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The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) - Politics - Nairaland

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The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by TonySpike: 7:48pm On Feb 06, 2012
The Yoruba Kiriji Wars was an epic and chronic civil war between two powerful Yoruba confederate armies of mainly Western Yorubas (Ibadan and its allies) and Eastern Yorubas (Ijeshas and Ekitis). It is on record that the remote cause of this war was the collapse of the Oyo empire, while the immediate cause was the domineering stance of the Ibadan military output on Yoruba towns and cities.

It is said that the war lasted for about 16 years with heavy casualties on both sides although historians believe that the losses were even. Also, the war showcased the largest array of military hardwares in Western Africa. It is said that the Eastern Yoruba confederacy purchased a large number of cannon guns which produced the thunderous sound "Kiriiiiiiji". The name "Kiriji" came from the earth-like vibrations that accompanied the use of the cannons and it indeed gave the Eastern Yorubas an advantage over the Ibadans. Meanwhile, it is believed that several Yoruba towns and villages were completely wiped out of history due to the scorched-earth policy of the civil war. Two good examples of such settlements are Osogun (somewhere in Oyo) and Ijaiye.

I would like anyone with any form of information about the ancient Kiriji wars to tell us more about these wars. I personally would like to know more about the military hardwares used, the war codes, the location and flashpoints of the war, the allies and enemies, heroes and villains and names of obliterated cities. Pictures are also welcome. The thread is open!!!

3 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by dayokanu(m): 7:53pm On Feb 06, 2012
Look for Katsumoto and he would satisfy all your need

1 Like

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by NegroNtns(m): 7:54pm On Feb 06, 2012
It appears you already searched in google and elsewhere online and did not find detailed info.  To get the detailed level of information you are demanding, check with museums and or libraries.  That will be your best option.  Whatever you find please bring back and share with us.  or like dayo said, grab hold of katsumoto

2 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Nobody: 7:57pm On Feb 06, 2012
This should make a good epic movie.

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Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by AndreUweh(m): 8:04pm On Feb 06, 2012
There are so many books about this war. You may check out for books written by Prof Emeritus J. Ade-Ajayi, Oguntumisin and others at the famous Ibadan school of History.
Goodluck.

2 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Rgp92: 8:10pm On Feb 06, 2012
Found something with a quick seach through google:

[size=20pt] The Yoruba War 1877-1893[/size]


Ibadan had already become involved in yet another war over trade with Egba and Ijebu in 1877, when Ibadan traders on their way from Porto Novo with firearms were attacked by the Egba. This gave the Ekiti and the Ijesa their chance. In 1878, the revolt against Ibadan rule started with the massacre of Ibadan officials in Ijesa, Igbomina and Ekiti. This led to a war which dragged on for sixteen years. Eventually, Ibadan found itself fighting on five fronts. In the east it faced the Ekitiparapo under the command of Ogedemgbe, the Seriki of Ijesa. In the south it faced the Egba and Ijebu. Ilorin joined in in the north. Finally, Ife joined the alliance in 1882. There had long been friction between the Ife and the Oyo settlers at Modakeke. These animosities were strengthened by the war during which Ife itself was sacked by the Modakeke and their Ibadan allies, and Modakeke was sacked by the Ife and Ekiti.

The main action of the war, however, took place in the north-east. The Ibadan and Ekitiparapo forces faced each other at Kiriji, a few miles east of Ikirun. Control of the trade routes was a major issue. There were three main routes to the interior, via Egba, Ijebu and Ondo. The Ondo route had been opened up by the British because of the frequent closure of the other roads. During this war, it became the main supply route for both sides (Akintoye, 1969). Some Ibadan supplies were able to get through via Ijebu. The war was unpopular with Ijebu traders, and the Awujale was forced into exile in 1885. Despite this, the flow of supplies was not completely free. Ijebu traders' profit margins were high, and they retained strict control of trade through the kingdom (Johnson, 1921: 610-11).

After some initial reverses, the Ekitiparapo gained something of an advantage in the conflict, and the help they received from Ekiti Saro merchants in Lagos was crucial. The most important factor was the supply of breech-loading rifles, much more accurate than the arms being used by the rest of the Yoruba, though the Ibadan were later able to get a small supply of them as well (Akintoye, 1971: 119).

Attempts at mediation had started as early as 1879-80. Both the Alafin and the Oni were involved, but neither was trusted by both sides, and Ife later joined in the fighting. The Lagos government was under instructions from London and Accra to keep out of the conflict, even though the fighting was having serious effects on the economic life of the colony. Under commercial and mission pressure, the Lagos government attempted to mediate but was rebuffed, and from 1882 to 1884 the British did nothing. Attempts by Saro in Lagos and by the Fulani emirs to end the conflict also failed.

