Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / LOGIN! / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 2,714,297 members, 6,413,577 topics. Date: Saturday, 31 July 2021 at 01:46 AM

Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa - Culture (11) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Culture / Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa (85893 Views)

Homosexuality In Pre-colonial Africa / Architectural Wonders From Pre-colonial Africa - Pics / Was Prostitution Part of Our Culture during The Precolonial Period? (2) (3) (4)

(1) (2) (3) ... (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by Nobody: 6:08pm On Jun 26, 2013
mamiwata i urge to stop talking with that airhead, only a fool believe in fairy tales that happened in the middle east and have-had no connection with her...the dude did'nt even know your continent , talkless about your village .. she says we worship idols and we are devils, yet she is whorshipping a dead man lwkd.


mami wata she is taking you on the path of heresy and apostasy beware of christians , muslims and jews they are not our friends.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by Ishilove: 6:33pm On Jun 26, 2013
Double post
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by MamiWata: 1:06pm On Jun 27, 2013
CAMEROONPRIDE: ah ha , we exist oooo. the name is BWITI . eh eh your parents are from Benin and you are from mars? tongue


Actually I think I have heard of Bwiti but only in passing. There was a movie I saw a couple of years ago about a guy who cured people's drug addictions using a bark called iboga and I believe he mentioned it is used in Bwiti. Another traditionalist on here also mentioned iboga as a medicine that can be used to heighten spiritual dreams. Are you familiar with iboga? I was born in the U.S. but I say I'm Beninese.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by MamiWata: 1:18pm On Jun 27, 2013
CAMEROONPRIDE: mamiwata i urge to stop talking with that airhead, only a fool believe in fairy tales that happened in the middle east and have-had no connection with her...the dude did'nt even know your continent , talkless about your village .. she says we worship idols and we are devils, yet she is whorshipping a dead man lwkd.


mami wata she is taking you on the path of heresy and apostasy beware of christians , muslims and jews they are not our friends.

Most Africans claim to be muslims or christians so, yes, they have the same negative attitudes towards traditionalists as Europeans do. However because they are African I'm determined to give them the respect and room to explain that people don't normally extend to us. I feel the need for dialogue but I understand your frustration. We shouldn't have to explain and defend our traditions with our own people but that's the point where we are at.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by MamiWata: 1:28pm On Jun 27, 2013
Ishilove:
Lucky you. The damned spirits have brought me and my household nothing but headaches and heartaches. My maternal aunt embraced them wholeheartedly but it didn't stop them from taking her second daughter when the poor child was just fourteen. My great cousin who was like one of the wealthiest people in that godforsaken little village fell victim to them. My grandmother who was quite a dedicated follower was unceremoniously plucked when she was thirty-six. Another maternal aunt, a mother of eight children was not spared when she turned 39.

I'm sorry to hear about your losses. For me traditional spirituality has always been first and foremost about reconnecting with ancestors which, for you, would include your grandmother. Other spirits are important but I spend most of my energy trying to hear from my ancestors and, therefore, feeding them. Perhaps if you took the opportunity to reach out to some of your deceased family members they could shed light on why they were taken so relatively quickly and guide the living from following in their path.



In all honesty, would you want to honour spirits that have been a thorn in the neck from the very beginning? Forget what that bufoon, CameroonReetard says, there is only one power that deserves honour, and it is not definitely not a bunch of principalities dwelling in the depths of the ocean.

Spirits have existed from the very beginning and have a role to play in the lives of the living. I think it's unwise to pretend that they don't play a role. Every aspect of nature deserves honor and respect. I think this is one major way where traditional spirituality diverges from Abrahamic religions. It seems much more sane to me to acknowledge the awesome power in all of nature....the spirits in nature and work with them instead of seeking to dominate them. I'm reminded of that group of Asian islands who survived the Asian tsunami because they maintained their ancestral ways of determining how nature changes. Many thousands perished frankly because they hadn't maintained an ear to spirit. I want to make sure I do my part so that at least one set of ears in my family are still listening.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by Ishilove: 8:11am On Jun 28, 2013
You're romanticising the spirits, Mz Mami Wata.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 3:03am On Aug 02, 2013
"Nigeria 100 years ago – Through the eyes of Leo Frobenius and his expedition team

