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Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) - Politics - Nairaland

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Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 11:49am On Mar 27, 2012
Here is a recording of interview of Maryam Abacha (the late wife of the military leader Gen. Sani Abacha) at Freedom Radio. in the Kowane Tsnuntsu Program on Saturday 29th May, 2010 anchored by Lami Sumayya Murtala and Maimuna Saidu Bello.

http://www.freedomradionig.com/news/interviews-and-special-events/item/38-interview-with-hajiya-maryam-abacha

Can anybody translate this recording of Maryam Abacha’s interview from Hausa to English?

This is a rare opportunity to hear the views of a key member of the Abacha family in their own words. Usually journalist are reporting what they say and most times distorting the truth.

Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 11:11am On Mar 29, 2012
Any Hausa speakers able to translate?

GenBuhari: Can anybody translate this from Hausa to English?

http://www.freedomradionig.com/news/interviews-and-special-events/item/38-interview-with-hajiya-maryam-abacha
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 10:46pm On Mar 30, 2012
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 1:56am On Apr 03, 2012
If you can understand the interview please give me the gist of what the former first lady is saying.
Please!
GenBuhari: Can anybody translate this from Hausa to English?

http://www.freedomradionig.com/news/interviews-and-special-events/item/38-interview-with-hajiya-maryam-abacha
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by NegroNtns(m): 2:33am On Apr 03, 2012
no more translations. . . last time i translated boko haram video all of you rascals labeled me boko member.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 6:04pm On Apr 03, 2012
But Mariam Abacha is not Boko Haram undecided

Abeg, translate the interview for us. smiley
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 6:37pm On Apr 03, 2012
I know it may be time consuming , so take yout time to do a little bit of the interview whenever you get time. Even if it is translating her answer to one question at a time.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by muyoto: 7:59pm On Apr 03, 2012
@OP i actually thought you were a hausa guy
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by agent22: 8:40pm On Apr 03, 2012
No mind d genbuhari guy. He is forming as an igbo buhari supporter. Abeg translate jor.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 11:25pm On Apr 03, 2012
I am not Hausa.

I am a big supporter of Buhari and increasingly of Abacha, not because they are Hausa, but because they happen to have headed 2 of the best governments in our history.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by NegroNtns(m): 1:53am On Apr 04, 2012
Best Government Regime award goes to who, . . .Abacha you say

I will agree on Buhari anyday, but Abacha?? mahn, don't make me vex with you! >:
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by NegroNtns(m): 2:34am On Apr 04, 2012
This interview is a full 40mins long, broken into two parts. Part 1 is 33mins and 2 is 37mins. There are controversial points in this interview and I cant give everything tonight but here is the introductions into the interview. I will continue tomorrow and get everything out and put here for you.
______________________________________________________________________________________

Program Host:

May Peace be on all of you who are tuned in and listening to our broadcast at the present moment as we bring you our program “kowane tsuntsu”. Kowane Tsuntsu as you all know, is a program featured to invite important personalities of the society to come and share with us their views and opinions about our society. We announced in our schedule today that we will have the honor of hosting Hajiya Maryam Abacha, God willing! May God give her the will in our session of this interview as we converse with her.

As you all are aware, there is familiarity about Hajiya Maryam Sanni Abacha, she is the widow of former Head of State, Late General Sanni Abacha. May God give him rest and forgiveness!

Well, today we will be conversing with her to get her views on how they managed the events of that period.

Hajiya, before we enter into the main headings of our conversation, Freedom Radio welcomes you to our studio

Hajiya Maryam Abacha:

I thank you!
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 9:40pm On Apr 04, 2012
Thanks very much Negro Ntns,
I look forward to reading the rest of the translation.

Regarding Abacha's being one of our best governments, you do not have to take my word for for it , just use google and research economic performance during his reign
Nov 1993- June 1998.
Even check Nigeria's sporting achievements during the era, would indicate that something good about his government.

https://www.nairaland.com/823498/abacha-never-stole-obj-ibb
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by DuduNegro: 2:33am On Apr 05, 2012
Forget who credited him with success and consider whether or not the success was translated downstream into the society or did it end in private bank accounts in Switzerland. Abacha spent 5yrs in power, twice the time for Buhari. Buhari's success was just filtering down to the common man on the street. . . .and in a flash, they had kicked him out. Gullible Nigerians, intolerant of his disciplined approach to social and economic policies rejoiced and welcomed both Abacha and Babangida. Of course the West can never see any good in Buhari, he is trying to free Nigeria from their tentacles. . . .that's over a billion dollar a day revenue stream they will loose if he ever becomes President. Well, let me rephrase that. . . the Buhari that I knew, I dont know where he is now in his vision!

