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History Of Families In Lagos - Culture - Nairaland

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History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 4:40am On Jan 27, 2013
The Ado family = History has it that the Oba of Bini sent various trade expeditions to Ghana where spices were traded and one of his traders complained about the way she was being treated by the Awori's. The Oba of Bini then sent a trade expedition by sea. Ironically, the leader of the expedition arrived in the evening at a time when the people who were predominantly fishermen were either wading into the water or getting into their boats to gather their catch. He declined to engage them further and returned to what is now called Benin City where he reported to the Oba of Bini that they were attacked. This prompted the Oba of Bini to constitute a war expedition led by Ado, a Bini Prince to go to Lagos and demand an explanation. This was over 650 years ago.

However, on getting there, they were well received. The people were so enamored with Ado they asked him to stay and lead them. He agreed on the condition that they surrendered their sovereignty to the Oba of Bini to which they agreed. The Oba of Bini was told this and he gave his permission for the expedition to remain.

The Eletu or Odibo = Later on the oba of bini sent some of his chiefs and Eletu Odibo was one of them to assist Ado

The Obanikoro family = Obanikoro also was on of the chiefs from present day bini city and was asked to help Ado govern the Awori people

The Ashipa family

You see back in those days apart from the Bini language, the language used in the palace then for administration was Yoruba (particularly the Ijebu dialect) unlike now so it was easy for families to intermix with the people. Even when the whites first visited Nigeria, they saw some Ijebus heading for Bini city and asked where they were going. It is on record they said "We are going to see the Oba of bini for political issues". Note a bini/Yoruba subgroup such as the Itsekiris can communicate effectively in Ijebu dialect and not any other dialect but Ijebu which is a Yoruba subgroup.


Now this brings me to the topic "Who are the real Lagosians ?"

Are the real Lagosians ‘saro’ descendants from Olowogbowo, or a member of an old Brazilian family from Oke-popo or “Aguda”, or a member of old chiefly families-like Oluwo, Bajulaiye, Ojora, Oniru, Oshodi etc. could a Lagosian be one of the Muslims who have lived in Obalende since the end of the Asante wars. (Member of the West African frontier Force of Captain Glover in 19th century) or is it one that lives on Siriki street near the central mosque? In the sense and according to the school of thought, any of these people can be called true lagosians, yet the cultural spectrum the groups cover reveals the variety and heterogeneity of Lagos.

To understand this view or conclusion of these notable scholars on Lagos, one must appreciate that the answer lies in the history of Lagos itself. A code study will reveal two key factors that are interwoven, that is the development of the city and its society and added to these two, was also the element of trade.

Foundations which were based on the various successive waves of immigration that was intra and inter continental. Each wave of immigration from the earliest beginning brought about the creation of various settlement on the island. Increase and rapidity of these waves which were as a result of different but interrelated events, brought about an expansion that was to spread beyond the island to its environs.

Each group of immigrants concentrated in the areas or quarters named after them. They also brought with them their various religion and culture, which they practiced. All these elements of geographical space, religion and cultural practice, have survived and became woven into the rich tapestry of the heritage of the Lagosians. Descendants of the settlers who were born and grew up in Lagos have no connection with the places of their past ancestry. The most information they have is from ‘stories’ passed down through the generations as attested to by a Lagosians, Mrs. Efunjoke Coker (M.F.R), in her autobiography.

The majority of the immigrants came from the surrounding Yoruba area and the hinterlands, bringing new religions the Ogboni cult, Islam for instance was introduced in the 18th century, new institutions and customs (from Benin and elsewhere). These development of trades, both peaceful and slave trade brought first of all the indigenous people of the surroundings and hinterlands and later the Portuguese, French Dutch and British and further wave of repatriated freed slaves from the Americans, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These people Brazilians, Caribbean and Europeans brought aspect of their cultures, Christianity and Western Education.

From the first wave of the settlers in the 15th century to the first half of the 19th century, four (quarters) were separated from the Europeans, the educated Africans (Saros & Akus), the Brazilians and the indigenous community. By far, the earliest and the most important and without which the other quarter could have existed was the Isale-Eko quarter, here that the aboriginal Aworis descendants of Olofin of Isheri led by Aromire carefully settled in dry choice sites.
This nuclear settlement was between Itolo and Idumagbo lagoon including Ebute Ero in Isale Eko. With the help of place names and oral tradition, the extent of this important (quarter) of Lagos may be delineated. It must have been extended to Ofin area to Ebute Ero, the heart of Isale Eko to that part of Lagos named Victoria street after Queen Victoria of England during the colonial era renamed Nnamdi Azikiwe after independence. The original was Ehin Ogba (behind the fence) indicating that it was outside the inhabitant part of town, according to oral tradition, it was indeed the dumping ground for corpses of paupers and those class of children regarded as mysterious ‘Abiku’ ( born to die). The unceremonious burial being regarded as a kind deterrent to these children from dying so often. It was jungle then and seldom traversed. The history of Lagos had been chequered affected by the powerful influence of Dahomey on the West and Benin on the East. According to P.D Cole and A.B Aderibigbe, the expansionist policy of these kingdoms, forced more people living between them to emigrate to Lagos.

The Aworis were soon joined by other Yorubas, there was the considerable Ijebu population at Idumagbo, substancial body of immigrants from Ota who first came in search of trade at Obun Eko, but eventually settled at Idumota named after them. An extension of the premier, but with its own distinctive feature was Ofin. Its main center was Itolo squre with the Onitolo and the descendants of the earliest inhabitants. Outside this centre was Offin Ile in Ijebu Remo territory. The unique feature of this whole area was the internal water way formed by the Offin canal, the Elgbata creek and Itolo, which made the canoe an effective means of transportation. The second stage was marked by the military encounter between the invading army from Benin and Olofins men of Iddo Island. There was a protracted struggle until the era of Oba Orhogbua of Benin sent his grandson Eskipa (Ashipa in Yoruba) to further consolidate Benin influence and to firmly establish a vice royality. Authorities are divided in opinion, whether the new government was first based at Iddo and was moved by the third king in the dispensation Gabaro to Lagos Island, or whether it was from the beginning of this existence that it seized the Island of Lagos, avoiding Iddo Island with its tradition of resistance to Benin influence.

