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Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 - Politics - Nairaland

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Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 12:31am On May 04
To the blessed memory of all ISHEAGU Indigenes (Anioma) slain by the Nigerian Army on 2ND MAY 1968.

ISHEAGU MASSACRE

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND:

Isheagu is a town whose origin is traceable to the Eastern part of the contraption called Nigeria. It consists of 7 districts (quarters) namely: Ogbetiti, Ogbeonishe, Umueze, Umuoma, Umuonichi, Isikiti and Onuiyi. It is a town with a growing population that runs into thousands. Isheagu is an Igbo speaking community, situated amongst hundreds of predominantly Igbo Biafran Indigenous ethnic nationality in the present day Delta State called "Delta Igbos" or better still, the "Aniomas". It is an integral part of Enuani clan in Aniocha-South Local Government Area, with Headquarters at Ogwashi-Uku. It is a community naturally endowed with sprawling portions of arable land, untapped crude oil deposits and other viable economic resources. It has various large fresh rivers running across it's territories with diverse kinds of fish and animal habitats. Major occupations include agricultural activities like fish farming, cultivation/production of cassava, yam, garri processing, hunting, etc. Isheagu has a retinue of reputable intellectuals who are greatly doing exploits in their various fields of endeavors across the world. The indigenes of Isheagu are exceptionally outstanding in hospitality, peacefully co-existing with non-indigenes and very blatantly abhor all traces of injustice and oppression. Prior to the Biafra/Nigeria civil war between 1967-1970, Isheagu used to be a beehive of activities socially, economically and politically.

THE MASSACRE:

On 2nd of May 1968, Isheagu was murderously invaded by a contingent of the Hausa-Fulani cum Yoruba ethnic dominated Nigerian army, led by a young commissioned officer in the rank of a Lieutenant-Colonel, late Samuel Osaigbovo Ogbemudia, from the present day Edo State. He later became the first military governor of the old Mid-Western region in 1973 which transformed into Bendel from where Delta and Edo States of today were created. Late Samuel Osaigbovo Ogbemudia retired as a Brigadier-General of the murderous Nigerian army. He led a detachment of the Nigerian troops from Asaba to Isheagu on what was termed "definitive intelligence report", linking Isheagu people as saboteurs. Samuel Osaigbovo Ogbemudia and his army of vampires stormed a once peaceful and bubbling town at about 8:00pm on a commando-style invasion. They clinically rounded up His Royal Highness- late King Agbogidi Obi John Onyema I, all his Chiefs-in-Council and summarily got them executed. It was a gruesome war carried out by the Nigerian government under the arch-genocidist, General Yakubu Gowon against a relatively innocent people of Isheagu. Other indigenes especially men were picked up and killed. The sin of the community against the military government of Yakubu Gowon, was the safe haven granted the Biafran soldiers who they termed as enemies. The reckless killings continued from dawn of 3rd of May same year 1968, being Afor day, a major market day in Isheagu. The rampaging Nigerian troops shot sporadically at every moving object which claimed the lives of quite a number of the indigenes including women and children who were cut down in the cross-fire. Over 500 Isheagu citizens were gruesomely murdered, with men as predominant victims.

Amongst the 7 districts (quarters) that made up Isheagu community, only 3 namely: Umuonichi, Isikiti and Onuiyi, were not directly affected due to Riiver Iyete that separates them from the other 4 districts of Ogbetiti, Ogbeonishe, Umueze and Umuoma which were directly wrecked. The invading Nigerian army were scared crossing the river to get to their other targets.

Killed along with the king of Isheagu town, HRH late King Agbogidi Obi John Onyema I, were all the Chiefs-in-Council (Palace Chiefs) which included:
1) Chief Adianeze
2) Chief Dominic Oshagwu
3) Chief Jacob Nteh
4) Chief Nwabuokei
5) Chief Obuzor Odogwu
6) Chief Thomas Enudigwe
7) Chief Andrew Nwabudike
� Chief Thomas Ojogwu
9) Chief Okonta Nzeagwu
10) Chief Obuzor Nwadei
11) Chief Joseph Onyeanalim
12) Chief Okwuokwu Ogobueze

Survivors of this genocide, managed to escape into nearby forests, farmlands, across the rivers and few neighbouring communities. Some women and children were forcefully taken as refugees to Ogwashi-Uku by the Nigerian soldiers. When the vampires discovered that the town has been deserted, they resorted to destroying and razing down buildings. The ever bustling town of Isheagu was thereby mercilessly reduced to a ghost community.

