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The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by Yinksdavid(m): 4:31pm On Nov 03, 2021
Microsoft’s own registry hack makes upgrades painless.

It turns out there’s a dramatically easier way to install Windows 11 on computers with older CPUs — with no need to reformat your drive, erase your files, or even burn the ISO to an external USB drive.

If you’re currently seeing “This PC doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements” or “The processor isn’t currently supported for Windows 11,” there’s a Microsoft-approved registry hack that should instantly make it better.

How to See Why Your PC Is Unsupported

You can check if Windows 11 supports your PC by downloading and running Microsoft’s PC Health Check app. If your PC is supported, upgrading to Windows 11 is easy. You can do it in just a few clicks.

If Windows 11 doesn’t officially support your PC, the PC Health Check will say it “doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements” and tell you why. If the tool reports your PC is unsupported, the process you need to follow will depend on the problem it reports. You may just have to change a setting in your PC’s UEFI firmware (the modern replacement for the BIOS) to make your PC supported—or the process may be more involved.



How to Enable TPM 2.0

Windows 11 officially requires TPM 2.0. (However, there’s an easy way to install Windows 11 if your PC only has TPM 1.2, which we’ll cover below). If the tool reports that your computer doesn’t have TPM, there’s a chance your PC does have TPM—but it may be disabled by default.

To check for and enable TPM 2.0, you will need to enter your computer’s UEFI firmware settings (the modern replacement for the BIOS). Look for an option named something like “TPM,” “Intel PTT,” “AMD PSP fTPM,” or “Security Device.” You may find it in the main UEFI settings menu or in a menu named something like “Advanced,” “Trusted Computing,” or “Security.”

Registry Hack for Unsupported CPUs and/or Only TPM 1.2

If your only problem is that your computer has an unsupported CPU and/or that it only has TPM 1.2 instead of TPM 2.0, this is the easiest problem to get around.

If you so choose, you can get around this restriction with a simple Windows Registry change. Making this change will cause Windows 11 to ignore the CPU version check and install even if only TPM 1.2 is present. However, this won’t eliminate other checks—for example, if your computer doesn’t have a TPM at all, this registry change won’t let you upgrade.

Warning: The Windows Registry is complex, and you should be careful what you add, edit, or delete in it. You could cause problems with your Windows installation. If you’re not comfortable editing the registry, you may want to avoid upgrading. However, as long as you follow our advice here, you shouldn’t have any problems.

To get started, open the Registry Editor. You can press Windows+R, type “regedit”, and press Enter, or type “registry” into the Start menu’s search box and click the “Registry Editor” shortcut.



Type the following below address into the address bar in the Registry Editor window (or navigate to it in the left pane):

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup



Right-click in the right pane, select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value, and enter the following text as the name:

AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU



Double-click the “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” value here, set it to “1”, and click “OK.”



These files work in the same way as the above registry hack—they just set the “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” value to “1” (to enable unsupported upgrades) or “0” (to revert to the default setting).



To ensure the change takes effect, reboot your PC before continuing.

You can now download and run the Windows Installation Assistant tool from Microsoft’s website to upgrade your PC to Windows 11, just as if it had a supported CPU or TPM 2.0. You’ll just have to agree to a warning first.

Note: Bear in mind that this only does two things: It makes Windows 11 ignore the CPU requirement, and it lets Windows 11 install with TPM 1.2 instead of TPM 2.0. It won’t get around other requirements. For example, if your PC doesn’t have a TPM at all or has only a legacy BIOS instead of UEFI firmware, this registry setting won’t help.

PCs With No TPM at All, No UEFI, or Other Major Problems

If the tips above and the registry hack aren’t enough for your PC, now things start to get dicey. If your computer doesn’t have a TPM at all, for example, it’s really unsupported. What does that mean? Well, Microsoft provides an official way to install Windows 11 with older CPUs and TPM 1.2 chips, for example. You just have to flip a registry setting. It’s unsupported, but Microsoft helps you do it.

There are reportedly ways to install Windows 11 even if you don’t have TPM 1.2 or UEFI. But this is really unsupported—you’re even more at risk of encountering bugs and not getting future security updates if you hack your way around even these base-level requirements. We’ve also seen mixed reports of success from people following these tricks. Even if it works for you, an update in a few months may result in your computer blue-screening, breaking your operating system and forcing you to reinstall Windows 10.

