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Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 4:45am On Sep 30, 2023
As part of our Development Plan for African Countries, BTG ~ European Member of the Bigkoko Group Inc. is partnering with investment partners to develop tourism related products in Eastern part of the Nigerian Federation.

First of our Investment Plan is Development of Smart Riverside Resort villages nicknamed Obi's Towns. These smart, fully integrated European Styled Clusters of villages would dot the River banks of the Blue River; Azumini, starting from Azumini Ndoki of Abia state to as far as Ukanafun in Akwa Ibom State.

Expected commencement Date is First Quarter 2024

Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 4:45am On Sep 30, 2023
#Latestupdate
Azumini! Old Slave trade Route; South Eastern Nigerian gateway to the Atlantic, to experience huge investment as BTG~ European Member of the Bigkoko Group Inc. kicks off project Design for it's Flagship Smart Resort villages, nicknamed "Obi's Town"!

Unspoiled by man, the waters have remained crystal clear. The waters are in fact so clear you can see the fish from the bridge.
Recent research shows that the gravel and sand in the river are exceptionally bright and clear. That is why they are now being used as raw materials in various industries.
Azumini Blue River in Abia state Nigeria, is a river that joins with IMO river as an estuary, and heads to Atlantic Ocean through Akwa-Ibom. It is one of the major blue rivers in Nigeria. The river is cool, and pleasing to the eye, surrounded by lush greens and cool waters. Part of the river heads into the rapids, where it becomes known as the blue river. Nature lovers will love the breathtaking scenery.

Tourists can have picnics and leisurely strolls along the Azumini Blue River. It is also a good place to watch water birds. You’ll see these creatures swoop to the river and get their meal.

It is our initiative to pilot the Development of Smart villages on the bank of this River as it steadily heads to the Atlantic. These 21st century villages would have names like OT Azumini, OT Ukanafun, OT Ohuodun etc.

Project Description: European Styled Clusters of Smart Riverside Resort villages, fully integrated, Green & runs a Cashless & Contactless economy. Suitable as a get away from bustle of City hustle. Idea for Leisure, Research & lot's more. Strictly private sector driven.
Project Location: Abia & Akwa Ibom States of Nigeria Federation.
Project Start Date: 1st Quarter 2024.

Brought to you by Bigkoko Transcontinental Gruppen Filial ~ European Member of the Bigkoko Group!
Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 4:57am On Sep 30, 2023
What is a Village?
The word “village” is sometimes used to refer to certain neighborhoods within a larger urban area. Greenwich Village in New York City, United States, for instance, has enjoyed a reputation as an artistic enclave for more than a century. Today, "the Village" is an upper middle-class residential area.

The purpose of building these Brand New villages is to create a wholesome, healthy mini cities where the best quality of life is available for everyone living there.
Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 5:10am On Sep 30, 2023
A village is a small settlement usually found in a rural setting. It is generally larger than a "hamlet" but smaller than a "town." Some geographers specifically define a village as having between 100 and 2,500 inhabitants.

In most parts of the world, villages are settlements of people clustered around a central point. A central point is most often a church, marketplace, or public space. A public space can be a open space (sometimes called a village green), or developed square (sometimes called a plaza. This type of village organization is called a nucleated settlement.

Some villages are linear settlements. They are not clustered around a central public space, but around a line. This line can be natural, such as a river bank or seashore. (Fishing villages are often linear settlements.) Linear settlements can also develop around a transportation route, such as a railroad line.

Planned villages are communities that do not develop around a central point. They are outlined by city planners, often to avoid land-use conflicts that are common in nucleated settlements.

Planned villages are sometimes called "new towns." Tapiola, Finland, for instance, was planned as an "ecological village" or "garden city" in the 1950s. The nonprofit organizations that planned Tapiola were guided by the principles of providing local jobs, including all income levels, and establishing life in harmony with nature and the natural world.