Disheartening among all these, was the brazen acts of sabotage by some assumed friends in the neighbouring communities where some Isheagu victims sought refuge. On very insignificant misunderstandings as is common amongst mortals, the Nigerian soldiers still stationed in the "conquered town of Isheagu", would be alerted. They would get down to the spot, pick up the "male refugees" involved with their trucks to the deserted Isheagu central square at daylights and got them summarily executed in cold blood by having their throats slashed open. It was really a horrifying experience for Isheagu people.

As survivors started finding their ways back from their hideouts at the end of the civil war, they were confronted with the daunting, sorrowful and traumatic tasks of burying the remains of their loved ones. Mass graves were variously dug at different locations for burials. Debris of destroyed buildings were cleared. Scarce quantities of relief materials like machetes and roofing zincs were sent to a whole community. Lots of financial savings were lost as nothing was done in that regard to assuage the sufferings of the people. They were left to their fate for survival. Mud houses were erected by a few to accommodate returnee families through self efforts. The massively uncleared military explosives left behind by the Nigerian soldiers after the war, claimed additional casualties among returnee survivors.

Our neighbouring communities on their own parts, never showed concern for the excruciating plights Isheagu people suffered but instead cruelly and selfishly resorted to using the unfortunate opportunities occasioned by the sacking of the whole community to encroach into Isheagu lands. This has in no small measures created a near endemic inter-communal strifes prevalent in the area till date, between Isheagu and her neighbors.

It is noteworthy to state at this juncture, that since the end of the civil war in 1970, there has not been any commensurate government presence in Isheagu given as a compensation except for a General Hospital that was built in the 70s. This is a town where over 500 innocent souls were gruesomely killed by the Nigerian army under the watch of an arch-genocidist, Yakubu Gowon and his cohorts.

Isheagu people have been unjustly murdered by Nigeria and left to lick their wounds for decades of years. This painful experience will forever remain indelible in the psych of both the present and upcoming generations of Isheagu indigenes.

Narrated by:
Okonji Chiadika Sunday

Written/Compiled by:
Peter Ikechukwuka Oshagwu

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Juliusmalema: 12:37am On May 04
You sabi copy anything copyable and rushing to Nairaland to post.


I read this earlier today..

Sometimes I don't always understand the rationale of people rushing to always post every single thing here.

Maybe because of the useless back and forth argument and the urge to prove and prove...Lol

I see.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 12:40am On May 04
Juliusmalema:
You sabi copy anything copyable and rushing to Nairaland to post.


I read this earlier today..

Sometimes I don't always understand the rationale of people rushing to always post every single thing here.

Maybe because of the useless back and forth argument and the urge to prove and prove...Lol

I see.

What are you blabbing about?
If you don't have anything to say about the topic, hit the door mehn.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Kosoco(m): 12:40am On May 04
Aluta
Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 12:46am On May 04
Nigerian government murdered a whole King and his cabinet who possessed no gun.
And you expect descendants of these people to embrace your Nigeria?

Hmm!

And the funny thing is that what happened in Isheagu repeated itself in almost all Igbo towns on various scales.
Many towns are still in shock to come fort with their own stories. And these are not hearsay concocted stories as you can see that the names of the victims were well compiled and documented.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by dhardline(m): 12:49am On May 04
What a sad incidence. cry

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 1:02am On May 04
Ojukwu really bleeped up by using his people as a shield for a war he isn’t that prepared for.

Propaganda can only last for a while, you can’t win a war based on propaganda because reality is different from fantasies.

There are cases where the Biafran army massacred some south-south minorities during the war too so I think this is a case of the devil with the strongest kill power.

