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Programming / What Is The Most Preferred Programming Language For A Web-based Startup? by MadNuke(m): 12:12pm On Sep 09, 2017
It doesn't matter much.

You are going to build a web browser hosted application with some live ajax features (notifications, chatting maybe). On the browser you're going to write in HTML and Javascript with some number of Javascript libraries (there are many, they all skin the cat a little differently).

On the server, you will likely use anything that can parse an http request and spit back json. My personal preference is bare handed PHP. It deploys quickly and easily. It has a very robust runtime model. It has very little overhead with respect to tool chain (no compilers, no "app containers" to fall over, dead simple deployments). PHP developers are plentiful. PHP has a bit of a bad rap because it is easy to get started and a lot of amateurs have build some truly horrific piles of pasta with it but PHP is coming into a new age of good package management via composer and more mature frameworks like Laravel (which I personally don't use). PHP scales very well in the cloud.

Ruby on Rails is similarly productive and easy to build product with more deployment headaches and more overhead.

Python is a bit like Ruby but lacks a really cohesive web culture.

Java has a fairly large tool chain overhead and is slow to develop due to compilers, build processes, application container overhead, etc. It is always my very last choice.

NodeJS is gaining momentum but I don't have enough experience with it to recommend it and a few apps I have seen have been tremendously bad at error handling. Server side javascript isn't a lot like browser hosted javascript even though the language is the same.

At the end of the day, language makes very little difference compared to architecture and algorithms. If you are writing it yourself, use what you like. If you are hiring it out, use whatever make hiring your team easiest.

Do you have an idea you wish to fund?
Contact me for detailed list of 1000+ investors in Nigeria with name, insustry-bias, startups, contacts, linkedin profiles, etc. | bolajitoseda@outlook.com | 08171562253
Business / 7 Things To Know Before Joining A Startup by MadNuke(m): 11:42am On Sep 09, 2017
Although new businesses have always generated hype, the popularity of startups continues to rise despite the pandemonium left in wake of the dot-com bubble. Glamourised by the media and the idea that anyone could have a million-pound idea, startups embody the age old excitement of high risk and high reward.

As a millennial, I can tell you that startups will be eternally popular with us because of these qualities, along with our petulant reluctance in having anyone tell us what to do or how to live our lives. However, until we use our brilliant ideas to form our own new companies, the next best thing seems to be to work for one--which is what I did.

While the general passerby is apt to 'ooh' and 'ahh' when I nonchalantly mention working for a startup (during a dramatic pause, of course), starting out was a little of a shock, and a lot of a challenge. So before you join that ultra-cool team that’s developing a new dating app or turning music into electricity, check out my 7 things to know before joining a startup.

1. Prepare for a multifarious role.

When you initially join a new company, you probably bring a certain expertise or have some kind of idea of what you’ll be doing, like marketing or IT. However, be wary of settling as 6 months’ down the line you may have moved to chasing candidates in recruitment or crunching numbers in finance. Being able to handle a barrage of assorted tasks and adapt to different situations is essential, and while the business tries to level its footing you’ll be expected to have an 'all hands on deck' attitude.

Whilst ‘role advancement’ may be hazy, your career development will certainly be unique. By the time you leave (if you ever do), you‘ll have a varied range of experiences along with a strange and ambiguous title such as ‘Tech & Development Leader.’

2. The internet will be your teacher, best friend, and moral companion.

Many times the epicentre of a startup is a new and innovative concept where the ‘right’ route to doing business is not always clear. More often than not you’ll be scouring the web looking for ‘best practices’ whilst biting your nails as you attempt to execute new strategies in uncharted waters.

If you’re the type of person who appreciates the guidance of someone with years of experience to offer clear direction on your responsibilities or advice on 'the correct way' to do something, you may be in for a surprise. As outsourcing is an inconceivable option at this point, good luck finding the right help forum or YouTube tutorial.

That said, the true beauty of being part of a startup is the opportunity to explore original ways to reach your objectives, especially those that can give the business a competitive edge in the market. Following 'best practices' as well as embracing divergent thinking can lead to valuable lessons learnt.

3. What org structure?

Lack of structure is and always will be part of a love-hate relationship in startups. Whilst the absence of hierarchy allows you to work autonomously, it can be maddening trying to discern whether you need to run your plans by someone or not, who that someone is, and if what you're doing is helping in any way, shape, or form.

To add, experience does not always equal seniority. Rather, it’s likely you may be working for someone younger or more green than you, but they’ll have a bigger voice in the company because they’ve been there longer. If this bothers you, steer clear.

4. Complete transparency.

Remember when you used to hear your coworkers complain about being left in the dark or unconsulted about important matters? This won’t happen in a startup. In fact, it’s much more likely that your ‘desk’ will be a shared dining room table where all discussions from business development to HR admin to everyone's personal lives will happen. You’ll get to learn a lot about your co-workers, the business, and you’ll get to know yourself pretty well too.

Communication will always remain an important staple of relationships and successful businesses, so be ready to receive more than your fair share.

5. There’s always more to do.

Although we all experience the occasional drop in productivity whilst working, when you're at a startup it won’t be because there’s nothing to do. On the contrary, nothing ever seems to get finished! There will constantly be new activities or developments to get involved in, which can be both a blessing and a burden. It’s nice to be able to switch between projects whenever one becomes dry, but prioritisation remains key to avoid getting overwhelmed.

6. Sense of purpose.

One of the great things about working for a new business is the rewarding feeling you get from building something from scratch and seeing the results that stem from your direct influence. Because you're starting at ground zero, growth is easier to measure and actualise, which is exciting.

On the flipside, no one will hold your hand and walk you to your goals. With so much to work on and everyone contributing their share, you need to be able to embrace your independence and take ownership of your work.

