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Words Fondly Used By Nigerians That Are Not In The Dictionary by KrisThespian(m): 10:53pm On Feb 20, 2015
Disvirgin, cross-carpeting, go-slow & 7
more ‘ words ’ you won’t find in the
dictionary By @ChineduRylan

1. Installmentally: This “word” is a favourite
of many Nigerians , but, sadly, it simply
does not exist. You won’t find it any
reputable dictionary. The correct thing to
say when “installmentally” comes to your
mind is in instalments or by instalments.

2. Plumpy: Nigerians use “plumpy” when
they want to say that someone is chubby or
slightly fat. The correct expression is
plump.

3. Disvirgin: This particular “word” is used
severally on a daily basis, especially by
Nigerian men when they intend saying that
a woman has lost her virginity to a guy.
The correct word to use, however, is
deflower, because “disvirgin” is not a word.

4. Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting: This is
a favourite of Nigerian politicians and
political analysts alike. They use it when
they want to say that a politician has
dumped his political party for another
party, usually a rival party. The right
terms to use when describing this scenario
are party switching, defection and crossing
the floor and not “cross-carpeting” or
“crosscarpeting.”

5. Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not
in the way Nigerians use it. A “go-slow,” in
the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a
situation in which road traffic is very
sluggish due to vehicle queues. However,
go-slow in the English language actually
means an industrial tactic used by
employees whereby they intentionally
reduce activity, productivity and efficiency
in order to press home some demands.
When this happens, you say that work in
the office, factory or organization is at a
go-slow. The correct terms to use when
road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle
queues are traffic jam, traffic congestion,
gridlock, and (less technically) hold-up, not
“go-slow.”

6. Cunny: “Cunny” is not found in
authoritative dictionaries, but it can be
found in some slang dictionaries. Over
there, it is a slang used to refer to a
woman’s v**ina. The correct term to use is
cunning (which is used to describe someone
that is being deceitful or crafty) and not
“cunny.”

7. Opportuned: There is nothing like
“opportuned” anywhere in the English
language, but that has not stopped its
blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria,
including journalists and writers. The
correct word is opportune. The word
opportune is an adjective; therefore it has
no past tense. An adjective has no past
tense. However, some verbs can function as
adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These
verbs are called participles and they do
have past tenses. They are not pure
adjectives. Examples of participles are
fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified,
overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as
it may, opportune is a pure adjective and
not a participle, therefore it has no past
tense. Opportune means appropriate or
well-timed.

8. Alright: “Alright” is a misspelling of the
term all right. All right is used when you
want to say that something is adequate,
acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To
hardcore English language linguists,
“alright” is not a word. However, its usage
is gaining traction and it’s increasingly
becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster
Dictionary – which is considered the gold
standard among American English speakers
– has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for
its permissiveness when it began indexing
some otherwise colloquial and street
language terms, including “alright.” Most
linguists disagree with the gradual
acceptance of “alright” as a word by the
public and even the media, while those in
the minority are “alright” with it.

9. Wake-keeping: “Wake-keeping” exists only
in the imagination of a few English
speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no
such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct
word is wake and not even “wake-keep.”
Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are
ungrammatical.

10. Screentouch: This bad grammatical
expression gained currency in Nigeria and
neighbouring West African countries with
the influx of made-in-China stylus pen
touchscreen not-so-smart phones in the
mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in
Nigeria had not seen it – or even thought
such advanced technology was possible –
before. So, they looked for a name to call it
and “screentouch” came to mind, after all
you just touch the screen and it starts
working. In case you’ve still not figured it
out yet, the correct thing to say is
touchscreen and not “screentouch.”

So there you have it, 10 English language
“words” Nigerians love to use that are not
found in the dictionary. Feel free to add
yours.
————————-
Author: Chinedu Rylan

1 Like

Re: Words Fondly Used By Nigerians That Are Not In The Dictionary by agoadiv(m): 10:58pm On Feb 20, 2015
DEm never ban u before angry
Re: Words Fondly Used By Nigerians That Are Not In The Dictionary by chidekings(m): 11:05pm On Feb 20, 2015
were u first fed with SK when ur born.



ur almost repeating the same words
Re: Words Fondly Used By Nigerians That Are Not In The Dictionary by t0pconnect: 6:15am On Feb 21, 2015
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Re: Words Fondly Used By Nigerians That Are Not In The Dictionary by jerflakes(m): 8:15am On Feb 21, 2015
KrisThespian:
Disvirgin, cross-carpeting, go-slow & 7
more ‘ words ’ you won’t find in the
dictionary By @ChineduRylan

1. Installmentally: This “word” is a favourite
of many Nigerians , but, sadly, it simply
does not exist. You won’t find it any
reputable dictionary. The correct thing to
say when “installmentally” comes to your
mind is in instalments or by instalments.