Villages often function as units of local government. In China and Japan, a village is an official administrative unit. An administrative unit is a single component of government, with its own leadership (similar to city councils) and services, such as mail delivery.

Villages in the Past

In the past, rural villagers usually engaged in a primary activity such as farming or fishing. In the United Kingdom, a "pit village" is a settlement whose primary activity is mining. In many underdeveloped nations, these primary activities are still the focus of rural village life.

Primary activities provide basic goods and services for inhabitants and for people in surrounding areas. In this way, some villages function as trading centers. Villages surrounding the city of Damascus, Syria, for example, have been trading hubs for thousands of years.

Many villages were surrounded by thick walls or gates. A tulou, for example, is a traditional building among the Hakka people of Southern China. These walled, circular buildings are constructed around a large, open, central courtyard. The tulou itself houses most villagers—up to 800.

The Industrial Revolution of the late 18th and early 19th centuries forever changed village life. The Industrial Revolution, defined as transition from animal-based labor to machines that manufacture goods, vastly increased productivity. As this happened, countless small villages grew into cities and towns.

In this process, called urbanization, nucleated settlements built up around around factories, not churches or community centers. This trend began on the island of Great Britain and eventually spread around the world. Hampstead was a English village that expanded rapidly after rail lines opened in the 1860s, for example. Today, Hampstead is a major neighborhood of London.

Village Life Today

Agricultural villages remain the predominant form of rural settlement throughout most of the world. (In much of North America and Australia, however, the most common form of rural settlement is the isolated farmstead.)

Most villages in developed countries are no longer oriented toward primary activities. Cultural changes, globalization, and other factors have encouraged residents to seek other occupations, or, in some cases, to migrate. Perhaps the most radical change in village life came to Russia during the Soviet period. In the 1920s, Russia was an agricultural nation, with more than 75 million people living in villages. Russia quickly became an industrial nation, with the government supporting a manufacturing-based economy that was mostly located in cities. By the end of the Soviet Union in 1989, fewer than 40 million Russians lived in villages.

Some urban residents moved to villages and commute to jobs in larger cities and towns. This phenomenon is referred to as "urban flight" or "suburban colonization." Villages or suburbs not only grow larger, but gain political power. Conflict between village or suburban residents and inner-city residents over resources and priorities often define political debates in urban areas such as Delhi, India, or Mexico City, Mexico.

The word “village” is sometimes used to refer to certain neighborhoods within a larger urban area. Greenwich Village in New York City, United States, for instance, has enjoyed a reputation as an artistic enclave for more than a century. Today, "the Village" is an upper middle-class residential area.

FAST FACT

Global Village
The "global village" is shorthand for the world connected by electronic devices, such as smart phones or the Internet.

FAST FACT

Philippine Villages
In the Philippines, "village" usually refers to a gated community in an urban area.

FAST FACT

Soul of India
The Indian political and spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi declared that the soul of India lives in its villages. In 2011, 69% of India's 1.24 billion people lived in rural villages.

Audio & Video
National Geographic Video: Oil Spill Threatens Native American 'Water' Village
website
Laboratory for Anthropogenic Landscape Ecology: Village Anthromes
bank
Noun
a slope of land adjoining a body of water, or a large elevated area of the sea floor.

church
Noun
building used for spiritual worship and religious practices.

city
Noun
large settlement with a high population density.

city planner
Noun
person who plans the physical design and zoning of an urban center.

commute
Verb
to travel to and from specific places on a regular basis, usually for a specific purpose, such as employment.

conflict
Noun
a disagreement or fight, usually over ideas or procedures.

develop
Verb
to expand or grow.

economy
Noun
system of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

factory
Noun
one or more buildings used for the manufacture of a product.

farming
Noun
the art, science, and business of cultivating the land for growing crops.

geographer
Noun
person who studies places and the relationships between people and their environments.

globalization
Noun
connection of different parts of the world resulting in the expansion of international cultural, economic, and political activities.

government
Noun
system or order of a nation, state, or other political unit.

hamlet
Noun
very small village.

