, but that has not stopped its blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria, including journalists and writers. The correct word is opportune. The word opportune is an adjective; therefore it has no past tense. An adjective has no past tense. However, some verbs can function as adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These verbs are called participles and they do have past tenses. They are not pure adjectives. Examples of participles are fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified, overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as it may, opportune is a pure adjective and not a participle, therefore it has no past tense. Opportune means appropriate or well- timed.



(coolAlright

“Alright” is a misspelling of the term all right. All right is used when you want to say that something is adequate, acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To hardcore English language linguists, “alright” is not a word. However, its usage is gaining traction and it’s increasingly becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary – which is considered the gold standard among American English speakers – has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for its permissiveness when it began indexing some otherwise colloquial and street language terms, including “alright.” Most linguists disagree with the gradual acceptance of “alright” as a word by the public and even the media, while those in the minority are “alright” with it.



(9)Wake-keeping

“Wake-keeping” exists only in the imagination of a few English speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct word is wake and not even “wake-keep.” Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are ungrammatical.



(10)Screentouch: This bad grammatical expression gained currency in Nigeria and neighbouring West African countries with the influx of made-in-China stylus pen touchscreen not- so-smart phones in the mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in Nigeria had not seen it – or even thought such advanced technology was possible – before. So, they looked for a name to call it and “screentouch” came to mind, after all you just touch the screen and it starts working. In case you’ve still not figured it out yet, the correct thing to say is touchscreen and not “screentouch.

So there you have it, 10 English language “words” Nigerians love to use that are not found in the dictionary. Feel free to add yours;
https://www.gbetutv.com/10-grammatical-jargon-often-used-by-nigerians/

Lalasticlala

195 Likes 34 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by uekejiuba(m): 5:20pm On Nov 02
Interesting. ....

15 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by General0847: 5:23pm On Nov 02
That bigot with BBQGRILL on his handle needs to read this.

70 Likes 6 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Ahmed0336(m): 5:33pm On Nov 02
General0847:
That bigot with BBQGRILL on his handle needs to read this.

That man you just quoted is patriot.

56 Likes 2 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Saintbusco1(m): 5:41pm On Nov 02
May I ask if this is plagiarism or piracy?

Whichever way... it still serve its intended purpose
Thanks

37 Likes 2 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by General0847: 5:53pm On Nov 02
Ahmed0336:

That man you just quoted is patriot.
Changes nothing.

27 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by FromZeroToHero(m): 7:28pm On Nov 02
You forgot to add the most popular one "Let me come and be going"

187 Likes 7 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by darfay: 7:34pm On Nov 02
What I see here is nothing but inferiority complex.

First of language is dynamic and as such changes over time, you can't expect us to not be innovative with our official language regardless of wherever it came. Brazilians have their own Portuguese vocabulary as does Mexico, chile, Argentina which differs to some extent from colonial Portuguese and Spanish. So if they can why shouldn't we?

If it were new American slang, them know born the Brits not to include and recognize it in their dictionary but since it's us now

210 Likes 16 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by TheTourist: 7:46pm On Nov 02
You forgot to add "assiduous" grin

3 Likes 2 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Opportuneke(m): 8:46pm On Nov 02
Fantastic....

6 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by SolarRen(m): 9:00pm On Nov 02
English is dynamic Jor. If majority of people are using it then its correct English. Diva as a word was just recently added to the English dictionary

37 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Mathscum: 9:01pm On Nov 02
New testament of the use of English that year . But you did not tell us what to use instead of opportuned, I think we can use fortunate, can we?

6 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by ZACHIE: 9:04pm On Nov 02
Say what you know only.
Do not legislate on what is above your competence.

PLUMPY is good

ALRIGHT is good.