I recommend you not to follow any of these extreme tricks—you’re setting yourself up for trouble ( I did mine on a test environment on my Virtual Machine). Windows 10 will function just fine until October 2025, and you’ll probably want a new PC by then if your current PC is too old for even TPM 1.2.

1 Like

Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by uchaymart(m): 8:11pm On Nov 03, 2021
Yinksdavid:

Microsoft’s own registry hack makes upgrades painless.

It turns out there’s a dramatically easier way to install Windows 11 on computers with older CPUs — with no need to reformat your drive, erase your files, or even burn the ISO to an external USB drive.

If you’re currently seeing “This PC doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements” or “The processor isn’t currently supported for Windows 11,” there’s a Microsoft-approved registry hack that should instantly make it better.

How to See Why Your PC Is Unsupported

You can check if Windows 11 supports your PC by downloading and running Microsoft’s PC Health Check app. If your PC is supported, upgrading to Windows 11 is easy. You can do it in just a few clicks.

If Windows 11 doesn’t officially support your PC, the PC Health Check will say it “doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements” and tell you why. If the tool reports your PC is unsupported, the process you need to follow will depend on the problem it reports. You may just have to change a setting in your PC’s UEFI firmware (the modern replacement for the BIOS) to make your PC supported—or the process may be more involved.



How to Enable TPM 2.0

Windows 11 officially requires TPM 2.0. (However, there’s an easy way to install Windows 11 if your PC only has TPM 1.2, which we’ll cover below). If the tool reports that your computer doesn’t have TPM, there’s a chance your PC does have TPM—but it may be disabled by default.

To check for and enable TPM 2.0, you will need to enter your computer’s UEFI firmware settings (the modern replacement for the BIOS). Look for an option named something like “TPM,” “Intel PTT,” “AMD PSP fTPM,” or “Security Device.” You may find it in the main UEFI settings menu or in a menu named something like “Advanced,” “Trusted Computing,” or “Security.”

Registry Hack for Unsupported CPUs and/or Only TPM 1.2

If your only problem is that your computer has an unsupported CPU and/or that it only has TPM 1.2 instead of TPM 2.0, this is the easiest problem to get around.

If you so choose, you can get around this restriction with a simple Windows Registry change. Making this change will cause Windows 11 to ignore the CPU version check and install even if only TPM 1.2 is present. However, this won’t eliminate other checks—for example, if your computer doesn’t have a TPM at all, this registry change won’t let you upgrade.

Warning: The Windows Registry is complex, and you should be careful what you add, edit, or delete in it. You could cause problems with your Windows installation. If you’re not comfortable editing the registry, you may want to avoid upgrading. However, as long as you follow our advice here, you shouldn’t have any problems.

To get started, open the Registry Editor. You can press Windows+R, type “regedit”, and press Enter, or type “registry” into the Start menu’s search box and click the “Registry Editor” shortcut.



Type the following below address into the address bar in the Registry Editor window (or navigate to it in the left pane):

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup



Right-click in the right pane, select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value, and enter the following text as the name:

AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU



Double-click the “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” value here, set it to “1”, and click “OK.”



These files work in the same way as the above registry hack—they just set the “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” value to “1” (to enable unsupported upgrades) or “0” (to revert to the default setting).



To ensure the change takes effect, reboot your PC before continuing.

You can now download and run the Windows Installation Assistant tool from Microsoft’s website to upgrade your PC to Windows 11, just as if it had a supported CPU or TPM 2.0. You’ll just have to agree to a warning first.

Note: Bear in mind that this only does two things: It makes Windows 11 ignore the CPU requirement, and it lets Windows 11 install with TPM 1.2 instead of TPM 2.0. It won’t get around other requirements. For example, if your PC doesn’t have a TPM at all or has only a legacy BIOS instead of UEFI firmware, this registry setting won’t help.

PCs With No TPM at All, No UEFI, or Other Major Problems

If the tips above and the registry hack aren’t enough for your PC, now things start to get dicey. If your computer doesn’t have a TPM at all, for example, it’s really unsupported. What does that mean? Well, Microsoft provides an official way to install Windows 11 with older CPUs and TPM 1.2 chips, for example. You just have to flip a registry setting. It’s unsupported, but Microsoft helps you do it.