Industrial Revolution
Noun
change in economic and social activities, beginning in the 18th century, brought by the replacement of hand tools with machinery and mass production.

isolated farmstead
Noun
single farm, consisting of one or several houses and farm buildings not associated with a settlement.

linear settlement
Noun
settlement of people clustered along a line, such as a river bank or railroad route.

manufacture
Verb
to make or produce a good, usually for sale.

market
Noun
central place for the sale of goods.

migrate
Verb
to move from one place or activity to another.

mining
Noun
process of extracting ore from the Earth.

neighborhood
Noun
an area within a larger city or town where people live and interact with one another.

nonprofit organization
Noun
business that uses surplus funds to pursue its goals, not to make money.

nucleated settlement
Noun
settlements of people clustered around a central point.

phenomenon
Noun
an unusual act or occurrence.

predominant
Adjective
leading or most influential.

primary activity
Noun
work that provides basic goods and services, such as food, shelter, and clothing.

principle
Noun
rule or standard.

productivity
Noun
rate at which goods and services are produced.

resource
Noun
available supply of materials, goods, or services. Resources can be natural or human.

rural
Adjective
having to do with country life, or areas with few residents.

seashore
Noun
beach or coast.

settlement
Noun
community or village.

Soviet
Adjective
having to do with the Soviet Union and the areas it influenced.

town
Noun
human settlement larger than a village and smaller than a city.

trading center
Noun
settlement or business area where goods and services are exchanged.

transportation
Noun
movement of people or goods from one place to another.

underdeveloped country
Noun
country that has fallen behind on goals of industrialization, infrastructure, and income.

urban flight
Noun
process where city residents move to villages or suburbs and commute to jobs in larger towns.

urbanization
Noun
process in which there is an increase in the number of people living and working in a city or metropolitan area.

village
Noun
small human settlement usually found in a rural setting.

Immigration is the process of moving to a new country or region with the intention of staying and living there. People may choose to immigrate for a variety of reasons, such as employment opportunities, to escape a violent conflict, environmental factors, educational purposes, or to reunite with family. The process of immigrating to the United States can be complicated and is often driven by a few key principles including uniting families, boosting the economy with skilled professionals, promoting diversity, and helping refugees. Learn more about U.S. immigration with this curated resource collection.

Concept of Place
One of the oldest tenets of geography is the concept of place. As a result, place has numerous definitions, from the simple “a space or location with meaning” to the more complex “an area having unique physical and human characteristics interconnected with other places.” There are three key components of place: location, locale, and a sense of place. Location is the position of a particular point on the surface of Earth. Locale is the physical setting for relationships between people, such as the South of France or the Smoky Mountains. Finally, a sense of place is the emotions someone attaches to an area based on their experiences. Place can be applied at any scale and does not necessarily have to be fixed in either time or space. Additionally, due to globalization, place can change over time as its physical setting and cultures are influenced by new ideas or technologies.

212
Agricultural Communities
COLLECTION
Agricultural Communities
Agricultural communities developed approximately 10,000 years ago when humans began to domesticate plants and animals. By establishing domesticity, families and larger groups were able to build communities and transition from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle dependent on foraging and hunting for survival. Select from these resources to teach your students about agricultural communities.

Rural Area
A rural area is an open swath of land that has few homes or other buildings, and not very many people. A rural area’s population density is very low.

Regional Economies
COLLECTION
Regional Economies
Economies are often molded by the location and cultures of which they are apart. This explains why distinct regional economies develop to serve the unique needs of people. Use these resources to teach students about the regional economies found throughout the world.

