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Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? - Culture - Nairaland

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Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by pashaun(f): 8:54am On Feb 10, 2016
I mean Afro-Caribbeans were the ones who created hip hop culture, thug life and the twerking crap that's been going on for the past 30-40 years in America.

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Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Wulfruna(f): 9:22am On Feb 10, 2016
pashaun:
I mean Afro-Caribbeans were the ones who created hip hop culture, thug life and the twerking crap that's been going on for the past 30-40 years in America.

How did Afro-Caribbeans create hip hop and 'thug life'?

Twerking is, perhaps, more closely related to Caribbean dance forms than to American dance forms, so you may have a point there. But hip hop and 'thug life'?
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Nobody: 9:40am On Feb 10, 2016
*face palm*
Another elitist noise making troll.
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by makahlj2: 9:44am On Feb 10, 2016
"Thug life" is definitely an African-American invention.
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by pashaun(f): 1:42am On Feb 11, 2016
Wulfruna:


How did Afro-Caribbeans create hip hop and 'thug life'?

Twerking is, perhaps, more closely related to Caribbean dance forms than to American dance forms, so you may have a point there. But hip hop and 'thug life'?

Hip Hop was created by Caribbeans in the 70s. Dj Kool Herc is founder of hip hop, he is Jamaican. Caribbeans dominate hip hop, followed by Latinos. Tupac created the Thug Life, his mother is Caribbean and father is Moroccan. Biggie Smalls is Jamaican. Future and Young Thug are Haitian. Nicki Minaj is Trini.

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Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by pashaun(f): 1:43am On Feb 11, 2016
makahlj2:
"Thug life" is definitely an African-American invention.

"Thug Life" was created by Tupac Shakur who is Half Caribbean and half African
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Wulfruna(f): 3:55am On Feb 11, 2016
pashaun:


Hip Hop was created by Caribbeans in the 70s. Dj Kool Herc is founder of hip hop, he is Jamaican. Caribbeans dominate hip hop, followed by Latinos. Tupac created the Thug Life, his mother is Caribbean and father is Moroccan. Biggie Smalls is Jamaican. Future and Young Thug are Haitian. Nicki Minaj is Trini.

Is this what you meant? LOL. I really thought you were going to tell me about actually Caribbeans in Caribbean countries who developed hip hop in Caribbean countries.

With the exception of DJ Kool, everybody on that list was born in America, and identifies (identified) with the African-American community. DJ Kool, too, did his work in New York, and not in Jamaica. You cannot credit his work to Jamaica. Jamaicans in Kingston, etc, had nothing to do with it. All of them on this list are not even of Caribbean descent as you claim.

Hip-Hop developed in the black neighbourhoods of New York. It wasn't developed in the Caribbean and then imported to America. It was an African-American invention; the fact that some of the proponents were African-Americans with Caribbean parentage is irrelevant. Most of these guys (the ones who are of Caribbean descent) see themselves and are seen as just African-American. Often you don't even know they have Caribbean origins until you Google. They don't speak Haitian Creole or Patois. They are just African-Americans, period. You can't pin hip hop on the Caribbeans living in the Caribbeans.

There are a lot of other pioneers of hip hop who did not have Caribbean orogins. If we were to draw a complete list of the pioneers of that music genre, most of the people on that list would be just regular African-Americans.

(PS: Tupac's dad Billy Garland was not Moroccan. Reading that made me go WTF)

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Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by pashaun(f): 9:18am On Feb 11, 2016
Wulfruna:


Is this what you meant? LOL. I really thought you were going to tell me about actually Caribbeans in Caribbean countries who developed hip hop in Caribbean countries.

With the exception of DJ Kool, everybody on that list was born in America, and identifies (identified) with the African-American community. DJ Kool, too, did his work in New York, and not in Jamaica. You cannot credit his work to Jamaica. Jamaicans in Kingston, etc, had nothing to do with it. All of them on this list are not even of Caribbean descent as you claim.

Hip-Hop developed in the black neighbourhoods of New York. It wasn't developed in the Caribbean and then imported to America. It was an African-American invention; the fact that some of the proponents were African-Americans with Caribbean parentage is irrelevant. Most of these guys (the ones who are of Caribbean descent) see themselves and are seen as just African-American. Often you don't even know they have Caribbean origins until you Google. They don't speak Haitian Creole or Patois. They are just African-Americans, period. You can't pin hip hop on the Caribbeans living in the Caribbeans.

There are a lot of other pioneers of hip hop who did not have Caribbean orogins. If we were to draw a complete list of the pioneers of that music genre, most of the people on that list would be just regular African-Americans.

(PS: Tupac's dad Billy Garland was not Moroccan. Reading that made me go WTF)

Dj Kool Herc was born in Jamaica. Doug E. Fresh was born in Barbados. Eric B. & Rakim are both have Jamaican parents. Biggie Smalls parents are Jamaican. Lil Kim is half Jamaican and half Haitian. Tupac's biological father is Tuareg. They also don't identify themselves as Black Americans.