This should be a lesson to this generation, before you commit to a full blown war, be prepared with the necessary alliance so you won’t sent your people in their millions to Hades due to hasty decisions.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 1:06am On May 04
Iegendhero:
Ojukwu really bleeped up by using his people as a shield for a war he isn’t that prepared for.

Propaganda can only last for a while, you can’t win a war based on propaganda because reality is different from fantasies.


There are cases where the Biafran army massacred some south-south minorities during the war too so I think this is a case of the devil with the strongest kill power.


This should be a lesson to this generation, before you commit to a full blown war, be prepared with the necessary alliance so you won’t sent your people in their millions to Hades due to hasty decisions.


We have always heard this from history revisionists from those ends.
They have written books about it. But when we ask them to mention the Biafran unit and commanders involved in the concocted stories and the names of the so called victims, they all run blank.

It's all part of Nigerian government propaganda to justify the genocide they carried out in Igboland.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by tit(f): 1:07am On May 04
The murderous Nigeria army is getting worse day by day

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by nwaanambra1(m): 1:19am On May 04
Igboid:


We have always heard this from history revisionists from those ends.
They have written books about it. But when we ask them to mention the Biafran unit and commanders involved in the concocted stories and the names of the so called victims, they all run blank.

It's all part of Nigerian government propaganda to justify the genocide they carried out in Igboland.

you get time dey reply the ngwulo.

They used that forged story to assuage their conscience on the sad betrayal of the igbos by the people the igbos see as neighbors - not knowing they are the true definition of the enemy within.

Till today they still hold on to the properties the igbos left behind while running for their dear lives.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 1:32am On May 04
Igboid:


We have always heard this from history revisionists from those ends.
They have written books about it. But when we ask them to mention the Biafran unit and commanders involved in the concocted stories and the names of the so called victims, they all run blank.

It's all part of Nigerian government propaganda to justify the genocide they carried out in Igboland.

Read this from How 32:
https://encompass.eku.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1017&context=jora

The Forgotten Victims: Ethnic Minorities in the Nigeria-Biafra War, 1967-1970
Arua Oko Omaka
McMaster University, omakaao@mcmaster.ca

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 1:33am On May 04
Excerpts:
—To understand the divergent attitudes of the minorities to the Biafran secession, an examination of oral histories from people who occupied positions of authority during the war as well as from ordinary people is necessary.

— . The Ikun in the present day Cross River State presents a good example of the crimes committed against the minorities. The Ikun clan is in the Biase Local Government Area of Cross River State. The people share a common boundary with the Ohafia, an Igbo clan, in the present day Abia State. When the war broke out, Biafra stationed some of its troops in the Cross River region, including Ikun. According to a female survivor-victim of the Biafran occupation, the Ikun initially supported Biafra and had friendly relations with the soldiers, who were also accommodating. As time went on, tensions emerged. Some Ikun men were suspected of collaborating with Nigerian soldiers. This led to arrests, looting, rapes, and other atrocities in Ikun land.27 William Norris of the London Times who visited Biafra, also reported an eye- witness account in which some men of Ibibio ethnic origin were beaten to death at Umuahia on April 2, 1968.28 These Ibibios who included old men and young men were apparently suspected of collaborating with advancing Nigerian troops. They were reportedly frog-marched across an open space while the local people attacked them with sticks and clubs.29 Oral testimony by the survivor-victim corroborates this account. According to the eyewitness, Biafran soldiers allegedly took Ikun men to Ohafia for a meeting but never brought them back. The informant also alleged that the soldiers returned to the community and rounded up some men within their reach and shot them. This survivor who lost her four-day old son and her grandmother seemed to have suspected foul play from the Ohafia people who share a common boundary with her community. The victimization continued until the Biafran headquarters likely issued an order that people should not be killed again.30 By this time, the remaining people had escaped the community, leaving behind only the soldiers, the Ohafia, and some Ikun who were said to be of mixed blood - half Ohafia and half Ikun. These remaining groups, according to the survivor-victim shared the fish ponds, forests, and farms belonging to Ikun people. 31

