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Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by OEPHIUS(m): 11:37am On Jul 30
Apapa is an industrial hub that needs all the encouragement it can get from government because of its contribution to the country’s economy. For that to happen, the traffic gridlock which causes losses of revenue to the industrial hub of the country running into trillions of naira and denying the national economy that much in Gross Domestic Product (GDP), needs to be eradicated.

A major contributor to the gridlock is the deplorable state of the roads. This is set to worsen with the ill-timing of traffic diversion from the Third Mainland Bridge (TMB), as the bridge is due for maintenance. These are twin factors that are guaranteed to cost billions in man hours and cause excruciating delays at the ports. Interestingly, over 117,000 vehicles ply the TMB on a daily basis. Diverting such huge traffic to alternative routes including an already congested Apapa route is a only disaster waiting to happen. Apapa, which is already slow, is likely to grind to a halt.

Apart from accommodating Nigeria’s most vibrant and viable ports, Apapa is the Mecca of the maritime and export industries as well as the shipping and oil industries among many others. But unfortunately, the gridlock is stunting the potential of an area on which the country has depended for economic growth even before independence.

As a result of the gridlock, analysts said cargo dwell time at the ports has increased to 22 days. This is against the global best business practices in the maritime trade, as it is the longest in the West Africa sub-region. Comparatively, the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Organisation said that cargo dwell time in Togo is nine days; 14 days in Benin Republic; and 15 days in Ghana. One report said “with a capacity of 3 million twenty-foot equivalent units (which is far less than South Africa’s volume of 5.5 million TEUs), the Nigeria Customs Service (NCS) should have realised as much as N1.25 trillion as against the N692 billion it made from 1.5 million TEUs in 2017.”

The scenario reduces the potential for job creation in the maritime, oil export and other sectors. Studies say the Lagos ports employ about 35,000 workers; it can be better without the gridlock. After all in South Africa, 700,000 people are employed at its ports.

The economy’s industrial capacity utilisation has also taken a hit; it stood at 53-60 per cent in 2015, but has since declined to 38-40 per cent in 2017, still owing to traffic gridlock.

It also diminishes the country’s export potential as observed above. For instance, 25 per cent of perishable products like cashew, which was being exported to Vietnam in 2017, rotted away after overstaying for weeks at the ports.

Summing up the self-inflicted losses, the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) survey in partnership with the Nigerian Economic Summit Group (NESG), Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN) and the Organised Private Sector (OPS) showed that Nigeria loses about N3.06 trillion (or $10 billion) on non-oil export and about N2.5 trillion corporate earnings across the sectors annually to the challenge.

Given the highly- deleterious scenarios above, a more logical approach for government would be first, to fix the roads in Apapa and other access roads as to make them world-class in line with Apapa’s contribution to the economy and then divert some traffic to it from the TMB. Suffice this to mean that government should mute maintenance work on the bridge until all other routes that are likely to have more traffic during the bridge’s closure to traffic are fixed.

Given that logic, stakeholders may have thought that was what government was up to when the minister of works promised last year that the roads in Apapa would be fixed before December this year. Government must redeem this pledge if it sincerely believes in boosting economic activity and in improving the ease of doing business. This has become an urgent priority.

https://nationaleconomy.com/editorial/impact-of-apapa-gridlock-on-the-economy/

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by OkhaiAsein(m): 12:21pm On Jul 30
hmmm e Don red be that o
.
meanwhile I'll. design a brand new logo for your business for 2k
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by realmanarken(m): 12:21pm On Jul 30
FTC
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Finnese001: 12:21pm On Jul 30
okay
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by realmanarken(m): 12:22pm On Jul 30
OkhaiAsein:
b
your papa

























Waka well well

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Proffesy: 12:22pm On Jul 30
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Prodigee: 12:22pm On Jul 30
Naija as whole has been on gridlock since 1960

7 Likes

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by kyuniii(m): 12:23pm On Jul 30
Not new.
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Jamesboss1997(m): 12:23pm On Jul 30
A major contributor to the gridlock is the deplorable state of the roads. This is set to worsen with the ill-timing of traffic diversion from the Third Mainland Bridge (TMB), as the bridge is due for maintenance. These are twin factors that are guaranteed to cost billions in man hours and cause excruciating delays at the ports. Interestingly, over 117,000 vehicles ply the TMB on a daily basis. Diverting such huge traffic to alternative routes including an already congested Apapa route is a only disaster waiting to happen. Apapa, which is already slow, is likely to grind to a halt.

Apart from accommodating Nigeria’s most vibrant and viable ports, Apapa is the Mecca of the maritime and export industries as well as the shipping and oil industries among many others. But unfortunately, the gridlock is stunting the potential of an area on which the country has depended for economic growth even before independence.