Urbanization
COLLECTION
Urbanization
The development of human civilizations was supported by large numbers of people who lived in sparsely-populated rural areas defined by agriculture, fishing, and trade. Over time, as these rural populations grew, cities began to develop. Urban areas are defined by dense populations, the construction of multiple and often large buildings, monuments and other structures, and greater economic dependence on trade rather than agriculture or fishing. Even the ancient Incan, Egyptian, or Chinese civilizations, changed their environment in order to urbanize. Modern urban cities like New York City, Beijing, Dubai, and Paris are bustling centers of business, entertainment, and trade. However, the modifications humans make to their surroundings in order to urbanize can impact the environment in negative ways: pollution, disruption of water flow, deforestation, and desertification. Explore the effects of urbanization on the environment and help students explore how human cities impact the world around us with this curated collection of resources.
Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 5:11am On Sep 30, 2023
A village is a small settlement usually found in a rural setting. It is generally larger than a "hamlet" but smaller than a "town." Some geographers specifically define a village as having between 100 and 2,500 inhabitants.

In most parts of the world, villages are settlements of people clustered around a central point. A central point is most often a church, marketplace, or public space. A public space can be a open space (sometimes called a village green), or developed square (sometimes called a plaza. This type of village organization is called a nucleated settlement.

Some villages are linear settlements. They are not clustered around a central public space, but around a line. This line can be natural, such as a river bank or seashore. (Fishing villages are often linear settlements.) Linear settlements can also develop around a transportation route, such as a railroad line.

Planned villages are communities that do not develop around a central point. They are outlined by city planners, often to avoid land-use conflicts that are common in nucleated settlements.

Planned villages are sometimes called "new towns." Tapiola, Finland, for instance, was planned as an "ecological village" or "garden city" in the 1950s. The nonprofit organizations that planned Tapiola were guided by the principles of providing local jobs, including all income levels, and establishing life in harmony with nature and the natural world.

Villages often function as units of local government. In China and Japan, a village is an official administrative unit. An administrative unit is a single component of government, with its own leadership (similar to city councils) and services, such as mail delivery.

Villages in the Past

In the past, rural villagers usually engaged in a primary activity such as farming or fishing. In the United Kingdom, a "pit village" is a settlement whose primary activity is mining. In many underdeveloped nations, these primary activities are still the focus of rural village life.

Primary activities provide basic goods and services for inhabitants and for people in surrounding areas. In this way, some villages function as trading centers. Villages surrounding the city of Damascus, Syria, for example, have been trading hubs for thousands of years.

Many villages were surrounded by thick walls or gates. A tulou, for example, is a traditional building among the Hakka people of Southern China. These walled, circular buildings are constructed around a large, open, central courtyard. The tulou itself houses most villagers—up to 800.

The Industrial Revolution of the late 18th and early 19th centuries forever changed village life. The Industrial Revolution, defined as transition from animal-based labor to machines that manufacture goods, vastly increased productivity. As this happened, countless small villages grew into cities and towns.

In this process, called urbanization, nucleated settlements built up around around factories, not churches or community centers. This trend began on the island of Great Britain and eventually spread around the world. Hampstead was a English village that expanded rapidly after rail lines opened in the 1860s, for example. Today, Hampstead is a major neighborhood of London.

Village Life Today

Agricultural villages remain the predominant form of rural settlement throughout most of the world. (In much of North America and Australia, however, the most common form of rural settlement is the isolated farmstead.)

Most villages in developed countries are no longer oriented toward primary activities. Cultural changes, globalization, and other factors have encouraged residents to seek other occupations, or, in some cases, to migrate. Perhaps the most radical change in village life came to Russia during the Soviet period. In the 1920s, Russia was an agricultural nation, with more than 75 million people living in villages. Russia quickly became an industrial nation, with the government supporting a manufacturing-based economy that was mostly located in cities. By the end of the Soviet Union in 1989, fewer than 40 million Russians lived in villages.

Some urban residents moved to villages and commute to jobs in larger cities and towns. This phenomenon is referred to as "urban flight" or "suburban colonization." Villages or suburbs not only grow larger, but gain political power. Conflict between village or suburban residents and inner-city residents over resources and priorities often define political debates in urban areas such as Delhi, India, or Mexico City, Mexico.