—In a related account, B. J. Ikpeme, a member of a minority group and retired Senior Medical Officer in the then Eastern Region revealed atrocities perpetrated by Biafran soldiers against the minorities in some towns in the present-day Cross River and Akwa- Ibom States. Ikpeme argued that Ojukwu’s declaration of the Republic of Biafra had been issued against the wishes of the majority of the people of Calabar, Ogoja, and Rivers Provinces, who for many years had agitated for a separate state of their own. According to Ikpeme, the Igbo leadership, who did not like the minority agitation, decided either to force the five million non-Igbo minorities into the new republic or eliminate them. It was on this basis, claims Ikpeme, that Biafran soldiers were quickly sent to the minority areas to “keep down the people, detain or even kill all who dared raise a voice in protest against the idea of Biafra.”32 It was during this period that the non-Igbos started experiencing different forms of inhumane treatment, ranging from torture, detention, to killing. Ikpeme himself was detained in what he described as a “concentration camp” and was later transferred to a prison cell where he was given urine to drink when he demanded water.33

—Ikpeme described instances where the Biafran soldiers allegedly perpetrated atrocities against some members of non-Igbo groups. In Asang town in Enyong, from where Ikpeme originated, about four hundred people were carried away to an unknown destination. Another town called Attan Onoyon in the same Enyong was burnt down with many people killed by the Biafran soldiers. In Ikot Ekpenyong in the present day Akwa Ibom State, Biafran soldiers were said to have shot many villagers. Ikpeme also recounted that similar killings carried out by Biafran soldiers took place in places like Ikot Okpot and Idoro. He equally alleged that when the Nigerian troops landed in Calabar on October 18, 1967, about 169 civilians in detention were lined up and shot by Biafran soldiers. This same allegation had also been published in The New York Times as an informational advertisement by the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in New York.34 These two accounts, given by the survivor-victim of Ikun and Dr. Ikpeme, portray similar pictures of gross atrocities but with different underlying objectives.
Biafra ran a special operations group known as the Biafran Organization of Freedom Fighter (BOFF). This was a paramilitary organization set up by the civil defence group in Bende.35 This special operations group was instructed to suppress the enemy, but they apparently targeted some minorities in Cross River and Akwa Ibom States on the account of sabotage against the Biafran government.36 Philip Effiong, who was from one of the ethnic minorities, probably ordered the BOFF’s “combing” operations after the death of one Major Achibong. In an interview, the informant did not reveal the circumstances surrounding the death of Major Achibong who was equally a member of a minority group. He argued that if Effiong ordered any “combing” operation, it could not have been aimed at exterminating members of his ethnic group. What the informant’s testimony reveals is that some members of the BOFF who also operated as the Bende Special Operations group could have taken advantage of the assignment to accomplish selfish interests. For instance, an intriguing revelation about the Bende Special Operations group shows that some of its members decapitated their victims for ritual purposes.37 Head-hunting in warfare was a cultural practice in some parts of Biafra known as Old Bende. This tradition survived up to the beginning of the twentieth century. In the pre-colonial era, it was culturally acceptable for members of a certain age-grade to go to war and come back with human heads as trophies. Successful warriors who brought back trophies were highly honoured among members of their age-grades and in the whole community. The war situation might have created an opportunity for the warrior group to r reactivate a tradition that had faded out as a result of Western influence.

—At Bolo and Ogu in Okirika, and Onne in Eleme, the villagers suffered the same fate. After the battle at Onne, Biafran troops removed the town inhabitants suspected to have collaborated with federal troops and sent them to the Rainbow Town headquarters of the Biafran 52 Brigade in Port Harcourt. Graham-Douglas, who was also thrown into detention, claimed to have seen about three hundred men detained in the Rainbow Town. He asserted that no fewer than six thousand Rivers people were sent to different refugee camps in Igboland.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 1:34am On May 04
Iegendhero:


Read this from How 32:
https://encompass.eku.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1017&context=jora

The Forgotten Victims: Ethnic Minorities in the Nigeria-Biafra War, 1967-1970
Arua Oko Omaka
McMaster University, omakaao@mcmaster.ca

I have read that concocted lies years ago.
Every thing there is shoddy and veiled.
No Biafran commander mentioned, no name of so called commanding unit, no list of names of victims to avoid verification and exposure of his lies.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 1:40am On May 04
Igboid:


I have read that concocted lies years ago.
Every thing there is shoddy and veiled.
No Biafran commander mentioned, no name of so called commanding unit, no list of names of victims to avoid verification and exposure of his lies.