7. Inspiration for a lifetime.

Startups are born from passion and the desire to do something or provide something in a different, unconventional way. Being around like-minded others who share the drive to develop a budding business is thrilling, and motivates you to think about what you truly care about, and how you can apply your passion in work. Joining a startup can open your mind to new ideas about where to take your career, and encourage you to push yourself to see all you’re capable of.
- culled from linkedin

Do you have an idea you wish to fund?
Contact me for detailed list of 1000+ investors in Nigeria with name, insustry-bias, startups, contacts, etc. | bolajitoseda@outlook.com | 08171562253
Investment / 7 Things To Know Before Joining A Startup by MadNuke(m): 11:36am On Sep 09, 2017
Although new businesses have always generated hype, the popularity of startups continues to rise despite the pandemonium left in wake of the dot-com bubble. Glamourised by the media and the idea that anyone could have a million-pound idea, startups embody the age old excitement of high risk and high reward.

As a millennial, I can tell you that startups will be eternally popular with us because of these qualities, along with our petulant reluctance in having anyone tell us what to do or how to live our lives. However, until we use our brilliant ideas to form our own new companies, the next best thing seems to be to work for one--which is what I did.

While the general passerby is apt to 'ooh' and 'ahh' when I nonchalantly mention working for a startup (during a dramatic pause, of course), starting out was a little of a shock, and a lot of a challenge. So before you join that ultra-cool team that’s developing a new dating app or turning music into electricity, check out my 7 things to know before joining a startup.

1. Prepare for a multifarious role.

When you initially join a new company, you probably bring a certain expertise or have some kind of idea of what you’ll be doing, like marketing or IT. However, be wary of settling as 6 months’ down the line you may have moved to chasing candidates in recruitment or crunching numbers in finance. Being able to handle a barrage of assorted tasks and adapt to different situations is essential, and while the business tries to level its footing you’ll be expected to have an 'all hands on deck' attitude.

Whilst ‘role advancement’ may be hazy, your career development will certainly be unique. By the time you leave (if you ever do), you‘ll have a varied range of experiences along with a strange and ambiguous title such as ‘Tech & Development Leader.’

2. The internet will be your teacher, best friend, and moral companion.

Many times the epicentre of a startup is a new and innovative concept where the ‘right’ route to doing business is not always clear. More often than not you’ll be scouring the web looking for ‘best practices’ whilst biting your nails as you attempt to execute new strategies in uncharted waters.

If you’re the type of person who appreciates the guidance of someone with years of experience to offer clear direction on your responsibilities or advice on 'the correct way' to do something, you may be in for a surprise. As outsourcing is an inconceivable option at this point, good luck finding the right help forum or YouTube tutorial.

That said, the true beauty of being part of a startup is the opportunity to explore original ways to reach your objectives, especially those that can give the business a competitive edge in the market. Following 'best practices' as well as embracing divergent thinking can lead to valuable lessons learnt.

3. What org structure?

Lack of structure is and always will be part of a love-hate relationship in startups. Whilst the absence of hierarchy allows you to work autonomously, it can be maddening trying to discern whether you need to run your plans by someone or not, who that someone is, and if what you're doing is helping in any way, shape, or form.

To add, experience does not always equal seniority. Rather, it’s likely you may be working for someone younger or more green than you, but they’ll have a bigger voice in the company because they’ve been there longer. If this bothers you, steer clear.

4. Complete transparency.

Remember when you used to hear your coworkers complain about being left in the dark or unconsulted about important matters? This won’t happen in a startup. In fact, it’s much more likely that your ‘desk’ will be a shared dining room table where all discussions from business development to HR admin to everyone's personal lives will happen. You’ll get to learn a lot about your co-workers, the business, and you’ll get to know yourself pretty well too.

Communication will always remain an important staple of relationships and successful businesses, so be ready to receive more than your fair share.

5. There’s always more to do.

Although we all experience the occasional drop in productivity whilst working, when you're at a startup it won’t be because there’s nothing to do. On the contrary, nothing ever seems to get finished! There will constantly be new activities or developments to get involved in, which can be both a blessing and a burden. It’s nice to be able to switch between projects whenever one becomes dry, but prioritisation remains key to avoid getting overwhelmed.

6. Sense of purpose.

One of the great things about working for a new business is the rewarding feeling you get from building something from scratch and seeing the results that stem from your direct influence. Because you're starting at ground zero, growth is easier to measure and actualise, which is exciting.

On the flipside, no one will hold your hand and walk you to your goals. With so much to work on and everyone contributing their share, you need to be able to embrace your independence and take ownership of your work.

7. Inspiration for a lifetime.

Startups are born from passion and the desire to do something or provide something in a different, unconventional way. Being around like-minded others who share the drive to develop a budding business is thrilling, and motivates you to think about what you truly care about, and how you can apply your passion in work. Joining a startup can open your mind to new ideas about where to take your career, and encourage you to push yourself to see all you’re capable of.
- culled from linkedin.

Do you have an idea you wish to fund?
Contact me for detailed list of 1000+ investors in Nigeria with name, insustry-bias, startups, contacts, etc. | bolajitoseda@outlook.com | 08171562253
Programming / Re: Signs That You Are Not Meant To Be A Programmer by MadNuke(m): 10:36pm On Aug 28, 2015
Sign #8: You like girls more than you like your laptop.
So if the girl says "It's me or the laptop". You must go with the laptop.

3 Likes

Programming / Re: Want To Know How To Tweak by MadNuke(m): 11:09pm On Aug 27, 2015
Do you mean twerk? You can take Miley Cyrus as your mentor
Programming / Re: Programming Jargons Other Programmers Don't Know by MadNuke(m): 10:01pm On Aug 27, 2015
I'm new on Nairaland, can someone guide me to the psychiatric section. grin

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