After 1885 the attitude of the administration started to change. Firstly, there was the changing political status of Lagos which was separated from the Gold Coast in 1886. Secondly, the scramble for Africa by the colonial powers was well under way, and there were fears of French interference. Thirdly, some of the main protagonists of the war were themselves getting tired of it (Akintoye, 1971: 176).

To negotiate a peace, the administration turned to the CMS. A ceasefire was arranged in 1886 through the efforts of Samuel Johnson, the historian, and Charles Phillips, later the Bishop of Ondo. The parties then signed a treaty in Lagos with Governor Maloney which provided for the independence of the Ekitiparapo towns and the evacuation of Modakeke, to suit Ife,. This proved impossible to carry out. Ilorin refused to stop fighting in the north where it was besieging Ofa. Thus the war dragged on, and the forces refused to disband (Akintoye, 1971: 181-4).

British fears of the French soon appeared justified. There was the curious incident of 1888 when an employee of a French company persuaded the Egba chiefs to sign a treaty with France, providing for the construction of a rail link with Porto Novo (Ayandele, 1966: 49-51). This was a direct threat to trade with Lagos, but the French refused to ratify the treaty. The two powers hastily agreed on a frontier in 1889 (Anene, 1963). The areas recently invaded by Dahomey fell within the French sphere of influence. The British moved into the interior with the establishment of a post at Ilaro in 1890, while the French invaded Dahomey in 1892.

More aggressive measures to extend British control in the interior came with the arrival of Governor Carter in 1891. Like Glover, he took the view that the key to the situation lay in control of the trade routes through Ijebu and Egba. The result was the Ijebu expedition of 1892 (Ayandele, 1966: 54-69; Smith, 1971b). Ayandele suggests that in fact the Ijebu had showed more willingness to open the road than the Egba, but the decision to attack Ijebu was based partly on the hostility of the missions: unlike Egba, Ijebu had never allowed them in. The impact of the expedition was considerable. In 1893, Carter was able to set off on a tour around Yorubaland, making treaties with Oyo and Egba, and finally persuading the Ibadan and Ekitiparapo forces to disperse. The Egba opened the road to Ibadan, and allowed the start of railway construction. After two final incidents, the bombardment of Oyo in 1895 (Ayandele, 1967) and the capture of Ilorin by the Royal Niger Company in 1897, effective colonial control was established throughout most of Yorubaland

http://www.onwar.com/aced/data/whiskey/westafricanwar1877.htm

3 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Chyz2: 8:18pm On Feb 06, 2012
Either this gets moved to the Culture section or I put up thread on Igbo history, preferebly Afikpo, or in fact, where ever in Igbo land. cool
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by AndreUweh(m): 8:22pm On Feb 06, 2012
@RGP92,
Some of the accounts I have read did not claim that Ife at any time sacked Modakeke. It is just the other way round.

1 Like

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Rgp92: 8:31pm On Feb 06, 2012
Andre Uweh:

@RGP92,
Some of the accounts I have read did not claim that Ife at any time sacked Modakeke. It is just the other way round.

give me link please?
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by sheyguy: 8:46pm On Feb 06, 2012
Chyz*:

Either this gets moved to the Culture section or I put up thread on Igbo history, preferebly Afikpo, or in fact, where ever in Igbo land. cool
the thread is about a war which happens to be a yoruba one. If u av a problem with the yorubas u can go create a thread for that. I don't see how anybody shld have a problem with a thread on a war/conflict in politics section.

4 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by hercules07: 8:53pm On Feb 06, 2012
@OP

Look for a book titled the History of the Yorubas, you will find it compelling, Ife could not have sacked Modakeke as the Modakekes were on Ife Land, the Modakekes sacked the Ifes several times (remember the modakekes had fought the fulanis and were battle hardened).
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by NegroNtns(m): 8:55pm On Feb 06, 2012
Either this gets moved to the Culture section or I put up thread on Igbo history, preferebly Afikpo, or in fact, where ever in Igbo land

Dummy, I have to continously teach you about the value of relations and influence.  Just because we are discussing war, you don't come in with a threat to get your demands.  Animals do that!  You state your concern for why you think the post is in the wrong section and ask (not demand, but ask) if it would not be better to relocate it.  