The word “village” is sometimes used to refer to certain neighborhoods within a larger urban area. Greenwich Village in New York City, United States, for instance, has enjoyed a reputation as an artistic enclave for more than a century. Today, "the Village" is an upper middle-class residential area.

FAST FACT

Global Village
The "global village" is shorthand for the world connected by electronic devices, such as smart phones or the Internet.

FAST FACT

Philippine Villages
In the Philippines, "village" usually refers to a gated community in an urban area.

FAST FACT

Soul of India
The Indian political and spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi declared that the soul of India lives in its villages. In 2011, 69% of India's 1.24 billion people lived in rural villages.

Audio & Video
National Geographic Video: Oil Spill Threatens Native American 'Water' Village
website
Laboratory for Anthropogenic Landscape Ecology: Village Anthromes
bank
Noun
a slope of land adjoining a body of water, or a large elevated area of the sea floor.

church
Noun
building used for spiritual worship and religious practices.

city
Noun
large settlement with a high population density.

city planner
Noun
person who plans the physical design and zoning of an urban center.

commute
Verb
to travel to and from specific places on a regular basis, usually for a specific purpose, such as employment.

conflict
Noun
a disagreement or fight, usually over ideas or procedures.

develop
Verb
to expand or grow.

economy
Noun
system of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

factory
Noun
one or more buildings used for the manufacture of a product.

farming
Noun
the art, science, and business of cultivating the land for growing crops.

geographer
Noun
person who studies places and the relationships between people and their environments.

globalization
Noun
connection of different parts of the world resulting in the expansion of international cultural, economic, and political activities.

government
Noun
system or order of a nation, state, or other political unit.

hamlet
Noun
very small village.

Industrial Revolution
Noun
change in economic and social activities, beginning in the 18th century, brought by the replacement of hand tools with machinery and mass production.

isolated farmstead
Noun
single farm, consisting of one or several houses and farm buildings not associated with a settlement.

linear settlement
Noun
settlement of people clustered along a line, such as a river bank or railroad route.

manufacture
Verb
to make or produce a good, usually for sale.

market
Noun
central place for the sale of goods.

migrate
Verb
to move from one place or activity to another.

mining
Noun
process of extracting ore from the Earth.

neighborhood
Noun
an area within a larger city or town where people live and interact with one another.

nonprofit organization
Noun
business that uses surplus funds to pursue its goals, not to make money.

nucleated settlement
Noun
settlements of people clustered around a central point.

phenomenon
Noun
an unusual act or occurrence.

predominant
Adjective
leading or most influential.

primary activity
Noun
work that provides basic goods and services, such as food, shelter, and clothing.

principle
Noun
rule or standard.

productivity
Noun
rate at which goods and services are produced.

resource
Noun
available supply of materials, goods, or services. Resources can be natural or human.

rural
Adjective
having to do with country life, or areas with few residents.

seashore
Noun
beach or coast.

settlement
Noun
community or village.

Soviet
Adjective
having to do with the Soviet Union and the areas it influenced.

town
Noun
human settlement larger than a village and smaller than a city.

trading center
Noun
settlement or business area where goods and services are exchanged.

transportation
Noun
movement of people or goods from one place to another.

underdeveloped country
Noun
country that has fallen behind on goals of industrialization, infrastructure, and income.

urban flight
Noun
process where city residents move to villages or suburbs and commute to jobs in larger towns.

urbanization
Noun
process in which there is an increase in the number of people living and working in a city or metropolitan area.

village
Noun
small human settlement usually found in a rural setting.

Immigration is the process of moving to a new country or region with the intention of staying and living there. People may choose to immigrate for a variety of reasons, such as employment opportunities, to escape a violent conflict, environmental factors, educational purposes, or to reunite with family. The process of immigrating to the United States can be complicated and is often driven by a few key principles including uniting families, boosting the economy with skilled professionals, promoting diversity, and helping refugees. Learn more about U.S. immigration with this curated resource collection.

