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Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine - Culture (3) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Culture / Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine (46815 Views)

Why Do Igbos Always Stealing Rivers Last Names / Why Do Igbos Always Travel Every December / To The Nigerians That Live Outside Nigeria, How Often Do You Travel 'home'? (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by dieBYfire: 10:31pm On Dec 25, 2017
JasonScolari:
This article long pass naira bet slip.

Funny man

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by dieBYfire: 10:32pm On Dec 25, 2017
FrenchWay:
...
Igbos only travel for TWO major reasons: SHOW OFF and JAZZ RENEWAL.

If they are not visiting home to showcase to the villagers there beautiful fiancée; they are there to showcase their wealth from drug deals in Indonesia.

If they are not home to renew their jazz for the next year; they are there to launch their new house(built with ritual money)

If they are not there to show their new rides; they are there to carry a new maid to Lagos that they will end up trafficking to Libya.

I weep for these people.

And this human being is normal abi? undecided

3 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Nobody: 10:37pm On Dec 25, 2017
Daboomb:


So, you still cant beleive that an Igbo guy could be this silly, to write this long epistle, just to convince us of what we know is not true....and you had to ascribe it to Afoja? grin grin

Chai! Afonja don do you badt thing for inside dream since 1930! grin grin
Even if Mazi say make you dey come home now now, you go say na Afonja spirit catch am, abi? shocked shocked
pretty sure tribune is an afonja newspaper
besides even efulefus still go home if in doubt ask joe yorubakwe grin

2 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by herich(m): 10:37pm On Dec 25, 2017
FrenchWay:
...
Igbos only travel for TWO major reasons: SHOW OFF and JAZZ RENEWAL.

If they are not visiting home to showcase to the villagers there beautiful fiancée; they are there to showcase their wealth from drug deals in Indonesia.

If they are not home to renew their jazz for the next year; they are there to launch their new house(built with ritual money)

If they are not there to show their new rides; they are there to carry a new maid to Lagos that they will end up trafficking to Libya.

I weep for these people.
Chaii.
Sorry for weeping for them.
I pray you don't die in the process.
Cause they really don't care bout your existence.

3 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by ogene144: 10:37pm On Dec 25, 2017
mazimee:

You are such a Clown cheesy cheesy grin
maka y
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Ladyhippolyta88(f): 10:38pm On Dec 25, 2017
chubinwa:
who again didn't read to d end
Me.

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by enemyofprogress: 10:39pm On Dec 25, 2017
They go home to pay their tithes to amadioha and other gods

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by afroxyz: 10:45pm On Dec 25, 2017
Alariiwo:


Like I don't get.. must they show off?

Some even borrow stuffs from their friends to go show off in the village. Who the fvck does that.
I can't just deal.

Just shut up if you don't have anything reasonable to say.

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Daboomb: 10:48pm On Dec 25, 2017
leezzz:

pretty sure tribune is an afonja newspaper
besides even efulefus still go home if in doubt ask joe yorubakwe grin

It is either you are abusing Ojukwu's son, or abusing Rochas Okorocha or abusing Joe Igbokwe!
You Ibos always have hatred and bile running in your veins.

There is truely no cure for hatred and jeaousy. undecided undecided

5 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Iamzik: 10:54pm On Dec 25, 2017
bumi10:
I personally told my friend that I'm not going to travel this time and he told me to forget that thing. That before new year now I go carry my bag travel, that I'm an Igbo and no matter what, if they tell me that masquerade is dancing in the village now, I will travel. I laughed anyway and got crossed with him instantly.

I looked at him and said "why are you guys so stupid? (He is Yoruba), Why do you guys always have problem with Igbos in everything? Even to travel to their various villages to see their people, you people will still complain. What is wrong with you guys. Lagos is not my land, I got to go and see my people and apparently, you still have problem with that. My friend had to shut up.

Well this article I stumbled upon on net will explain to whoever care to know the reason is necessary for any Igbo man anywhere to come home and see his people at least once in a year during festive periods like Christmas ...