19 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Bigiyo(m): 9:07pm On Nov 02
Abeg...
That how we speak our English, I can't come and kill myself

23 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by javaguru: 9:12pm On Nov 02
I dont want to argue, as it was moved from another source, so scientifically you cant have access to my logic

1 Like

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by chubinwa(m): 9:37pm On Nov 02
ZACHIE:
Say what you know only. Do not legislate on what is above your competence.
PLUMPY is good
ALRIGHT is good.
Alright

4 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by samstradam: 10:50pm On Nov 02
Great post @OP.

One of the most annoying is "cunny", to think most of the people who drop these kind of bombs will be feeling cocky with themselves while talking rubbish!

13 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by tjfulloption(m): 10:51pm On Nov 02
gimmehear:
10 grammatical jargon often used by Nigerians.



In Nigeria, people use a lot of grammatical jargon daily and most this jargon are/were/is believed to be correct when view in the English man’s way, but interestingly, most of this jargon often have no sensible meaning when searched for in the dictionary.

Below are some compiled words.

(1)Installmentally:

This “word” is a favourite of many Nigerians, but, sadly, it simply does not exist. You won’t find it any reputable dictionary. The correct thing to say when “installmentally” comes to your mind is in instalments or by instalments.

(2)Plumpy:

Nigerians use “plumpy” when they want to say that someone is chubby or slightly fat. The correct expression is plump.

(3)Disvirgin:



This particular “word” is used severally on a daily basis, especially by Nigerian men when they intend saying that a woman has lost her virginity to a guy. The correct word to use, however, is deflower, because “disvirgin” is not a word depicting that meaning.



(4)Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting



This is a favourite of Nigerian politicians and political analysts alike. They use it when they want to say that a politician has dumped his political party for another party, usually a rival party. The right terms to use when describing this scenario are party switching, defection and crossing the floor and not “cross-carpeting” or “crosscarpeting.”
Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not in the way Nigerians use it.

(5)A “go-slow,”

in the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a situation in which road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues. However, go-slow in the English language actually means an industrial tactic used by employees whereby they intentionally reduce activity, productivity and efficiency in order to press home some demands. When this happens, you say that work in the office, factory or organization is at a go- slow. The correct terms to use when road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues are traffic jam, traffic congestion, gridlock, and (less technically) hold-up, not “go- slow.”



(6)Cunny

“Cunny” is not found in authoritative dictionaries, but it can be found in some slang dictionaries. Over there, it is a slang used to refer to a woman’s v**ina. The correct term to use is cunning (which is used to describe someone that is being deceitful or crafty) and not “cunny.”

(7)Opportuned

There is nothing like “opportuned” anywhere in the English language, but that has not stopped its blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria, including journalists and writers. The correct word is opportune. The word opportune is an adjective; therefore it has no past tense. An adjective has no past tense. However, some verbs can function as adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These verbs are called participles and they do have past tenses. They are not pure adjectives. Examples of participles are fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified, overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as it may, opportune is a pure adjective and not a participle, therefore it has no past tense. Opportune means appropriate or well- timed.



(coolAlright

“Alright” is a misspelling of the term all right. All right is used when you want to say that something is adequate, acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To hardcore English language linguists, “alright” is not a word. However, its usage is gaining traction and it’s increasingly becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary – which is considered the gold standard among American English speakers – has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for its permissiveness when it began indexing some otherwise colloquial and street language terms, including “alright.” Most linguists disagree with the gradual acceptance of “alright” as a word by the public and even the media, while those in the minority are “alright” with it.



(9)Wake-keeping

“Wake-keeping” exists only in the imagination of a few English speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct word is wake and not even “wake-keep.” Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are ungrammatical.



(10)Screentouch: This bad grammatical expression gained currency in Nigeria and neighbouring West African countries with the influx of made-in-China stylus pen touchscreen not- so-smart phones in the mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in Nigeria had not seen it – or even thought such advanced technology was possible – before. So, they looked for a name to call it and “screentouch” came to mind, after all you just touch the screen and it starts working. In case you’ve still not figured it out yet, the correct thing to say is touchscreen and not “screentouch.

