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Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? - Politics - Nairaland

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Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by AnonPoet: 8:22pm On Oct 05
I had the privilege to stumble on a report titled: “Pandora Papers: Inside Peter Obi’s secret businesses — and how he broke the law”. It was written by one Taiwo-Hassan Adebayoand published in Premium Times Newspaper on the 4th day ofOctober, 2021. Most Nigerian and indeed my humble self, had perceived Peter Obi to be an epitome of transparency, good governance, patriotism and economic astuteness. This perception heightened my curiosity to read through the article in order to discover the hidden secrets which the article had to bear against the former two term Governor of Anambra State and the Vice-Presidential candidate of the People’s Democratic Party in the 2019 national election. Having read through the article, my lawyerly self queried whether Peter Obi actually violated the law as alleged in the article. This prompted my decision to dispassionately test the allegations against Peter Obi against the provisions of the law.

The allegations in the article basically bother on allegations of tax evasion and non-declaration of certain jointly owned assets by Peter Obi. It was argued that Peter Obi committed the offence of tax evasion by establishing a company outside the shores of Nigeria in “havens where little or no taxes are paid”. It was further argued that Peter Obi committed a crime by non-declaration of some of his jointly owned assets outside the shores of Nigeria and failure to resign from the board of directors of those companies 14 months after assuming the office of the Governor in Anambra state. These allegations shall be addressed seriatim.

It must be stated there is a world of difference between allegation, facts and evidence. Allegation are mere claims and assertion of a person’s wrong doing that are not yet proven. Facts are events that are confirmed or verifiable. While evidence are concrete facts used to support an assertion or a claim. At the moment, the claims of the Adebayo against Peter Obi are still within the realm of mere allegations. However, this article will proceed with the assumption without necessarily conceding that Adebayo’s claims against Peter Obi are factual, as the said Peter Obi still enjoys the presumption of innocence in his favour as protected by the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. This presumption stands unshaken until otherwise proven.

A cursory look at Adebayo’s article would reveal that the author seems to have confused tax avoidance for tax evasion. It is appreciated that both terms may easily be mistaken one for another or erroneously used interchangeably except for persons who are well informed about tax laws. In simply terms, tax evasion is an offence, whereas tax avoidance is not an offence. At this point, it must be stated that on the authority of Section 36 (12) of the Nigerian Constitution, a person shall not be held liable for an offence except such offence is expressly defined by a written law and a sentence specifically prescribed thereto. The case of George v. FRN (2015) All FWLR (Pt. 718) 879 is apt in this regard.

In Nigeria, tax evasion used in two sense. First, as a specific offence. Second, as generic expression for acts of tax non-compliance or violation of tax laws. Section 26 Value Added Tax Act 1993 and Section 164 Custom and Excise Management Act 1959 are the two known tax law provisions that specifically provide for the offence of tax offence. Every other tax offence, including, omitting or understating income in order to make incorrect return; failure to keep the required records; refusal or neglect to pay tax; dishonest declaration of income, earnings or assets; fraudulent tax returns, etc. are loosely referred to as tax offences. However, the definition of the “tax evasion” in the two aforementioned tax law provisions has nothing to do with a business man deciding which part of the country to invest his legitimately earned money. It would be preposterous and despotic for any government to even prevent any entity from making such business decision, when the same government do solicit for foreigners to invest in the Nigerian economy. Why should a Nigerian be penalised for deciding to invest his resources in other countries irrespective of the prevailing tax rate in that country? Indeed, the question to ask is: is there any Nigerian law that prohibits and penalises a Nigeria from investing in any jurisdiction outside Nigeria? Adebayo did not mention any. My guess is, he could not find any.