“It has become our tradition to travel every Christmas. I am going with my wife and my children because this is the only opportunity to see our relatives who are based in other parts of the country and even abroad. We meet to discuss family issues. No matter the fare, we must go.” At the Jibowu Bus Park in Lagos during the week, Ugochukwu Anufurum was firm on going “home” for Christmas/New Year celebrations no matter the situation.

The Yuletide and New Year season is one of the few seasons millions of people look forward to every year all over the world. In Nigeria, it is one of the few seasons that bring friends and families together, including long-lost ones, and as such, one that countless number of people always looks forward to.

However, the Igbo people in the South East section of the country are known to have, over the years, developed special interest for this season (seemingly above all others) and as such would do everything possible that they mark the season in grand styles. It is therefore a very common sight to see the Igbo using the occasion of Christmas to storm their villages from wherever they might be, including far away cities like Lagos and Abuja, while some even travel from outside the countries for the same purpose.

The Igbo, as believed in some quarters, love to show off their wealth and flaunt what they have and this they do more than any other ethnic group in Nigeria. It is believed that they use the Christmas time to travel to their villages to show off the wealth they have been able to accumulate over the year.
However, the pan-Igbo socio-cultural group, Ohanaeze Indigbo, strongly differed as it declared that the Igbo never travel at Christmas because of show off. The group vehemently denied that the mass travelling of Igbo, especially during the Yuletide, is done for showboating, but rather something the Igbo do as a mark of respect for their roots. As such, the group maintained that no Igbo person should ever be vilified over the issue.

In a chat with Saturday Tribune, the Publicity Secretary of the Ohanaeze Indigbo, South West, Mr Peter Anosike, pointed out that only two tribes in the whole world-the Igbo and the Israelis-were known to never joke with their roots and who always ‘remember their homes’ wherever they might be in any part of the world.

“Anywhere we go, we must always remember home. The only tribes that remember home are the Igbo and Israelites. Even when they die in a foreign land, they would prefer that their dead bodies be brought back home for burial. As people that have travelled far and wide, the Christmas time provides the Indigbos the opportunity to see their families and loved ones again.

“So it is more of a home-coming for an average Igbo traveler, because an individual you’ve not seen from January to December, you are suddenly given the opportunity to see such an individual. So travelling home for Christmas is never about showoff and those who have such a notion should discard it immediately. The period provides an opportunity for Indigbos from all walks of life to have a reunion sort of,” he pointed out.

At this juncture, it is noteworthy to state that there are many other festivals that also serve as an avenue for south-easterners to visit their villages, or “home” as it is generally referred to. Each of such festivals is unique in its own way and attracts its own fair share of participants. For example, Easter, another major Christian festival, also serves the same purpose, while there a few traditional festivals that Igbo still hold in high esteem and which they would do their best possible to participate in.

Some of such traditional functions or festivals include: the annual kingship festival, that is, the Ofala Festival, which is mostly celebrated during the Christmas in different villages in Igboland; Iwa Akwa; and the Okonko Festival, which is used as the festival to celebrate the coming of age of male youths. There is also the Iza aha, Ede aro festival (in celebration of the Aro Deity), age grade meetings, as well as the Iwa Ji Festival, which is the famous New Yam Festival, among others.

These cultural and traditional activities would almost always make an average Igboman embark on a journey back home to participate in the festivities. But despite this large array of festivals and their popularity, it is only right to say that Christmas and festivities associated with it dwarf them all.

The real seasons the Igbo don’t joke with going “home” during this period has always been a source of debate, especially among non-Igbo and no matter the length of such debates, the real reasons have always remained evasive. However, inquest into some of the arguments provided by those who engage in this practice and those who don’t might provide some sort of insights into possible reasons behind this annual pilgrimage.