According to the ‘Idejo” source-they, the Bini people, did not conquer them- they were invaded to settle disputes among the sons of Olofin. According to this source, the facts that the Obas of Lagos ‘owned’ no land in Lagos which is disposed of exclusively by the Yoruba Idejo chiefs, and that the Idejo chiefs did not perform any administrative duties on behalf of the Oba and took to the mainland in time of war leaving the Oba to defend Lagos, do not suggest an original Benin conquest. They suggest a shadowy tributary relationship, occasional intervention in an Obaship that quickly became indigenously Yoruba and independent in Lagos. Lagos external relations where conducted with no reference to Benin. According to Benin source, Oba Orhogbua, during his punitive expedition against recalcitrant vassal states in about 1550 made his war camp (Eko) on Lagos Island and from there attacked his enemies for many years. Anyway the origins of the Benin connection is obscure and laden with controversy. It probably originated in a vice- royalty from the mid 16th century.

It is strongly believe that the king and his retinue of Benin adviers and warriors first pitched their camp in the area known as Enu Owa with the celebrant Oju Olobun’ now a ‘national shrine’, but at the beginning a spiritual symbol of supremacy of the Oba of Benin. The truth of this belief is attested to by the fact that the coronation of an Oba is not regarded as valid, without the performance of ‘kikam’ (ikanse) at this same place. That Lagos derived its name “Eko” from Orhogbuas camp should not be seen as contradicting the claim of Yoruba sources that Olofin and his subjects regarded Lagos as “Oko” farm. Oba Gabaro did more that start a tradition. By choosing for his permanent abode, the very site for which Aromire had made his ‘red paper’ farm3, this Oba showed remarkable political acumen. A new regime had indeed arrived but was housed on the soil prepared by Aronire, the first settler on the Island and the son of Olofin, whose sway the new order has come to displaced. This was a visible evidence of the factor of continuity and change in history. Indeed it had been pointed out that ‘Oko” and ‘Eko’ marked two distinct periods and waves of immigration in the history of Lagos, the earliest Awori Yoruba settlement and rule, and of Bini hegemony, ‘Eko’ supplanting ‘Oko’ once the Bini were in the ascendant.

The similarity between the two words must have facilitated this transition in the minds of the people. Also a new nucleus of chiefs, royal courtiers and warlords was established, not based on possession of land like the Idejo, but on service to the Oba. They all lived, each in his own Iga, a lesser version of the Oba’s palace. The area of Isale-Eko, thus delimited, was the hub of Lagos politics. Its focus was the Iga Idungaran. Here dwelt both the Awori and bini aristocracies. Despite the conflicting myth both aristocracies made adjustment between Yoruba and Benin political structures and traditions. The local Yoruba aristocracy reserved the right to opt out of the political struggles in which the political struggles in which Benin counterpart might engage. This right was always threatened by increased intermarriage and the growing power of the Oba. There was the considerable Ijebu population and there was the hard core settlers from Idoluwo Ile, who came with the Obanikoro, head of the Ogalade Class of Chiefs who gave their name Idoluwo to their present abode.

Here dwell also the most influential of those who took part in the peaceful commerce. Although the 18th and 19th centuries saw the beginning and dominance of the Trans Atlantic Slave trade, it is often erroneously assumed that the more natural kind of commercial trade did not play a vital role in the relationship between Lagos and her neighbors. The available oral evidence against that, on the contrary, the nucleus of the system of periodic markers could be discerned in the proceeding the era of the slave trade even at the height of the slave trading period the ‘legitimate’ type of trade, especially in the articles of domestic consumption, held its own. The antiquity and indispensable nature of Ebute Ero and Obun Eko market for trade of large area of Lagos hinterland, was of the most notable Lagos market, for peaceful commerce, it also acted as a forum for social activities other than commerce – in the Roman sense of the word. The periodic markets of Badagry patronized by the people of Lagos and the surrounding countries no doubt, received greater prominence after the British ‘pax’ but were not created by it. The market noted for the profusion of foodstuff brought to Lagos by traders from Potto Novo is now immortalized in the street named Poto Novo Market Street. It should not be thought that effects of Bini hegemony were limited to the aristocracy. The ordinary citizens must have felt the impact of the changes that came in its wake. Even right from its formative stage, there was systematic consultation between the Oba and his Chiefs, for example the institution of ‘Osa Iga’, when important chiefs were expected at the palace and at which important affairs of the state were discussed. The absence of chiefs from this particular meeting was interpreted a san act of rebellion against the king. There was the ‘Ilupeju’- literally a meeting of the whole town – which enable proposals from the Oba to be published and commented upon by eminent personalities in the community. The strong tradition of the ancestors worship in the religion, the different order or class of chiefs surrounding the court of the oba, are Bini elements, and important strands in the web of traditional culture of Lagos.

Two principle factors are responsible for the rapid rise in population and the importance of Lagos as the commercial center in the second half of the 19th century; one was the abolition of the slave trade and the consequent introduction of the British preventive squadron to patrol the West Coast. This increased the risk and cost of the Atlantic Slave trade from the traditional West Coast slaving ports and thereby help in rise of small towns like Lagos and Badagry, which were till then, not heavily frequented points on the coast, therefore not heavily patrolled by the squadron) it offered traders relatively safe and cheap ports for the evacuation of slaves. More so the hinterland of Lagos was quite disorganized, during the early part of the 19th century. Oyo Empire was breaking up a result of its own internal inadequacies, conflicts, and pressure of the Fulani from the North. This pressure led to general disorder in the interior, it also brought about the fall of the Oyo Empire in 1835, and the resultant rise of Ibadan a military power. These circumstances brought about more waves of migration of those escaping from the wars, to find refuge in relatively peaceful Lagos, such as the Egbas, Egbados and Aworis. Inn terms of population, various parts of Lagos itself and the mainland benefited vastly from these movements of people. These circumstances first acted in the interest of Lagos and Badagry, which now prospered. However this advantage eventually became a liability of another kind in that it strengthened the stand of those ready to bring pressure on the British government to use the pretext of the illegal ( and in the 1850’s diminishing) trade in slaves, to reduce Lagos to a colony by mid 19th century.