Business owners and entities ordinarily direct their business undertakings in such a way as to avoid financial liabilities including payment of tax. This is what is also known as tax planning. To quote Lord Clyde in the case of Ayrshire Pullman Motor Services and D. M. Ritchin v. Commissioner of Inland Revenue, (1920) 14 Tax Cas 754, 763–764: “No man in this country is under the smallest obligation moral or otherwise so to arrange his legal relations to his business or to his property as to enable the Inland Revenue to put the largest possible shovel into his stores. The Inland Revenue is not slow and quite rightly to take every advantage, which is open to it under the taxing statutes for the purpose of depleting the taxpayer’s pocket. And the taxpayer is in like manner entitled to be astute to prevent so far as he honestly can the depletion of his means by the Revenue. Every company has the option of carrying out tax planning in order to minimize tax liability within the law of the territory in which it operates”.

There are tax avoidance schemes that is even recognized by tax laws. Individuals or companies may avoid payment of tax by simply increasing its capital expenditure in order to reduce its taxable profit. In this instance, the company would be said to be taken advantage of section 24 of the Company Income Tax Act (CITA) which includes certain capital expenditures as allowable deductions. This would be regarded as measures taken to reduce its tax liability. Provided such act is not prohibited by law, the company cannot be said to have committed any tax offence.

Provided that a particular scheme to avoid or reduce tax liabilities are not prohibited by law, they are still within the realm of tax avoidance and no criminal liability can accrue thereto. The best the government can do to address the incidence of tax evasion is to identify tax avoidance schemes and then get the legislature to criminalise it. Then again, the legislative enactment criminalising such act has effectively moved from tax avoidance into the realm of tax evasion. Until there is a law prohibiting a Nigerian from investing outside the shores of Nigeria, Peter Obi cannot be said to have committed the offence of tax evasion or any other tax offence(s), however so called.

On the issue of non-declaration of jointly or partly owned foreign asset: the law which addresses this subject is majorly the constitution and the Code of Conduct Bureau and Tribunal Act.Section 11 (1) (b) Part I Fifth Schedule to the Constitution Adebayo referred to requires a public officer to declare his properties, assets, and liabilities. The said provision did not specifically require the declaration of jointly or partly owned assets. It is appreciated that a public officer is required to declare his assets in view of the public trust reposed in the office they occupy. It would be irrational to expose assets that are partly owned by other individuals, when they are not the ones occupying the public office in question. Some business investors actually prefer to invest quietly, hence, a declaration of their jointly owned assets breach that business trust which they expect from their business partners. The otherwise could amount to a breach of the right to privacy and quiet enjoyment of the property of these individuals.

It is to be noted that Section 6 (b) of the Code of Conduct Bureau and Tribunal Act did not prohibit a public officer from holding an interest in a company. It only prevents the said public officer not to personally “engage or participate in the management or running of any private business, profession or trade”. To my mind this does not preclude a public officer to shut down his hitherto existing business or profession simply upon his assumption of public office. It would be unreasonable for the law to expect that of such public officer. Provided the public officer is not personally involved in administering the business while in office, he is in the right side of the law. The appointment of nominee directors by companies are legitimate and well known corporate law practice recognised by the Companies and Allied Matters Act. More so, Nigerian law recognises that companies have distinct personalities different from its shareholders and directors. As such, it is legally incorrect to say that a person owns a company. Adebayo failed to tie down Peter Obi’s personal involvement in the administration of the companies while occupying the office of the governor of Anambra State.

Eti Best Herbert is a legal practitioner and legal research consultant. He is the Head of Practice of Olive Branch Attorneys. He may be reach via: etiherbert@gmail.com
https://leaders.ng/did-peter-obi-actually-break-the-law/

43 Likes 11 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by godliman: 8:34pm On Oct 05
All those rejoicing in ignorance are worshippers of Mr fake integrity. They are eager to cast aspersion on the true Mr Integrity who they are bitterly envious of. Peter Obi is too pure to be a Nigerian.

181 Likes 10 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by TooMuchStuff: 8:37pm On Oct 05
Peter the Rock is unshakable....!

Who dey breattttttt

134 Likes 6 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by TheSupleemLeada(m): 8:39pm On Oct 05
Long stories to justify a man who claimed to be of modest means meanwhile his teenage daughter had billions registered in her name.


The godforsaken idiots quoting me should also ask why he didn't declare it as assets before entering office. He registered it in his kids name simply because he didn't want to declare it.

