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When The Right Person Happens… (written By Joy A. Adewumi) - Literature - Nairaland

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When The Right Person Happens… (written By Joy A. Adewumi) by SpiritPen(f): 1:00am On Feb 23
‘Yo, sis!’ Josh hailed as I walked into my parents’ house around seven o’clock on Friday evening after a tough workday and a gruesome ordeal with Lagos traffic. Lagos traffic on a normal day is no joke, but Lagos traffic from the island to the suburbs on a weekend is even worse. It was usually as if everyone lived in the suburbs but worked on the island, and they were all going to their respective homes, at the same time, on Fridays, for a reprieve from the week’s hustle.

I slouched in exhaustion as I flung my handbag on one sofa and sunk my tired weight into another. I glanced through tired half-shut eyelids at my twin who had an impossible combo of concern and amusement on his face. The dude had always been weird like that. ‘Wipe that annoying look off your face, it’s increasing my stress level.’ I mumbled.

Josh bellowed in laughter inciting a bubble of tired laughter from my throat too. With a sigh, I smiled and cuddled more comfortably on the chair. It felt good to be home. It had been almost a month if not more. Apart from the fact that there was always extra work to catch up on, on the weekends, I seldom came home to my parents’ place in the suburbs because the mere thought of the traffic was always enough reason for me to rethink. When Josh said he was going to be in Lagos this weekend, however, not even the traffic could stop me. Amazingly too, I didn’t have any carryover of work – a rare occurrence. Josh was running his Master’s at the University of Ibadan and worked concurrently at an insurance firm there.

‘You know, if I knew being apart from you would make me miss you this much, I wouldn’t have been in such a hurry to get out of your hair.’ Josh said with an indulgent smile.

‘Hey! Is someone getting cheesy?’ I teased, kicking his shin lightly with mine from my seat not far away from his.

He returned my smile and shrugged, ‘Happens to the best of us.’ Then he took his laptop on which he had been typing steadily off his legs and turned to me. ‘You know what you need?’

‘What?’ I asked, smiling because I knew what was coming.

‘A warm shower.’ I totally saw that coming. Josh was the average annoying sibling, but he was super sweet whenever he felt like it.

‘I made Amala and Efo riro, your favorite.’ I jerked up from my half-lying position. It was from shock. My jaws dropped and I blinked uncontrollably.

‘Since when?’ I asked, narrowing my eyes at him, once I got control of them.

‘Haba! Don’t be dramatic. I wasn’t that bad before. You reacted just like mum did when she walked in on me preparing the meal. She said to film your reaction when I tell you I cooked. Y’all are just overreacting.’ Josh whined.

I laughed. I bet mum must have wanted to stay back and make sure Josh did not burn down the house, but couldn’t because of the weekly pastor’s meeting she had to attend in church with dad. ‘Yes, you were bad. No, terrible. You were terrible.’ I argued.

‘My boiled water was quite nice, and you know that.’ He retorted and laughter bubbled strongly from my lips. He joined me with a chuckle and commented, ‘It feels nice to hear that laughter that sounds so much like mine. You don’t know how hard it was to convince people that my laugh is nowhere as boisterous as yours. No one would believe a girl could produce a laugh similar to mine. I have to record it when next you laugh.’

‘I know, these things called genes, ehn? Plus spending nine full months in the same confinement with another person does that to you.’ Josh rolled his eyes at me. ‘But wait, Amala and Efo riro. Seriously, you have to tell me, since when? Dude, you could barely steam rice without causing a mishap. And I’m talking as recently as last year December. It’s been how long since then, three months? Four?’ I asked wanting to hear how the transformation happened.

Josh folded his arms across his wide midriff and leaned back as he said, ‘Four and a half, madam. And well, I’ve been going steady with my cooking lessons since the start of the year.’

‘Wawu! Wonders will never cease.’ I clapped my hand thrice and hiked my eyebrows in disbelief. Then I mirrored his posture and asked, ‘So, what happened to you?’

With a sigh and a smile, I didn’t always see on his face - a dreamy smile birthed from deep pleasure, my brother said, ‘Well, the right persons happened to me.’

‘Whoa!’ I exclaimed as I jerked forward on the chair, eyes wide and my mouth open wide in perfect ‘o’.

‘Wait, madam! Stop getting ahead of yourself. I said "the right persons" not "person". Always-’ He was saying with a grin when I cut him off with a flick of my wrist.

‘Baba, don’t get me started jare! It was yesterday they gave birth to me, abi? See, men don’t wear dreamy faraway looks with big grins when they’re talking about random people or even random women for that matter. You might as well have said “the one” happened to you. It means, at least one of these persons is the right woman. So, was that why you came home?’