As usual, igbos will always deny every source except theirs.

It’s not a surprise and I never provided that reference because of you. I did this for other folks from other ethnic group that is willing to learn.

Convincing any Igbo man to agree to a truth is like poring water inside a basket; an exercise in futility. I rather spend my time convincing my dog instead coz time is money!

**********************
This is the writer and name and email:
Arua Oko Omaka
McMaster University, omakaao@mcmaster.ca

ACKNOWLEDGMENT:
I wish to thank J. O. Ahazuem of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, for granting me interviews and permitting me to use some transcripts of the oral interviews his team conducted on the Nigeria-Biafra War.

You can contact her or go to the said J.O Ahazuem who gave her some transcripts of the oral interview they conducted on the civil war.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 1:45am On May 04
Iegendhero:


As usual, igbos will always deny every source except theirs.

It’s not a surprise and I never provided that reference because of you. I did this for other folks from other ethnic group that is willing to learn.

Convincing any Igbo man to agree to a truth is like poring water inside a basket; an exercise in futility. I rather convince my dog instead coz it take little time to do that.


What is the truth in a shady report?
Some minority men were whisked away by Biafran troops he claimed. And a rational mind is forced to ask the following questions: So what are their names? Tell us their village names, surnames, etc , tell us Biafran units and commanders involved, these people cannot be ghosts.
Look at Isheagu Massacre. We know the names of the victims and their villages and even families, we know the Nigerian commander and unit involved.
You can see the story can be verified.

Compare it to the trash you posted where everything is kept at general terms, no specificity, only hearsays, to avoid being exposed.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 1:51am On May 04
And for what is worth. The arrest of Sabos were not restricted to minority areas.
It was a common theme throughout the war.
It was even more violent in Igboland. Ifeajuna family house was razed down and his family members were hunted by angry populace and they had to flee for their lives.
There were more Sabos of Igbo origin arrested by Biafran troops than there could ever be in minority areas.
I mean, Ifeajuna and his Igbo co conspirator as well as Banjo were publicly executed for being Sabo.
I bet if Ifeajuna were minority, it would also be spinned as Igbo genocide on minorities, right?
Very ridiculous.

Additionally, relocation of people from riverine areas to hinterland was done in good faith, which was to limit civilian casualties when Nigerian Army invaded those areas and Biafran troops had to engage them in fierce battle.
Even in Igboland, it was done too.
Communities where Biafran army set ambushes for Nigerian Army were usually evacuated of civilian population to minimize casualties, this should be common sense, but apparently common sense is not common anymore.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 1:55am On May 04
Igboid:
And for what is worth. The arrest of Sabos were not restricted to minority areas.
It was a common team throughout the war.
There were more Sabos of Igbo origin arrested by Biafran troops than there could ever be in minority areas.
I mean, Ifeajuna and his Igbo co conspirator as well as Banjo were publicly executed for being Sabo.
I bet if Ifeajuna was minority, it would also be spinned as Igbo genocide on minorities, right?
Very ridiculous.

Additionally, relocation of people from riverine areas to hinterland was done in good faith, which was to limit civilian casualties.
Even in Igboland, it was done too.
Communities were Biafran army set ambushes for Nigerian Army are usually evacuated of civilian population to minimize casualties.



This is what was written as the reason for the massacre by the OP:
The sin of the community against the military government of Yakubu Gowon, was the safe haven granted the Biafran soldiers who they termed as enemies.