Concept of Place
One of the oldest tenets of geography is the concept of place. As a result, place has numerous definitions, from the simple “a space or location with meaning” to the more complex “an area having unique physical and human characteristics interconnected with other places.” There are three key components of place: location, locale, and a sense of place. Location is the position of a particular point on the surface of Earth. Locale is the physical setting for relationships between people, such as the South of France or the Smoky Mountains. Finally, a sense of place is the emotions someone attaches to an area based on their experiences. Place can be applied at any scale and does not necessarily have to be fixed in either time or space. Additionally, due to globalization, place can change over time as its physical setting and cultures are influenced by new ideas or technologies.

Agricultural Communities
COLLECTION
Agricultural Communities
Agricultural communities developed approximately 10,000 years ago when humans began to domesticate plants and animals. By establishing domesticity, families and larger groups were able to build communities and transition from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle dependent on foraging and hunting for survival. Select from these resources to teach your students about agricultural communities.

Rural Area
A rural area is an open swath of land that has few homes or other buildings, and not very many people. A rural area’s population density is very low.

Regional Economies
COLLECTION
Regional Economies
Economies are often molded by the location and cultures of which they are apart. This explains why distinct regional economies develop to serve the unique needs of people. Use these resources to teach students about the regional economies found throughout the world.

Urbanization
COLLECTION
Urbanization
The development of human civilizations was supported by large numbers of people who lived in sparsely-populated rural areas defined by agriculture, fishing, and trade. Over time, as these rural populations grew, cities began to develop. Urban areas are defined by dense populations, the construction of multiple and often large buildings, monuments and other structures, and greater economic dependence on trade rather than agriculture or fishing. Even the ancient Incan, Egyptian, or Chinese civilizations, changed their environment in order to urbanize. Modern urban cities like New York City, Beijing, Dubai, and Paris are bustling centers of business, entertainment, and trade. However, the modifications humans make to their surroundings in order to urbanize can impact the environment in negative ways: pollution, disruption of water flow, deforestation, and desertification. Explore the effects of urbanization on the environment and help students explore how human cities impact the world around us with this curated collection of resources.
Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 5:23am On Sep 30, 2023
#Hiring.
If you can conduct a good Feasibility Study regarding the route of the Blue River starting from Azumini Ndoki in Abia state through Ukanafun in Akwa Ibom State, shoot us a mail.
Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 9:29am On Oct 16, 2023
Hey Nigerians we bring y'all glad tidings!
How does a European styled, cabin get away rendezvous home sound to you? How do you like your get away cottage home like? On high lands or River side? Worry no more!

Bigkoko Transcontinental Gruppen Filial; European member of the Bigkoko Group Inc. has some really great stuffs coming to the Nigerian market, exclusively for techies and individuals seeking a safe, conducive and properly run Green resort village home on a river bank to run their hustle! Free from the bustle of city life.

Proudly brought to you Bigkoko Transcontinental Gruppen Filial ~ Member Swedish Business Association. Member Swedish Technology Companies. Covered by Technology Services Agreement.

Need Support? Contact our Swedish office!

Re: Obi's Towns; Clusters Of Riverside Villages! Coming Soon! by Bigkoko: 1:56pm On Oct 24, 2023
How do you like a European style, River bank cabin home for weekend get away? In a well planned resort village with lots of entertainment, security and serenity?

How do you like a idea home in a serene environment where you can work, idle away or spend time with friends & family?
Bigkoko Transcontinental Gruppen ~ European member of the Bigkoko Group Inc is currently working with some partners to deliver such products to our Nigerian Clients!

Prices of such homes starts from as little as $8,000 equivalent of the Naira!

Locations of the first two sites and mock up would be unveil by our European team in less than two months!

Owning a home should not be much of a worry for a serious hustler!

For more information, shoot us a mail on:

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