‘Partly,’ he said, shrugging and smiling.

Click here to read the full story: ‘Yo, sis!’ Josh hailed as I walked into my parents’ house around seven o’clock on Friday evening after a tough workday and a gruesome ordeal with Lagos traffic. Lagos traffic on a normal day is no joke, but Lagos traffic from the island to the suburbs on a weekend is even worse. It was usually as if everyone lived in the suburbs but worked on the island, and they were all going to their respective homes, at the same time, on Fridays, for a reprieve from the week’s hustle.

I slouched in exhaustion as I flung my handbag on one sofa and sunk my tired weight into another. I glanced through tired half-shut eyelids at my twin who had an impossible combo of concern and amusement on his face. The dude had always been weird like that. ‘Wipe that annoying look off your face, it’s increasing my stress level.’ I mumbled.

Josh bellowed in laughter inciting a bubble of tired laughter from my throat too. With a sigh, I smiled and cuddled more comfortably on the chair. It felt good to be home. It had been almost a month if not more. Apart from the fact that there was always extra work to catch up on, on the weekends, I seldom came home to my parents’ place in the suburbs because the mere thought of the traffic was always enough reason for me to rethink. When Josh said he was going to be in Lagos this weekend, however, not even the traffic could stop me. Amazingly too, I didn’t have any carryover of work – a rare occurrence. Josh was running his Master’s at the University of Ibadan and worked concurrently at an insurance firm there.

‘You know, if I knew being apart from you would make me miss you this much, I wouldn’t have been in such a hurry to get out of your hair.’ Josh said with an indulgent smile.

‘Hey! Is someone getting cheesy?’ I teased, kicking his shin lightly with mine from my seat not far away from his.

He returned my smile and shrugged, ‘Happens to the best of us.’ Then he took his laptop on which he had been typing steadily off his legs and turned to me. ‘You know what you need?’

‘What?’ I asked, smiling because I knew what was coming.

‘A warm shower.’ I totally saw that coming. Josh was the average annoying sibling, but he was super sweet whenever he felt like it.

‘I made Amala and Efo riro, your favorite.’ I jerked up from my half-lying position. It was from shock. My jaws dropped and I blinked uncontrollably.

‘Since when?’ I asked, narrowing my eyes at him, once I got control of them.

‘Haba! Don’t be dramatic. I wasn’t that bad before. You reacted just like mum did when she walked in on me preparing the meal. She said to film your reaction when I tell you I cooked. Y’all are just overreacting.’ Josh whined.

I laughed. I bet mum must have wanted to stay back and make sure Josh did not burn down the house, but couldn’t because of the weekly pastor’s meeting she had to attend in church with dad. ‘Yes, you were bad. No, terrible. You were terrible.’ I argued.

‘My boiled water was quite nice, and you know that.’ He retorted and laughter bubbled strongly from my lips. He joined me with a chuckle and commented, ‘It feels nice to hear that laughter that sounds so much like mine. You don’t know how hard it was to convince people that my laugh is nowhere as boisterous as yours. No one would believe a girl could produce a laugh similar to mine. I have to record it when next you laugh.’

‘I know, these things called genes, ehn? Plus spending nine full months in the same confinement with another person does that to you.’ Josh rolled his eyes at me. ‘But wait, Amala and Efo riro. Seriously, you have to tell me, since when? Dude, you could barely steam rice without causing a mishap. And I’m talking as recently as last year December. It’s been how long since then, three months? Four?’ I asked wanting to hear how the transformation happened.

Josh folded his arms across his wide midriff and leaned back as he said, ‘Four and a half, madam. And well, I’ve been going steady with my cooking lessons since the start of the year.’

‘Wawu! Wonders will never cease.’ I clapped my hand thrice and hiked my eyebrows in disbelief. Then I mirrored his posture and asked, ‘So, what happened to you?’

With a sigh and a smile, I didn’t always see on his face - a dreamy smile birthed from deep pleasure, my brother said, ‘Well, the right persons happened to me.’

‘Whoa!’ I exclaimed as I jerked forward on the chair, eyes wide and my mouth open wide in perfect ‘o’.

‘Wait, madam! Stop getting ahead of yourself. I said "the right persons" not "person". Always-’ He was saying with a grin when I cut him off with a flick of my wrist.

‘Baba, don’t get me started jare! It was yesterday they gave birth to me, abi? See, men don’t wear dreamy faraway looks with big grins when they’re talking about random people or even random women for that matter. You might as well have said “the one” happened to you. It means, at least one of these persons is the right woman. So, was that why you came home?’

‘Partly,’ he said, shrugging and smiling.