As a result of the gridlock, analysts said cargo dwell time at the ports has increased to 22 days. This is against the global best business practices in the maritime trade, as it is the longest in the West Africa sub-region. Comparatively, the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Organisation said that cargo dwell time in Togo is nine days; 14 days in Benin Republic; and 15 days in Ghana. One report said “with a capacity of 3 million twenty-foot equivalent units (which is far less than South Africa’s volume of 5.5 million TEUs), the Nigeria Customs Service (NCS) should have realised as much as N1.25 trillion as against the N692 billion it made from 1.5 million TEUs in 2017.”

The scenario reduces the potential for job creation in the maritime, oil export and other sectors. Studies say the Lagos ports employ about 35,000 workers; it can be better without the gridlock. After all in South Africa, 700,000 people are employed at its ports.

The economy’s industrial capacity utilisation has also taken a hit; it stood at 53-60 per cent in 2015, but has since declined to 38-40 per cent in 2017, still owing to traffic gridlock.

It also diminishes the country’s export potential as observed above. For instance, 25 per cent of perishable products like cashew, which was being exported to Vietnam in 2017, rotted away after overstaying for weeks at the ports.

Summing up the self-inflicted losses, the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) survey in partnership with the Nigerian Economic Summit Group (NESG), Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN) and the Organised Private Sector (OPS) showed that Nigeria loses about N3.06 trillion (or $10 billion) on non-oil export and about N2.5 trillion corporate earnings across the sectors annually to the challenge.

Given the highly- deleterious scenarios above, a more logical approach for government would be first, to fix the roads in Apapa and other access roads as to make them world-class in line with Apapa’s contribution to the economy and then divert some traffic to it from the TMB. Suffice this to mean that government should mute maintenance work on the bridge until all other routes that are likely to have more traffic during the bridge’s closure to traffic are fixed.

Given that logic, stakeholders may have thought that was what government was up to when the minister of works promised last year that the roads in Apapa would be fixed before December this year. Government must redeem this pledge if it sincerely believes in boosting economic activity and in improving the ease of doing business. This has become an urgent priority.

https://nationaleconomy.com/editorial/impact-of-apapa-gridlock-on-the-economy/[/quote]
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Evaromantik(m): 12:23pm On Jul 30
Two international airplanes just collided at MM Airport in the same Lagos, while they're busy locking bridges and starving the poor.

Nothing balance for this country sha

5 Likes 1 Share

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Evaromantik(m): 12:23pm On Jul 30
Naija my Naija!
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by pheelhip(m): 12:23pm On Jul 30
This is serious
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by jojofola: 12:24pm On Jul 30
E remain make Chinese con takeover everything.

Yahoo dey part of the things wey still dey sustain the economy of average Nigerians sha. (I no dey advocate but na pesin wey get sense go understand)

We no get Government.

6 Likes

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Bmaster(m): 12:26pm On Jul 30
Let the heavy duty engine vehicles operate at night,let everyone obey the traffic warden,let pedestrians use fly overs whilst crossing (if there are any),
Finally,let every form of Hawking be checkmate.


My humble opinion though!

4 Likes

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by prinsam30(m): 12:26pm On Jul 30
I've been sleeping with my phones beside my pillow waiting for alert to enter, only for useless NCDC to sent me happy sallah, Abeg who congratulatory text don help, I need money jor
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by iampeterben(m): 12:27pm On Jul 30
It's well oh! Next news as there is nothing to say about this. Lagos and traffic are like twin brothers.
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by ComeToJesus: 12:27pm On Jul 30
After oil, the second largest revenue earner for Nigeria is import duties. A large chunk of that is from the ports. Yet, the access road is in a terrible mess.

Trailers are the Kings of the manor on these roads that lead to the Port. Zero efforts from the government. Never seen a government that is so irredeemably useless.

2 Likes

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by colestephan86: 12:27pm On Jul 30
OEPHIUS:
Apapa is an industrial hub that needs all the encouragement it can get from government because of its contribution to the country’s economy. For that to happen, the traffic gridlock which causes losses of revenue to the industrial hub of the country running into trillions of naira and denying the national economy that much in Gross Domestic Product (GDP), needs to be eradicated.

A major contributor to the gridlock is the deplorable state of the roads. This is set to worsen with the ill-timing of traffic diversion from the Third Mainland Bridge (TMB), as the bridge is due for maintenance. These are twin factors that are guaranteed to cost billions in man hours and cause excruciating delays at the ports. Interestingly, over 117,000 vehicles ply the TMB on a daily basis. Diverting such huge traffic to alternative routes including an already congested Apapa route is a only disaster waiting to happen. Apapa, which is already slow, is likely to grind to a halt.

