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Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax - Celebrities (2) - Nairaland

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Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 9:27pm On Feb 07
But I say that wisdom is better than might, though the poor man’s wisdom is despised and his words are not heard.
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 11:35pm On Feb 07
Nobody on Earth is going to show you this wisdom about DNA that I just did.
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 2:52pm On Feb 08
DNA
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 6:10pm On Feb 08
Asian pedophiles too


Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 8:00pm On Feb 08
Of course the Illuminati stretches to China and into Russia.

Some are forced to go alone with world wide hoaxes and lies perpetrated upon the poor and uneducated people.
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 8:51pm On Feb 08
Wake up out your slumber

Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 2:10am On Feb 09
A pure hoax to cause panic
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 4:56pm On Feb 09
Truth is powerful and indisputable
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 12:39am On Feb 10
Hoax
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 2:12am On Feb 10
Fear is the mind killer
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 1:29pm On Feb 10
Wow
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 7:34pm On Feb 10
Don"t believe the hype no matter how many puppets in the play it's still a puppet show.
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Elxandre(m): 9:05pm On Feb 10
angry
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 10:08pm On Feb 10
Nearly two decades have passed since a coronavirus known as SARS emerged in China, killing hundreds of people and sparking panic that sent a chill through the global economy. The virus now rampaging across China could be much more damaging.

China has become an indispensable part of global business since the 2003 SARS outbreak. It's grown into the world's factory, churning out products such as the iPhone and driving demand for commodities like oil and copper. 

The country also boasts hundreds of millions of wealthy consumers who spend big on luxury products, tourism and cars. China's economy accounted for roughly 4% of world GDP in 2003; it now makes up 16% of global output.
SARS sickened 8,098 people and killed 774 before it was contained. 

The new coronavirus, which originated in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, has already killed more than 900 people and infected over 40,000 across at least 25 countries and territories. Chinese officials have locked down Wuhan and several other cities, but the virus continues to spread.

"The outbreak has the potential to cause severe economic and market dislocation. But the scale of the impact will ultimately be determined by how the virus spreads and evolves, which is almost impossible to predict, as well as how governments respond," said Neil Shearing, group chief economist at Capital Economics.

Compounding the risk is the fact that the world outside China has also changed since 2003.
Globalization has encouraged companies to build supply chains that cut across national borders, making economies much more interconnected. 

The major central banks have used up much of the ammunition they would typically deploy to fight economic downturns since the 2008 financial crisis, and global debt levels have never been higher. Rising nationalism may make it harder to coordinate a worldwide response, if that's required.

The virus is snarling supply chains and disrupting companies.
Car plants across China have been ordered to remain closed following the Lunar New Year holiday, preventing global automakers 

Volkswagen (VLKAF), Toyota (TM), Daimler (DDAIF), General Motors (GM), Renault (RNLSY), Honda (HMC) and Hyundai (HYMTF) from resuming operations in the world's largest car market. 

According to S&P Global Ratings, the outbreak will force carmakers in China to slash production by about 15% in the first quarter. Toyota said on Friday it would keep its factories shut at least until February 17.

Luxury goods makers, which rely on Chinese consumers who spend big at home and while on vacation, have also been hit. British brand Burberry (BBRYF) has closed 24 of its 64 stores in mainland China, and its chief executive warned Friday that the virus is causing a "material negative effect on luxury demand." Dozens of global airlines have curtailed flights to and from China.

Even more troubling is the threat to global supply chains. Qualcomm (QCOM), the world's biggest maker of smartphone chips, warned that the outbreak was causing "significant" uncertainty around demand for smartphones, and the supplies needed to produce them. 

Already, auto parts shortages have forced Hyundai (HYMTF) to close plants in South Korea and caused Fiat Chrysler (FCAU) to make contingency plans to avoid the same result at one of its plants in Europe.

Economists say the current level of disruption is manageable. If the number of new coronavirus cases begins to slow, and China's factories reopen soon, the result will be a fleeting hit to the Chinese economy in the first quarter and a dent in global growth. 

If the virus continues to spread, however, the economic damage will increase rapidly.

Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser to Allianz (ALIZF), told CNN Business that he was most worried about the potential cascading economic effects. "They first paralyze the region of the virus outbreak," he said. "Then they gradually spread domestically, undermining internal trade, consumption, production and the movement of people. If the virus is still not contained, the process spreads further, including regionally and internationally by disrupting trade, supply chains and travel."

Epidemic risk...
Economists have a hard time working out the potential costs of epidemics because of their unique characteristics. Yet diseases can be far more damaging than natural disasters such as hurricanes or a tsunami, or other unpredictable events known as "black swans." 

According to a study by the World Bank, a severe pandemic could cause economic losses equal to nearly 5% of global GDP, or more than $3 trillion. Losses from a weaker flu pandemic, such as the 2009 H1N1 virus, can still wipe 0.5% off global GDP.