For many, one reason the Igbo travel home for Christmas is to ensure family reunion. According to those who nurse this belief, only few tribes in the world could match the adventurous and industrious nature of the Igbo. Therefore, according to those who hold this argument, if an Igbo individual has been away from his home and roots all through the year, it is only normal for such people to create an avenue for themselves to meet once again in an atmosphere of unity and camaraderie.

Sharing this view with Saturday Tribune, was a Lagos-based businessman and an octogenarian, Pa Uche Anisiemeka, who claimed to have spent over 60 years in Lagos. Pa Anisiemeka’s escapades and success in Lagos have him boasting of an enviable house and other investments in the Okota area of the city. But despite his over six-decade sojourn in Lagos, Pa Anisiemeka claimed to have only missed spending his Christmas holidays in his native Imo State on a few occasions.

“It is common knowledge that the Igbo are very enterprising. They are migrant-entrepreneurs who are endowed with immense competitive spirit. They prefer to leave their families and homes in search of greener pastures elsewhere. They can live in the cities from the beginning of the year to the end without visiting home, but one thing a lot of them would not do is to celebrate Christmas outside of their hometowns, in the company of their families, friends and age-long colleagues. Celebrating Christmas at home is considered typically cultural and it is curiously expected of anyone living in town or abroad to re-connect with the home people during Christmas,” he told Saturday Tribune.

Yet, there are many others (mostly non-Igbo) who are of the opinion that the yearly journey home is spurred primarily by ego, showmanship and unhealthy competition, rather than genuine need for reunion. Saturday Tribune, during the week took up the task of attempting to unveil the reason(s) for this ageless behaviour and as such, some opinions of randomly selected Igbo travelers were sampled. The quest to solve this “mystery” took Saturday Tribune to some popular motor parks in Lagos which, as expected, had become a beehive of activities.

At the popular and ever-busy Maza Maza Bus Terminus in Lagos, a middle-age traveler who identified himself as Chinedu Obasi, argued that no matter how busy one is, he should always create time to remember home. According to him, since it is practically impossible for many Igbo living in the other parts of the country to be travelling home as often as they would have loved, calving out just one period in an entire year to achieve this purpose is not too much. This, he said, is what the yearly journey home during Christmas is all about.

“Christmas brings a moment in a year when all Igbo or majority of them living outside Igboland return to their villages to reunite with their kin who they have not seen, probably in the last 12 months,” said Obasi, who was getting set to travel to his native Enugu State.

Similarly, Chizaram, a 37-year-old native of Abia State, also pointed out to Saturday Tribune that Christmas provided the only opportunity she had of seeing her aged parents, other relatives and loved ones, who like her, were living in far places. Chizaram, who was spotted making last minutes efforts to board a bus, also at Maza Maza, which was going to her hometown of Umuahia in Abia State, said she was willing to brave all odds to make the journey.

She however also hinted that it might be impossible to rule out showoff and show-boasting as one of the reasons some travel at this time, a development she said often served as one of the reasons young men and women often veered to a life of crime so that they would be able to make money at all cost so as to be able to meet up with others. She further pointed out that, in some instances, parents whose children are coming home go all the way to boast about such children and the children in return will do everything possible not to disappoint such parents, including taking to a life of crime.

“To an average Igbo man, going to the village is non-negotiable. Far and near, sons and daughters return home, besiege their respective villages, not only to celebrate Christmas with their kith and kin, but also to provide an opportunity for many families to boast about their illustrious sons and daughters, whom they are proud of,” she said.

But for other travelers, the yearly exodus is nothing more than a family tradition. At the Jibowu Bus Park, yet another traveler, Ugochukwu Anufurum, insisted that the period provided an opportunity for him to attend to salient and sometimes delayed family/community matters, especially since other important stakeholders in such matters would also be around.

“I can say that this is why the Igbo work hard to ensure that they gather enough money with which they can go home for the Christmas celebration. They do this because the communal life they live as umunna would require them to give gifts to their kin when they get back home,” he further noted.


more @ http://www.exlinklodge.com/2017/12/why-igbos-always-travel-home-during.html


There is a comprehension skills called summary.
Op need to learn that skill.