More translations and I thought I could finish all today but sorry, it is impossible with other things I do. S o i will put them here in piecemeal.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Host - Lami Murtala:
. . .and also here with me is my co-host, Maimuna Saidu Bello.

Co-host – Maimuna Saidu Bello:
Audience, may peace be with you.

Host:
Myself and Maimuna Saiid will be conducting this interview.
Hajiya, following in line with our tradition for interviewing VIPs we ask that they share with us their background and history, so I ask now that you share with our listeners your background.


Guest:
Audience, may peace and blessings of God be upon you all. My name is Maryam. My father is from Borno State and so is my mother. My father schooled in Lagos State where he met my mother and they were married and relocated to Kaduna State where I was born in March of 1947. My father was a hospital worker and also worked in some other places. He later on relocated, towards the end of 1958, to Kano and worked in all the hospitals there as well. I then started school in 1959 at the Girls School at the airport, popularly called Shekara. . . but was formerly known as PTS. I graduated there and then went to Girls Grammar School in Dalla. After graduation I was married to my husband and then we went to the South. We then started a new life and he went and joined the Army which exposed us to the national political landscape generally and the different cultures and traditions and regimes that came with that. So that’s how that went and we proceeded with life and then had our children. . . .until the time when God separated us.


Host:
May God grant him rest. Hajiya, can you recall any of your classmates and friends back in school at the airport?

Guest:
Without a doubt! I heard that there were two women from Kano that graduated ahead of our set. Ya Waude and Ya Abbas. Ya Waude’s sister also graduated from there. In the school there were. . .. . anyway in my class there was Hajiya Umma Makama, there was Hajiya Tata Saraki, there was Hajiya Halima Ladan, there was Hadiza Kofar Mata, there was Hasiya Bello and generally many more of them and I know them all and even one from my school in Dalla, uptill now we are all still together.


Host:
Okay. Hajiya, you lived with your husband in army barracks for many years. Living in barracks has its ups and downs, no doubt. In your life in the barracks, what were the lessons learnt and the favors gained?

Guest:
In the beginning there was cooperation amongst the army wives. They will come to our house and cheer. . ah, Abacha, you are married now.. . ah, you have a daughter now, … .and so on so forth. . . Some other time they came and wanted to know if I knew how to cook. They will offer to come and assit in teaching me new recipes. They will ask “do you know how to make alala, that is moin-moin. . . do you know how to fry plaintain, do you know how to cook fresh pepper soup and so on and so forth. . . This is all in effort to support and welcome in the area of household and as well child delivery and nursing. The women in the South were very helpful, cooperative and supportive.. . . particularly in the military we had that tradition of support and backing one another and keeping company.

Host:
Well, there was one group. . .the army officer’s wives association, they had their presence and how did you feature in that organization?

Guest:
Yeah, army officer’s wives association has a long history, preceeding even colonial times but the colonialists brought the army as we know it now and that’s when they started this tradition of army officers wives organization and then after independence we continued the tradition. Then during the war, our husbands, the soldiers, were young and we the wives were also young. . . .so we used to rally round and support wounded soldiers coming home from front and their families. With the dead soldiers we supported their wives and children. So that’s what we did. Then much later my husband became Brigade Commander and the officers wives organization mirrored that hierarchy and there were plenty events and programs. Then my husband became GOC, in the officers wives rank we continued our support and backing of one another with improved programs and exposure, we ran a well coordinated social program for monetary donations, food charity and condolences. After that my husband became Chief of Army Staff and then I became the overall head of the officers wives organization for the entire Army. During this tenure which lasted five years and I think within two to two and half years we already established community programs for nursery schools, primary schools, secondary schools and vocational centers and community clinics and health centers in different communities and we funded programs for providing women’s prescription drug assistance, hospital admission and their children well being. Often times we got cases where during delivery a mother might die and we will sponsor the child through school into adolescence. So we did these outreach. Then my husband became Minister of Defense and Joint Chief of Staff. . . . . .so then I launched a organization which I already thought of years earlier in NAOWA and called it Joint Officers Wives which included the wives of Army, Air Force and Navy officers, in fact, it included the wives of Police with their own version which we called Joint Forces Wives (JOFOPOCO) which served as consultative committee at the time. Then my husband became Head of State and we inaugurated a new body, Defense Wives Association. We are now at the Villa and left the affairs of Army and Military alone. So we transformed into caretaking for overall citizen affairs.