If you use this Yoruba approach of dialoguing, 90% of time your request will be met.   grin grin

6 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Katsumoto: 9:00pm On Feb 06, 2012
Rgp92:

Found something with a quick seach through google:

                                                                             [size=20pt]   The Yoruba War 1877-1893[/size]


Ibadan had already become involved in yet another war over trade with Egba and Ijebu in 1877, when Ibadan traders on their way from Porto Novo with firearms were attacked by the Egba. This gave the Ekiti and the Ijesa their chance. In 1878, the revolt against Ibadan rule started with the massacre of Ibadan officials in Ijesa, Igbomina and Ekiti. This led to a war which dragged on for sixteen years. Eventually, Ibadan found itself fighting on five fronts. In the east it faced the Ekitiparapo under the command of Ogedemgbe, the Seriki of Ijesa. In the south it faced the Egba and Ijebu. Ilorin joined in in the north. Finally, Ife joined the alliance in 1882. There had long been friction between the Ife and the Oyo settlers at Modakeke. These animosities were strengthened by the war during which Ife itself was sacked by the Modakeke and their Ibadan allies, and Modakeke was sacked by the Ife and Ekiti.

The main action of the war, however, took place in the north-east. The Ibadan and Ekitiparapo forces faced each other at Kiriji, a few miles east of Ikirun. Control of the trade routes was a major issue. There were three main routes to the interior, via Egba, Ijebu and Ondo. The Ondo route had been opened up by the British because of the frequent closure of the other roads. During this war, it became the main supply route for both sides (Akintoye, 1969). Some Ibadan supplies were able to get through via Ijebu. The war was unpopular with Ijebu traders, and the Awujale was forced into exile in 1885. Despite this, the flow of supplies was not completely free. Ijebu traders' profit margins were high, and they retained strict control of trade through the kingdom (Johnson, 1921: 610-11).

After some initial reverses, the Ekitiparapo gained something of an advantage in the conflict, and the help they received from Ekiti Saro merchants in Lagos was crucial. The most important factor was the supply of breech-loading rifles, much more accurate than the arms being used by the rest of the Yoruba, though the Ibadan were later able to get a small supply of them as well (Akintoye, 1971: 119).

Attempts at mediation had started as early as 1879-80. Both the Alafin and the Oni were involved, but neither was trusted by both sides, and Ife later joined in the fighting. The Lagos government was under instructions from London and Accra to keep out of the conflict, even though the fighting was having serious effects on the economic life of the colony. Under commercial and mission pressure, the Lagos government attempted to mediate but was rebuffed, and from 1882 to 1884 the British did nothing. Attempts by Saro in Lagos and by the Fulani emirs to end the conflict also failed.

After 1885 the attitude of the administration started to change. Firstly, there was the changing political status of Lagos which was separated from the Gold Coast in 1886. Secondly, the scramble for Africa by the colonial powers was well under way, and there were fears of French interference. Thirdly, some of the main protagonists of the war were themselves getting tired of it (Akintoye, 1971: 176).

To negotiate a peace, the administration turned to the CMS. A ceasefire was arranged in 1886 through the efforts of Samuel Johnson, the historian, and Charles Phillips, later the Bishop of Ondo. The parties then signed a treaty in Lagos with Governor Maloney which provided for the independence of the Ekitiparapo towns and the evacuation of Modakeke, to suit Ife,. This proved impossible to carry out. Ilorin refused to stop fighting in the north where it was besieging Ofa. Thus the war dragged on, and the forces refused to disband (Akintoye, 1971: 181-4).

British fears of the French soon appeared justified. There was the curious incident of 1888 when an employee of a French company persuaded the Egba chiefs to sign a treaty with France, providing for the construction of a rail link with Porto Novo (Ayandele, 1966: 49-51). This was a direct threat to trade with Lagos, but the French refused to ratify the treaty. The two powers hastily agreed on a frontier in 1889 (Anene, 1963). The areas recently invaded by Dahomey fell within the French sphere of influence. The British moved into the interior with the establishment of a post at Ilaro in 1890, while the French invaded Dahomey in 1892.

More aggressive measures to extend British control in the interior came with the arrival of Governor Carter in 1891. Like Glover, he took the view that the key to the situation lay in control of the trade routes through Ijebu and Egba. The result was the Ijebu expedition of 1892 (Ayandele, 1966: 54-69; Smith, 1971b). Ayandele suggests that in fact the Ijebu had showed more willingness to open the road than the Egba, but the decision to attack Ijebu was based partly on the hostility of the missions: unlike Egba, Ijebu had never allowed them in. The impact of the expedition was considerable. In 1893, Carter was able to set off on a tour around Yorubaland, making treaties with Oyo and Egba, and finally persuading the Ibadan and Ekitiparapo forces to disperse. The Egba opened the road to Ibadan, and allowed the start of railway construction. After two final incidents, the bombardment of Oyo in 1895 (Ayandele, 1967) and the capture of Ilorin by the Royal Niger Company in 1897, effective colonial control was established throughout most of Yorubaland

http://www.onwar.com/aced/data/whiskey/westafricanwar1877.htm

A good account but it is actually from a book titled The Yoruba Today by Jeremy Eades.