Exhibition series with images from the ethnographic picture archive and the photographic archive of the Frobenius Institute, Frankfurt (Germany)"

http://www.frobenius-institut.de/index.php/das-institut/veranstaltungen/ausstellungen/42-das-institut/119-nigeria-100-years-ago

Yorubaland: http://www.frobenius-institut.de/images/stories/Ausstellungen/Nigeria/yorubaland.pdf

Nupeland: http://www.frobenius-institut.de/images/stories/Ausstellungen/Nigeria/nupeland.pdf

Tivland and Jukunland: http://www.frobenius-institut.de/images/stories/Ausstellungen/Nigeria/tiv-jukunland.pdf

Adamawa: http://www.frobenius-institut.de/images/stories/Ausstellungen/Nigeria/adamawa.pdf

Portraits: http://www.frobenius-institut.de/images/stories/Ausstellungen/Nigeria/portraits.pdf


I plan to post a lot of select images from the image database of the Frobenius Institute's website, but those pdfs above give a brief and interesting overview of some of the areas in Nigeria that Frobenius's expedition team focused heavily on during some of their expeditions to Africa.

1 Like

Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by TerryCarr(m): 5:35pm On Sep 28, 2013
benin city
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 6:13pm On Apr 19, 2015
^

Another image of Benin City, from the same source, H. Ling Roth's book Great Benin (1903):



This illustration was published in the Illustrated London News on March 27th, 1897 (after the Punitive Expedition and the destruction of Benin City) and it was made by one H.C. Seppings Wright.

There are more important pictures (actual photographs) of 1890s Benin that I have come across recently, that I will post in the Benin art/architecture thread later. I may post some of them in this thread later as well.

2 Likes

Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 6:41pm On Apr 19, 2015
This image (and several of the images I will post afterward that follow it) and caption are from a University of Virginia webpage:


A Queen and Her Entourage, Central Nigeria, 1832-33

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Allen08.JPG[/img]

Image Reference
Allen08

Source
William Allen, Picturesque views on the river Niger, sketched during Lander's last visit in 1832-33, by Commander William Allen (London, 1840), facing p. 16 (top). (Copy in Library of Congress, Rare Book/Special Collections)

Comments
Caption, "the morning call"; shows a local queen and her entourage calling on British visitors. Views of village with conical roofed houses; various male onlookers, some carrying spears. The king of this small kingdom afforded Allen and his companions lodging. The king's wife/Queen "did the very polite thing, by calling on us attended by her handmaidens. . . . Her hands and feet were deeply tinged with henna, and her lovely eyes with antimony. Her hair--thickly plastered with indigo--was enveloped in a sort of turban, and a country cloth encircled her waist with many graceful folds" (Allen, p. 16).
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 6:46pm On Apr 19, 2015
Nigerian Dignitaries, 1841

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Allen04.JPG[/img]

Source
William Allen, A Narrative of the Expedition sent by Her Majesty's Government to the River Niger, in 1841 (London, 1848), vol. 2, facing title page. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Caption, " A Palaver." This same image appears (facing p. 12) in Allen's Picturesque Views on the River Niger: sketched during Lander's last visit in 1832-33 (London, 1840). In Picturesque Views he describes the "Palaver" illustration as follows: "I have grouped together all the principal characters of whom I had individual sketches . . . . I witnessed such a scene... when the king of Attah sent a deputation to assure us [the British] of his friendly intentions . . . the figure in the center of the group is from a sketch of Abokko, the brother of the king of Attah."


