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"Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by ISpiksDaTroof: 10:07pm On Mar 25, 2015
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Don’t Steal Nigeria’s Election


Campaign posters for Gen. Muhammadu Buhari, an opposition candidate, in Lagos.

AHMED JALLANZO / EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

By JEAN HERSKOVITS

MARCH 25, 2015

LAGOS, Nigeria — Nigeria’s government canceled the February presidential election just days before it was to be held, postponing it until March 28. If this weekend’s vote is delayed, disrupted or canceled, it will imperil the democratic future of Africa’s most populous country.

This election is unlike any other in Nigerian history. President Goodluck Jonathan’s Peoples Democratic Party is facing the first credible challenge to a ruling party, and he is intent on staying in power, even though popular discontent with the P.D.P. is rife.

If the election had been held as scheduled on Feb. 14, it is likely that Gen. Muhammadu Buhari of the opposition All Progressives Congress would have won. The six-week delay broke the A.P.C.’s momentum and gave the P.D.P. time to to reverse the tide. Incumbency guarantees access to the treasury and command of the security forces — the first is in play now, and the second could be during the election and its aftermath.

Nigerian politics can be murderous; Mr. Buhari has already survived one attempted assassination, an October bombing in Kaduna. And if there is another postponement, a contrived disruption on election day that leads to an unconstitutional interim arrangement, or if the election results do not appear credible, Nigeria could erupt in violence.

Although Nigerians have often been divided along ethnic, religious and regional lines, there has been a remarkable change. Until quite recently, southern Nigerians overwhelmingly supported Mr. Jonathan, a southern Christian. That view prevailed in 2011, when Mr. Buhari also ran for president. The influential Lagos press portrayed him as a dictatorial, fanatical Muslim seeking to impose Shariah on the whole country despite the fact that Christians were a majority in his cabinet when he ruled the country in the mid-1980s.

But daily life has worsened and corruption has escalated. Last year, Mr. Jonathan removed from office the respected governor of the Central Bank, Lamido Sanusi, after Mr. Sanusi announced that in one 15-month period at least $20 billion in government funds went unaccounted for. (The government recently claimed that an audit had found that “only $1.47 billion” was missing).


Meanwhile, the same central government has failed to send money it owes to the states, and teachers and other civil servants have gone unpaid. Currency devaluation and inflation mean that unpaid and laid-off workers in the public and private sectors are now in the same boat as the country’s impoverished and jobless millions. They are unlikely to vote for the status quo.

There have been military humiliations, too. Nigerians are embarrassed that their army needed reinforcements from smaller, poorer neighbors like Chad, Niger and Cameroon to reclaim northern towns from the terrorist group, Boko Haram. In fact, no Nigerian troops were present in some of the liberated towns. Worse, the government is hiring South African mercenaries for $400 a day in a country where soldiers are paid much less, often late, or not at all.

Frontline troops have long complained they did not have adequate equipment or sufficient ammunition. But according to the government’s own figures, a quarter of federal budgets since 2010 have been allotted to security. Many Nigerians conclude that the money has gone to enrich the army top brass and their civilian colleagues.

The February election was supposedly postponed so that the military could focus on the offensive it has now launched against Boko Haram. But the government’s priority doesn’t appear to be protecting Nigeria’s people and territory; its goal is to stay in power. The postponement has simply allowed the ruling party more time to spend money the opposition cannot match.

Many Nigerians now see Mr. Buhari as the man who can deliver them from corruption and insecurity. He was Nigeria’s military ruler from 1984-85. He was petroleum minister before that. And in the late 1990s, as a civilian, he chaired the Petroleum Trust Fund. He could have enriched himself, but he did not. In the 1980s, he repelled a Chadian invasion and acted decisively against an earlier extremist Muslim group. As Adeyemi Adefulu, a Yoruba civil servant who was unjustly imprisoned under Mr. Buhari’s regime during sweeping arrests of the allegedly corrupt in the 1980s, wrote recently, “Our jailer has become our hope.” He is now actively campaigning for Mr. Buhari.

With so much at stake, the United States must play a constructive role. Secretary of State John Kerry has stressed that the election must take place on Saturday and that it be “free, transparent and credible.” And Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. last week expressed support for the electoral commission and urged electronic authentication of voters.

More is needed. America must publicly insist on retaining the head of the electoral commission, preventing any election-day violence or intimidation by security forces, and announcing results at each polling place. And voters should not be prevented from using mobile phones to photograph local results as a precaution against later rigging.