Andre Uweh:

@RGP92,
Some of the accounts I have read did not claim that Ife at any time sacked Modakeke. It is just the other way round.

The account of Modakeke being sacked is more known because Ife was bigger and more important than Modakeke. Which is more likely to make the news - a squatter chasing a home owner away or a home owner chasing a squatter away? You can chase your squatters away but I doubt anyone would call it a sack. Modakeke was able to sack Ife because Ibadan supported Modakeke at that time.

hercules07:

@OP

Look for a book titled the History of the Yorubas, you will find it compelling, Ife could not have sacked Modakeke as the Modakekes were on Ife Land, the Modakekes sacked the Ifes several times (remember the modakekes had fought the fulanis and were battle hardened).

Correct but the Modakekes always got support from Ibadan as they were all originally from Oyo.

1 Like

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by ektbear: 9:10pm On Feb 06, 2012
My great-great-grandfather (the man I am named after) fought in this war. We had his sword, but it seems to be "missing" from our family compound undecided
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Ufeolorun(m): 9:35pm On Feb 06, 2012
So our forefathers were basically kicking one another's bu.tt. Uncontrollable laughter here lol!
Ekiti-parapo:Kaakaki Oyo/Ibadan yanmije nishe laada kete renu po! Lol!
Nobody came to this world to serve another man.
Its either we have a peaceful, independent Yorubaland or we destroy /burn everything to the ground.lol!
Ijebu,Ekiti,Ijesha,Egba:you can alwys sense it,naturally defiant life style.

I thought the Akokos were involved too? Anyone?

Very interesting.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Kilode1: 9:45pm On Feb 06, 2012
ekt_bear:

My great-great-grandfather (the man I am named after) fought in this war. We had his sword, but it seems to be "missing" from our family compound undecided

Orúko nií ro omo. . .

Names are like prophecies.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by AndreUweh(m): 9:54pm On Feb 06, 2012
hercules07:

@OP

Look for a book titled the History of the Yorubas, you will find it compelling, Ife could not have sacked Modakeke as the Modakekes were on Ife Land, the Modakekes sacked the Ifes several times (remember the modakekes had fought the fulanis and were battle hardened).
This is the correct version.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by dayokanu(m): 9:59pm On Feb 06, 2012
Should we have a Nairaland version of Kiriji wars where i would be kicking the Ekiti parapo armies butts.

Who would be the Ogedengbe, the Fabunmi, Sodeke, the Kurunmi, the Latosa, the Ogunmola etc

Ektbear might end up being the leader of the Ekiti army on NL or Ufeolorun, you want to challenge him?

Who is the Ijesha to represent Ogedengbe etc?
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by hercules07: 10:03pm On Feb 06, 2012
@Katsumoto

The Ibadans had the Modakeke's back because they were originally Oyos though the modakekes were warriors afterall they had fought the Fulanis (no be beans to fight cavalry) and practically had nowhere to go, funny thing is present day modakeke was not the original modakeke.
@ufe
Of course we were fighting one another, though, we fought with honor and knew when to negotiate.
@Dayo
The Ibadans and their Oyo guys will kick the Ekiti and Ijesha parapo, na today?

1 Like

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by AndreUweh(m): 10:06pm On Feb 06, 2012
dayokanu:

Should we have a Nairaland version of Kiriji wars where i would be kicking the Ekiti parapo armies butts.

Who would be the Ogedengbe, the Fabunmi, Sodeke, the Kurunmi, the Latosa, the Ogunmola etc

Ektbear might end up being the leader of the Ekiti army on NL or Ufeolorun, you want to challenge him?

Who is the Ijesha to represent Ogedengbe etc?
Say no to the above. The Hausa-Fulani will seize that opportunity to sack the entire Yorubaland. That has always been their wish.  There is no ethnic group in this Africa that hates the Yorubas more than the Hausa- Fulani.
The Yorubas should be united at all time to withstand Hausa-Fulani aggression.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by ektbear: 10:10pm On Feb 06, 2012
Kilode?!: Indeed. I'm not an overly superstitious, religious guy, but at times I wonder. . .
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by T9ksy(m): 10:29pm On Feb 06, 2012
Andre Uweh:

Say no to the above. The Hausa-Fulani will seize that opportunity to sack the entire Yorubaland.

Whenever they are ready, we shall not be found wanting!


That has always been their wish.
Stale news. 