Qed
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by luvinhubby(m): 10:57pm On Dec 25, 2017
The Igbos never used to have the annual ritual of Christmas homecoming until the upheavals and subsequent civil war of 1966 - 1970. Before, ndi Igbo hardly travel home except on very serious cases and even when they do so, will hardly spend a few days at home, because they saw anywhere they are based as their home.
But at the onset of the civil war and the attendant pogrom targeted against Igbos in the Northern and Western parts of Nigeria, a whole lot of Igbo families was forced to run for their lives down to the only safe part of Nigeria for them then and that was the East, it was called 'oso agha' (fleeing the war). Because most of the families that fled to their villages and towns in East then rarely visited home, they did not have houses of their owns that can accommodate their wives, children and properties and most families only had small houses and huts built by their aged parents, a lot of the properties they ran home with was abandoned outside and was destroyed by rains, the children had to squeeze into small, uncomfortable spaces, at times under licking thatched houses, with their parents. The Igbos saw this as a fallout of not visiting home frequently as that would have compelled them to see the need to put up decent houses at their respective hometowns.

So immediately after the civil war and the Igbos returned to their previous bases in the West and North and resumed their works and trading, it became a necessity for every Igboman to do two things, start a deliberate act of visiting his hometown at least once a year and alongside it, make effort to build a decent house in his hometown that will shelter himself and his household during his annual homecomings and to act as his refuge in the event of another oso agha.


Ndi be anyi ekene m unu !

10 Likes 1 Share

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Nobody: 11:00pm On Dec 25, 2017
MrPresident1:
It is biblical, the Igbos are Benjamin in the Bible, and the Yorubas are Judah, anywhere you see egbon Judah, you see aburo Benjamin, and Benji is always competing with Judah. Judah and Benjamin are the Jews, they are the southern tribes of Israel, collectively called the kingdom of Judah. They never forgot the ancient tradition to visit home, Jerusalem once a year at least, as commanded in Deuteronomy.

This has nothing to do with the Israelis, the Israelis are not the Israelites of the Bible.
The weed you are smoking must be authentic first grade. grin

2 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by iloejikefestus(m): 11:02pm On Dec 25, 2017
Love this article, only the patient would read it. I can't wait to join my relatives at home, Anambra Amaka....
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Nobody: 11:02pm On Dec 25, 2017
Daboomb:


It is either you are abusing Ojukwu's son, or abusing Rochas Okorocha or abusing Joe Igbokwe!
You Ibos always have hatred and bile running in your veins.

There is truely no cure for hatred and jeaousy. undecided undecided
lol why so pained
i just said d truth grin grin

2 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Lilimax(f): 11:07pm On Dec 25, 2017
Lovely Article! As a complete nwafor Igbo, the best place to be this season is in the East cos it's happening live. My father's house is currently bubbling in NRI in Anaocha LGA of Anambra state. Merry Christmas everybody!

5 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by MrPresident1: 11:09pm On Dec 25, 2017
12inches1:

The weed you are smoking must be authentic first grade. grin

Kwale premium ++

grin
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by ehinmowo: 11:16pm On Dec 25, 2017
Well no matter how i say this it will sound derogatory. so I don't care. igbos travel home for jazz and show offs. only few travel for tangible reasons

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Achor1111(m): 11:18pm On Dec 25, 2017
FrenchWay:
...
Igbos only travel for TWO major reasons: SHOW OFF and JAZZ RENEWAL.

If they are not visiting home to showcase to the villagers there beautiful fiancée; they are there to showcase their wealth from drug deals in Indonesia.

If they are not home to renew their jazz for the next year; they are there to launch their new house(built with ritual money)

If they are not there to show their new rides; they are there to carry a new maid to Lagos that they will end up trafficking to Libya.