Host:
Okay., Hajiya, when you were in power you had an idea for creating a family welfare program. What led you to this idea and what successes did you score?

Guest:
Well, I am a family too and my parents are a family, all over the world everyone has and belong in a family and no aspect of social living is more worthy of charitable support than family affair. I cannot attend to the men and ignore the women, I cannot do for the women and ignore the men, I cannot attend to the needs of the children and ignore their parents. So this is why we did the family support and even prior, in Army, we also had social welfare program for women in barracks because sometimes the women often have conflict and difficulties with their husbands or with other women and wives living in the barracks. So we intervene with conflict resolution and mediation to help. At the time we were in the Villa, we visited America and met with many officers, the Army, Navy and Air Force and met with their wives and inspected their different social programs and support system. . . family support system, similar to the one I already launched here at home. So we got back and it reaffirmed the need for me to continue the goodwill of that program.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 3:50am On Apr 05, 2012
^ Nice one friend.

keep it coming!

Abacha never stole it was all a conspiracy between Western nations and Obj and IBB to discredit him and justify reversing his pro- Nigerian policy and adopting pro - IMF and World bank policies.

If a nations sporting achievement is a barometer of good governance, then realise this:
Under Abacha we won:
Africa Nations cup
2 Olympic gold medals ( only golds we ever won)


Check our economic performance:

Abacha held Naira at N22 =$1 through out his reign.

Reduced inflation from 54% to under 9%

REjected IMF and World bank loans

Prosecuted 2 wars in Sierra Leone and Liberia to rightful assert our authority as regional super power.


All this at a time when revenue from oil was a 10th of what Obj was enjoying at only $9/Barrel


What I hope this interview that you are translating would achieve is to enlighten Nigerians who have been taken in by Obj/IBB/Western nations propanganda about Abacha, this would be the first interview I have seen that gives Abacha's side of the story.



Keep it coming!
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by congoshine(m): 1:38pm On Apr 05, 2012
I agree , Abacha probably did better on the international & economic level than OBJ.

However on the home front he stifled decent and was as ruthless a dictator as they come.

Corruption and nepotism was the order of the day & because he didnt trust anyone,the country slid into a decline.

OBJ was a unqualifiable disaster,I have never seen someone with so much opportunity ,let down himself so much.but Abacha wasn't necessarily better.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 1:51pm On Apr 05, 2012
@congoshine,
This your comment is baseless and incorrect, the fact that you can make such a comment would indicate that you were probably too young during Abacha era and all you know is Obasanjo's and Western nation countries' propaganda.

congoshine: I agree , Abacha probably did better on the international & economic level than OBJ.

However on the home front he stifled decent and was as ruthless a dictator as they come.

Corruption and nepotism was the order of the day & because he didnt trust anyone,the country slid into a decline.

OBJ was a unqualifiable disaster,I have never seen someone with so much opportunity ,let down himself so much.but Abacha wasn't necessarily better.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by Beaf1: 2:07pm On Apr 05, 2012
Some Bigots up there thought GenBuhari is Hausaman.
So supporting Buhari simply means one is an hausaman or from the north. SMH

GenBuhari and DuduNegro good work. You guys are too mush.

1 Like

Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 6:22pm On Apr 07, 2012
Dudu_Negro,
Please continue oh!! I am waiting in anticipation for your translation. smiley

Dudu_Negro: Forget who credited him with success and consider whether or not the success was translated downstream into the society or did it end in private bank accounts in Switzerland. Abacha spent 5yrs in power, twice the time for Buhari. Buhari's success was just filtering down to the common man on the street. . . .and in a flash, they had kicked him out. Gullible Nigerians, intolerant of his disciplined approach to social and economic policies rejoiced and welcomed both Abacha and Babangida. Of course the West can never see any good in Buhari, he is trying to free Nigeria from their tentacles. . . .that's over a billion dollar a day revenue stream they will loose if he ever becomes President. Well, let me rephrase that. . . the Buhari that I knew, I dont know where he is now in his vision!

More translations and I thought I could finish all today but sorry, it is impossible with other things I do. S o i will put them here in piecemeal.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Host - Lami Murtala:
. . .and also here with me is my co-host, Maimuna Saidu Bello.

Co-host – Maimuna Saidu Bello:
Audience, may peace be with you.