"A severe pandemic would resemble a global war in its sudden, profound, and widespread impact," the World Bank assessed in a report on pandemics from 2013. (The Wuhan coronavirus has not been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.)

The virus is not the driving factor behind those losses, however. Instead, it's the way consumers, businesses and governments respond to an outbreak that matters most.
People are more likely to stay home during an outbreak to avoid getting sick, preventing them from traveling, shopping and working. Doing so limits demand for consumer goods and energy. 

Decisions by companies and governments to close shops and idle factories, meanwhile, curtail production.
"This is continuing to grow in scope and magnitude. It could end being really, really big, and really, really serious. We can't project that now," said William Reinsch, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies who spent 15 years as president of the National Foreign Trade Council.

According to Shearing, past epidemics show that China's economy is likely to take a significant hit in the first quarter. But that will quickly fade from memory if the virus is contained.

"As long as factory closures don't lead to job losses, by this time next year the level of GDP is unlikely to be very different from what it would have been without the virus," he said.

What can be done?
China's government has moved quickly to counter the economic fallout from the coronavirus and the measures taken to contain it.

The People's Bank of China cut a key interest rate this week and injected huge amounts of cash into markets in order to help take the pressure off banks and borrowers. Officials have also announced new tax breaks and subsidies designed to help consumers.

Yet China is also more vulnerable to a crisis than it was 17 years ago when SARS broke out.
"It has much higher debt, trade tensions with a major trading partner and its growth has been steadily slowing down for a number of years, which gives a weak starting point to face such a crisis," said Raphie Hayat, a senior economist at Dutch bank Rabobank.

Analysts at Capital Economics expect the government to announce additional measures in the coming days. If the virus keeps spreading, they believe that Beijing will have to abandon its long-running efforts to get its debt under control and pump money directly into the economy.

Central banks in neighboring countries including Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines have cut interest rates in recent weeks. South Korea and Taiwan could be next.
But the big powers of the financial world are exhausted from a decade fighting anemic growth since the global financial crisis. 

The European Central Bank introduced negative interest rates in 2014 and hasn't been able to increase them since, while the Bank of Japan is in a similar position. The US Federal Reserve already cut interest rates three times last year; Chair Jerome Powell has said he's carefully monitoring the situation.

Meanwhile, debt levels have soared in the United States, Japan and key European countries including Italy, limiting the scope for a big fiscal stimulus if the world economy goes into another tailspin. Global debt, including borrowing by households, governments and companies, has jumped to more than three times the size of the global economy, the highest ratio on record, according to the Institute of International Finance.

Also critical is whether governments are able to coordinate their response to the outbreak, ideally with help from multinational institutions. This is especially true because, according to the World Bank, preparedness for a potential pandemic is low. But coordination may prove difficult in a increasingly fractured world where nationalism is often prized over cooperation.

"It's quite clear that multinational institutions are under more pressure, and have less teeth on day to day issues than 10 years ago," Shearing said. "But the optimist in me would like to think that in the face of a global pandemic, global institutions are still in a position to respond."



All to stop the rise of West Africa the richest land upon Earth. The land of the richest emperor in history the legendary Musa Mansa.


Wake up out your slumber

Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 11:05pm On Feb 10
Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 1:29am On Feb 11
It's a complete hoax
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 12:41pm On Feb 11
Wow
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Novaccines: 3:55pm On Feb 11


NEWS

The stories they told: How the Chinese railroad workers live onCourtesy of Amanda Wilson Bergado

By Sean Lee on June 5, 2019

A century and a half after the Golden Spike was hammered in at Promontory Summit, Utah, people from all over the Bay crowded into Tressider Oak Lounge with standing room only. Except instead of being on the sidelines like they had been in 1869, the contributions of the Chinese railroad workers were the focus at the 150th Anniversary event, The Golden Spike: Chinese Workers and The Transcontinental Railroad.

For many in the audience, however, the presentation of the decades-long scholarship of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America at Stanford project served a purpose beyond recognition of the workers’ mark on American history. The legacy of their ancestors were on full display.

“So many people from across the Bay — many of whom are fourth, fifth, sixth generation Chinese — heard that this event was happening and came to see the exhibition, to see the history of their ancestors be highlighted,” said Amanda Wilson Bergado, an attendee and director of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis at Stanford. “It was moving to see so many people, especially descendants, in the room.”

For descendants of Chinese railroad workers and nineteenth-century Chinese immigrants, the work that Chinese Railroad Workers Project co-directors Shelley Fisher Fishkin and Gordon Chang have achieved is not just about setting the historical record straight; it’s about reclaiming their families’ place in American history. And for people like Michael Solorio ’20, a junior at Stanford whose great-great-great grandfather Lim Lip Hong worked on the transcontinental railroad, it is about finally including the forgotten individuals who built Stanford from the ground up in the University’s history.