2. Plumpy: Nigerians use “plumpy” when
they want to say that someone is chubby or
slightly fat. The correct expression is
plump.

3. Disvirgin: This particular “word” is used
severally on a daily basis, especially by
Nigerian men when they intend saying that
a woman has lost her virginity to a guy.
The correct word to use, however, is
deflower, because “disvirgin” is not a word.

4. Crosscarpeting or cross-carpeting: This is
a favourite of Nigerian politicians and
political analysts alike. They use it when
they want to say that a politician has
dumped his political party for another
party, usually a rival party. The right
terms to use when describing this scenario
are party switching, defection and crossing
the floor and not “cross-carpeting” or
“crosscarpeting.”

5. Go-slow: The word go-slow exists, but not
in the way Nigerians use it. A “go-slow,” in
the peculiarly Nigerian context, is a
situation in which road traffic is very
sluggish due to vehicle queues. However,
go-slow in the English language actually
means an industrial tactic used by
employees whereby they intentionally
reduce activity, productivity and efficiency
in order to press home some demands.
When this happens, you say that work in
the office, factory or organization is at a
go-slow. The correct terms to use when
road traffic is very sluggish due to vehicle
queues are traffic jam, traffic congestion,
gridlock, and (less technically) hold-up, not
“go-slow.”

6. Cunny: “Cunny” is not found in
authoritative dictionaries, but it can be
found in some slang dictionaries. Over
there, it is a slang used to refer to a
woman’s v**ina. The correct term to use is
cunning (which is used to describe someone
that is being deceitful or crafty) and not
“cunny.”

7. Opportuned: There is nothing like
“opportuned” anywhere in the English
language, but that has not stopped its
blatant use by all and sundry in Nigeria,
including journalists and writers. The
correct word is opportune. The word
opportune is an adjective; therefore it has
no past tense. An adjective has no past
tense. However, some verbs can function as
adjectives or adverbs in a sentence. These
verbs are called participles and they do
have past tenses. They are not pure
adjectives. Examples of participles are
fattened, amused, disgusted, mystified,
overwhelmed, upset and bored. Be that as
it may, opportune is a pure adjective and
not a participle, therefore it has no past
tense. Opportune means appropriate or
well-timed.

8. Alright: “Alright” is a misspelling of the
term all right. All right is used when you
want to say that something is adequate,
acceptable, agreeable or suitable. To
hardcore English language linguists,
“alright” is not a word. However, its usage
is gaining traction and it’s increasingly
becoming acceptable. The Merriam-Webster
Dictionary – which is considered the gold
standard among American English speakers
– has recently drawn a lot of criticisms for
its permissiveness when it began indexing
some otherwise colloquial and street
language terms, including “alright.” Most
linguists disagree with the gradual
acceptance of “alright” as a word by the
public and even the media, while those in
the minority are “alright” with it.

9. Wake-keeping: “Wake-keeping” exists only
in the imagination of a few English
speakers. As a matter of fact, there is no
such thing as “wake-keeping.” The correct
word is wake and not even “wake-keep.”
Both “wake-keeping” and “wake-keep” are
ungrammatical.

10. Screentouch: This bad grammatical
expression gained currency in Nigeria and
neighbouring West African countries with
the influx of made-in-China stylus pen
touchscreen not-so-smart phones in the
mid 2000s. It was a novelty then; many in
Nigeria had not seen it – or even thought
such advanced technology was possible –
before. So, they looked for a name to call it
and “screentouch” came to mind, after all
you just touch the screen and it starts
working. In case you’ve still not figured it
out yet, the correct thing to say is
touchscreen and not “screentouch.”

So there you have it, 10 English language
“words” Nigerians love to use that are not
found in the dictionary. Feel free to add
yours.
————————-
Author: Chinedu Rylan

LOVELY!!!! cheesy

Damn! So I have been blowing gbagun since cry

I dey 4k up o.

Op, try and keep updating this list.

More medula oblongata to your brain.

(1) (Reply)

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