Technically, they were sabo too and the Nigeria military dealt with them. Now using you analogy about sabo, why are you guys now crying over this thread since it’s a common occurrence throughout the war based on the analogy you gave about Biafrans doing the same?

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:00am On May 04
Iegendhero:


This is what was written as the reason for the massacre by the OP:
The sin of the community against the military government of Yakubu Gowon, was the safe haven granted the Biafran soldiers who they termed as enemies.

Technically, they were sabo too and the Nigeria military dealt with them. Now using you analogy about sabo, why are you guys now crying over this thread since it’s a common occurrence throughout the war?


Nope.
They were not Sabo, because their allegiance were never with Nigeria. You can't label a whole community Sabo and unleash genocide on them. The least you can do is acknowledge them as enemy territory and secure the areas and move on.
They were Igbos, so naturally they were Biafrans unofficially, and worst still, they were not armed and couldn't have even stopped Biafran army march if they wanted.
No time did Ndiigbo raze down any minority community because they were Sabos.
I dare them to post real names of such victims and Biafran unit involved.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by horsepower102: 2:01am On May 04
Iegendhero:


This is what was written as the reason for the massacre by the OP:
The sin of the community against the military government of Yakubu Gowon, was the safe haven granted the Biafran soldiers who they termed as enemies.

Technically, they were sabo too and the Nigeria military dealt with them. Now using you analogy about sabo, why are you guys now crying over this thread since it’s a common occurrence throughout the war based on the analogy you gave about Biafrans doing the same?


You are showing how evil minded you are by openly justifying the killing of civilians.

How can they be sabo when they are not part of the biafran military. If we were to go by your logic, the Nigerian government should have wiped out all the communities and their leaders where boko haram thrives. But you wouldn’t push for that would you?

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:04am On May 04
horsepower102:


You are showing how evil minded you are by openly justifying the killing of civilians.

How can they be sabo when they are not part of the biafran military. If we where to go by your logic, the Nigerian government should have wiped out all the communities and their leaders where boko haram thrives. But you wouldn’t push for that would you?

Good one bro.
When Ihejirika came down hard on the terrorists, they all started crying that he was avenging the Biafra massacre on NORTH.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 2:06am On May 04
horsepower102:


You are showing how evil minded you are but openly justifying the killing of civilians.

How can they be sabo when they are not part of the biafran military. If we where to go by your logic, the Nigerian government should have wiped out all the communities and their leaders where boko haram thrives. But you wouldn’t push for that would you?

All this nonsense appeal to pity don’t work on me. So stop saying I’m evil coz I don’t give a bleep about emotions here.

Are all those the Biafrans took from the ethnic minorities soldiers?

All is fair in war and there are even times which the USA have indulged in what they stylishly called collateral Damage.

When they nuked Hiroshima, do you mean they only killed military men? Do you know the civilian casualties in that strike? What about Vietnam?

In war several atrocities are made sometimes under duress and the most barbaric strategies are sometimes deployed based on the situation. I am not denying that Nigeria military committed crimes BUT you should not absolve the Biafrans of their crimes against minorities too.

If you can condemn Nigeria military then you are a hypocrite for absolving the Biafran military from blames under the pretext of eradicating Sabo. Rubbish!

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by horsepower102: 2:08am On May 04
Igboid:


Good one bro.
When Ihejirika came down hard on the terrorists, they all started crying that he was avenging the Biafra massacre on NORTH.

That’s to tell you that these monsters in human bodies know the evils that they did towards igbos during and after the war. They are desperately reaching to justify it. Any neutral move igbos make as in the case of ihejirika, they look at it through a distorted lens.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by horsepower102: 2:11am On May 04
Iegendhero:


All this nonsense appeal to pity don’t work on me. So stop saying I’m evil coz I don’t give a bleep about emotions here.

Are all those the Biafrans took from the ethnic minorities soldiers?

All is fair in war and there are even times which the USA have indulged in what they stylishly called collateral Damage.

When they nuked Hiroshima, do you mean they only killed military men? Do you know the civilian casualties in that strike? What about Vietnam?