Host:
Myself and Maimuna Saiid will be conducting this interview.
Hajiya, following in line with our tradition for interviewing VIPs we ask that they share with us their background and history, so I ask now that you share with our listeners your background.


Guest:
Audience, may peace and blessings of God be upon you all. My name is Maryam. My father is from Borno State and so is my mother. My father schooled in Lagos State where he met my mother and they were married and relocated to Kaduna State where I was born in March of 1947. My father was a hospital worker and also worked in some other places. He later on relocated, towards the end of 1958, to Kano and worked in all the hospitals there as well. I then started school in 1959 at the Girls School at the airport, popularly called Shekara. . . but was formerly known as PTS. I graduated there and then went to Girls Grammar School in Dalla. After graduation I was married to my husband and then we went to the South. We then started a new life and he went and joined the Army which exposed us to the national political landscape generally and the different cultures and traditions and regimes that came with that. So that’s how that went and we proceeded with life and then had our children. . . .until the time when God separated us.


Host:
May God grant him rest. Hajiya, can you recall any of your classmates and friends back in school at the airport?

Guest:
Without a doubt! I heard that there were two women from Kano that graduated ahead of our set. Ya Waude and Ya Abbas. Ya Waude’s sister also graduated from there. In the school there were. . .. . anyway in my class there was Hajiya Umma Makama, there was Hajiya Tata Saraki, there was Hajiya Halima Ladan, there was Hadiza Kofar Mata, there was Hasiya Bello and generally many more of them and I know them all and even one from my school in Dalla, uptill now we are all still together.


Host:
Okay. Hajiya, you lived with your husband in army barracks for many years. Living in barracks has its ups and downs, no doubt. In your life in the barracks, what were the lessons learnt and the favors gained?

Guest:
In the beginning there was cooperation amongst the army wives. They will come to our house and cheer. . ah, Abacha, you are married now.. . ah, you have a daughter now, … .and so on so forth. . . Some other time they came and wanted to know if I knew how to cook. They will offer to come and assit in teaching me new recipes. They will ask “do you know how to make alala, that is moin-moin. . . do you know how to fry plaintain, do you know how to cook fresh pepper soup and so on and so forth. . . This is all in effort to support and welcome in the area of household and as well child delivery and nursing. The women in the South were very helpful, cooperative and supportive.. . . particularly in the military we had that tradition of support and backing one another and keeping company.

Host:
Well, there was one group. . .the army officer’s wives association, they had their presence and how did you feature in that organization?

Guest:
Yeah, army officer’s wives association has a long history, preceeding even colonial times but the colonialists brought the army as we know it now and that’s when they started this tradition of army officers wives organization and then after independence we continued the tradition. Then during the war, our husbands, the soldiers, were young and we the wives were also young. . . .so we used to rally round and support wounded soldiers coming home from front and their families. With the dead soldiers we supported their wives and children. So that’s what we did. Then much later my husband became Brigade Commander and the officers wives organization mirrored that hierarchy and there were plenty events and programs. Then my husband became GOC, in the officers wives rank we continued our support and backing of one another with improved programs and exposure, we ran a well coordinated social program for monetary donations, food charity and condolences. After that my husband became Chief of Army Staff and then I became the overall head of the officers wives organization for the entire Army. During this tenure which lasted five years and I think within two to two and half years we already established community programs for nursery schools, primary schools, secondary schools and vocational centers and community clinics and health centers in different communities and we funded programs for providing women’s prescription drug assistance, hospital admission and their children well being. Often times we got cases where during delivery a mother might die and we will sponsor the child through school into adolescence. So we did these outreach. Then my husband became Minister of Defense and Joint Chief of Staff. . . . . .so then I launched a organization which I already thought of years earlier in NAOWA and called it Joint Officers Wives which included the wives of Army, Air Force and Navy officers, in fact, it included the wives of Police with their own version which we called Joint Forces Wives (JOFOPOCO) which served as consultative committee at the time. Then my husband became Head of State and we inaugurated a new body, Defense Wives Association. We are now at the Villa and left the affairs of Army and Military alone. So we transformed into caretaking for overall citizen affairs.

Host:
Okay., Hajiya, when you were in power you had an idea for creating a family welfare program. What led you to this idea and what successes did you score?