There is no ethnic group in this Africa that hates the Yorubas more than the Hausa- Fulani.
Are you sure? I thought the ibos hates the yorubas much more than the hausa-fulanis. In fact, they hate the yorubas much more than they hate the northerners who has been (and still persist in) slaughtering them like roaches.


The Yorubas should be united at all time to withstand Hausa-Fulani aggression.
Don't develop migraine for our imaginary headache, jo. we truncated fulani hegemonic ambitions into our territory at the battle of oshogbo in 1840. And we shall surely repeat the same feat next time they decide to invade our homeland.

3 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Rgp92: 10:30pm On Feb 06, 2012
Andre Uweh:

Say no to the above. The Hausa-Fulani will seize that opportunity to sack the entire Yorubaland. That has always been their wish.  There is no ethnic group in this Africa that hates the Yorubas more than the Hausa- Fulani.
The Yorubas should be united at all time to withstand Hausa-Fulani aggression.

Wrong. hausa-fulani dont hate yoruba. Stop spreading propaganda.

2 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Ufeolorun(m): 10:34pm On Feb 06, 2012
@Dayo:I will be in lagos negotiating a truce lol! Or let me consult awon iya mi
Osoromoniga,Abiamo gboja gboro gboro,alakara oru afunije mafe ki eniyo,Amoni seni, lol!
Even Fadeyi Oloro consulted and if they ask me to go then I won't stop until I am crowned the next Soun Ogbomosho lol!

@Hercules
This time arround it will be the Ijebus,Ijesha,Egba,ekiti with. Asisting giripas from Akoko,ondo town,Akure,owo,Yagba,even Ikale and Ilaje(they will come in through Ogupa river,you know they love water)
Lol!
Ibadan shall be renamed Ekiti-Tedo,ashe Olodumore!
Haha
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Onlytruth(m): 10:45pm On Feb 06, 2012
Andre Uweh:

Say no to the above. The Hausa-Fulani will seize that opportunity to sack the entire Yorubaland. That has always been their wish.  There is no ethnic group in this Africa that hates the Yorubas more than the Hausa- Fulani.
The Yorubas should be united at all time to withstand Hausa-Fulani aggression.

hehehe! They think it is that sticks and stones hide and seek chasing games they were playing with themselves calling it "war". I dey laugh.
Aboki has been itching to thoroughly colonize their @sses and dip that Koran in the Lagos lagoon.
War ko, rat race ni. undecided
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by ektbear: 10:45pm On Feb 06, 2012
T9ksy and Rgp92.

Can't you see that he was baiting you? Why did you bother responding?

It is not everything that someone says that is worth responding to.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by tunnytox(m): 10:47pm On Feb 06, 2012
subscribing
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by tpia5: 10:52pm On Feb 06, 2012
Ufeolorun is not yoruba (or sane).

He's just pretending to be yoruba for the usual nefarious reasons.

Someone should look up his ip address- i'm sure it will match some other one/s on nl.
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Rgp92: 10:53pm On Feb 06, 2012
More stories, remember most of this have change overtime and the truth will never be known until Nigerians start caring about their history. Anyway enjoy
Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Rgp92: 10:55pm On Feb 06, 2012
[size=20pt]PREAMBLE: IJESALAND BEFORE HIS BIRTH:[/size]

It was a known fact that before Chief Ogedengbe was born, Ilesa and the entire Ijesaland was under the total control of the Alaafin of Oyo, who doubled to be the eldest son of Olofin Ajaye popularly called the Oduduwa of Yoruba hegemony.

There had been several attacks and assaults on Ilesa by the Oyos in orders to make Ilesa, the headquarters of Ijesaland, a tributary territory for the Oyo Empire. All efforts to conquer the Ijesas were not successful because of their strength, fortitude and winning spirit. It was during these periods of war, turbulence and communal disturbances that a Saviour and redeemer, a conqueror and a champion of his time would come.

Before Chief Ogedengbe was born, the Owa Obokun of Ilesa was virtually disturbed and perplexed on the continuous ravaging wars from the Oyos. The Owa Obokun then invited his Ifa Oracle consultants to find ways of quelling these incessant problems from the Oyos. These consultants consulted their ifa oracle and there was a revelation that a ‘great son’ of Ijesa was about to be born was about to be born who would salvage his people from the whims and caprices of the Oyos. In order to actualize the birth of this boy, a black cow and other herbs far and near were to be concoted. The Ifa Oracle then decided where the ‘golden boy’ was to be born. It fell on ‘
Atorin’ a little village very close to Ifewara in Atakunmosa West Local Government.

oba1

OGEDENGBE’S BIRTH:- A pregnant women by frame name, FALUPO woke up in her village at Atorin, only to be told to show up at the Town Hall where verification exercise on whom to bear the ‘golden boy’ was to be identified. Lady Falupo amongst other sixteen (16) pregnant women was identified to bear the child. All rituals were performed at Atorin near Ifewara and deposits were taken to a site close to the present Hope Grammer School Bolorunduro, Ilesa for sedimentation.