Peter Obi should forget presidency.... he's has more chances at president of August meeting association.....

90 Likes 10 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by weblord1900: 8:40pm On Oct 05
Lol. Are these newspapers fighting themselves.
Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by gidgiddy: 8:42pm On Oct 05
Tax avoidance is not against the law, tax evasion is

113 Likes 4 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by cybersoldiers: 8:55pm On Oct 05
Southwestern Taliban's won't like this.

Sons of Anarchy won't like this.

Fulani, Hsusas won't have any problems with this truth but Yorubas will.

103 Likes 5 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by ekesol: 8:58pm On Oct 05
AnonPoet:
I had the privilege to stumble on a report titled: “Pandora Papers: Inside Peter Obi’s secret businesses — and how he broke the law”. It was written by one Taiwo-Hassan Adebayoand published in Premium Times Newspaper on the 4th day ofOctober, 2021. Most Nigerian and indeed my humble self, had perceived Peter Obi to be an epitome of transparency, good governance, patriotism and economic astuteness. This perception heightened my curiosity to read through the article in order to discover the hidden secrets which the article had to bear against the former two term Governor of Anambra State and the Vice-Presidential candidate of the People’s Democratic Party in the 2019 national election. Having read through the article, my lawyerly self queried whether Peter Obi actually violated the law as alleged in the article. This prompted my decision to dispassionately test the allegations against Peter Obi against the provisions of the law.

The allegations in the article basically bother on allegations of tax evasion and non-declaration of certain jointly owned assets by Peter Obi. It was argued that Peter Obi committed the offence of tax evasion by establishing a company outside the shores of Nigeria in “havens where little or no taxes are paid”. It was further argued that Peter Obi committed a crime by non-declaration of some of his jointly owned assets outside the shores of Nigeria and failure to resign from the board of directors of those companies 14 months after assuming the office of the Governor in Anambra state. These allegations shall be addressed seriatim.

It must be stated there is a world of difference between allegation, facts and evidence. Allegation are mere claims and assertion of a person’s wrong doing that are not yet proven. Facts are events that are confirmed or verifiable. While evidence are concrete facts used to support an assertion or a claim. At the moment, the claims of the Adebayo against Peter Obi are still within the realm of mere allegations. However, this article will proceed with the assumption without necessarily conceding that Adebayo’s claims against Peter Obi are factual, as the said Peter Obi still enjoys the presumption of innocence in his favour as protected by the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. This presumption stands unshaken until otherwise proven.

A cursory look at Adebayo’s article would reveal that the author seems to have confused tax avoidance for tax evasion. It is appreciated that both terms may easily be mistaken one for another or erroneously used interchangeably except for persons who are well informed about tax laws. In simply terms, tax evasion is an offence, whereas tax avoidance is not an offence. At this point, it must be stated that on the authority of Section 36 (12) of the Nigerian Constitution, a person shall not be held liable for an offence except such offence is expressly defined by a written law and a sentence specifically prescribed thereto. The case of George v. FRN (2015) All FWLR (Pt. 718) 879 is apt in this regard.

In Nigeria, tax evasion used in two sense. First, as a specific offence. Second, as generic expression for acts of tax non-compliance or violation of tax laws. Section 26 Value Added Tax Act 1993 and Section 164 Custom and Excise Management Act 1959 are the two known tax law provisions that specifically provide for the offence of tax offence. Every other tax offence, including, omitting or understating income in order to make incorrect return; failure to keep the required records; refusal or neglect to pay tax; dishonest declaration of income, earnings or assets; fraudulent tax returns, etc. are loosely referred to as tax offences. However, the definition of the “tax evasion” in the two aforementioned tax law provisions has nothing to do with a business man deciding which part of the country to invest his legitimately earned money. It would be preposterous and despotic for any government to even prevent any entity from making such business decision, when the same government do solicit for foreigners to invest in the Nigerian economy. Why should a Nigerian be penalised for deciding to invest his resources in other countries irrespective of the prevailing tax rate in that country? Indeed, the question to ask is: is there any Nigerian law that prohibits and penalises a Nigeria from investing in any jurisdiction outside Nigeria? Adebayo did not mention any. My guess is, he could not find any.