Guest:
Well, I am a family too and my parents are a family, all over the world everyone has and belong in a family and no aspect of social living is more worthy of charitable support than family affair. I cannot attend to the men and ignore the women, I cannot do for the women and ignore the men, I cannot attend to the needs of the children and ignore their parents. So this is why we did the family support and even prior, in Army, we also had social welfare program for women in barracks because sometimes the women often have conflict and difficulties with their husbands or with other women and wives living in the barracks. So we intervene with conflict resolution and mediation to help. At the time we were in the Villa, we visited America and met with many officers, the Army, Navy and Air Force and met with their wives and inspected their different social programs and support system. . . family support system, similar to the one I already launched here at home. So we got back and it reaffirmed the need for me to continue the goodwill of that program.

Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by DuduNegro: 7:34pm On Apr 07, 2012
Hey, I did not do any translating yesterday, no time at all to attend to it but I did some in the past hour and here they are. I am not going to have any time for rest of today to do more translation. So far I am at 20mins mark of the first 30mins recording. I wish I had a full time to dedicate but I don't. Sorry.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Host:
So, like what different programs were included in that support system at that time because you didn’t just stop there, the system was adopted broadly and had representation nationally.

Guest:
Yes, at the time we began to hear rumors that the First Lady had no political authority to initiate or implement policies, to the extent even that legal suits were filed in court alleging that the First Lady had no power of office and so on and so forth so I then wrote to the Secretary to The Federal Government asking for guidelines in my role and to explain the boundaries. . . . . . .

Host:
. . . where you can have involvement and participate or not. . .

Guest:
. . . yes, . . . . within which I can participate or not. So their response came back with guidelines instructing on limited participation in some areas and listing the specifics areas where I can have a full authority. So then I continued on with the family support program and initiated a campaign rally nationwide for its support. We then obtained official backing of the government to develop a blue print that will document and detail the procedures for the family support. Then we saw that first priority was health! Under this program we built and commissioned plenty national hospitals and also created trust funds. We raised funds and built national hospital at Abuja and built many hospitals around the country and even here in Kano we built a women’s hospital. In Sokoto we built a special hospital beside regular general hospital. . . we built a hospital that specialized on the treatment of a disease called noma disease.

This is a disease that destroys body tissues and the foreign experts were raising awareness that this disease is prevalent in the Sokoto, Katsina and Niger areas. My understanding is that this is a genetic disease. So we commissioned the hospital which uptil today is still functioning in Sokoto. Then working with Governors wives we deployed hospitals nationwide. There is no state that does not have a hospital and no state that does not have a vocational training center, we also opened markets. We authorized Governors wives to implement programs specific to the needs and priorities of the citizens of her state at the time. Very often in Nigeria there is no tap water , so we installed plenty boreholes, we supported widows and orphans. Actually, I was the one that implemented the disabled support program for paraplegic, blinds, I assembled them and created an association for them with funding and a secretariat and it is still a functioning program till today. For the widows we gave support, we created a support association. . .. . .particularly in the South they often remain single after they have lost their husbands and they are left to continue life without benefits. So we struggled to modify the local laws so as to protect these women but their culture was too entrenched to make any gain and our efforts failed so the association for self-support and government support was a way to get them help.

Then we created an association of retired soldiers wives because they too don’t have a husband. . .. oh no, they have husbands but their husbands are now without work and honestly, for some of them their men left at a very junior rank and their retirement earnings is quite insignificant to support their lifestyle. So we created a self-support system for them too and also a doorway through which generosity of people can help support them, as well insurance and government home grants. So that’s all about health and well being but the main success was on prevention. I instructed that we ought to have a prevention program for women and children. Usually, we get inoculations for disease prevention from UNICEF, this inoculation was called EPI. But on many occasions they are not available at every hospital and even where it is available they often run short and not enough to go around for the children and so the individual will have to go to private clinic to get it, so we came up with a program. . . national program for immunization. We then obtained money from local government ministry since they were not using the money and so we used that because we felt every citizen of Nigeria is entitled to enjoy some benefits of the oil profits that God has blessed this country with, especially where healthcare and well being is concerned. So, on and on the program of prevention gained ground and included scheduled check-ups for children. Then you also have sick children who were born with genetic disease or deformities, the types of children that end up in Torrey Homes and so on. So support programs were also created and scaled to their needs and care. Thank God, we did what we had the capacity to accomplish.

Host:
Okay, in regard to the women and children hospital in Abuja which now has been redesignated and called National Hospital and is run by the Federal Government, do you think it has continued with the legacy you left in place in terms of its operations or has the new leadership gone on a different path?