[The "king of Attah" referred to above is the Attah of Igala.]
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 6:58pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Serer Man, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat01.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 2 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The bearded man, a talented weaver according to the author, is shown with an earring and what appears to be an amulet (gris-gris) hanging from his neck; he belonged to the kingdom of Sine, one of the pre-colonial Wolof states (pp. 7-8 ). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text. Born in Senegal of a French father and a bi-racial mother ('metisse signare'), Boilat left Senegal at around the age of 13, was educated in France and became ordained as a Catholic priest. He returned to Senegal in 1842, lived there for ten years as an educator and, after returning to France, completed his Esquisses Senegalaises; he also authored the first comprehensive grammar of the Wolof language. He died in France in 1901, at the age of 84.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:01pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Wolof Man, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat02.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 4 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Captioned, "Mari de la Reine du Walo" (Husband of the Queen of the Walo), the plate shows the "Marosso" or the Queen's husband, who was also the head general of the Walo army. He is in full regalia or formal attire, holding his rifle "of honor" and wearing various ornaments, including a bead necklace, earrings, anklets, and, on his left arm, "an enormous silver bracelet, the emblem of his office" (p. 9). Walo was a pre-colonial Wolof state. Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:04pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Wolof Queen, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat03.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 5 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Captioned, "Reine du Walo, Woloffe", shows Queen Ndeté-Yalla in her royal attire sitting on a mat covered bench, smoking a long-stemmed pipe. She wears a bead necklace and bracelets on both wrists, and a leather purse hangs from her neck. The author provides a lengthy description of his visit to the Queen: "we were presented to Her Majesty," he writes, "who received us graciously and spoke to us in a low voice" (pp. 10-12). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text. Walo was a pre-colonial Wolof state.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:06pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, A Wolof Soldier, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat04.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 6 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Captioned simply "Thiédo". A Thiedo was a Wolof soldier. He is pictured here seated on rocks near the town of Bakel, seen in the background. He is wearing a turban, with a gold (?) bracelet on one wrist, anklets, and a bead necklace and amulets (gris-gris) around his neck. The glass bottle contains brandy (eau de vie) given to him by a trader (pp. 12-14). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:09pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Mandingo Woman, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat05.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 7 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The woman is shown in full dress, with leather or bead bracelets and anklets; a large calabash or pottery bowl is in the foreground. The author writes (p. 14) that the woman is resting after having fetched water from a stream; in the background is the village of Toubaboukané. Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:11pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Wolof Merchant, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat06.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 8 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The man is shown in full and elaborate dress, carrying a walking stick and an amulet (gris-gris) around his neck. He is a "marchand de pagnes" ("pagnes" are long narrow strips of woven cotton). The merchant is carrying three samples of different types and prices; one on his head and the other two on each shoulder. Boilat writes that he encountered this man one day and requested permission to draw him which was readily given (p. 15); all of the author's drawings were made from life, and the 24 published plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:12pm On Apr 19, 2015
Wolof Woman Carrying a Child, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat07.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 9 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The woman is shown with her infant strapped to her back, in classic African style; the author gives a rather lengthy description of how the infant is carried (p. 16). The woman wears bead jewelry and the child has an amulet around his neck.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:15pm On Apr 19, 2015
Mandingo Marabout in Prayer, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat08.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 10 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The marabout, as a devout Muslim, is shown doing one of his five daily prayers. The small vessel in the left-hand corner of the picture is a "satala," containing water for washing himself before and after prayer (p. 17). In the background is the fort at St. Louis, flying the French flag.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:16pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Peule Man, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat09.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 17 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
This Peule man is shown in his everyday dress. He is wearing a small blue cap, decorated with a plume of horsehair; his hair style includes a pomade of curdled milk/rennet ('lait caille') or white cheese. Around his neck are amulets (gris-gris) serving various protective functions, and crossed over his chest are other gris-gris to ward off bullets; he is also wearing a "grigri" on his right arm, while ornamental copper bracelets are worn on his left arm and right ankle. Slung from his waist is "coufa," a horn which contains powder, bullets, and smoking tobacco. A Peule, the author notes, never travels without his spear (pp. 25-26). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:19pm On Apr 19, 2015
Peule Woman, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat10.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 18 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The woman is shown bare chested, with bead necklaces and copper jewelry on her arms/wrists and ankles; a riverside village with canoes is in the background. "This woman," the author writes, "is as dressed up as a Peule woman can be; but all of her jewels are of copper" (p. 26). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:21pm On Apr 19, 2015
Toucouleur/Tukulor Marabout, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat11.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 19 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Captioned, "Toucoulaure, Grand Marabout du Foula" (The Chief Marabout of the Fula), he is shown seated on a chair in front of his thatched roof house made of reeds; the door, Boilat writes, is so low that one must bend over to enter. The man is wearing a cloth over his shoulder, while holding a key to his (storage) chest; his "nafa" (a small, flat leather purse or pouch used for carrying small goods, including money) is also hanging from his hand (pp. 26-27). The author made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:22pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Sarakole Man, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat12.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 21 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Full-robed and wearing sandals, the author claims this man represents a typical Sarakole (Soninke) man. The man's robe is dyed blue with indigo and is embroidered on the front and the back with designs in colored silk; he is also wearing a very handsome woven belt. Two gris-gris to protect him in war are worn over his chest. And in his hand he carries his "chapelet", which, according to Boilat (a Catholic priest), is "the muslim rosary composed of 100 beads, representing the 100 perfections of God." These people, he writes, "pay great attention to their hair, and their hair styles are quite artistically accomplished" (pp. 28-29). The author made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:24pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Sarakole Woman, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat13.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 22 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Clothed in an elaborate indigo-dyed blue gown with turban or head-tie and a gauze veil ('which she made herself'), the woman is shown with an intricate long necklace of "coral and enormous amber" beads that hangs down to her chest. This outfit is worn on solemn occasions and the same type of dress, the author notes, is also found among the neighboring Toucouleur/Tukulor (p. 29). The author made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:27pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Bambara Man, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat14.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 23 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
The subject of this portrait, the author's occasional gardener, is wearing a typical Bambara hat made of straw, and has on Moroccan leather sandals; he carries a walking stick over his shoulder from which is dangling a basket with vegetables he is going to sell in the market; a knife is in his right hand. Although this man is shown with amulets (gris-gris) around his neck, the author points out that since the Bambara are not Muslims, these are simply ornaments and have no spiritual significance (pp. 29-31).
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:29pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing Style, Bambara Woman, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Boilat15.JPG[/img]