So there you have it, 10 English language “words” Nigerians love to use that are not found in the dictionary. Feel free to add yours;
https://www.gbetutv.com/10-grammatical-jargon-often-used-by-nigerians/

Lalasticlala



I was OPPORTUNED to be a 30 minutes boss over our driver MAQLATUNJI when We were driving home from the bank where our boss SEUN OSEWA sent us on errand to deposit some Moines in his bank account. GO SLOW-SLOW I said to him as I spot this beautiful PLUMPY lady walking by. I'm on my way to a friend's WAKE-KEEPING of her late dad she replied when asked where she was going. As a fast guy I brought out my blackberry porch SCREENTOUCH PHONE I bought on INSTALMENTALLY term from a LALASTICLALA to collect her mobile number. SHARP-SHARP we drop her at the venue as I told her I will give her a call. Bros! You are very CUNNY O, you are claiming to be the car owner abi? ALRIGHT I go tell Oga, the driver JOKENLY tells me. This babe ASWEAR na me go DISVIRGIN HER if she no dey to do CROSS-CARPETING.

118 Likes 7 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Came4amod: 11:02pm On Nov 02
Ahmed0336:


That man you just quoted is patriot.

It's good to sleep oo I was seeing parrot instead of what u wrote grin

7 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by samstradam: 11:13pm On Nov 02
darfay:
What I see here is nothing but inferiority complex.

First of language is dynamic and as such changes over time, you can't expect us to not be innovative with our official language regardless of wherever it came. Brazilians have their own Portuguese vocabulary as those Mexico, chile, Argentina which differs to some extent from colonial Portuguese and Spanish. So if they can why shouldn't we?

If it were new Americana slang, them know born the Brits not to include and recognize it in their dictionary but since it's us now

Bad English is poor English, and there is no excuse. Travel around and you'll appreciate that every nationalty drops bombs including the English. However we in Nigeria stick out for our love of unnecessary tautology and outrageous grammar while keeping a straight face!

10 Likes 3 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by 2RUTHHURTS(m): 11:21pm On Nov 02
The one wey dey vex me pass Na "PENALITY" instead of Penalty grin

11 Likes 2 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by stinggy(m): 6:08am On Nov 03
gimmehear:
10 grammatical jargon often used by Nigerians.

In Nigeria, people use a lot of grammatical jargon daily and most this jargon are/were/is believed to be correct when view in the English man’s way, but interestingly, most of this jargon often have no sensible meaning when searched for in the dictionary.


You clearly don't know what "jargon" mean. Check the dictionary before you argue.

18 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by chuksville(m): 6:19am On Nov 03
OP you forgot to add

Short knicker = Short OR Knicker

Indigene = indigenous

Night Virgil = Virgil

Barbing salon = Barbershop

Running Nose = Runny Nose

Traveling bag = Travel Bag OR Travellers Bag

Borrow Me = Lend Me

Crack Your Brain = Rack Your Brain

Lacking Behind = Lagging Behind

Exercise Patient = Be Patient

Uplifting = Uplift

Complimentary Card = Contact Card OR Business Card

Luxurious Bus = Luxury Bus

Air-Conditioner = Air-Condition

Plate Number = Number Plate

Insultive = Insulting

Mannerless = ill-mannered

Over-speeding = Speeding

And Many More............

68 Likes 9 Shares

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Nobody: 6:53am On Nov 03
grin.
Some of those words are not stopping anytime soon.not even if we are all aware they are wrong.

10 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by helinues: 6:55am On Nov 03
You see me ri

You know me ri

1 Like

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by xaggar(m): 6:55am On Nov 03
Even your leaders do this...

11 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by AlphaStyles(m): 6:55am On Nov 03
Oga leave us with our jargon jare we like am like that

3 Likes

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by Goldencheese(m): 6:55am On Nov 03
Amazing.

Thanks for sharing this vital information.

God bless.

gimmehear:
10 grammatical jargon often used by Nigerians.