In war several atrocities are made sometimes under duress and the most barbaric strategies are sometimes deployed based on the situation. I am not denying that Nigeria military committed crimes BUT you should not absolve the Biafrans of their crimes against minorities too.


Yes in Nigeria all is fair in war as long as it’s Igbos that are involved.

The massacre of Igbo civilians all over Nigeria was justified by nzeogu’s coup. But no other groups was massacred when leaders from their tribes committed the same coups.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:14am On May 04
Iegendhero:


All this nonsense appeal to pity don’t work on me. So stop saying I’m evil coz I don’t give a bleep about emotions here.

Are all those the Biafrans took from the ethnic minorities soldiers?

All is fair in war and there are even times which the USA have indulged in what they stylishly called collateral Damage.

When they nuked Hiroshima, do you mean they only killed military men? Do you know the civilian casualties in that strike? What about Vietnam?

In war several atrocities are made sometimes under duress and the most barbaric strategies are sometimes deployed based on the situation. I am not denying that Nigeria military committed crimes BUT you should not absolve the Biafrans of their crimes against minorities too.


Well. You can't be dropping a nuke on a people and still want to be country men with them in the future.
USA dropped nuke on Japan because they are two independent countries, and for all it's worth, Japanese were the aggressors who were in alliance with Nazi Germany to invade and rule the world.

Nigeria is not going to kill all the people in Borno because they are habouring Boko Haram or are sympathetic with them, do you know why?
Because Borno people are supposed to be Nigerians. You don't kill your people.

If you are going to unleash massacre on Isheagu and indeed Igbo civilians on Grand scale on account of habouring Biafran soldiers, then you must have determined those civilians are not Nigerians and you can't seriously been seen in the future wondering why they will never embrace your one Nigeria mantra.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 2:14am On May 04
horsepower102:


Yes in Nigeria all is fair in war as long as it’s Igbos that are involved.

The massacre of Igbo civilians all over Nigeria was justified by nzeogu’s coup. But no other groups was massacred when leaders from their tribes committed the same coups.

That’s because the Igbos don’t think before acting in their majority which is one of the greatest disadvantage you guys are encountering as a tribe.

You kill the tribesleader of other ethnic group and still have the liver for circulating pamphlets of the slain leader in the same North as a mocking mechanism in a very volatile North which had some past history of same.

Action beget consequences and you can’t simulate reaction of people to an injustice against them no matter how small you think it could be.

This is not about me supporting genocide, but I’m just telling you the situation and how human nature work especially when politics is mixed with hate.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:15am On May 04
horsepower102:


Yes in Nigeria all is fair in war as long as it’s Igbos that are involved.

The massacre of Igbo civilians all over Nigeria was justified by nzeogu’s coup. But no other groups was massacred when leaders from their tribes committed the same coups.

The Massacre of MASOB and IPOB members by Nigerian military and police for waving Biafran flag was justified by these evil people, until they went on their senseless SARS protest and got served by the same monsters they made.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by horsepower102: 2:18am On May 04
Iegendhero:


That’s because the Igbos don’t think before acting in their majority which is one of the greatest disadvantage you guys are encountering as a tribe.

You kill the tribesleader of other ethnic group and still have the liver for circulating pamphlets of the slain leader in the same North as a mocking mechanism in a very volatile North which had some past history of same.

Action beget consequences and you can’t simulate reaction of people to an injustice against them no matter how small you think it could be.

This is not about me supporting genocide, but I’m just telling you the situation and how human nature work especially when politics is mixed with hate.

And this explanation and justification makes perfect sense to you. Ok

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:19am On May 04
Iegendhero:


That’s because the Igbos don’t think before acting in their majority which is one of the greatest disadvantage you guys are encountering as a tribe.

You kill the tribesleader of other ethnic group and still have the liver for circulating pamphlets of the slain leader in the same North as a mocking mechanism in a very volatile North which had some past history of same.

Action beget consequences and you can’t simulate reaction of people to an injustice against them no matter how small you think it could be.

This is not about me supporting genocide, but I’m just telling you the situation and how human nature work especially when politics is mixed with hate.