The second factor in this development was the gradual opening up of the interior for both missionaries and business. The activities of the missionaries in Abeokuta area were already extensive prior to the reduction of Lagos in 1861 Reverend Townsend (agent of the church Missionary Society), Mr. Robert Campbell (later of the Lagos Press) and Mr. Samuel Crowther Jnr had all been seeking expanded roles for missions and for the returning slaves in the Abeokuta area. Indeed it is well known, both Christian and business pressure was behind the final decision of the B5rirish government to support Akintoye and his Badagry allies against king Kosoko. Their activities in Abeokuta hinterland and the prospect of intermediary trade between Abeokuta and Lagos led to the increase in the number of rescued or emancipated slaves from Sierra Leone and Liberia, Brazil and Cuba who either desired or could be encouraged to return to their homes in Yoruba land. The creation of the British ‘Pax’ in 1861, when British annexed Lagos, further accentuated the influx of peoples to various parts of the colony. The prevailing peace in British Lagos, induced a large number of Yoruba to forsake their homeland plagued with internecine was and to seek their fortunes in the colony. An example, after the destruction of Ijaye town, as result of war which ended 1862 a large number of Ijaye refuges found a new home in the Oke Arin section of Lagos named Ijaye court and Ijaye Street after them.

A much more important exodus of people to Lagos was occasioned by the upheaval Abeokuta, the expulsion of the missionaries and converts locally known as ‘Ifole’ in 1867. so great was the number of the refuges, that Governor Glover had to settle them at Ebute-metta on the mainland inn the quarter now known as Ago Egba, the Egba camp. There were other quarters Isale-Eko, which judged by their names, were originally farms, Errko and Oko Faji. These areas seemed to have served the interest of the inhabitants of the Isale Eko quarter. but the distinction between town and farm usually maintained rigidly in order parts of Yuroba land by a town wall, was fluid in Lagos, and farms soon began to assume the appearance of settled ‘quarters’. The transformation was generally started by influential Chiefs of Isale Eko who in search for more dry land for their clientele (the domestic of oral tradition) eventually turned farmland into more permanent abodes. Ereko was to be completely transformed into a princely dominion with an Iga of its own, by the intransigent Kosoko, after his rapprochements with the new British authorities and his consequent return to Lagos in 1862. Some of his followers who returned with him from Epe settled at Epetedo between 1862 and 1868. Epetedo means settlement of Epe members, notable among these retunees was Oshodi Tapa, Kososko’s war general. Tapa Street is named after him. Oba Faji, had the unique distinction of being owned and named after a woman Chief Fajinola, who emigrated from Imahi in Egun with her husband and her only daughter Samota. She was a native doctor invited bu Oba Akinsemoyin. She was unhappy because she preferred to settle where she could find an Iroko tree to worship. Oba Akinsemoyin begged chief Aromire for a piece of land to be given to her. On getting to Faji, she found a female Iroko tree. She settled there and started worshiping there. Near the iroko tree, is now her Iga, known as Iga Faji, named after her, but shortened to Faji. Oko faji, owned and governed by this very wealthy lady was a very large family stretching from present Faji market to the Trinity Methodist Church Tinubu. It was within the same quarter that another distinguished lady, Efunroye. Tinubu played her remarkable economics and anti-British roles, roles for which the British expelled her from Lagos, to her native Abeokuta, but which also, won her the admiration of succeeding generation and an honored place in the history of Lagos. Place names (Faji Market, Ita Faji, Tinubu Street, Tinubu Court, Tinubu Square) now proclaim the significant of the activities of Faji and Tinibu in this quarter of Lagos and should serve as a warning to historians, who often ignore the vital roles played by women in African societies. The continues growth of two new types of quarters, which were exclusively settled by freed slave and also British occupation of Lagos, influenced Lagos society ty to a significant degree. It brought in its wake a large number repatriates from Sierra Leone, Brazil, Cuba who were to have a great influence on the structure and nature of the society. Their return profoundly affected the history of Lagos. The Sierra Leone and Liberians were known as ‘Saros’ or ‘Akus” the Brazilian, and Cubans as ‘Agudas’

The Agudas were mainly Catholics, skilled artisans and crafts men (in trades such as masonry, carpentry, mechanics, bakery and confectionery)who had purchased their freedom and returned home to their country origin’ the Akus or Saros’ were slaves (or descendants of slaves) rescued by the British naval squadron that patrolled the high seas on the lookout for slaves. The Saros emigrants were mainly missionaries (Protestants, teachers and clerks) and traders. All returned emigrants had their homes in one of the hinterland kingdom, Ijebu Egba, Ekiti, Oyo0Ibadan, Nupe, Edo, Hausa, Fulani, Boguwa, Kanuri. Most were probably shipped from Lagos but none seem to have been Lagosians. Separated by distance, the “Saro” at Olowogbowo area and the “Agudas” at Portuguese town (popo Aguda) brought with them different but complimentary skills the former the benefits of the grammar-school- type of education with little emphasis on its practical application, the latter the rich experience and expertise in crafts-manship. These qualities were to make the communities very important in the future development of Lagos. Whether they were repatriates from the Americans, from Liberia and Sierra Leone, or simply educated immigrants from Egbaland, these people were a force in setting Lagos apart, as the youngest and fastest growing community, on the West Coast of Africa.

Educated and sophisticated, they constituted themselves into a unique community maintaining ties with the Yuroba homeland and yet sharing a great deal with the small but prominent and prosperous European community, which by 1890, according a cross of that year unnumbered just about 150, half of them British. It should not be imagined, however that Lagos was the exclusive preserve of the Africans, indigenous or immigrants. A small European quarter was already in evidence near the coast. Situated in an area called ‘Ehingben’ by the local people, who valued it mainly as a place for refuse disposal and therefore beyond the pale of responsibility, this insipient “European’ area must have excited the curiosity of the local people concerning the sense of judgment of the ‘white man’. They could understand the first phase of this European enterprise when it consisted only of ‘piers’ or trading wharfs, but when by the end of the 1850s, the once neglected Ehingbeti was cleared and with construction of the ‘Broad’ road, it was transformed what we call the Marina and Broad Streets. The Marina became a promenade fronting the lagoon where merchants built their stores and luxurious dwellings with important timber, marble and prefabs for the glorious life-sustaining breezes “Markets have been regulated, soldiers and police force organized, and a race course established, schools, courthouses, hospitals, government house and barracks built, and a cemetery
(which drives a brisk trade)”.