Source
P. David Boilat, Esquisses Sengelaises (Paris, 1853), plate 24 (Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
This portrait, the author writes (p. 31), is of a woman named Sira, who requested him to draw her. She is sitting on a woven grass mat and is wearing an elaborate silk gown, her holiday dress. An ornate kerchief or head-tie of Madras cloth is tied around her head, and her jewelry consists of large gold earrings, and several bracelets and anklets, in addition to a long necklace which ends in little straw rings that have been made with great care. She is also shown with cicatrisation/scarification marks are on her cheeks.
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 7:52pm On Apr 19, 2015
These images from the NYPL Digital Collection are from the same source above (P.D. Boilat's 1853 book):


[img]http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1167963&t=w[/img]

"Homme et Femme Toucoulaures; Marabout faisant un Grigri."


[img]http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1222710&t=w[/img]

"Femmes Séréres."


http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/esquisses-sngalaises-physionomie-du-pays-peuplades-commerce-religions-pass#/?tab=about&scroll=3
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 8:07pm On Apr 19, 2015
Playing the Balafon, Senegal, 1780s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/VILE-211.JPG[/img]

Source
René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L'Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 4, facing p. 211. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Caption, "Negre jouant au balafo" (Black playing the balafon); musician playing; circular house or granary in background. Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi).




Canoes, Senegal, 1780s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/VILE-60.JPG[/img]

Source
René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L'Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 3, facing p. 60. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Caption, "Piroques des Negres" (Canoes of the Blacks). Shows canoes, one with sails, and their paddlers; background, walled/fenced village. Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi).
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 8:14pm On Apr 19, 2015
Soldier with Weapons, Senegal, 1780s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/VILE-36.JPG[/img]

Source
René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L'Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 3, facing p. 36. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Caption, "Soldat Negre" (black soldier); holding lance/spear, with sword, pistol, wearing beads and amulets. Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi).




Mandingo Man Clothing Style, Senegal, 1780s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/VILE-170.JPG[/img]

Source
René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L'Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 3, facing p. 170. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Caption, "Negre Manding" (Mandingo Black), showing clothing style (including sandals), wearing amulets and beads. Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi).