In Nigeria, people use a lot of grammatical jargon daily and most this jargon are/were/is believed to be correct when view in the English man’s way, but interestingly, most of this jargon often have no sensible meaning when searched for in the dictionary.

Below are some compiled words.

(1)Installmentally:

This “word” is a favourite of many Nigerians, but, sadly, it simply does not exist. You won’t find it any reputable dictionary. The correct thing to say when “installmentally” comes to your mind is in instalments or by instalments.

(2)Plumpy:

Nigerians use “plumpy” when they want to say that someone is chubby or slightly fat. The correct expression is plump.

(3)Disvirgin:



This particular “word” is used severally on a daily basis, especially by Nigerian men when they intend saying that a woman has lost her virginity to a guy. The correct word to use, however, is deflower, because “disvirgin” is not a word depicting that meaning.



(4)Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting



This is a favourite of Nigerian politicians and political analysts alike. They use it when they want to say that a politician has dumped his political party for another party, usually a rival party. The right terms to use when describing this scenario are party switching, defection and crossing the floor and not “cross-carpeting” or “crosscarpeting.”
Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not in the way Nigerians use it.

(5)A “go-slow,”

in the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a situation in which road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues. However, go-slow in the English language actually means an industrial tactic used by employees whereby they intentionally reduce activity, productivity and efficiency in order to press home some demands. When this happens, you say that work in the office, factory or organization is at a go- slow. The correct terms to use when road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle queues are traffic jam, traffic congestion, gridlock, and (less technically) hold-up, not “go- slow.”



(6)Cunny

“Cunny” is not found in authoritative dictionaries, but it can be found in some slang dictionaries. Over there, it is a slang used to refer to a woman’s v**ina. The correct term to use is cunning (which is used to describe someone that is being deceitful or crafty) and not “cunny.”

(7)Opportuned

There is nothing like “opportuned” anywhere in the English language, but that has not stopped its blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria, including journalists and writers. The correct word is opportune. The word opportune is an adjective; therefore it has no past tense. An adjective has no past tense. However, some verbs can function as adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These verbs are called participles and they do have past tenses. They are not pure adjectives. Examples of participles are fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified, overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as it may, opportune is a pure adjective and not a participle, therefore it has no past tense. Opportune means appropriate or well- timed.



(coolAlright

“Alright” is a misspelling of the term all right. All right is used when you want to say that something is adequate, acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To hardcore English language linguists, “alright” is not a word. However, its usage is gaining traction and it’s increasingly becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary – which is considered the gold standard among American English speakers – has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for its permissiveness when it began indexing some otherwise colloquial and street language terms, including “alright.” Most linguists disagree with the gradual acceptance of “alright” as a word by the public and even the media, while those in the minority are “alright” with it.



(9)Wake-keeping

“Wake-keeping” exists only in the imagination of a few English speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct word is wake and not even “wake-keep.” Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are ungrammatical.



(10)Screentouch: This bad grammatical expression gained currency in Nigeria and neighbouring West African countries with the influx of made-in-China stylus pen touchscreen not- so-smart phones in the mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in Nigeria had not seen it – or even thought such advanced technology was possible – before. So, they looked for a name to call it and “screentouch” came to mind, after all you just touch the screen and it starts working. In case you’ve still not figured it out yet, the correct thing to say is touchscreen and not “screentouch.

So there you have it, 10 English language “words” Nigerians love to use that are not found in the dictionary. Feel free to add yours;
https://www.gbetutv.com/10-grammatical-jargon-often-used-by-nigerians/

Lalasticlala

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by midnighter(f): 6:55am On Nov 03
"Alright" is correct but not acceptable in formal writing

You can add "passport". People say "bring your passport" when they mean "passport photo" or "passport[-sized] picture"

4 Likes 1 Share

Re: 10 Grammatical Jargons Often Used By Nigerians. by koyeni(m): 6:56am On Nov 03
Good one




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