The Marina had access to the priers and so to business, it faced outward from the center of native residences, and was occupied by the Europeans. In short, it became one of the best area in colonial Lagos. An unprecedented value was henceforth placed on ‘land fronting the sea; and the struggle for possession of land in this formerly despise area of the town. Some of the successful Yorubas who lived side by side the Europeans were Henry Pratt, Ben Dawodu, R.B.Blaize, J.S.Leigh, Samuel Crowther, E. Campbell. They were the select few. This struggle for land fronting the sea was to find its highest expression in the latter day scramble, on the part of eminent Nigerians, for the land on Victoria Island, which was, in time past the haunt of humble and itinerant fishermen.

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Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 4:48am On Jan 27, 2013
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 4:52am On Jan 27, 2013
I am a Laogian part Awori part Ogu (Anago/nago) so I am not biased. From the map by Sir Smith, it is clear the areas where Yoruba is spoken as a language whether administratively or casually.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 5:02am On Jan 27, 2013
Oba Ado ( remember he was given the permission to rule Lagos) had 3 children

read more here

http://edoglobalorganization.org/Publications%20pdf/Edo%20Customs/History%20of%20the%20past%20and%20present%20Oba%20of%20Lagos.pdf

All Ado children have Yoruba names as well showing the adminstrative language was Yoruba
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 5:06am On Jan 27, 2013
The Nupe Families in Lagos

Chief Balogun Landuji Oshodi Tapa was an outstanding warrior and a statesman. During the reign of King Eshilokun, he immigrated to Lagos from Bida in what is now known as the Niger State. This was after he had lost his parents in a tribal war when he was only six years old. He put himself under the protection of the King as his servant in order to prevent himself from being taken and sold into slavery. The King in turn put him under the supervision of one of his trusted men, Fagbemi.

Some years later, one of the Portuguese merchants, a friend of King Eshilokun, asked the king to let two of his children accompany him to Portugal and he promised to bring them back. The King was very wary of this offer and he thought instead of risking the lives of any of his own children, he would offer two people loyal to him. Hence he chose Oshodi and Dada Antonio to go with the Portuguese merchant.

While the King thought he was protecting the interests of his own children, he was in fact denying them an opportunity that would have benefited them more in the future.

Oshodi and Dada Antonio went with the Portuguese merchant to America and they were later returned to the King after many years.

On arrival from America, Oshodi was employed by Messrs. G. L. Gaiser as a Commission Agent and Toll Collector. With the arrival of the ships of the Portuguese merchants, business flourished, and Oshodi’s commissions from sales increased and he eventually became a rich man. Oshodi never forgot the hands that fed him, so to speak; he continued to be loyal to the King and was made a chief solely responsible for looking after the King’s wives. He was the only one who could go into the Queen’s apartment to oversee repairs, if the need arose.

After the death of King Eshinlokun, Chief Oshodi remained loyal to his children. He particularly cast his lot with Idewu Ojulari who succeeded his father. After the reign of Chief Idewu Ojulari, Kosoko, a son of Oshinlokun, was said to be the rightful heir to the throne, but he was an enemy of Chief Eletu Odibo, whose duty was to install and crown any new king. It was said at the time, that young Prince Kosoko had seduced Eletu Odibo’s would-be wife. In retaliation, Eletu Odibo used his powerful position to crown Oluwole as the next King of Lagos in 1836.

Kosoko and other descendants of King Eshilokun were not satisfied with the decision

and were ready to show their resentment. They waged a war against King Oluwole and Chief Eletu Odibo. Kosoko and his warriors invaded Isale-Eko. The battle was fierce and prolonged but ended with victory on the side of the king’s army. Kosoko fled to Whydah, realizing the consequences of his action.



When King Oluwole died, Akitoye was crowned in 1841 as the next King of Lagos.

Conscious of the right of Kosoko to the throne, Akitoye justly decided to search for Kosoko his nephew, who had taken refuge in Whydah. He believed that he must enjoy his patronage while on the throne. Akitoye organized a search party under the command of bold and gallant Chief Oshodi. The rapidity with which the party achieved its success was directly related to the military might of Chief Oshodi.

Kosoko finally returned to Lagos with Chief Oshodi in a vessel belonging to a merchant called, Domingo.



Henceforth, Chief Oshodi worked to maintain peace between Kosoko and Akintoye, and eventually brought the two together on terms. The peace effort was thwarted by Chief Eletu Odibo who had employed all the persuasive words he could, to dissuade King Akitoye from bringing Kosoko back to Lagos. He believed that Lagos would not contain the two of them. For a while, he did all he could to create conflicts between them, but later left Lagos for exile in Badagry.



When a war broke out between King Akitoye and Kosoko, Chief Oshodi loyally pitched his tent with Kosoko, the son of Eshilokun, through thick and thin. Akitoye asked Eletu Odibo to return to Lagos with his warriors to fight on his side. Akitoye’s men led by Eletu Odibo were soundly defeated. Eletu Odibo was captured in an ambush and killed.



With the death of Eletu Odibo, the elders advised Akitoye to escape to his mother’s town in Abeokuta. When Kosoko heard about the plan, he detailed his war chief, Oshodi, to lay ambush for Akitoye, kill him, and bring his head before him. Akitoye was in fact caught by Oshodi in the Agboyi waters, but instead of killing him, he paid homage to him and his Lord and prayed for his safe journey and safe return.



Chief Oshodi returned to report to Kosoko that Akitoye had escaped by the use of a powerful charm which put them all to sleep when he was passing. Historians were not able to assign any reason for the treatment which Oshodi gave Akitoye when in fact he was on orders to bring his head to Kosoko. In 1845, Kosoko defeated Akitoye and ascended the throne. In the meantime, Chief Oshodi remained Kosoko’s “Abagbon” war chief.