Business owners and entities ordinarily direct their business undertakings in such a way as to avoid financial liabilities including payment of tax. This is what is also known as tax planning. To quote Lord Clyde in the case of Ayrshire Pullman Motor Services and D. M. Ritchin v. Commissioner of Inland Revenue, (1920) 14 Tax Cas 754, 763–764: “No man in this country is under the smallest obligation moral or otherwise so to arrange his legal relations to his business or to his property as to enable the Inland Revenue to put the largest possible shovel into his stores. The Inland Revenue is not slow and quite rightly to take every advantage, which is open to it under the taxing statutes for the purpose of depleting the taxpayer’s pocket. And the taxpayer is in like manner entitled to be astute to prevent so far as he honestly can the depletion of his means by the Revenue. Every company has the option of carrying out tax planning in order to minimize tax liability within the law of the territory in which it operates”.

There are tax avoidance schemes that is even recognized by tax laws. Individuals or companies may avoid payment of tax by simply increasing its capital expenditure in order to reduce its taxable profit. In this instance, the company would be said to be taken advantage of section 24 of the Company Income Tax Act (CITA) which includes certain capital expenditures as allowable deductions. This would be regarded as measures taken to reduce its tax liability. Provided such act is not prohibited by law, the company cannot be said to have committed any tax offence.

Provided that a particular scheme to avoid or reduce tax liabilities are not prohibited by law, they are still within the realm of tax avoidance and no criminal liability can accrue thereto. The best the government can do to address the incidence of tax evasion is to identify tax avoidance schemes and then get the legislature to criminalise it. Then again, the legislative enactment criminalising such act has effectively moved from tax avoidance into the realm of tax evasion. Until there is a law prohibiting a Nigerian from investing outside the shores of Nigeria, Peter Obi cannot be said to have committed the offence of tax evasion or any other tax offence(s), however so called.

On the issue of non-declaration of jointly or partly owned foreign asset: the law which addresses this subject is majorly the constitution and the Code of Conduct Bureau and Tribunal Act.Section 11 (1) (b) Part I Fifth Schedule to the Constitution Adebayo referred to requires a public officer to declare his properties, assets, and liabilities. The said provision did not specifically require the declaration of jointly or partly owned assets. It is appreciated that a public officer is required to declare his assets in view of the public trust reposed in the office they occupy. It would be irrational to expose assets that are partly owned by other individuals, when they are not the ones occupying the public office in question. Some business investors actually prefer to invest quietly, hence, a declaration of their jointly owned assets breach that business trust which they expect from their business partners. The otherwise could amount to a breach of the right to privacy and quiet enjoyment of the property of these individuals.

It is to be noted that Section 6 (b) of the Code of Conduct Bureau and Tribunal Act did not prohibit a public officer from holding an interest in a company. It only prevents the said public officer not to personally “engage or participate in the management or running of any private business, profession or trade”. To my mind this does not preclude a public officer to shut down his hitherto existing business or profession simply upon his assumption of public office. It would be unreasonable for the law to expect that of such public officer. Provided the public officer is not personally involved in administering the business while in office, he is in the right side of the law. The appointment of nominee directors by companies are legitimate and well known corporate law practice recognised by the Companies and Allied Matters Act. More so, Nigerian law recognises that companies have distinct personalities different from its shareholders and directors. As such, it is legally incorrect to say that a person owns a company. Adebayo failed to tie down Peter Obi’s personal involvement in the administration of the companies while occupying the office of the governor of Anambra State.

Eti Best Herbert is a legal practitioner and legal research consultant. He is the Head of Practice of Olive Branch Attorneys. He may be reach via: etiherbert@gmail.com

https://leaders.ng/did-peter-obi-actually-break-the-law/
.

Go to hell with your report.
Go and tell Tinubu to tell us how he looted Lagos dry and how his case with EFCC were written off
Petre okute Obi is the only Presidential Hopeful to rearrange Nigeria.
We can not fall for the gimmick of Lagos Ibadan express way media report.