“This country has a long history of disrespecting immigrant laborers, and this recognition is one movement of change in the right direction,” Solorio said. “I am happy that Chinese railroad workers like Lim Lip Hong are finally being recognized for their important contributions to the United States,” Solorio said. “Stanford was built on the backs of exploited immigrant laborers, so we owe them respect and recognition for their tough sacrifices.”

Stories passed down through generations

A twelve-year-old Lim Lip Hong emigrated to the United States from Guangdong Province in 1855. Like many other Chinese who emigrated at the time, Lim wanted to make money to send back to his family given the domestic turmoil occuring in China from the Opium Wars, famines, the Taiping Rebellion and civil unrest during the nineteenth century. He found work as a laborer on the Transcontinental Railroad, the western section of which was being built by the Central Pacific Railroad Company. The Central Pacific Railroad’s president was none other than California governor and university founder Leland Stanford.

Lim was eventually promoted to Crew Head, recruiting and overseeing laborers who braved the Sierra Nevadas to set hundreds of miles of track. Solorio, who is descended from Lim’s third child Lim Sing, recounts stories of Lim and his descendants, passed down as oral history on his mother’s side.

“One oral story that my grandma told me was how Lim Sing ‘saved the SF Chinatown,’” Solorio said. “After the San Francisco earthquake and fires, the local government formed a committee essentially to move Chinatown away from San Francisco and somewhere else. Lim Sing and his friend Wong Git Yow fought against the committee until it was disbanded.”

Since immigration and labor records, especially for Chinese immigrants, were often not well recorded or erased, family stories like those passed down to Solorio form oral histories that serve as valuable primary sources in the rich history of Chinese Americans. The Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project compiled and uploaded interview videos and transcripts with numerous descendants of railroad laborers, where they shared stories passed down generations that can now be accessed for posterity on the project website.  

“[My great grandfather] came to the United States, we think, in the mid 1860s,” recounted Russell Low in one such interview. “He came, with an uncle, older brother actually, he came with one of his brothers, and they worked on the Transcontinental Railroad. At some point during this, the story according to his son, was that the brother lost an eye during a blasting accident. And exactly where that happened isn’t clear. But that’s the story as we know it. The fact is that there is little that is known about that time period.”

Some interviewees discussed not just the stories of ancestors who worked on the railroad, but how their family in subsequent generations cemented themselves in the United States.

“After working on the railroad as a foreman… my great-grandfather, Lee Wong Sang, has a store ‘Wong Sang Wo,’” said Connie Young Yu. “He had three sons working there, and my grandfather who was the second son, Lee Yuk Suy…the [1906 San Francisco] earthquake hit and my grandfather, he realized he just had to get the papers… his birth certificate—no one was going to believe a Chinese was born in 1878 in San Francisco.”

Connie Young Yu’s father later attended Stanford, where, despite the essential contributions that Chinese workers made in building campus and building Stanford’s fortune, he lived “in the Chinese clubhouse — and that was because Chinese students were not allowed to live in the dorms,” Yu continued. “And this was after 1919 when a Chinese [person] came to Encina Hall and was thrown out bodily by, you know, some good ol’ boys at Stanford. And then the Chinese in the community raised money to build the Chinese clubhouse.”

“I’ve always thought about the incredible irony of all this,” Yu said.

And while the work of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America project has comprehensively and unprecedentedly managed to document Chinese American history, for many descendants, much of their family’s history remains in uncertainty. Language barriers, a dearth of records making it difficult to corroborate oral stories and the pressures of American exclusionary policies causing necessary omissions and changes in narratives recounted by families to avoid deportation leave much to be explored.

“Due to the Chinese Exclusion Act, Chinese people had to fit within certain social classes in order to be admitted to the US, which narrowed the identities of people possible,” Wilson Bergado, who is fourth and sixth generation Chinese American, said. “From the start of exclusion, a lot of the stories passed down by my family, and many others, conformed to a certain narrative by political necessity because we had to be of the merchant class in order to remain in the US.”

Wilson Bergado’s ancestor Lee Bo Wen, according to their family history, is said to have emigrated to the United States during the 1850s, but a lack of written records make this hard to confirm.

“That may have obfuscated the nuances of my family’s history, and with Lee Bo Wen, my ancestor who I know nothing about, he may not have been a merchant during that time and thus there might have been an intentional gap and secrecy surrounding his identity,” Wilson Bergado said. Some of her ancestors were also detained for months on Angel Island, the infamous immigration station in San Francisco Bay where Chinese immigrants were processed, separated and deported during the exclusion era.

“There was some reticence on the part of some of the older people in my family to talk about things that were particularly hard in their past because they were Chinese, whether it was racism in their communities or the real challenge that immigration policies posed. They’d tell me, ‘We’re not actually supposed to talk about this,’ even though [her ancestors] are long gone,” Wilson Bergado said.