I weep for these people.

sense fall on you

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by frankobobby(m): 11:19pm On Dec 25, 2017
MrPresident1:
It is biblical, the Igbos are Benjamin in the Bible, and the Yorubas are Judah, anywhere you see egbon Judah, you see aburo Benjamin, and Benji is always competing with Judah. Judah and Benjamin are the Jews, they are the southern tribes of Israel, collectively called the kingdom of Judah. They never forgot the ancient tradition to visit home, Jerusalem once a year at least, as commanded in Deuteronomy.

This has nothing to do with the Israelis, the Israelis are not the Israelites of the Bible.

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by abitime(m): 11:19pm On Dec 25, 2017
Alonso91:
This is epistle of Paul to Igbos?
My brother I taya for this writer oooo grin grin

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Nobody: 11:21pm On Dec 25, 2017
oviejnr:
So their village people can see their success and restrategize grin cheesy


Seeing this pic around 11:30pm. It can give someone nightmares o. Literally grin grin

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by mavinc4u(f): 11:25pm On Dec 25, 2017
9free:
At 18k per seat ticket from Abuja to Onitsha , I no travel again.

Seriously?
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by abitime(m): 11:26pm On Dec 25, 2017
bumi10:
I personally told my friend that I'm not going to travel this time and he told me to forget that thing. That before new year now I go carry my bag travel, that I'm an Igbo and no matter what, if they tell me that masquerade is dancing in the village now, I will travel. I laughed anyway and got crossed with him instantly.

I looked at him and said "why are you guys so stupid? (He is Yoruba), Why do you guys always have problem with Igbos in everything? Even to travel to their various villages to see their people, you people will still complain. What is wrong with you guys. Lagos is not my land, I got to go and see my people and apparently, you still have problem with that. My friend had to shut up.

Well this article I stumbled upon on net will explain to whoever care to know the reason is necessary for any Igbo man anywhere to come home and see his people at least once in a year during festive periods like Christmas ...

“It has become our tradition to travel every Christmas. I am going with my wife and my children because this is the only opportunity to see our relatives who are based in other parts of the country and even abroad. We meet to discuss family issues. No matter the fare, we must go.” At the Jibowu Bus Park in Lagos during the week, Ugochukwu Anufurum was firm on going “home” for Christmas/New Year celebrations no matter the situation.

The Yuletide and New Year season is one of the few seasons millions of people look forward to every year all over the world. In Nigeria, it is one of the few seasons that bring friends and families together, including long-lost ones, and as such, one that countless number of people always looks forward to.

However, the Igbo people in the South East section of the country are known to have, over the years, developed special interest for this season (seemingly above all others) and as such would do everything possible that they mark the season in grand styles. It is therefore a very common sight to see the Igbo using the occasion of Christmas to storm their villages from wherever they might be, including far away cities like Lagos and Abuja, while some even travel from outside the countries for the same purpose.

The Igbo, as believed in some quarters, love to show off their wealth and flaunt what they have and this they do more than any other ethnic group in Nigeria. It is believed that they use the Christmas time to travel to their villages to show off the wealth they have been able to accumulate over the year.
However, the pan-Igbo socio-cultural group, Ohanaeze Indigbo, strongly differed as it declared that the Igbo never travel at Christmas because of show off. The group vehemently denied that the mass travelling of Igbo, especially during the Yuletide, is done for showboating, but rather something the Igbo do as a mark of respect for their roots. As such, the group maintained that no Igbo person should ever be vilified over the issue.

In a chat with Saturday Tribune, the Publicity Secretary of the Ohanaeze Indigbo, South West, Mr Peter Anosike, pointed out that only two tribes in the whole world-the Igbo and the Israelis-were known to never joke with their roots and who always ‘remember their homes’ wherever they might be in any part of the world.

“Anywhere we go, we must always remember home. The only tribes that remember home are the Igbo and Israelites. Even when they die in a foreign land, they would prefer that their dead bodies be brought back home for burial. As people that have travelled far and wide, the Christmas time provides the Indigbos the opportunity to see their families and loved ones again.