After twenty-one days of the rituals there areas where the rituals were placed started to spring-up water, later stream and eventually delevloping to a river. The Slogan, “Nya woo oo” ‘come and see’ now river ‘Ayao’ , which is a popular river in Ilesa metropolis.

No one can say exactly the date Chief Ogedengbe was born. Speculations were rife but one would boldly say he was born in the early 19th Century between 1805 – 1815 A.D. This could be decided by his strength and prowess during the last series of battles he fought at kiriji battle front at the Kiriji Battle front. Replying on the records of Captain B. W. Bower, the Resident of the British Government at Oyo, he rated him to be old and avassed in war experience and he would be about eighty years of age Captain B. W. Bower wrote this in his records in 1885

His mother’s town was Atorin while his father`s was OLORISA. He did not grow up in Olorisa because the mother had relocated to Atorin because of predictions and matrimonial problems from the bubbling husband whose personal physique and rotundity attracted several women to his household. His name is Apasan Forijiwa.

The little Ogedengbe grew up at Atorin until he shot a pregnant woman at Atorin. He could not go to school because schooling and formal education was unknown to Ijesaland then. He ran to IIesa to avoid being humiliated and assaulted or even punished. He was at Ifofin, in his Uncle’s house as an abode.

As a bachelor, he befriended a lady who had been bethrowned to one high Chief in Ilesa called Odole Ariyasunle. The Chief was not happy, he ordered his arrest, he was chained and detained at Idi – Ito ( Ijebu Jesa Junction of Ilesa). His peers and friends forcibly released him and he had to escape to Ibadan.

HIS FIRST TRAVAIL AT IBADAN: -

On getting to Ibadan, he could not settle peacefully. He had to enroll into the Ibadan upper Army Unit meant for outstanding soldiers. Aare Latosa gave him the necessary trainings and equipments to make him up. He was at Ibadan when he learnt that the Ibadan’s were waging war with the Ijesas and Igbajo (a district of Ijesas). He hurriedly left Ibadan to assist the Ijesas and Igbajo forces. On the battlefront, he was caught and brought back to Ibadan to face the case of sedition. He was given severe punishments and attempts were made to terminate his life. He was able to escape all the threats to his life.

HIS ESCAPE FROM IBANDAN:-

After several attempts to him failed. The Ibadan Army under Aare Latosa said he should be stoned to death. At this time a women, OLOKUNLARO came to his rescue and he was able to escape. He fraught his way back to Ilesa with great difficulties. Several security men were killed but Ogedengbe was not hurt.

On his arrival at Ilesha, Ogedengbe warned the Ijesas about the imminent wars already planned by the Ibadans against Ijesas. To the Contrary, Odole Ariyasunle who was never happy raised opposing views and advised Ogedengbe to leave Ilesa .Ogedengbe left Ilesa for Igbara Oke where he turned to his headquarters instead of Ilesa.

As predicted by Ogedengbe that the Ibadans would attack Ilesa, they came and pounced on the Ijesa heavily. The Ibadans surrounded Ilesa but could not enter into the town. This was because Ilesa was protected by traditional walls which were seven (7) in number. The height of each wall was over forty (40 feet). Though there were seven outlets into Ilesa then, they were highly fortified by Ijesa forces. The Ibadans could not penetrate despite their might and strength. These walls were called ‘ODI’.

Ogedengbe had about the onslaught of the Ibadans on his kinsmen, he was disturbed and he started to ‘NURSE’ an idea of revenge against the Ibadans if GOD permits. He settled permanently at Igbara Oke where he extended
his authorities over several Ekiti, Akoko and Edo countries. He fought and commanded his soldiers to capture several towns in the present Ekiti, Ondo, Edo and Kware states under the banner and respect for the Owa Obokun of Ijesaland. Through-out his expansionist battles, he did not touch any of the beaded Obas of Oduduwa. He did not fight in Ijero because of the Ajero of Ijero ,equally Aramoko because of the Deji and Owo Because of the Olowo. He was even invited to Benin Kingdom and honored by the Oba of Benin for his efforts in regaining the lost glory of Oduduwa. Towns like Ise-Ekiti,Emure,Somorika, Iyayu ,Ituwo ,Epinmin ,Iboropa ,Oka Akoko and tens of other could not forget Ogedengbe in their histories. These prowesses led to a slogan “O soko Ekiti soko Akoko, Eniti Akoko ndi esin sin lori oke.