51 Likes 3 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by SlyDev: 10:13pm On Oct 05
Peter Obi is fraud but his people will not call him out. He has bought the whole alaigbo with his blood money. Young igbos are suffering and he is keeping money in overseas

44 Likes 7 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by JavaScript90: 11:42pm On Oct 05
Lagos Ibadan bring him down syndrome. So many threads against obi has been moved to front page in an attempt to smear this innocent man. Nobody has seen this innocent man receiving bullion vans that contains billions on the eve of an election neither did he embezzle NEMA money nor did he receive 4bn from corrupt magu. He wasn't a former Chicago drug dealer. He didn't set up a company to swallow 10% of anambra igr. His daughter is not the iyaloja of any market in anambra. He doesn't have any thug loyal to him. His son neither control ads money in anambra nor any toll gate.

This is the type of man Nigeria needs. Frugal with resources and an accomplished industrialist and manager.
It is very unfortunate that fellow southerners who are Hawking southern unity like gala so as to blackmail the north on presidency are the ones trying to bring him down.

Well if Nigerians believed that buhari without a certificate against jonathan with good education could make a good president despite the obvious signs, then I don't pity Nigerians at all

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57 Likes 5 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Nobody: 4:21am On Oct 06
If you actually believe this man is a saint then you should as well believe Tinubu's real age is 69

39 Likes 1 Share

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by PerfectlyPerfect(m): 4:22am On Oct 06
Peter Obi didn't break the law but he'll be chastised because he's Igbo.
Oyedepo did same thing these morons are accusing Peter Obi of doing but these morons don't see anything wrong in his case,https://www.nairaland.com/6795392/pandora-observation-bishop-oyedepos-tax
Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by noleflendum: 4:22am On Oct 06
If he was Hausa, Fulani or Yoruba man those unfortunate Piglets would have been opening different threads the reason why 'the person should be killed' but since the culprit is from their side he is "innocent" and can not be charged to court.

51 Likes 6 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by FolabiCash: 4:22am On Oct 06
Tinubu 2023 journalists in full effect. I can't be fooled no more.

3 Likes

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by ntyce(m): 4:23am On Oct 06
Yes, he broke the law..

19 Likes 2 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Kewtt: 4:24am On Oct 06
SlyDev:
Peter Obi is fraud but his people will not call him out. He has bought the whole alaigbo with his blood money. Young igbos are suffering and he is keeping money in overseas
Go to school.... You said school na scam. Shey you see now?

55 Likes 2 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Lexusgs430: 4:28am On Oct 06
Peter don talk or is he thinking keeping mute, would keep pandora in her box......... wink

1 Like

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by greenie77: 4:28am On Oct 06
Some moral questions......

7 Likes

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by lebete3000: 4:30am On Oct 06
AnonPoet:

https://leaders.ng/did-peter-obi-actually-break-the-law/

Yorubas always in a haste to please their Gambari masters...see where the foolishness landed them?

15 Likes 1 Share

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by SirLakes: 4:33am On Oct 06
Time don reach
Make una dey slander una sef useless journalists featuring useless politicians angry

2 Likes

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by basty: 4:33am On Oct 06
cybersoldiers:
Southwestern Taliban's won't like this.

Sons of Anarchy won't like this.

Fulani, Hsusas won't have any problems with this truth but Yorubas will.

If among the three major tribes in Nigeria Igbo is the best and the other two are bad, then the self righteous Igbo congratulations

Though I don't join issues with darts.

22 Likes 4 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by BlueRayDick: 4:35am On Oct 06
Most young people wonder why Nigeria is in this terrible state it is, well this is one of the reasons right here.

I mean we all complain why we don't have good leaders, why our leaders keep taking us for granted with impunity ; but then we forget we are the ones who empower and encourage them to do so.

I understand the author of this article claimed he's trying to fact check the Peter Obi's alleged corruption against the law, but what he doesn't know is that he has given an easy way out for the man to wriggle himself out of this mess he presently found himself and has even encouraged more politicians like Peter Obi to do this same thing and get away with it.