“So it is more of a home-coming for an average Igbo traveler, because an individual you’ve not seen from January to December, you are suddenly given the opportunity to see such an individual. So travelling home for Christmas is never about showoff and those who have such a notion should discard it immediately. The period provides an opportunity for Indigbos from all walks of life to have a reunion sort of,” he pointed out.

At this juncture, it is noteworthy to state that there are many other festivals that also serve as an avenue for south-easterners to visit their villages, or “home” as it is generally referred to. Each of such festivals is unique in its own way and attracts its own fair share of participants. For example, Easter, another major Christian festival, also serves the same purpose, while there a few traditional festivals that Igbo still hold in high esteem and which they would do their best possible to participate in.

Some of such traditional functions or festivals include: the annual kingship festival, that is, the Ofala Festival, which is mostly celebrated during the Christmas in different villages in Igboland; Iwa Akwa; and the Okonko Festival, which is used as the festival to celebrate the coming of age of male youths. There is also the Iza aha, Ede aro festival (in celebration of the Aro Deity), age grade meetings, as well as the Iwa Ji Festival, which is the famous New Yam Festival, among others.

These cultural and traditional activities would almost always make an average Igboman embark on a journey back home to participate in the festivities. But despite this large array of festivals and their popularity, it is only right to say that Christmas and festivities associated with it dwarf them all.

The real seasons the Igbo don’t joke with going “home” during this period has always been a source of debate, especially among non-Igbo and no matter the length of such debates, the real reasons have always remained evasive. However, inquest into some of the arguments provided by those who engage in this practice and those who don’t might provide some sort of insights into possible reasons behind this annual pilgrimage.

For many, one reason the Igbo travel home for Christmas is to ensure family reunion. According to those who nurse this belief, only few tribes in the world could match the adventurous and industrious nature of the Igbo. Therefore, according to those who hold this argument, if an Igbo individual has been away from his home and roots all through the year, it is only normal for such people to create an avenue for themselves to meet once again in an atmosphere of unity and camaraderie.

Sharing this view with Saturday Tribune, was a Lagos-based businessman and an octogenarian, Pa Uche Anisiemeka, who claimed to have spent over 60 years in Lagos. Pa Anisiemeka’s escapades and success in Lagos have him boasting of an enviable house and other investments in the Okota area of the city. But despite his over six-decade sojourn in Lagos, Pa Anisiemeka claimed to have only missed spending his Christmas holidays in his native Imo State on a few occasions.

“It is common knowledge that the Igbo are very enterprising. They are migrant-entrepreneurs who are endowed with immense competitive spirit. They prefer to leave their families and homes in search of greener pastures elsewhere. They can live in the cities from the beginning of the year to the end without visiting home, but one thing a lot of them would not do is to celebrate Christmas outside of their hometowns, in the company of their families, friends and age-long colleagues. Celebrating Christmas at home is considered typically cultural and it is curiously expected of anyone living in town or abroad to re-connect with the home people during Christmas,” he told Saturday Tribune.

Yet, there are many others (mostly non-Igbo) who are of the opinion that the yearly journey home is spurred primarily by ego, showmanship and unhealthy competition, rather than genuine need for reunion. Saturday Tribune, during the week took up the task of attempting to unveil the reason(s) for this ageless behaviour and as such, some opinions of randomly selected Igbo travelers were sampled. The quest to solve this “mystery” took Saturday Tribune to some popular motor parks in Lagos which, as expected, had become a beehive of activities.

At the popular and ever-busy Maza Maza Bus Terminus in Lagos, a middle-age traveler who identified himself as Chinedu Obasi, argued that no matter how busy one is, he should always create time to remember home. According to him, since it is practically impossible for many Igbo living in the other parts of the country to be travelling home as often as they would have loved, calving out just one period in an entire year to achieve this purpose is not too much. This, he said, is what the yearly journey home during Christmas is all about.