Guest:
Well, what we intended was not for it to be a national hospital, it was created as a Family Support and National Hospital for Women and Children. It wasn’t just a hospital for women and children in the ordinary sense but they also had a program for babysitting. Generally the women and their children had a higher proportion cases of sickness and illness. There are various infant mortality cases attributed to childbirth sickness and illness and a child born underweight need intensive care and attention and so on and so forth, even we women we often take ill because of the nature God has given us. . . from menstruation, childbirth and depression. . and so on and so forth. This is why we gave dedication to the care of women and children. Then with the transition into civilian rule and its attending politics, the Family Support was dropped. . .and then gradually the focus on children was edged out and so all you have now is just National Hospital. Well, you are not a stranger to the affairs of politics in this country, we pray that God repair these affairs for us.

This hospital was intended well and had a good beginning but then the people that took after us had gone away from what the pioneers created it to be. You know whatever was reformed will not be same in the way it was started, so people went into recreating and reforming without consulting with the founders, they had their own mistakes and so ended with a product completely different from the blueprint. But the hospital is still there and running. Nonetheless, it belongs to the Federal Government and is not a private enterprise.

Host:
Okay, Hajiya, this country has witnessed different colors of regime, from civilian to military and from military to civilian, and so on. In your own outlook, what is the difference?

Guest:
The difference is . . .

Host:
. . . . . .it’s a Nigerian thing! The civilian and the military, the line that separates them is very blurry. . .

*Studio Laughter*. . .

Host:
. . . . perhaps you might have something to contribute that will not be deemed controversial statement. . . perhaps!.


Guest:
. . . . . speech censorship is just as current under civilian as it is under military regimes. . . . .

*Studio Laughter*. . . . .

Host:
. . . . they are all feared, we are afraid of them, if not their guns, then their jails!

*more laughter from studio*....
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 11:06pm On Apr 07, 2012
@Dudu_Negro,
Great job.
I really appreciate this.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 7:08pm On Apr 11, 2012
@Dudu_Negro,
Please do continue your excellent translation.
I am eager to read more smiley.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 8:41pm On Apr 12, 2012
@Dudu_Negro
I hope you have not forgotten to finish this translation.

Please I am still waiting with great anticipation.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by baslone: 10:18pm On Apr 12, 2012
Interesting!
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 2:50pm On Apr 16, 2012
Dudu_Negro,
Please continue your translations.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by DuduNegro: 3:33pm On Apr 16, 2012
Mahn, this lady is not saying anything you dont already know. Tell Seun to pay me for the time so I can finish the rest translations. Future translations will be on paid time as well. SEUN, do you hear me?
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 11:14pm On Apr 16, 2012
Dudu_Negro,
I want to hear what she has to say in her own words.
I have searched high and low for an interview where we get to hear the Abacha family answer the allegations made against them (in their own words).
Please continue the translation na!.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by NegroNtns(m): 5:26am On Apr 17, 2012
You will have to wait your turn then. . . I have many things Im involved in at moment and each is equally demanding. I get to it when I can or ask other Hausa speakers in here to fill in and help. Rhino sabi Hausa well, Ndu_Chucks, Namfav, Auren Fulani, . . . you feel me?
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 9:53am On Apr 17, 2012
Thanks Dudu_Negro.
I appreciate it time comsuming.

I also understand that it would be difficult to translate the views or words of someone if you disagree with what they are saying.

However, I would like to assure you that this is very important translation because there is virtually no other interview that coould be found where Nigeria has been given the opportunity to hear the Abacha family's side of the story.

I am urging you to persevere, even if you translate only one sentence a day it would still be worthwile.
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 2:04am On Apr 23, 2012
Dudu_Negro,
Please continue, even if you translate one question at a time.

Please ooh!
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by isalegan2: 1:37am On Apr 25, 2012
Go on then, Broda Dudu Negro. smiley Good job. cool

BTW, GenBuhari, sorry I have not fulfilled my volunteer work on the other thread either. I also have other pressing issues that prevent me from having the focus to research what we previously discussed. Pele joo. Say "Hi" to your namesake for me. cheesy
Re: Abacha's wife interview - her own words (translated from hausa by Negro_Ntn) by GenBuhari(m): 3:21am On Apr 25, 2012
^ Thanks madam. smiley
Please help me beg him.

regarding the research you promised to do for the Nigeria history thread, I fully understand it is not easy to get the time when you are busy, but please keep it on you task list tongue smiley

@ General Muhammadu Buhari (rtd): Hi
I just said "Hi" to him as you requested wink tongue

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