While in exile, Akitoye appealed to the British Government for help to restore him to his throne. A war broke out; the British started to bombard Lagos, setting the town on fire. Kosoko’s defense under the command of Chief Oshodi was effective and modern by the international standard of the time. After nine days of consecutive serious military actions, the British fleet unleashed excessive gun power which resulted in the defeat of Kosoko’s fleet. Under this unfavorable condition, Kosoko had to flee to Epe with Chief Oshodi and his warriors on the night of the13th of August 1853.

Akitoye was brought back to Lagos by the British Consul and was restored as the King of Lagos. Akitoye died on the 2nd of September 1853, about two weeks after Kosoko and his men had fled. In the afternoon of September 3rd, 1853, his son, Dosunmu was formally installed as the King of Lagos.

Although the war seemed to have ended with Kosoko in exile, there were sporadic raids on Lagos from Epe; disturbing the peace and trade of the island. The raids caused the British Consul Campbell, the Elders, and White Cap chiefs of Lagos, to initiate a move to reconcile the warring royal relatives.

On the 26th of January 1854, a peace conference, historically known as Langbasa meeting, was held at Agbekin (Palaver Island) about four months after King Dosunmu’s coronation. The British Consul’s party included the Commander of HMS Plato with other officers under his command, and Kosoko’s party which included Chief Oshodi Tapa and Chief Onisemo Adeburusi of Epe. They came without Kosoko in about sixty canoes each containing forty men. King Dosunmu was represented by several white cap chiefs and war chiefs.

At the opening of this remarkable conference, the Epe people, led by Chief Oshodi Tapa expressed their strong desire to return to Lagos a to the British Consul and be at peace with their friends and relatives. Chief Oshodi proposed that Kosoko be allowed to return to Lagos and live as a private person.

The proposal was not agreeable to the Consul on the basis that two Kings could not rein in Lagos. As an appeasement, Chief Oshodi was offered to return alone as the Consul for the people of Epe, but he declined the offer and insisted on Kosoko’s return from exile. Several years later in 1862, Kosoko was allowed back to Lagos with his war chief, after signing a peace treaty negotiated with the British Consul by Chief Oshodi.

Governor Glover was very grateful for Chief Oshodi’s contributions to peace in Lagos.

On their arrival to Lagos, Governor Glover sought permission from Aromire to give part of Epetedo to Chief Oshodi. For himself, his family, his followers, and servants who returned with him from Epe, he held the area under the native customary law of land tenure, subject to the native system of the devolution of land.

The palace of Oshodi is located in the center of the area of land in Epetedo. The area is uniquely laid out into 21 compounds. Four of these compounds; Oshodi, Akinyemi, Ewumi, and Alagbede courts belong exclusively to Chief Balogun Oshodi’s extended family.

For the most notable and extraordinary role of Chief Oshodi in the restoration of peace to Lagos and his contribution to the Government of Lagos, he was presented by Governor Glover on the Lagos Race Course grounds with a sword from Mr. Cardwell, the Secretary of State to the British Government. The sword was inscribed “presented by the Government of Queen Victoria to Chief Tapa in commemoration of the loyal services rendered by him to the Government of Lagos”

With his background of having been to America, Oshodi did not miss the opportunity to educate his children. He solicited Governor Glover to educate one of his children in England. This child later assumed the surname of Oshodi-Glover.

Chief Balogun Oshodi Tapa died on 2nd of July1868 about six years after his return from exile in Epe, leaving forty six surviving children. His body was laid to rest at the center of Oshodi Street in Epetedo, Lagos. The descendants of Chief Oshodi constructed an imposing edifice at his burial site, as a monument to the memory of the renowned warlord, peacemaker, and statesman. This monument has been classified as a historic site by the Lagos State Government.



CHILDREN OF CHIEF BALOGUN OSHODI TAPA*

Feyishitan Daudu Oshodi

Faronke Oshodi

Shado Oshodi

Ewumi Oshodi

Asunmo Oshodi

Lande Oshodi

Amore Oshodi

Ambintan Asogba Oshodi

Okilu Oshodi

Alli Igunnu Oshodi

Salu Asogba Oshodi

Lashimi Oshodi

Rabiu Eshugbayi I Oshodi

Cordelia Kobile Oshodi

Joseph II Oshodi

Lawani Eshugbayi II Oshodi

Amosu Oshodi

Oteyinka Oshodi

Momo Awosu Oshodi

Oterunmi Oshodi

Asatu Oshodi

Moshisa Oshodi

Idewu Igbo Oshodi

Fabiyi Oshodi

Idewu Olukotun Oshodi

Joseph II Oshodi

Asun Oshodi

Ambose Oshodi

Lagbayi Oshodi

Oteshimi Oshodi

Abu Oshodi

Adeogun Oshodi

Adeshi Oshodi

Dada Oshodi

Iyatomi Oshodi

Etikuron Oshodi

Henry Fatusi Glover Oshodi

Apotun Oshodi

Adebowale Oshodi

Dada Omotinuwa Oshodi

Aina Oshodi

David Oduntan Oshodi

Sakariyawo Oshodi

Faye Oshodi

Ambose Bese Oshodi



Barikisu Fabi Oshodi



* Names not in order of birth

It remains unclear how the ruling houses were determined by the Chieftaincy Committee under the Obas and Chiefs Law of the century. Nevertheless, the following are the twelve ruling houses in the Oshodi Tapa Chieftaincy according to the Registered Declaration:

Ruling Houses:

1. Feyishitan

2. Eshugbayi

3. Fatusi

4. Obadimeji

5. Jose

6. Lagbayi

7. Sakariyawo

8. Amore

9. Ewumi

10. Kobile

11. Modina

12. Alli-Igunnu

In the event of a vacancy, the order of rotation is as above, starting from Feyishitan Ruling House having taken into account those ruling houses that had produced chiefs after Chief Balogun Oshodi Tapa.