FYI: New York rappers are 1st or 2nd generation Caribbeans.
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Wulfruna(f): 11:52am On Feb 11, 2016
pashaun:


Dj Kool Herc was born in Jamaica. Doug E. Fresh was born in Barbados. Eric B. & Rakim are both have Jamaican parents. Biggie Smalls parents are Jamaican. Lil Kim is half Jamaican and half Haitian. Tupac's biological father is Tuareg. They also don't identify themselves as Black Americans.

FYI: New York rappers are 1st or 2nd generation Caribbeans.

I think I already made my point. Naming Americanized People of Afro-Caribbean descent doesn't make rap a Caribbean thing. It is an American thing - a black American a.k.a African-American thing.

One last thing: Billy Garland (Tupac's dad) was no Tuareg. I see a lot of people saying that and I wonder if it is that they don't understand their sources or they just like to mislead people.

Billy was African-American. His parents were African-Americans. It is believed that (but not exactly confirmed) he has some Tuareg ancestry dating back to slavery days. Every African-American has African ancestors if you follow their ancestry far back enough into the slave-trade period. Forest Whittaker and TD Jakes have Nigerian ancestry. Chris Tucker has Cameroonian ancestry. Ben Carson has Cameroonian and Sierra Leonian ancestry. BTW, you know who else has Tuareg ancestry? Morgan Freeman.

All this African ancestry goes back hundreds of years, and is essentially meaningless. These people are all fully African-American, as is Billy Garland, Tupac's dad. No Tuareg bears the name 'Billy'.

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Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Nobody: 1:13pm On Feb 11, 2016
Wulfruna:

Is this what you meant? LOL. I really thought you were going to tell me about actually Caribbeans in Caribbean countries who developed hip hop in Caribbean countries.

With the exception of DJ Kool, everybody on that list was born in America, and identifies (identified) with the African-American community. DJ Kool, too, did his work in New York, and not in Jamaica. You cannot credit his work to Jamaica. Jamaicans in Kingston, etc, had nothing to do with it. All of them on this list are not even of Caribbean descent as you claim.

Hip-Hop developed in the black neighbourhoods of New York. It wasn't developed in the Caribbean and then imported to America. It was an African-American invention; the fact that some of the proponents were African-Americans with Caribbean parentage is irrelevant. Most of these guys (the ones who are of Caribbean descent) see themselves and are seen as just African-American. Often you don't even know they have Caribbean origins until you Google. They don't speak Haitian Creole or Patois. They are just African-Americans, period. You can't pin hip hop on the Caribbeans living in the Caribbeans.

There are a lot of other pioneers of hip hop who did not have Caribbean orogins. If we were to draw a complete list of the pioneers of that music genre, most of the people on that list would be just regular African-Americans.

(PS: Tupac's dad Billy Garland was not Moroccan. Reading that made me go WTF)

You're very ignorant. The most important element of hip-hop came from the Caribbean, ditto most of the original creators of hip-hop, apart from Afrika Bambaataa and the African elements he added to it, after his visit to Africa.

The art of "Toasting" which later became rapping and deejaying came from the Caribbean. Saying hip-hop has no Caribbean root is like saying "garage" and "grime" have no Caribbean root, when both came from reggae dubstep.

No hip-hop head will dispute this fact.
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Wulfruna(f): 2:46pm On Feb 11, 2016
YoruBadGoon:


You're very ignorant. The most important element of hip-hop came from the Caribbean, ditto most of the original creators of hip-hop, apart from Afrika Bambaataa and the African elements he added to it, after his visit to Africa.

The art of "Toasting" which later became rapping and deejaying came from the Caribbean. Saying hip-hop has no Caribbean root is like saying "garage" and "grime" have no Caribbean root, when both came from reggae dubstep.

No hip-hop head will dispute this fact.

Neither you nor Pashaun even understands what I'm saying and that inability to understand baffles me.
Re: Why Don't Afro-Caribbeans Receive The Same Flack As Black Americans? by Nobody: 3:06pm On Feb 11, 2016
Wulfruna:


Neither you nor Pashaun even understands what I'm saying and that inability to understand baffles me.

Perhaps it's cos what you're saying doesn't make sense and you just posted for the sake of it.

The fact that you grouped Caribbean immigrants and folks of Caribbean descent with African Americans in this context is also baffling. Yes, you can use African American loosely for all black people born in America in certain context when it's a race thing. However, that doesn't negate the fact that African American is a distinct black group and you've to use the term distinctly when talking in certain contexts. The same way you can use African loosely when it comes to race, but in other contexts, a Nigerian is different from a Ghanaian.

There are Caribbean Americans and there's a big Jamaican community in New York. And they see themselves as Jamaican Americans, regardless of generation. Ditto the Haitian American community. Based on your premise, that means Wale is also African American and not Nigerian American, no? That's how ridiculous your posts sound. grin

Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash, Doug E. Fresh et al. are Caribbean. And everyone knows that the art of "toasting" that later became rapping and deejaying has Caribbean root.

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