While there is still more to unearth in regards to Chinese American history — even now, the Stanford Archaeology Project is excavating sites in the Stanford Arboretum where Chinese workers were housed as they built campus — descendants like Wilson Bergado and Solorio are grateful on a personal level for the progress the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America project has made in showcasing the history of Chinese contributions to the U.S.

“The dearth of records and the dearth of inclusion in the histories I learned growing up in California spurred my interest in becoming a historian,” Wilson Bergado said. “I’m grateful that this is opening up new narratives, new dimensions, addressing the gaps in our history. Not just understanding history from above … but from below, from the people who made this happen.”

Solorio also expressed gratitude for the institutional change around recognition of the Chinese railroad workers happening at Stanford.

“I feel very connected to the Chinese railroad workers because I would not be here if it wasn’t for the job opportunity here in the 1850s,” Solorio said. “Going to Stanford, I feel grateful that change is happening and that some descendants of mistreated laborers are finally getting the chance to benefit from institutions like Stanford.”

Solorio continued, “Every piece of information we have about them is valuable.”

This article has been corrected to remove an unsubstantiated claim that anti-Chinese mobs burned down the Virginia City Chinatown in 1875. The Daily regrets this error.

Contact Sean Lee at seanklee ‘at’ stanford.edu.

Sean Lee

Sean Lee '22 is the desk editor for the University News beat. He is interested in studying Political Science, History, International Relations, the humanities and the intersections between the humanities and STEM. An avid boba connoisseur and adventure seeker, he proudly hails from Arcadia, Los Angeles, California. Contact him at seanklee 'at' stanford.edu.





I'm not crazy I am sane. The Li family helped establish Americas industrialization by the building of the railroad that connected America coast to coast. The Chinese are efficient builders and do not tire in labor. They were enslaved and mistreated by their own who collaborated with Western Europeans. How come? Because the Li FAMILY are Chinese Jews. They have always owned a piece of America. The Chinese own much America now so the rise of Eco Currency would affect them too.


Wake up out your slumber

Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 8:33pm On Feb 11
Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 12:42am On Feb 12
So they decided to name this hoax disease as COVID-19.

Since we know the Li's are Chinese Jews and they are one of the 13 Illuminati families that own America originally the 13 colonies we will use Jewish gematria to get a hint of its intent.

COVID-19 = 766

District of Columbia = 766

She's corrupt = 766 the district mayor manager is a very corrupt Black woman. A Black Jew not all African Americans have Jewish paternal lineage yet in this area genetic slave breeding was very high.

District of Columbia is the modern Rome and Washington DC the capital of the United States.


This means that they are connected to the hoax and that it concerns the Illuminati.

The rise of Eco Currency or single currency would affect all the states under the Illuminati 13 this includes the Chinese economy. The Chinese own part of America.

Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 2:02am On Feb 12
My insight is God given you should account.
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 2:43am On Feb 12
Obama put 34 military bases in Africa to help stage recolonization. LGBT to soften Africa and divide it. Obama is a Black Jew and nearly all Jews desire to rule the world over the Cushite now today called Bantu, Fula, and Nilolithic. You must study DNA and ancient mythology to understand my insight. These Black American elites are mixed with Jewish paternal DNA and are actually mulattoes that now pass for Black. Black doesn't mean African. They stopped Booker T Washington from helping Africa, Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X. Some African Americans desire to help Africa yet cant get through because of the Pan Africans. Pan is a Greek god. Black Greeks and Romans who practice the opposite culture of traditional Africa and always have. Not all Blacks are from Africa and embedded with traditional culture that's why Yoruba call them Akata.

Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 3:37pm On Feb 12
A complete hoax
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 5:02pm On Feb 12
Fake news
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 8:01pm On Feb 12
Li Family Illuminati
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 9:41pm On Feb 12
Coronavirus is the flu. Did you know flu virus is contagious and can be deliberately spread? People are that wicked where money is concerned.


wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 9:43pm On Feb 12
co·ro·na1

/kəˈrōnə/

noun

1.

ASTRONOMY

the rarefied gaseous envelope of the sun and other stars. The sun's corona is normally visible only during a total solar eclipse, when it is seen as an irregularly shaped pearly glow surrounding the darkened disk of the moon.

2.

ANATOMY

a part of the body resembling or likened to a crown.



Baal loving sun worship right in front of you.


The world is wicked

Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 10:16pm On Feb 12
Wake up out your slumber
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 12:29am On Feb 13
Homosexuality is Baal worship
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 3:10am On Feb 13
Hoax
Re: Unveiling Li Family Chinese Illuminati Coronavirus Hoax by Thirteenblood: 1:17pm On Feb 13
Its fear spread to stop single Currency from rising in West Africa.

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