This election must not be stolen from the people. Mr. Kerry has suggested that visa restrictions could be placed on anyone who interferes with the electoral process. This policy, along with a threat of targeted financial sanctions, should be announced now and it should include members of Nigeria’s security forces.

The global fall in oil prices, Nigeria’s squandered foreign reserves and the draining of an account intended to cushion price shocks mean that Nigerians face hard times ahead. They deserve to choose who will lead them through those times.



Jean Herskovits, a research professor at the State University of New York, Purchase, has written on Nigerian politics since 1970.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/26/opinion/dont-steal-nigerias-election.html?_r=3&referre

2 Likes

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by temitemi1(m): 10:10pm On Mar 25, 2015
TRASH!
ISpiksDaTroof:
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Don’t Steal Nigeria’s Election


Campaign posters for Gen. Muhammadu Buhari, an opposition candidate, in Lagos.

AHMED JALLANZO / EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

By JEAN HERSKOVITS

MARCH 25, 2015

LAGOS, Nigeria — Nigeria’s government canceled the February presidential election just days before it was to be held, postponing it until March 28. If this weekend’s vote is delayed, disrupted or canceled, it will imperil the democratic future of Africa’s most populous country.

This election is unlike any other in Nigerian history. President Goodluck Jonathan’s Peoples Democratic Party is facing the first credible challenge to a ruling party, and he is intent on staying in power, even though popular discontent with the P.D.P. is rife.

If the election had been held as scheduled on Feb. 14, it is likely that Gen. Muhammadu Buhari of the opposition All Progressives Congress would have won. The six-week delay broke the A.P.C.’s momentum and gave the P.D.P. time to to reverse the tide. Incumbency guarantees access to the treasury and command of the security forces — the first is in play now, and the second could be during the election and its aftermath.

Nigerian politics can be murderous; Mr. Buhari has already survived one attempted assassination, an October bombing in Kaduna. And if there is another postponement, a contrived disruption on election day that leads to an unconstitutional interim arrangement, or if the election results do not appear credible, Nigeria could erupt in violence.

Although Nigerians have often been divided along ethnic, religious and regional lines, there has been a remarkable change. Until quite recently, southern Nigerians overwhelmingly supported Mr. Jonathan, a southern Christian. That view prevailed in 2011, when Mr. Buhari also ran for president. The influential Lagos press portrayed him as a dictatorial, fanatical Muslim seeking to impose Shariah on the whole country despite the fact that Christians were a majority in his cabinet when he ruled the country in the mid-1980s.

But daily life has worsened and corruption has escalated. Last year, Mr. Jonathan removed from office the respected governor of the Central Bank, Lamido Sanusi, after Mr. Sanusi announced that in one 15-month period at least $20 billion in government funds went unaccounted for. (The government recently claimed that an audit had found that “only $1.47 billion” was missing).


Meanwhile, the same central government has failed to send money it owes to the states, and teachers and other civil servants have gone unpaid. Currency devaluation and inflation mean that unpaid and laid-off workers in the public and private sectors are now in the same boat as the country’s impoverished and jobless millions. They are unlikely to vote for the status quo.

There have been military humiliations, too. Nigerians are embarrassed that their army needed reinforcements from smaller, poorer neighbors like Chad, Niger and Cameroon to reclaim northern towns from the terrorist group, Boko Haram. In fact, no Nigerian troops were present in some of the liberated towns. Worse, the government is hiring South African mercenaries for $400 a day in a country where soldiers are paid much less, often late, or not at all.

Frontline troops have long complained they did not have adequate equipment or sufficient ammunition. But according to the government’s own figures, a quarter of federal budgets since 2010 have been allotted to security. Many Nigerians conclude that the money has gone to enrich the army top brass and their civilian colleagues.

The February election was supposedly postponed so that the military could focus on the offensive it has now launched against Boko Haram. But the government’s priority doesn’t appear to be protecting Nigeria’s people and territory; its goal is to stay in power. The postponement has simply allowed the ruling party more time to spend money the opposition cannot match.

Many Nigerians now see Mr. Buhari as the man who can deliver them from corruption and insecurity. He was Nigeria’s military ruler from 1984-85. He was petroleum minister before that. And in the late 1990s, as a civilian, he chaired the Petroleum Trust Fund. He could have enriched himself, but he did not. In the 1980s, he repelled a Chadian invasion and acted decisively against an earlier extremist Muslim group. As Adeyemi Adefulu, a Yoruba civil servant who was unjustly imprisoned under Mr. Buhari’s regime during sweeping arrests of the allegedly corrupt in the 1980s, wrote recently, “Our jailer has become our hope.” He is now actively campaigning for Mr. Buhari.