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Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 5:10am On Jan 27, 2013
Others include

The Ara Oke people from the Nigerian hinterland, particularly Ilorin, Oyo, Ilesa and Ogbomoso. They live in areas of the island, Okepopo, Oko Awo and Oke Arin where they sell their merchandise, usually items of food, yam, plantain and vegetables from their home territories. Later, many of them switched to retail imported small building materials, which they buy from the European companies.

· The Aganyins, Ajases and Kurumos had travelled into Lagos along the great and ancient road skirting the West African coastline and migrated from Ivory Coast, Liberia, Togoland, Gold Coast and Dahomey. The Aganyins and Ajases live mainly at Araromi and Lafiaji areas with a few of them spilling across the lagoon to the adjacent fringe of Obalende. They are traders and artisans including washer men and home helps. They are easily identified with their shiny black and beautiful skin as well as the decorative hair plaiting styles of their beautiful women.

· The Koras are the Syrians and Lebanese who with some sprinkling of Indians dominate the textile trade business. They live along Ereko and Victoria Streets stretching from Tinubu Square through Ereko to Idunmota. Their shops are situated on the street level floor of their residences. Although, they live a segregated life from the Eko people, their children invariably grow up speaking the Yoruba Eko.

· There were the British colonialists who only worked in the colonial civil service with offices at Onikan, Broad Street and Race Course. Some of their kith were the managers of British shops and businesses that dotted the Marina and Broad Street. They merely worked in Lagos, but they lived at Ikoyi.

· There were some young professionals of West Indian origin, engineers, technicians and nurses who worked in the colonial service, particularly in the electricity, public works and health departments. They occupied the middle grade posts of those departments. They lived in government quarters built in the premises of the various operational units of the departments.

Although, these many peoples live in well-designated parts of the island the compactness and smallness of the geography of Lagos and the speed of local dissemination of popular information and news ensured regular social interactions. The only fully and socially segregated peoples were the British colonialists, their private sector countrymen who all lived at Ikoyi, and to a lesser extent, the Koras, Syrians, Lebanese and Indians who live at Ereko and Idunmota. Otherwise, the Lagos people enjoyed frequent opportunities and occasions to mix socially.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by Akshow: 7:15am On Jan 27, 2013
*yawns* Longest tale. Who wan read all this history?

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Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 7:45am On Jan 27, 2013
alhj...keep keeping on! lol grin

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Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 11:31am On Jan 29, 2013
alj harem: You see back in those days apart from the Bini language, the language used in the palace then for administration was Yoruba (particularly the Ijebu dialect) unlike now so it was easy for families to intermix with the people.

You're talking about the administrative language of the Lagos palace, clearly.

Even when the whites first visited Nigeria, they saw some Ijebus heading for Bini city and asked where they were going. It is on record they said "We are going to see the Oba of bini for political issues".

And the source of this quote is?

Ever heard of an interpreter? Kingdoms that carried out significant trade with other groups had them in the past.

alj harem: All Ado children have Yoruba names as well showing the adminstrative language was Yoruba

The names are Aisikpa (Ashipa) and Edo (Ado), followed by Guobaro (Gabaro). The names changed a bit over time in Lagos, but they're still close to the Edo originals.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 5:28am On Jan 30, 2013
physics,

the Ado here is not the Edo you are talking about. The Ado meant here is in the name and not in the ethnicity. Aisikpa and Guobaro is correct.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 5:38am On Jan 30, 2013
alhj,

its hard to tell which of the names is yoruba and which is bini because of the closeness of the two cultures itself. Akinsemoyin, Eshilokun, Idewu, Akitoye, Dosumu, Akiolu....these are all bini names. Long after Ado the bini names continued even though the bini direct dynasty ended in Akinsemoyin and the Ijesha bloodline and dynasty started in Olorogun Kutere (bini name)
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 5:36pm On Jan 30, 2013
Negro_Ntns: physics,

the Ado here is not the Edo you are talking about. The Ado meant here is in the name and not in the ethnicity. Aisikpa and Guobaro is correct.

The Edo I was referring to there was a name.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 5:44pm On Jan 30, 2013
Negro_Ntns: Akinsemoyin, Eshilokun, Idewu, Akitoye, Dosumu, Akiolu....these are all bini names. Long after Ado the bini names continued

I don't think this is correct. It's hard to think of what Bini names these could be changed versions of, although the possibility can't be ruled out.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 6:18pm On Jan 30, 2013
all the kings from guobaro to dosumu were given bini names. they in turn gave their own sons bini names. the closeness in yoruba/bini language and culture makes it hard to discriminate the names.

are these bini or yoruba?

ashogbon
sogunro
obanikoro
modile
saba
oluwa
onisemo
onisiwo
oluwo
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 6:39pm On Jan 30, 2013
PhysicsQED:

You're talking about the administrative language of the Lagos palace, clearly.

No, I met administrative language at the palace of the Oba in benin city was yoruba until 1934 which is very recent.

PhysicsQED:

And the source of this quote is?


Lost the book, but I would look for it for you. You can also do the research yourself but it is in history

PhysicsQED:
The names are Aisikpa (Ashipa) and Edo (Ado), followed by Guobaro (Gabaro). The names changed a bit over time in Lagos, but they're still close to the Edo originals.

Hmmmmm I doubt that they still think they are bini rather majority of them (now aworis) think Binis and yorubas are one and the same. Reason for me talking like this is because I spoke with an elderly man from one of the families which the Oba of benin sent back then to lagos.

For example would you call Ashipa, Kosoko, Obanikoro or Modile binis or yorubas ?
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 6:41pm On Jan 30, 2013
PhysicsQED:

I don't think this is correct. It's hard to think of what Bini names these could be changed versions of, although the possibility can't be ruled out.

Yeah some corruption might have occurred but does that change the meaning of their names ? No and clearly they know their history because it was written and all over the internet.