THE KIRIJI WAR AND OGEDENGBE’S INVOLVMENT

Ogedengbe was at Igbara Oke when the Kiriji war of 1870 started. The
causes of the war were numerous and each group involved as parties believed they were right. But, to the Ijesas, we believed that the excesses Ajele (District Overseer) from Ibadan were too much for the Ijeasa and Ekitis to bear. Rumour has it that one FABUMMI a great Ijesaman from Oke Imeji made the history factual. It was true that his wife (FABUMMI) prepared his lunch and was heading to his farm to give him, when the servants of Ibadan Ajele, attacked her and forced her to be raped openly by the Ajele. These actions of the Ibadan apart from been barbaric and rough were alien and taboos to the Ijesas, hence the beginning of the ugly war.

The Ijesas invited their people in Ekiti land like Aduloju Dodondawa, Falowo from Ekiti and host of other war lords. It was then they realized that without Ogedengbe the battle WOULD not be won. The Ijesas contacted their Ifa oracle severally and it reveled on each occasions that it was only Ogedengbe who could conquer the Ibadans. Attempts were made to parliate Ogedengbe to come back to Ilesa and help them fight the Ibadan. Ogedengbe did not take the emissaries serious because of disappointments he did not take the emissaries serious because of the disappointments he had received from the powerful Ijesa High Chiefs. At long last, several rituals were prepared and sent to Igbara-Oke where Ogedengbe eventually conceded to head the Ekiti Parapo Arm. The man who took a white horse fully loaded with charms to Ogedengbe at Igbara-Oke was called Opiliki (aka) Asodedero.

It was when Ogedengbe arrived that the whole Ekiti believed that the Ijesas were actually serious to route out the Ibadans from their vicinity. Immediately Ogedengbe got to Imesi-Ile, he was appointed the “SERIKI MEYAKI” meaning the Commander- in-Chief or Generallissimo of the Ijesa / Ekiti Parapo forces or Army.

Ogedengbe announced the commencement of the battle. It was a fierce one, but after seven (7) weeks of fighting the Ibadans became weary; and Ogedengbe advised them to send to Ibadan and fetch their war lord popular called ‘Are Latosisa’

Are Latosisa arrived for the Kiriji war and settled at Ikirun. He even boasted before leaving Ibadan that he would use only three (3) days to overrun the Ijesas on getting to the battle front, he invited Ogedengbe and reminded him of his (Ogedengbe) oath at Ibadan immediately after the Igbajo war. Ogedengbe rebuffed him saying he was fighting Ijesa National war.

It was then known that the Ekiti Parapo forces were fully prepared to capture alive the Are Latosisa.The battle was time consuming, starting from the dawn to dusk.

When the Ibadans could no longer cope they started to hammer a slogan as thus:-‘Ilu Kereje a ta ni lofa, a ta ni lofa ara a ro ni koro’ meaning ‘Small towns with dangerous weapons to kill their opponets.

During the battle, the Ijesas who enormous influence in West Germany had brought riffles and other sophisticated weapons from Itebu in Lagos to assist the forces. Notable amongst them were the Haastrups Thompson Gureje and Turtons. Initially two (2) riffles were sent, but when they performed very well more riffles were brought; at the end of the war nor less than eight hundred (800) riffles were used. The prices of these weapons were battered, that his slaves were sent to Lagos to liquidate the debt.

By 1884, the Ibandan troops were fidgeting so, from their Igbajo base, Are Latosisa sent to Alaanfin of Oyo to contact the Residents of the colonial British Government, and find means of settlement because the Ijesas in alliance with the Ekitis generally are super difficult to succumb to the Oyos wishes. He said if care was not urgently taken, the Ijesas would ruin and destroyed the Oyos powerful army.

Alaafin of Oyo, contacted the governor in Lagos who directed his resident at Oyo to wade into the communal conflict for immediate settlement.
Captain Bower invited Ogedengbe and Are Latosisa for a truce to the ugly war. Ogedengbe did not immediately agreed for settlement but after several pressures and persuasion from captain Bower he agreed for settlement.

Captain Bower then mentioned the emergency codes for the two (2) warring parties:-

1. No more fighting;
2. No more ritual killing or cannibalism
3. No more slave trade in Yourbaland



On the same date, Igbajo camp was destroyed and burnt, and eventually returned to Ibadan. No one could say he Aare Latosisa returned to Ibadan because any war lost by the Aare of Ibadan would be the last outing for him in or outside Ibadan.