Wolof King, Senegal, 1787

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/VILE_154.JPG[/img]

Source
René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L'Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 3, facing p. 154. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
Captioned “Bour-Salum, dans sa Case” (Bour [King] Salum [Saloum] in his House). Villeneuve visited King Sandéné of the Wolof kingdom/state of Salum/Saloum in 1787; he provides a detailed description of the visit, including the king’s demeanor and appearance, his clothing, jewelry, and surroundings. This engraving shows the king in his chamber, seated on a platform. The splendor of his dress, the author writes, was more elaborate than that of any other African sovereign. Sandéné wears a gold crown and elaborate tunic (both described in detail), has sandals on his feet; hanging from his neck by a silk cord is a large gold medallion, the shape and size of “a chicken’s egg,” The king is depicted smoking a long stem pipe (a reed attached to a pipe bowl). A scimitar with a gold hilt and richly ornamented shoulder strap is hanging from a wall; a saddle with silver trimmings is against another wall (pp. 149-155). Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi).
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 8:16pm On Apr 19, 2015
Clothing and Hair Styles, Senegal, 1850s

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Raffenel3.JPG[/img]

Source
Anne Raffenel, Nouveau voyage dans le pays des negres, suivi d'études sur la colonie du Sénégal . . . (Paris, 1856), vol. 1, facing p. 72.

Comments
Captioned, "Negres du Bondou," shows three males and one woman with their clothing, hair styles, jewelry, etc. The woman on the left is identified as "Princesse Penda," the man to her right as "homme de Boulebane," next is "Ministre Tasapatto." On the right is a young boy whose hair is arranged in a fashionable style ('jeune garcon, coiffure tres a la mode').
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 8:22pm On Apr 19, 2015
Fulani Blacksmith, Sierra Leone, 1834

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/Rankin1.JPG[/img]

Source
F. Harrison Rankin, The white man's grave: a visit to Sierra Leone, in 1834 (London, 1836),Vol. 1, facing p. 128.

Comments
Titled, "Foulah Blacksmith," the author writes that in the Foulah [Fulani] quarter of Freetown, artisans can be seen employed in various trades. "Sitting upon the ground, the Foulah [blacksmith] holds his strange rude bellows between his legs, and contrives to heat his metal in a little heap of glowing charcoal." The bellows comprised of gourds covered with skin "are connected together by two hollow bamboos inserted into their sides and uniting at an angle." The construction of the bellows, how they are used and worked, and the appearance of the blacksmith are described; the blacksmith is also "the whitesmith, gunsmith, armourer, gold-worker, jeweler, and silversmith of the place," unlike the English blacksmith (pp. 128-130).
Re: Interesting Images From Precolonial And Early Colonial Africa by PhysicsQED(m): 8:27pm On Apr 19, 2015
Foot Soldiers and Cavalry, Bornu, Northeastern Nigeria, 1860

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/wag-1.JPG[/img]

Source
Hermann Wagner, Schilderung der Reisen . . .Eduard Vogel in Central-Afrika (Leipzig, 1860), p.16

Comments
Caption, "Panzerreiter und Bogenschütz aus Bornu" (rider in armor and bowman from Bornu). Shows a soldier carrying a bow, with a quiver of arrows on his back, conversing with horse- mounted soldier with lance and armor.




Market, Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria,1860

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/wag-5.JPG[/img]

Source
Hermann Wagner, Schilderung der Reisen . . .Eduard Vogel in Central-Afrika (Leipzig, 1860), p. 281

Comments
The marketplace, showing traders, goods, livestock, etc.




Kano, North Central Nigeria, 1860

[img]http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/SlaveTrade/collection/large/wag-4.JPG[/img]

Source
Hermann Wagner, Schilderung der Reisen . . .Eduard Vogel in Central-Afrika (Leipzig, 1860), p. 273

Comments
Panoramic view of the city and its architecture; camel train in the foreground.

(1) (2) (3) ... (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (Reply)

Ooni Of Ife Arrives Redeemed Camp In His Luxury Rolls Royce. Photos / Why I Married Moronke Naomi Silekunola - Ooni Of Ife, Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi / Ethiopian Women + Nigerian Men (PICS)

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2021 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 219
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.