What of Segun Agagu ? Yoruba or Bini
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 6:43pm On Jan 30, 2013
Negro_Ntns: alhj,

its hard to tell which of the names is yoruba and which is bini because of the closeness of the two cultures itself. Akinsemoyin, Eshilokun, Idewu, Akitoye, Dosumu, Akiolu....these are all bini names. Long after Ado the bini names continued even though the bini direct dynasty ended in Akinsemoyin and the Ijesha bloodline and dynasty started in Olorogun Kutere (bini name)

Thank you, I particularly know of Dosumu and Obanikoro families being bini ( 2 governorship candidates)

Also likes of Eshilokun, Idewu etc they all mean the same thing in both Yoruba and Bini so physics should explain to us why is that so.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by EzePromoe: 6:52pm On Jan 30, 2013
No Okoro family Me been think say Lagos na my village o cry tongue
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 7:04pm On Jan 30, 2013
Physics I know you read a lot and admire you for that. Read about Jacob U. Egharevba account on Yoruba and bini of which one of his books he said I quote

" That this stage, you are mama Odua that covers all Yorubas both home and dispora inculding bini kingdom where Oba Eraduiwa by the grace of God"
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by aljharem(m): 7:04pm On Jan 30, 2013
Eze Promoe: No Okoro family Me been think say Lagos na my village o cry tongue

grin grin grin grin grin grin grin grin grin Okoro family dey too grin grin grin grin grin
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by bokohalal(m): 8:16pm On Jan 30, 2013
alj harem: Physics I know you read a lot and admire you for that. Read about Jacob U. Egharevba account on Yoruba and bini of which one of his books he said I quote

" That this stage, you are mama Odua that covers all Yorubas both home and dispora inculding bini kingdom where Oba Eraduiwa by the grace of God"


Ooni Ife to Mrs. HID Awolowo.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 8:28pm On Jan 30, 2013
alj harem:

No, I met administrative language at the palace of the Oba in benin city was yoruba until 1934 which is very recent.

I think you're basing this statement on Peter Cutt Lloyd's statement about Yoruba, Itsekiri and Benin that was cited in that Toru Ibe Ijaw chiefs press release. There are a whole slew of errors in that press release, and since I intend to comment on that press release in detail, it's taking a bit longer to finish a reply to it, especially with other things I have to do, but I can comment on this particular claim outside of that thread since you're bringing it up. A dynasty having a Yoruba source, or any other outside source - whether Igala or Nupe or Ijaw or anything else that is claimed - would not mean that the administrative language of the palace of that dynasty would be in that outside language when there was a preexisting political structure and organization there to begin with that would have accommodated and brought the new outside element into the majority culture and language. This simple idea seems to elude some people, for whatever reason.

The "language of the Benin palace was Yoruba" stuff such as cited in that Toru Ibe Ijaw chiefs' press release makes no sense. Look at the actual titles of the palace officials of Benin like the officials in the Iwebo, Ibiwe societies, etc. Look at even the references in the old foreign historical documents on Benin to actual title holders like the Uwangue, Eribo, etc. When you find anything other than "Oba" that is Yoruba derived, let me know. It's strange that on this issue anyone could cite Lloyd, who is an expert on no ethnic group in Nigeria other than Yoruba - that is, his knowledge about non-Yoruboid groups is going to be limited - but not bother to look at any of the traditions of the other people actually discussed or any of the documents.

And Lloyd's quote does not make sense anyway. The name of Itselu in the Itsekiri kingdom is of Edo origin (from Uselu in Benin) and the titles used by the most important officials of the Itsekiri kingdom are of clear Edo origin (like Iyase, Uwangue, Imaran, Eson, Osula, Ero, etc.) and even "Ogiame" (lord of water), the honorific of the Olu, is in the Edo language. Yoruba linguistic and cultural features are dominant among the Itsekiri for the simple and obvious fact that the contribution of the Yoruba groups to forming the actual general population of the Itsekiri people was much greater than the other contributions from groups like Bini, Urhobo, Igala etc., but there is no reason to mix things up or reach conclusions that don't have any basis.

And also consider the title of Edaiken - the heir apparent to the Benin throne - that was created by Oba Ewuare. It is a contraction of Edayi n'Iken. Iken was a famous war leader of Benin in Oba Ewuare's time. Now Oba Ewuare and Iken, a hereditary war commander from Uselu, did not get along so Oba Ewuare sent him off to war to remove him from the kingdom (with the possibility that he might die in battle, of course - and he did). Edaiken was made the title of the crown prince because in Iken's absence (after he went to war) the crown prince took his place and acted as his substitute, taking up residence in Uselu. Edayi here basically means regent (one who acts in place of the original holder of that position). Now an edayi has a clear role even in the traditional village life of the Edo, such as acting in funeral rites: a close family member would have to stand in (act as a substitute, an edayi) for a minor in certain funeral rites if that son is very young when his father dies. An edayi is a general Edo term for a stand-in or substitute, not even a term used exclusively for that royal title (Edayi n'Iken). Does the title (Edaiken) have a meaning in Yoruba? Or did Oba Ewuare forget to use Yoruba for his administrative duties when he made that title? grin

Incidentally, in the kingdom of Owo, the title took the form Idaniken, a Yoruba pronunciation of the original Edaiken title. This is just one of the titles that Owo shared with Benin.

Now I certainly don't claim to be an expert on the history and culture even of my own group (few people are complete experts on all historical and cultural aspects of their people, after all), but I know enough to know that this particular claim (made by Lloyd, and repeated in a different form by the current Ooni of Ife) about the "administrative" language of the Benin palace has nothing going for it.

Lost the book, but I would look for it for you. You can also do the research yourself but it is in history

And the name of the book is?

I think the quote you were really thinking of was a mention of some officials/diplomats from Oyo that visited Benin in the 1700s who were described as being sent there on "political business." That is an actual verifiable quote from a foreign writer. What you're talking about sounds like it was someone's deliberate attempt to transform the 1700s Oyo and Benin quote into something else entirely. But like I said, anyone who is familiar with the concept of an interpreter in ancient kingdoms that carried out lots of trade would not be surprised by this. In Benin it was the ozedu (interpreter) of the Iwebo palace society that had this function. I'm sure other groups in Nigeria had their own equivalents.

Hmmmmm I doubt that they still think they are bini rather majority of them (now aworis) think Binis and yorubas are one and the same. Reason for me talking like this is because I spoke with an elderly man from one of the families which the Oba of benin sent back then to lagos.