“Christmas brings a moment in a year when all Igbo or majority of them living outside Igboland return to their villages to reunite with their kin who they have not seen, probably in the last 12 months,” said Obasi, who was getting set to travel to his native Enugu State.

Similarly, Chizaram, a 37-year-old native of Abia State, also pointed out to Saturday Tribune that Christmas provided the only opportunity she had of seeing her aged parents, other relatives and loved ones, who like her, were living in far places. Chizaram, who was spotted making last minutes efforts to board a bus, also at Maza Maza, which was going to her hometown of Umuahia in Abia State, said she was willing to brave all odds to make the journey.

She however also hinted that it might be impossible to rule out showoff and show-boasting as one of the reasons some travel at this time, a development she said often served as one of the reasons young men and women often veered to a life of crime so that they would be able to make money at all cost so as to be able to meet up with others. She further pointed out that, in some instances, parents whose children are coming home go all the way to boast about such children and the children in return will do everything possible not to disappoint such parents, including taking to a life of crime.

“To an average Igbo man, going to the village is non-negotiable. Far and near, sons and daughters return home, besiege their respective villages, not only to celebrate Christmas with their kith and kin, but also to provide an opportunity for many families to boast about their illustrious sons and daughters, whom they are proud of,” she said.

But for other travelers, the yearly exodus is nothing more than a family tradition. At the Jibowu Bus Park, yet another traveler, Ugochukwu Anufurum, insisted that the period provided an opportunity for him to attend to salient and sometimes delayed family/community matters, especially since other important stakeholders in such matters would also be around.

“I can say that this is why the Igbo work hard to ensure that they gather enough money with which they can go home for the Christmas celebration. They do this because the communal life they live as umunna would require them to give gifts to their kin when they get back home,” he further noted.


more @ http://www.exlinklodge.com/2017/12/why-igbos-always-travel-home-during.html


Is this the epistle of Saint Paul to the Igbo's? Someone should help me here because I am confused. This article is longer than river Mississippi undecided

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by patrick89(m): 11:30pm On Dec 25, 2017
Points I got from this junk are.

This article was written by a non Igbo person. He continually use "indigbo" the way Yoruba pronounce it,instead of ndi Igbo. No Igbo person can make that mistake.

2. Most people think Igbo people go home to do juju because that is their stock in trade. Their ignorance their loss.

Here are the major reasons why Igbo people travel..
Igbo love themselves so much forget the usual disagreement, there is nothing that sweets most than seeing your brother that you haven't seen for a very long time, your friends or even grand parents. Seat together break kola, drink fresh palmwine, with ishi ewu, and nkwobi, and you will be discussing nostalgic moments..

Community development, every Igbo town has a community development so every branch and group must come and represent in the general meeting of the town during xmas, for example, Lagos branch will likely send five men committee plus those intending travellers, to go and represent them in the town general meeting to bring feedback for those who wont be going home.

Another thing is hooking up.. You may have friends, brother who just graduated, looking for job, connection, etc it is an opportunity for your dad to get an instant job or link up for you. Same goes to those looking for admission.
All your dad needs to do is meet the right man,he might be his age mate, class mate etc. The he would be lucky to get the connection.

Another one is most parents with plenty girls, always come home to see if their children can be married by the people from their town. Our parents always wish we marry very nearby. If you do that ,it means that your eyes are on the ground ( anya ruru gI ala).
And others are coming for burial, traditional wedding, title ship,age grade etc.
We also have people that come to know how far their friends have gone in terms of wealth ,marriage, so that you will be preparing to seat up too. Yes the competition is tight. Watching your age mate come out to make donations of 200k, 1million, you will just be at back seat waggling your legs.
So people that talk about show off are nonentities. In Igbo villages. No matter your wealth or exposure, you can not be given a different seat during kindred meeting, and everyone is entitled to an opinion, you would see uneducated person country your opinion with a preponderance argument.