With so much at stake, the United States must play a constructive role. Secretary of State John Kerry has stressed that the election must take place on Saturday and that it be “free, transparent and credible.” And Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. last week expressed support for the electoral commission and urged electronic authentication of voters.

More is needed. America must publicly insist on retaining the head of the electoral commission, preventing any election-day violence or intimidation by security forces, and announcing results at each polling place. And voters should not be prevented from using mobile phones to photograph local results as a precaution against later rigging.

This election must not be stolen from the people. Mr. Kerry has suggested that visa restrictions could be placed on anyone who interferes with the electoral process. This policy, along with a threat of targeted financial sanctions, should be announced now and it should include members of Nigeria’s security forces.

The global fall in oil prices, Nigeria’s squandered foreign reserves and the draining of an account intended to cushion price shocks mean that Nigerians face hard times ahead. They deserve to choose who will lead them through those times.



Jean Herskovits, a research professor at the State University of New York, Purchase, has written on Nigerian politics since 1970.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/26/opinion/dont-steal-nigerias-election.html?_r=3&referre

1 Like

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by atlwireles: 10:18pm On Mar 25, 2015
JEAN HERSKOVITS the bastarddddd that fought very hard to keep boko haram off the terrorist list. Tell the old bitchhhh to hang herself.

1 Like

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by atlwireles: 10:21pm On Mar 25, 2015
Questions for Professor Jean Herskovits--on Boko Haram

In early 2012, Professor Jean Herskovits, a well-known historian who has written much about Nigeria for nearly half a century, wrote a most interesting Op-Ed in the New York Times. Titled, "In Nigeria, Boko Haram is not the Problem," the good professor--to whom many governments and NGOs go for advise on Nigerian matters--not only announced authoritatively that "there is no proof that a well-organized, ideologically coherent terrorist group called Boko Haram even exists today," she went on to claim that the world was being misled by the media into thinking that the BH is anything more than a bunch of unformed, criminal gangs produced by incessant poverty in the Muslim north, and insensitivity of a Christian-led government. According to her, "Someone who claims to be a spokesman for Boko Haram — with a name no one recognizes [I guess "no one" refers to specialists like her] and whom no one has been able to identify or meet with — has issued threats and statements claiming responsibility for attacks. Remarkably, the Nigerian government and the international news media have simply accepted what he says."

Her final advise--which was later adopted in a letter to the then Secretary Clinton by a bunch of US-based specialists, including Herskovits--was that the Obama Administration must not declare the BH a terrorist organization, and that the US must not wade into a "Nigerian war on Terror." Fine.

BUT, Professor Herskovits, in the wake of the large-scale murders of school children (in secondary and tertiary schools) in Born0 State before and since you wrote your Op-Ed, and considering the present abduction of nearly 300 school girls, all claimed by Boko Haram through their leader who you doubted his existence in 2012, what advise do you and your fellow Nigerian specialists have? Is the Boko Haram now a problem, in Nigeria? Do you now recognize or know the name Abubakar Shekau who has been leading BH since 2009?



http://chikaokeke-agulu./2014/05/questions-for-professor-jean-herskovits.html

1 Like

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by ISpiksDaTroof: 10:32pm On Mar 25, 2015
atlwireles:
Questions for Professor Jean Herskovits--on Boko Haram

In early 2012, Professor Jean Herskovits, a well-known historian who has written much about Nigeria for nearly half a century, wrote a most interesting Op-Ed in the New York Times. Titled, "In Nigeria, Boko Haram is not the Problem," the good professor--to whom many governments and NGOs go for advise on Nigerian matters--not only announced authoritatively that "there is no proof that a well-organized, ideologically coherent terrorist group called Boko Haram even exists today," she went on to claim that the world was being misled by the media into thinking that the BH is anything more than a bunch of unformed, criminal gangs produced by incessant poverty in the Muslim north, and insensitivity of a Christian-led government. According to her, "Someone who claims to be a spokesman for Boko Haram — with a name no one recognizes [I guess "no one" refers to specialists like her] and whom no one has been able to identify or meet with — has issued threats and statements claiming responsibility for attacks. Remarkably, the Nigerian government and the international news media have simply accepted what he says."

Her final advise--which was later adopted in a letter to the then Secretary Clinton by a bunch of US-based specialists, including Herskovits--was that the Obama Administration must not declare the BH a terrorist organization, and that the US must not wade into a "Nigerian war on Terror." Fine.