You know we have asked for the evidence of Igbos circulating pamphlets of slain Northern leaders since 2007 on this NL.
You forerunners here couldn't provide it.

I also noticed that you lots don't bring up the "Ewu na-ebe Akwa blackmail too, after that one had been debunked, as we know the song came out years before Saraduna murder and that the artist who sang it, was an Ijaw man and not even Igbo.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 2:19am On May 04
Igboid:


Well. You can't be dropping a nuke on a people and still want to be country men with them in the future.
USA dropped nuke on Japan because they are two independent countries, and for all it's worth, Japanese were the aggressors who were in alliance with Nazi Germany.

Nigeria is not going to kill all the people in Borno because they are habouring Boko Haram or are sympathetic with them, do you know why?
Because Borno people are supposed to be Nigerians.

If you are going to unleash massacre on Isheagu and indeed Igbo civilians on Grand scale on account of habouring Biafran soldiers, then you must have determined those civilians are not Nigerians.


Again you are making the mistake.

Whether Nigeria is fighting a Biafra that will come back to their fold OR a Biafra that might secede successfully, it is a war.

Whether the USA is fighting a different country Japan do not justify nuking civilians. It is just a decision they had to take to cripple the imperial Japan eveb at the cost of civilian lives (collateral damage).

You either condemn USA nuking Japan, Biafra army killing minorities civilians, Nigeria killing minorities civilian OR you support the three scenarios.

You can’t choose one to support or oppose. It’s not done like that.

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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Iegendhero: 2:21am On May 04
Igboid:


You know we have asked for the evidence of Igbos circulating pamphlets of slain Northern leaders since 2007 on this NL.
You forerunners here couldn't provide it.

I also noticed that you lots don't bring up the "Ewu na-ebe Akwa blackmail too, after that one had been debunked, as we know the song came out years before Saraduna murder and that the artist who sang it, was an Ijaw man and not even Igbo.

The first image is the decree by Ironsi against the peddling of mockery news. It was borne out of the Igbos mocking them in the North for the death of their tribesleader. Ironsi as wise as he is knows his kinsmen are setting themselves up for genocide with their thoughtless mannerism but it was too late to mend.

You are talking to Legendhero here, I don’t speak without having evidence to back my assertions.

The other picture is the rendering of the bread loaf and other pamphlets the igbos used in mocking the Northerners.

Even studying the Igbo with their current mannerism, every sane person will believe they can do this judging at their way of taking action before thinking.





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Re: Remembering The Isheagu Massacre Of May 1968 by Igboid: 2:28am On May 04
Iegendhero:


Again you are making the mistake.

Whether Nigeria is fighting a Biafra they will come back to their fold OR a Biafra that might secede successfully, it is a war.

Whether the USA is fighting a different country Japan do not justify nuking civilians. It is just a decision they had to take to cripple the imperial Japan seven at the cost of civilian lives (collateral damage).

You either condemn USA nuking Japan, Biafra army killing minorities civilians, Nigeria killing minorities civilian OR you support the three scenarios.

You can’t choose one to support or oppose. It’s not done like that.

You haven't provided any evidence of Biafra killing Minority civilians. Does it even make sense? I mean the likes of Effiong,Kogbara,Mbu etc were highranked minorities in Biafra government, how exactly would Biafra conduct targeted Massacre on their people without them challenging such decisions?
Biafra was not same as Igbo. Biafra had minorities handling critical decisions. Infact the leader of the Radio Biafra Okoko Ndem was from Calabar area too just like Effiong.

The whole talk of Biafra killing Minorities civilians has no substance. If Biafra were, the minority officials in Biafra government would know and they would be the ones telling the world.

So why is Nigeria not nuking entire Borno, Adamawa and Yobe so that the Boko Haram war can end?
Shouldn't those citizens there be used as good collateral damage?
Afterall for we know, Borno might become Independent ISWAP country from Nigeria tomorrow if BOKO succeeds, so why don't we line up all Borno indigenes and massacre them.
Or does this idea only work with Igbos?

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