Apart from accommodating Nigeria’s most vibrant and viable ports, Apapa is the Mecca of the maritime and export industries as well as the shipping and oil industries among many others. But unfortunately, the gridlock is stunting the potential of an area on which the country has depended for economic growth even before independence.

As a result of the gridlock, analysts said cargo dwell time at the ports has increased to 22 days. This is against the global best business practices in the maritime trade, as it is the longest in the West Africa sub-region. Comparatively, the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Organisation said that cargo dwell time in Togo is nine days; 14 days in Benin Republic; and 15 days in Ghana. One report said “with a capacity of 3 million twenty-foot equivalent units (which is far less than South Africa’s volume of 5.5 million TEUs), the Nigeria Customs Service (NCS) should have realised as much as N1.25 trillion as against the N692 billion it made from 1.5 million TEUs in 2017.”

The scenario reduces the potential for job creation in the maritime, oil export and other sectors. Studies say the Lagos ports employ about 35,000 workers; it can be better without the gridlock. After all in South Africa, 700,000 people are employed at its ports.

The economy’s industrial capacity utilisation has also taken a hit; it stood at 53-60 per cent in 2015, but has since declined to 38-40 per cent in 2017, still owing to traffic gridlock.

It also diminishes the country’s export potential as observed above. For instance, 25 per cent of perishable products like cashew, which was being exported to Vietnam in 2017, rotted away after overstaying for weeks at the ports.

Summing up the self-inflicted losses, the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) survey in partnership with the Nigerian Economic Summit Group (NESG), Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN) and the Organised Private Sector (OPS) showed that Nigeria loses about N3.06 trillion (or $10 billion) on non-oil export and about N2.5 trillion corporate earnings across the sectors annually to the challenge.

Given the highly- deleterious scenarios above, a more logical approach for government would be first, to fix the roads in Apapa and other access roads as to make them world-class in line with Apapa’s contribution to the economy and then divert some traffic to it from the TMB. Suffice this to mean that government should mute maintenance work on the bridge until all other routes that are likely to have more traffic during the bridge’s closure to traffic are fixed.

Given that logic, stakeholders may have thought that was what government was up to when the minister of works promised last year that the roads in Apapa would be fixed before December this year. Government must redeem this pledge if it sincerely believes in boosting economic activity and in improving the ease of doing business. This has become an urgent priority.

https://nationaleconomy.com/editorial/
impact-of-apapa-gridlock-on-the-economy/
Security agents and traffic officers are feeding fat from the gridlock, imagine paying 100k to pass one-way in other to avoid the gridlock.

2 Likes 1 Share

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Bmaster(m): 12:28pm On Jul 30
Prodigee:
Naija as whole has been on gridlock since 1960
Not really.
There was a time we were moving even faster,and you know that. shocked
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Dannyjojo99(m): 12:31pm On Jul 30
It has been well pointed out if the govt wants the good of the nation its should do so ASAP.
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by GeniusWeb: 12:31pm On Jul 30
The effect is everywhere, it's positive to some while negative to some..


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Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by AmuDimpka: 12:31pm On Jul 30
A simple policy would do...open up Eastern ports,dredge Obuaku in ABIA or the one in Anambra


The more the pressure is in apapa the more there would be hardship on commuters, environment would be degraded and containers falling on people and killing them


So why don't you guys just spread the risk ? Do we kill our own people on the Altar of greed
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Dee60: 12:32pm On Jul 30
AmuDimpka:
A simple policy would do...open up Eastern ports,dredge Obuaku in ABIA or the one in Anambra


The more the pressure is in apapa the more there would be hardship on commuters, environment would be degraded and containers falling on people and killing them


So why don't you guys just spread the risk ? Do we kill our own people on the Altar of greed

Not as simple as that, if you understand Nigeria. They dont use a port because the port is nice or because it has a lot of facilities. Some of those Eastern ports may be dredged and developed but as long as they dont have a lot of cargoes anyone who takes his cargo there is made to be pay double, triple or more...Its like driving from Ikeja to Lekki where you dont see any 'official' on the road but try drive to a village in a neighbouring state and you will be counting checkpoints. Thats the problem. That is why cargoes for Eastern markets are also dropped in Lagos. ports.

1 Like

Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by sanyablaze(m): 12:33pm On Jul 30
Traffic wasted time
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by AmuDimpka: 12:34pm On Jul 30
Dee60:


s
t
Re: Impact Of Apapa Gridlock On The Economy by Chapii: 12:37pm On Jul 30
There was a Boat Mishap on Tuesday Morning that serves as alternative route to Apapa. One woman lost her life in the incidence. A Barge conveying Containers collided with a fibre boat.

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