Nobody accused Peter Obi of being a thief years after his tenure expired as a governor probably because he had all his flanks covered and even kept on boasting about his clean and impeccable records up till this moment that the Pandora papers actually revealed he's not as clean as he claimed to be. Now a lawyer boldly coming out to start explaining tax law just to prove that the man might have done one or two things to help himself to make some money against the "Mr integrity" picture he was selling to us all ; it just looks somehow.

Later we will all be complaining why People like Tinubu and Odili got perpetual injunction prohibing the authorities from trying them for allegations bothering on financial misappropriation if their hands are actually clean; we will complain why EFCC didn't go after Tinubu after the bullion van episode; we will complain why Orji Uzor Kalu is a free man today walking up and down Nigeria on political visits despite what he did with Abia state's funds through Slok...... What we fail to understand is that people like this author that are smart and young will always be there to offer their "professional views" and claim to be fact checking when in fact they are emboldening future politicians to even do worse Than the present.

34 Likes 9 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Sergio101(m): 4:35am On Oct 06
No fault on obi if you ask me.

If Nigeria wants to see it's progress...... It's mainly through evolution of our education system.
Now who do you think can do it better??

Let's call a spade a spade..... Obi is the most organized, sensational leader Nigeria need at the moment.
But will hatred and tribalism allow us say the truth??

20 Likes 1 Share

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by TemmyT002(m): 4:40am On Oct 06
People will do anything, find any crooked way to justify and defend someone dear to them.
These lawyers ehn.
Avoidance.... Evasion.
Han han

24 Likes 3 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Commentor: 4:45am On Oct 06
Akwuzu SARS.

13 Likes 3 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by konkonbilo(m): 4:47am On Oct 06
TemmyT002:
People will do anything, find any crooked way to justify and defend someone dear to them.
These lawyers ehn.
Avoidance.... Evasion.
Han han
as in ehn.. This rubish can only happen in country like Nigeria. People go to jail in developed countries for his type of offense but since it's Nigeria emotion it's always attached to it and you see people supporting criminals. We still have a long way to go in this country.

24 Likes 6 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by gentiles: 4:53am On Oct 06
I

28 Likes 8 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by uthlaw(m): 4:56am On Oct 06
ekesol:
.

Go to hell with your report.
Go and tell Tinubu to tell us how he looted Lagos dry and how his case with EFCC were written off
Petre okute Obi is the only Presidential Hopeful to rearrange Nigeria.
We can not fall for the gimmick of Lagos Ibadan express way media report.
Lagos is not your father's Father land....Peter can be only presidential hope of Biafra,even in is dream,he cannot win presidential election in Nigeria....fight for ur Biafra,nor fight the governor's of ur region,Lagos is not your business!

29 Likes 6 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Tdoctor(m): 5:01am On Oct 06
The way tribal abuse goes on in nairaland, you begin to wonder if there is hope. When Peter Obi is questioned, Igbos rush out with brickbats to defend him. If Tinubu is mentioned, torrents of abuse rain from the Yorubas. If Buhari or Dangote is mentioned, the Fulani/Hausa flood the space with insults. Yet nothing is changing.

Yoots of today. Hypocrites of tomorrow Mtschew

37 Likes 6 Shares

Re: Did Peter Obi Actually Break The Law? by Tzar(m): 5:02am On Oct 06
This is absolute rubbish written to defend Obi.
On tax evasion, I agree that there is nothing wrong in investing in countries that permit you to pay little or no tax.
But on Obi's lack of transparency in NOT declaring his investments in such countries outside Nigeria (while attempting to serve / while serving in public office), he is absolutely wrong!
If Obi did not have anything to hide & he truly wanted to serve the people transparently, why will he keep such secrets?
I will continue to say it, Nigerians are the most evil set of human beings God created, they always find justification for EVERY WRONGDOING humans are capable of doing.

AnonPoet:

https://leaders.ng/did-peter-obi-actually-break-the-law/

18 Likes 4 Shares

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