There are reportedly ways to install Windows 11 even if you don’t have TPM 1.2 or UEFI. But this is really unsupported—you’re even more at risk of encountering bugs and not getting future security updates if you hack your way around even these base-level requirements. We’ve also seen mixed reports of success from people following these tricks. Even if it works for you, an update in a few months may result in your computer blue-screening, breaking your operating system and forcing you to reinstall Windows 10.

I recommend you not to follow any of these extreme tricks—you’re setting yourself up for trouble ( I did mine on a test environment on my Virtual Machine). Windows 10 will function just fine until October 2025, and you’ll probably want a new PC by then if your current PC is too old for even TPM 1.2.


Good write up as always.
1. Does one need a windows 11 activation key after this hack when the installation is successful or a valid windows 10 activation key would still be useful.

2. In the case of a PC whose TPM is 1.2 but this hack registry is implemented, does the PC stand a risk of not getting future security updates?

BTW I just want to understand all it takes, make sure it's safe for my PC that has TPM 1.2.

Awaiting your response/support

1 Like

Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by Yinksdavid(m): 8:35pm On Nov 03, 2021
uchaymart:


Good write up as always.
1. Does one need a windows 11 activation key after this hack when the installation is successful or a valid windows 10 activation key would still be useful.

2. In the case of a PC whose TPM is 1.2 but this hack registry is implemented, does the PC stand a risk of not getting future security updates?

BTW I just want to understand all it takes, make sure it's safe for my PC that has TPM 1.2.

Awaiting your response/support

Thanks Bro. To answer your questions

1. You can upgrade to Windows 11 or download, install, and use Windows 11 without a license key. However, a few limitations do come into place until you buy a Windows 11 product key.

When the setup wizard asks you to Activate Windows, click or tap on “I don’t have a product key” at the bottom of the window.

Once that’s out of the way, continue installing Windows 11 as you normally would. Microsoft won’t ask again for the Windows 11 product key during the installation.

2. Yes, you wont be getting future security and patches updates if its bypassed so i advice this is used for a limited time or trial. I actually performed the bypass on a virtual machine on my laptop. Though i have access to the activation key, I am not ready to fully migrate to the 11 OS now.

Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by somehow: 10:16am On Nov 10, 2021
Hello

I need to activate my Windows 10

Do you sell genuine keys or how do you go about it?
Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by Yinksdavid(m): 10:42am On Nov 10, 2021
somehow:
Hello

I need to activate my Windows 10

Do you sell genuine keys or how do you go about it?

Yes i do sell genuine activation/license key. Reach out to me via my whatsapp number on my signature.

I buy it on my Microsoft portal on request by clients
Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by somehow: 11:11am On Nov 10, 2021
Yinksdavid:


Yes i do sell genuine activation/license key. Reach out to me via my whatsapp number on my signature.

I buy it on my Microsoft portal on request by clients

Alright.
Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by Masco2006: 6:34pm On Dec 16, 2021
How can I install TPM 1.2 on my Dell vostro 3450 laptop?
Re: The Easy Way To Install Windows 11 On Unsupported Cpus by Yinksdavid(m): 6:57pm On Dec 16, 2021
Enabling the Trusted Platform Module as TPM 1.2

Procedure

1. During the compute module startup sequence, press the F9 key to access System Utilities.

2. From the System Utilities screen select System Configuration > BIOS/Platform Configuration (RBSU) > Server Security > Trusted Platform Module options.

3. Change the "TPM Mode Switch Operation" to TPM 1.2.

4. Verify "TPM Visibility" is Visible.

5. Press the F10 key to save your selection.

6. When prompted to save the change in System Utilities, do one of the following:

a. If in graphical mode, click Yes.

b. If in text mode, press the Y key.

7. Press the ESC key to exit System Utilities.

The compute module reboots a second time without user input. During this reboot, the TPM setting becomes effective.

8. Enable TPM functionality in the OS, such as Microsoft Windows BitLocker or measured boot

The above is the steps to enable TPM on your work station but i also found one specifically for Dell laptops and below is the link

https://www.dell.com/support/kbdoc/en-uk/000189676/windows-10-how-to-enable-the-tpm-trusted-platform-module

1 Like

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