BUT, Professor Herskovits, in the wake of the large-scale murders of school children (in secondary and tertiary schools) in Born0 State before and since you wrote your Op-Ed, and considering the present abduction of nearly 300 school girls, all claimed by Boko Haram through their leader who you doubted his existence in 2012, what advise do you and your fellow Nigerian specialists have? Is the Boko Haram now a problem, in Nigeria? Do you now recognize or know the name Abubakar Shekau who has been leading BH since 2009?



http://chikaokeke-agulu./2014/05/questions-for-professor-jean-herskovits.html
And?

Listen, you can pretend to yourself all you want--- like you Nigerians are fond of doing---your Govt has a lot to confess about on the Boko Haram menace. She was right. We weren't interested in helping your Govt fight it's political battle by framing his opponents. That's part of what made BH so big today.

2 Likes

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by atlwireles: 10:33pm On Mar 25, 2015
ISpiksDaTroof:
And?

Listen, you can pretend to yourself all you want--- like you Nigerians fond of doing---your Govt has a lot to confess about on the Boko Haram menace. She was right. We weren't interested in helping your Govt fight it's political battle by framing his opponents. That's part of what made BH so big today.

Dumbasss keep driving your cab.

1 Like

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by ISpiksDaTroof: 10:39pm On Mar 25, 2015
atlwireles:


Dumbasss keep driving your cab.
What'd I tell you years ago?

I've influenced policies that will guide how you and your generations will live their life in your own country. Just like they guided how your father and his father lived theirs. And what do you do in response?

Rant on the Internet!

You need to change your mentality. Even if I was a cab driver, it's an honorable, dignified, and honest profession. Only in your country have I seen people chastised for earning a honest living; that's why your country is the way it is today. Because an overwhelming majority of you are crooks and criminals and you don't even know it because that's what youre used to and was born into.

2 Likes

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by atlwireles: 11:22pm On Mar 25, 2015
ISpiksDaTroof:
What'd I tell you years ago?

I've influenced policies that will guide how you and your generations will live their life in your own country. Just like they guided how your father and his father lived theirs. And what do you do in response?

Rant on the Internet!

You need to change your mentality. Even if I was a cab driver, it's an honorable, dignified, and honest profession. Only in you country have I seen people chastised for earning a honest living; that's why your country is the way it is today. Because an overwhelming majority of you are crooks and criminals and you don't even know it because that's what your used to and was born into.


Dumbasss, I said maintain your lane, I don't want to deal with your inferiority complex tonight.

1 Like

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by Rose2014: 11:24pm On Mar 25, 2015
post=31990337:
Initially i supported APC but carefully looked at their way of life i discover that they are old thieves trying to wear new clothes i decamped to PDP at least i know what they have done afterall Northerners have ruled for more than 30 yrs including Buhari but nothing drastically changed
Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by Mogidi: 12:26am On Mar 26, 2015
This same Jean Herskovits was one of the people who wrote to Hilary Clinton the then US foreign secretary advicing the US govt not to declare Boko haram a terrorist organisation, she lost her credibility after that.


https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcarllevan.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F05%2FBoko-Haram-FTO-letter-to-Clinton4.pdf

Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by ISpiksDaTroof: 12:51pm On Mar 27, 2015
Mogidi:
This same Jean Herskovits was one of the people who wrote to Hilary Clinton the then US foreign secretary advicing the US govt not to declare Boko haram a terrorist organisation, she lost her credibility after that.


https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcarllevan.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F05%2FBoko-Haram-FTO-letter-to-Clinton4.pdf
Lost credibility with who, you?
Re: "Dont Steal Nigeria's Election"---- JEAN HERSKOVITS by Nobody: 12:53pm On Mar 27, 2015
Thrash
Say no to fake change
Say yes to jonathan
Say yes to transformation
As ya vote for transformation may ya life be transformed and vice versa
ISpiksDaTroof:
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Don’t Steal Nigeria’s Election


Campaign posters for Gen. Muhammadu Buhari, an opposition candidate, in Lagos.

AHMED JALLANZO / EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

By JEAN HERSKOVITS

MARCH 25, 2015

LAGOS, Nigeria — Nigeria’s government canceled the February presidential election just days before it was to be held, postponing it until March 28. If this weekend’s vote is delayed, disrupted or canceled, it will imperil the democratic future of Africa’s most populous country.

This election is unlike any other in Nigerian history. President Goodluck Jonathan’s Peoples Democratic Party is facing the first credible challenge to a ruling party, and he is intent on staying in power, even though popular discontent with the P.D.P. is rife.