During the war, Ogedengbe Kept the Owa Obokun at Esa Oke while the Ekiti Obas requested Owa Obokun too to come to the battle front, but Ogedengbe technically told them to find another leader for the Ekiti parapo forces then his Owa would appear. They reasoned with him that the son could not be stronger than his father. It settled there.

OGEDENGBE IN HIS LATE YEARS

Ogedengbe finally returned to Ilesa after the Kiriji War. He settled peacefully but his forces popular called the Ipayes because Pugilistics unruly, uncontrollable and causing several threats to the Ijesas. Reports were made orally and openly to Ogedengbe but he could not control then, believing that they were the fingers that fed him during his travails. Efforts were made attempting to terminate his life but all in failures. Then, the Ijesas reported him to the resident at Oyo. It was during the reign of Owa Obokun Elere. The Owa Obokun hesitated in singing his petition to the resident at Oyo, because he was the one who appointed and installed him when Ogedengbe refused to be installed as the Owa Obokun Captain Bower came to Ilesa with twenty-one soldiers to arrest Ogedengbe. On the day he was arrested, there was a mild drama. Arimoro, one of the Ogedengbes lieutenants wanted to prevent Captain Bower to take Ogedengbe away. Captain Bower immediately drew the boyonnet of his gun to strike him, immediately the bayonet broke into seven (7) pieces.

Ogedengbe then appealed to the Ijesas not to fight for him because the British Government would destroy Ilesa Town if only one of her citizen was killed.

The second drama on the same day was when they got to Osunjela, a boundary between Osogbo and Ilesa. It was very difficult to cross the river Osun, but surprisingly, Ogedengbe had crossed the river without any boat or helper with his white horse wailing this tail to him. It was here that captain Bower realized the prowess of Ogedengbe as a great man.

On where Ogedengbe should be exiled he told them that the preferred any town in Yorubaland but not Ibadan but instead he preferred Iwo. Tolls were paid to see him because of their past conjunction with some Ijesas like Gureje Thompson have invade his ANAYE house and removed all the riffles he used at the war front and other valuables. When Ogedengbe heard this, he wept for the first (1st) time in his life, saying Ijesas were very difficult to curtail. There were even rumour that he cursed the progressives in Ijesaland.

Before his arrival, Owa Obokun Elere had died. Efforts were geared to select him for the second time to become the Owa Obokun, he equally refused.

HIS DEATH oba3

Ogedengbe died in Ilesa in 1910 as the Obanla of Ijesaland. During his period his influence and affluence extended to Akoko in Ondo State; Ekiti land in Ekiti State; and towns like Owena; Ikeji-Ile, Arakeji, Ira; Ipetu Ijessa , Erin Oke and Erin Odo, Efon Alaye, Ido Ajinnare , Aramoko,Oke Mesi, Imese-Ile, Igbajo and Iresi to mention a few.

Seeing the support and cooperation of these numerous towns, he prayed that Ilesa and Ijesa would never witness any war AGAIN.

Before he died, two days to his demise, thunderstorms sounded three (3) times in the sky signaling the home-call of a great man. Owa Atayero invited him to appease the gods and goddesses of Ijesaland to avert the impeding problem but Ogedengbe told him that he was prepared to REST with his fore-fathers. He died peacefully with his children, Kith and Kin after advising them to be loyal, peaceful and law-abiding to a to all the rules and regulations of their fatherland. He appealed to them not to interfere with other Chieftaincies in Ijesaland and beyond except the Obanla of Ijesaland and if they followed their advice, love, prosperity and peace would dominate their lives.

source : http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=15;t=003554

3 Likes

Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by Ufeolorun(m): 11:10pm On Feb 06, 2012
tpia@:

Ufeolorun is not yoruba (or sane).

He's just pretending to be yoruba for the usual nefarious reasons.

Someone should look up his ip address- i'm sure it will match some other one/s on nl.

Han han! Momo tpia why attack me?
Am insane? where did that come from
Well you r not the first to question my identity even my family call me Gambari lol!
anyway Ufeolorun ni meha kiise ti eniyan like my mother usually say.
Back to trenches(in the thick forest of Igede-ekiti) preping.

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Re: The Yoruba Kiriji Wars (1877 - 1893) by ektbear: 11:15pm On Feb 06, 2012
Very interesting.

Btw, one thing I've wondered. What exactly is the difference between Ekiti people and Ijesha people? Are their languages mutually intelligible? Did they have some connection prior to this Ekitiparapo war?

How did the Ijesha come to settle in western Ekitiland? How long have they (or I should say we) been there for?

Some of this stuff is kind of confusing to me. How did we end up in Ekiti State (or I guess the old Ondo State) rather than the old Oyo State?

Also, how did we come to see themselves as Ekiti rather than Ijesha?

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