We value all these things, and we take pride in it. People are abusing it because either their town has been messed up or their family has been messed up.

Ndi Yoruba does not travel to their villages because it is a horrible place, and they expect everywhere to be like that. No, there some kindred you will see in igbo land, they love themselves to the fullest, they ensure every child goes to school, they ensure they assist their brothers especially those that have problems with their businesses..

If for instance, chika a trader at alaba has a problem with outsider he simply reports to chairman of his community, in Lagos, and his case will become an agendum in the next meeting, and they will rally around him and fight for him. Unless the person doesn't belong to the village meeting. That is why innoson is getting that kind of massive support. If you touch any one person, his kindred will take your matter to their town, and they will come together to fight you. So fyi, gtb is not fighting innoson alone they are fighting the whole nnewi..ekele kwa m unu

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Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by udemzyudex(m): 11:34pm On Dec 25, 2017
They always travel home but they won't invest in their home.. Then one governor will be saying they develop lagos.

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Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by 9free(m): 11:51pm On Dec 25, 2017
mavinc4u:


Seriously?
Yes
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Diso60090(m): 11:57pm On Dec 25, 2017
You travel ooo you nor travel oooo wetin be nairaland own inside

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Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Sanctecosma(m): 11:59pm On Dec 25, 2017
Alariiwo:
You should be ashamed.. Really!

After enjoying life living among gods (Yorubas) in the SW, you go back to do show off in you undeveloped villages that most of you abandon. Do you even have toilets?

No wonder village people kill their returnees grin

Negodi mgbada Ka o kwu oto (imagine a standing antelope).

You know when a fool (like you) starts an argument, he's asking for a beating. how much do you think you know about Igbo land. As the saying goes, a well travelled man is well experienced man. In case you don't know, the structural development you claim to have over there in th SW are majorly pioneered and built by Igbos. Believe me you, without Igbos in this country, you'll all be living like bush men. It's so unfortunate that you Yorubas have nothing to show for academic prowess. I am not surprised, cuz our Elders say that "when a man acquits himself well, he is praised as a worthy son of a great ancestor, in the moment of failure, man is adjudged to be unworthy of his forebears". N'ihi ya, were ire GI guo Eze GI onu.

7 Likes

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by tribalistseun: 11:59pm On Dec 25, 2017
Alariiwo:


You're enjoying life in Ogbomosho I guess grin

What do you do for a living? Hope it's a legit job
banging your mama everyday, hope that's legit?

1 Like

Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Namady(m): 12:00am On Dec 26, 2017
Divay22:
I didn't read o
I'm too tired to read this epistle.... Can someone make a summary for me please
I dey behind u to read the summary.. I can't read all that grin
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Originalsly: 12:01am On Dec 26, 2017
FrenchWay:
...
Igbos only travel for TWO major reasons: SHOW OFF and JAZZ RENEWAL.

If they are not visiting home to showcase to the villagers there beautiful fiancée; they are there to showcase their wealth from drug deals in Indonesia.

If they are not home to renew their jazz for the next year; they are there to launch their new house(built with ritual money)

If they are not there to show their new rides; they are there to carry a new maid to Lagos that they will end up trafficking to Libya.

I weep for these people.
So after this long write up to add knowledge..... you remain this ignorant?...and foolish to post such a comment ? I weep for you.
Re: Why Igbos Always Travel Home During Christmas Period - Come Rain, Come Shine by Nobody: 12:11am On Dec 26, 2017
Do you have a piece of land to sell?

FrenchWay:
...
Igbos only travel for TWO major reasons: SHOW OFF and JAZZ RENEWAL.

If they are not visiting home to showcase to the villagers there beautiful fiancée; they are there to showcase their wealth from drug deals in Indonesia.

If they are not home to renew their jazz for the next year; they are there to launch their new house(built with ritual money)

If they are not there to show their new rides; they are there to carry a new maid to Lagos that they will end up trafficking to Libya.

I weep for these people.

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