If the election had been held as scheduled on Feb. 14, it is likely that Gen. Muhammadu Buhari of the opposition All Progressives Congress would have won. The six-week delay broke the A.P.C.’s momentum and gave the P.D.P. time to to reverse the tide. Incumbency guarantees access to the treasury and command of the security forces — the first is in play now, and the second could be during the election and its aftermath.

Nigerian politics can be murderous; Mr. Buhari has already survived one attempted assassination, an October bombing in Kaduna. And if there is another postponement, a contrived disruption on election day that leads to an unconstitutional interim arrangement, or if the election results do not appear credible, Nigeria could erupt in violence.

Although Nigerians have often been divided along ethnic, religious and regional lines, there has been a remarkable change. Until quite recently, southern Nigerians overwhelmingly supported Mr. Jonathan, a southern Christian. That view prevailed in 2011, when Mr. Buhari also ran for president. The influential Lagos press portrayed him as a dictatorial, fanatical Muslim seeking to impose Shariah on the whole country despite the fact that Christians were a majority in his cabinet when he ruled the country in the mid-1980s.

But daily life has worsened and corruption has escalated. Last year, Mr. Jonathan removed from office the respected governor of the Central Bank, Lamido Sanusi, after Mr. Sanusi announced that in one 15-month period at least $20 billion in government funds went unaccounted for. (The government recently claimed that an audit had found that “only $1.47 billion” was missing).


Meanwhile, the same central government has failed to send money it owes to the states, and teachers and other civil servants have gone unpaid. Currency devaluation and inflation mean that unpaid and laid-off workers in the public and private sectors are now in the same boat as the country’s impoverished and jobless millions. They are unlikely to vote for the status quo.

There have been military humiliations, too. Nigerians are embarrassed that their army needed reinforcements from smaller, poorer neighbors like Chad, Niger and Cameroon to reclaim northern towns from the terrorist group, Boko Haram. In fact, no Nigerian troops were present in some of the liberated towns. Worse, the government is hiring South African mercenaries for $400 a day in a country where soldiers are paid much less, often late, or not at all.

Frontline troops have long complained they did not have adequate equipment or sufficient ammunition. But according to the government’s own figures, a quarter of federal budgets since 2010 have been allotted to security. Many Nigerians conclude that the money has gone to enrich the army top brass and their civilian colleagues.

The February election was supposedly postponed so that the military could focus on the offensive it has now launched against Boko Haram. But the government’s priority doesn’t appear to be protecting Nigeria’s people and territory; its goal is to stay in power. The postponement has simply allowed the ruling party more time to spend money the opposition cannot match.

Many Nigerians now see Mr. Buhari as the man who can deliver them from corruption and insecurity. He was Nigeria’s military ruler from 1984-85. He was petroleum minister before that. And in the late 1990s, as a civilian, he chaired the Petroleum Trust Fund. He could have enriched himself, but he did not. In the 1980s, he repelled a Chadian invasion and acted decisively against an earlier extremist Muslim group. As Adeyemi Adefulu, a Yoruba civil servant who was unjustly imprisoned under Mr. Buhari’s regime during sweeping arrests of the allegedly corrupt in the 1980s, wrote recently, “Our jailer has become our hope.” He is now actively campaigning for Mr. Buhari.

With so much at stake, the United States must play a constructive role. Secretary of State John Kerry has stressed that the election must take place on Saturday and that it be “free, transparent and credible.” And Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. last week expressed support for the electoral commission and urged electronic authentication of voters.

More is needed. America must publicly insist on retaining the head of the electoral commission, preventing any election-day violence or intimidation by security forces, and announcing results at each polling place. And voters should not be prevented from using mobile phones to photograph local results as a precaution against later rigging.

This election must not be stolen from the people. Mr. Kerry has suggested that visa restrictions could be placed on anyone who interferes with the electoral process. This policy, along with a threat of targeted financial sanctions, should be announced now and it should include members of Nigeria’s security forces.

The global fall in oil prices, Nigeria’s squandered foreign reserves and the draining of an account intended to cushion price shocks mean that Nigerians face hard times ahead. They deserve to choose who will lead them through those times.



Jean Herskovits, a research professor at the State University of New York, Purchase, has written on Nigerian politics since 1970.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/26/opinion/dont-steal-nigerias-election.html?_r=3&referre

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Election Result From My Polling Unit Etiosa Ward8 Unit 013 / APC presently whooping PDP / Opinion: Goodluck Jonathan Is The 'Mandela' Of Nigeria.

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