Click here to read the full story: ‘Yo, sis!’ Josh hailed as I walked into my parents’ house around seven o’clock on Friday evening after a tough workday and a gruesome ordeal with Lagos traffic. Lagos traffic on a normal day is no joke, but Lagos traffic from the island to the suburbs on a weekend is even worse. It was usually as if everyone lived in the suburbs but worked on the island, and they were all going to their respective homes, at the same time, on Fridays, for a reprieve from the week’s hustle.

I slouched in exhaustion as I flung my handbag on one sofa and sunk my tired weight into another. I glanced through tired half-shut eyelids at my twin who had an impossible combo of concern and amusement on his face. The dude had always been weird like that. ‘Wipe that annoying look off your face, it’s increasing my stress level.’ I mumbled.

Josh bellowed in laughter inciting a bubble of tired laughter from my throat too. With a sigh, I smiled and cuddled more comfortably on the chair. It felt good to be home. It had been almost a month if not more. Apart from the fact that there was always extra work to catch up on, on the weekends, I seldom came home to my parents’ place in the suburbs because the mere thought of the traffic was always enough reason for me to rethink. When Josh said he was going to be in Lagos this weekend, however, not even the traffic could stop me. Amazingly too, I didn’t have any carryover of work – a rare occurrence. Josh was running his Master’s at the University of Ibadan and worked concurrently at an insurance firm there.

‘You know, if I knew being apart from you would make me miss you this much, I wouldn’t have been in such a hurry to get out of your hair.’ Josh said with an indulgent smile.

‘Hey! Is someone getting cheesy?’ I teased, kicking his shin lightly with mine from my seat not far away from his.

He returned my smile and shrugged, ‘Happens to the best of us.’ Then he took his laptop on which he had been typing steadily off his legs and turned to me. ‘You know what you need?’

‘What?’ I asked, smiling because I knew what was coming.

‘A warm shower.’ I totally saw that coming. Josh was the average annoying sibling, but he was super sweet whenever he felt like it.

‘I made Amala and Efo riro, your favorite.’ I jerked up from my half-lying position. It was from shock. My jaws dropped and I blinked uncontrollably.

‘Since when?’ I asked, narrowing my eyes at him, once I got control of them.

‘Haba! Don’t be dramatic. I wasn’t that bad before. You reacted just like mum did when she walked in on me preparing the meal. She said to film your reaction when I tell you I cooked. Y’all are just overreacting.’ Josh whined.

I laughed. I bet mum must have wanted to stay back and make sure Josh did not burn down the house, but couldn’t because of the weekly pastor’s meeting she had to attend in church with dad. ‘Yes, you were bad. No, terrible. You were terrible.’ I argued.

‘My boiled water was quite nice, and you know that.’ He retorted and laughter bubbled strongly from my lips. He joined me with a chuckle and commented, ‘It feels nice to hear that laughter that sounds so much like mine. You don’t know how hard it was to convince people that my laugh is nowhere as boisterous as yours. No one would believe a girl could produce a laugh similar to mine. I have to record it when next you laugh.’

‘I know, these things called genes, ehn? Plus spending nine full months in the same confinement with another person does that to you.’ Josh rolled his eyes at me. ‘But wait, Amala and Efo riro. Seriously, you have to tell me, since when? Dude, you could barely steam rice without causing a mishap. And I’m talking as recently as last year December. It’s been how long since then, three months? Four?’ I asked wanting to hear how the transformation happened.

Josh folded his arms across his wide midriff and leaned back as he said, ‘Four and a half, madam. And well, I’ve been going steady with my cooking lessons since the start of the year.’

‘Wawu! Wonders will never cease.’ I clapped my hand thrice and hiked my eyebrows in disbelief. Then I mirrored his posture and asked, ‘So, what happened to you?’

With a sigh and a smile, I didn’t always see on his face - a dreamy smile birthed from deep pleasure, my brother said, ‘Well, the right persons happened to me.’

‘Whoa!’ I exclaimed as I jerked forward on the chair, eyes wide and my mouth open wide in perfect ‘o’.

‘Wait, madam! Stop getting ahead of yourself. I said "the right persons" not "person". Always-’ He was saying with a grin when I cut him off with a flick of my wrist.

‘Baba, don’t get me started jare! It was yesterday they gave birth to me, abi? See, men don’t wear dreamy faraway looks with big grins when they’re talking about random people or even random women for that matter. You might as well have said “the one” happened to you. It means, at least one of these persons is the right woman. So, was that why you came home?’

‘Partly,’ he said, shrugging and smiling.

Click here to read the full story: https://thespiritpen.com/when-the-right-person-happens/
Source: Thespiritpen.com

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