I didn't say anyone there thinks they are Bini. I was saying that the first three rulers had names that were Edo.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 9:29pm On Jan 30, 2013
Negro_Ntns: all the kings from guobaro to dosumu were given bini names. they in turn gave their own sons bini names. the closeness in yoruba/bini language and culture makes it hard to discriminate the names.

Closeness in some aspects of culture between linguistically distinct groups isn't going to mean the names are going to be indistinguishable though, even if there is some overlap or some names that are hard to ascribe definitively to one group alone.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 11:50pm On Jan 30, 2013
PhysicsQED:

Closeness in some aspects of culture between linguistically distinct groups isn't going to mean the names are going to be indistinguishable though, even if there is some overlap or some names that are hard to ascribe definitively to one group alone.

but yoruba and bini are not linguistically distinct. the land belongs to edo but the crown is no doubt yoruba. the situation you have in bini between land/throne nativity is repeated in itsekiri and lagos as well.

i will accept the lagos kings have bini names but reject that they have edo names.

fulani emirs are not hausas but their ifficial language is hausa. they dont own the land but they own the throne.

bini is an outcrop of ife. edo has nothing to do with ife...different people and culture. that they speak edo in bini court does not in anyway make it a non-yoruba throne.

lagos is an outcrop of bini (not edo). lagos has nothing to do with edo. that the language of lagos kings is yoruba does not change the fact that the throne and crown belongs to bini.

net-net, ife, bini, lagos.....are all in the same fold and yoruba.

so if Omo n'Oba is the crown head of bini throne and a bloodline of Ife, then by extension all bloodlines dotted line to Omo n'Oba are also of Ife, regardless if they speak ibo, jukun, edo, or whatever else. contradicting that will be like saying since fulani emirs only speak hausa, then they are hausa bloodline and must not be traced back to futa, their ancestral home in old massina.

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Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 3:50am On Jan 31, 2013
Bini is just an exonym for the Edo, not a reference to a separate group, and the use of that exonym has persisted because it is useful or convenient in distinguishing the people of the core of the Benin kingdom from other nearby groups that speak closely related languages. It is especially convenient in modern times now that those closely related groups are often referred to as being Edo people as well. For a similar case, the Ijaws used to call the Itsekiri people the Selemo or Iselema, but that doesn't mean that Selemo or Iselema is the "true" name of the Itsekiri nor does it mean that there is some non-Itsekiri group within the Itsekiri population that Selemo or Iselema refers to.

Bini is just derived from (is an altered form of) the name for the kingdom, so people from there were/are called Bini. Imagine if it was claimed that, since the Nupe called the Kanuri people the Bino in the past, after their kingdom, Bornu/Borno, there was really some ethnicity, language or culture within Kanuri called Bino that was distinct from Kanuri. This would be false, and clearly there was no such "Bino" people or language that was distinct from Kanuri just because the Nupe people called the Kanuri by the exonym "Bino".

There is not some confusion about the fact that Bini and Edo refer to one and the same people.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 5:25am On Jan 31, 2013
it is very well possible that edo/bini people use the one identifier "edo" for itself, but historically and culturally, lagos royalty does not recognise an edo beginning for itself at all. it will be wrong to call lagos royalty edo, it is not...linguistically, culturally or customarily.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by PhysicsQED(m): 1:08am On Feb 01, 2013
Negro_Ntns: it is very well possible that edo/bini people use the one identifier "edo" for itself,

It's not just possible, it's how it is.

but historically and culturally, lagos royalty does not recognise an edo beginning for itself at all. it will be wrong to call lagos royalty edo, it is not...linguistically, culturally or customarily.

Ok. I don't think anyone calls Lagos royalty Edo or Bini anyway, so I don't think this is a problem.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 4:54am On Feb 01, 2013
physics,

is your zodiac sign gemini?

the lagos throne, the crown, the sword, the oral history....everything is bini! how can you make a statement that no one claims lagos is bini? where is that coming from? the dynasties changed but the bini bloodline and ownership has not..

all the kings before akitoye were taken back to bini court for burial. shortly after the first deposition of akiyoye from the throne and when beecroft approached kosoko for partnership, the new king declared to him. that he was still awaiting his coronation staff from bini and untill he is in posession of ancestral authority he had no power to enter such proposal. on a second visit and after coronation, he flat out turned beecroft down. olojo, his (kosoko) first son returned back to his ancestral root. in bini where he later died but the children he left in lagos remained psrt of the olojo branch to the crown.

....and you know all these things but yet you made such statement in your response.

in fact just to take it further there is a thread, "the way of the Bini/Edo", opened by bokohalal and in which i asked to know if binis had tattoos. he is not sure. well, the sons of lagos crown have chest markings. it is discontinued now but when i was little you could identify the elderly princes on eyo day when they came out in loin white wraps. they have vertical lines about 6 or so inches long, laid two on each breast.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by tpia5: 4:59am On Feb 01, 2013
any info on dahomey input in lagos?

it [lagos] was one of main ports used by dahomey to lodge slaves.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by bokohalal(m): 2:22pm On Feb 01, 2013
in fact just to take it further there is a thread, "the way of the Bini/Edo", opened by bokohalal and in which i asked to know if binis had tattoos. he is not sure. well, the sons of lagos crown have chest markings. it is discontinued now but when i was little you could identify the elderly princes on eyo day when they came out in loin white wraps. they have vertical lines about 6 or so inches long, laid two on each breast.[/quote]

The thread on the Bini way insisted on it being about the regular everyday Bini person. The kind the vast majority of other people interact with. The contemporary Bini not the historical. Most Binis live their lives without having the Omo n Oba hovering over them.
Let us leave history and royalty for now. With just greeting I realised Ezotik was related to me on my mother side. You do not go unmask the masquerade to find out which Quarter it came from. With morning greeting Binis know each other. Ezotik did not ask me for my chest tattoo to establish that.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by NegroNtns(m): 11:22pm On Feb 01, 2013
^^^
true, your thread was on contemporary bini and you will notice i did not press further after you answered my inquiry in that respect.

however, this thread on lagos is historical and the mention of the body marking is a relevant point in this instance.
Re: History Of Families In Lagos by isalegan2: 5:52pm On Mar 01, 2013
Nice topic, alj harem. smiley

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