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Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? - Car Talk - Nairaland

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Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by menstrualpad: 12:58pm On Sep 30, 2017
Let's have your opinions.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by GAZZUZZ(m): 1:16pm On Sep 30, 2017
menstrualpad:
Let's have your opinions.

If same brand, ill take the newer vehicle with higher mileage.

Essential reasons.

1. Body: Newer car should have a body with less or no damage. You can easily replace and engine, transmission, suspension, but a body is not an easy replacement.

2. Interior. Newer car, newer interior.

3. Paintwork. Newer car, better paintwork

4. Suspension. Newer car (driven on good roads) suspension setup will be in good shape, worstcase senarion replace wheel bearings.

5. Ownership. Fewer/single owner. Less fear of car being stolen.

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Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by menstrualpad: 7:32pm On Sep 30, 2017
Interesting points by Gazzuzz. Nurey your views.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by nurey(m): 7:40pm On Sep 30, 2017
Oga @ the top has said it all
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by menstrualpad: 7:45pm On Sep 30, 2017
nurey:
Oga @ the top has said it all
Ok. So you will prefer a newer landrover freelander with high mileage over a older Toyota RAV4 with lower mileage?

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by nurey(m): 8:17pm On Sep 30, 2017
menstrualpad:

Ok. So you will prefer a newer landrover freelander with high mileage over a older Toyota RAV4 with lower mileage?

No, I would prefer a higher mileage 2016 Nissan Nismo GTR than an old school 2006 Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren

6 Likes

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by DaimlerBen(m): 1:09am On Oct 01, 2017
nurey:


No, I would prefer a higher mileage 2016 Nissan Nismo GTR than an old school 2006 Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren

3 Likes

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by dokiOloye(m): 5:43am On Oct 01, 2017
Some seals,rubbers etc in vital areas including d engine and suspension get spoilt with age not necessarily with use and getting an original replacement in Naija na war.
Cos of that,and d other reasons above,I'd take d newer car.

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Specialist900(m): 6:49am On Oct 01, 2017
My choice will depend on usage/maintenance of both cars, some newer cars could be badly maintained that the older car could then pass as new

2 Likes

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by serverconnect(m): 8:29am On Oct 01, 2017
Na your pocket they talk.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by sakalisis(m): 8:30am On Oct 01, 2017
tongue

New
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Lexusgs430: 8:30am On Oct 01, 2017
Newer model would surely be more appealing, higher mileage wear and tear effects can be worked on..... Hopefully the higher mileage would translate into buying it cheap, in comparison to the older model.....
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Sunymoore(m): 8:31am On Oct 01, 2017
New car
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by EmeeNaka: 8:32am On Oct 01, 2017
OP, can you explain this high mileage thing for me?

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by highchief1: 8:33am On Oct 01, 2017
Mileage is nothing trust me some cars with low miles have dead engine it depends on how d car is maintained once u service ur car regularly ur engine will be fine

4 Likes 2 Shares

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by mu2sa2: 8:35am On Oct 01, 2017
As of today most peoole cannot afford any car at all, so will gladdenly snatch any car that comes their way, high mileage or low.

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Kobicove(m): 8:41am On Oct 01, 2017
I think it would be better to go for a newer model car cos ts spare parts would likely be more accessible
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by olorunthobby(f): 8:45am On Oct 01, 2017
It’s an age-old question, really. Should you buy an older car that hasn’t seen too many miles, or should you opt for a newer model that’s been around the block a few hundred thousand times? The answer is: it depends .
There are many factors other than age and mileage that can (and should) influence your car-buying decision. Which car has the technology you can’t live without? Which car delivers the gas mileage you need? How much money are you prepared to spend on repairs and maintenance? How much money can you afford to spend up front? The list goes on.
You don’t have to be stuck in analysis paralysis, however. There are some simple guidelines that can help you decide which car is right for you, whether it’s a newer car with lots of miles, an older car with low miles, or something in between.
Let’s Start With The Older Car With Low Miles
First of all, what constitutes low miles for an older car? Generally, any car that has seen fewer than 10,000 miles per year since it was new can be considered relatively low-mileage. That means a 15-year-old car might have 150,000 miles and still be a “low-mileage” car—even though it might only have another 20,000 or 30,000 miles, if that, before it needs a major (read: expensive) service.
Some older cars may have seen fewer than 5,000 miles per year, making that 15-year-old example above a 50,000-75,000-mile car. Here, it might seem like a great idea—that older car has a nice vintage look and feel, it appears to be in good shape, and it should have another 75,000-100,000 miles of life in it, at least, right? Well, maybe.
When buying any older car, whatever the mileage, it’s important to learn as much as you can about the history of the car. That 5,000-mile-per-year average might be an honest 5,000 miles each of its 15 years, driven on a short commute, or driven infrequently as a third car, for example. But it might also reflect 15-20,000 miles per year, and a 10-year period where it sat, broken down or simply neglected. Knowing which situation applies to the specific car you’re interested in buying can mean the difference between years of satisfied ownership and a frustrating, time-consuming, expensive lemon.
Even if a car has sat for a long period, however, it may be just fine—again, it comes down to the particular circumstances. Was the car garaged in a temperature-controlled environment? Was it stored outside but shaded and protected from rain? Or was it parked in a grass lot and left to the elements? More importantly, how do you find out?
Figuring out exactly how a car has been treated throughout its life can be a difficult task. Services like CarFax can help, but it can’t give every detail, or explain every gap in the record. That’s why Instamotor pre-screens every car that’s listed through the app. The Trust and Safety Report helps fill in those gaps. Sometimes, you can even find an owner who has maintained their own records on the car, from oil changes to new tire purchases to major repairs and more. Some will even keep log books detailing how they used the car over its life. A car that comes with a binder full of details on its use might command a premium over similar examples, but it may well be worth it for the peace of mind.
Newer Car With Higher Miles?
On the flip side, buying a newer car with higher miles holds its own challenges. Newer cars, being newer, have had fewer opportunities for mistreatment, abandonment, or neglect, so they can often be in much better shape to the naked eye—but that shiny coat of paint and clean interior may hide issues just beneath.
Take a three-year-old car with 60,000 miles, for example. That’s a fairly high-mileage car, but typical of someone with a longer commute. If they maintained it regularly, per the manufacturer’s recommendations, it’s probably a solid buy. But if they cut corners, changing the oil only once a year (or less—it happens), or if the car drove those 20,000 miles per year in a very hot or cold environment, there could be significant mechanical issues that won’t present until farther down the road—after it’s in your driveway and not the original owner’s problem anymore.
Likewise, how the miles are accrued is an important factor. It’s often said that highway miles are easier on a car than city miles, but that’s not always the case. Extended periods at higher speeds can mean more wear on items not commonly replaced, like wheel bearings and hubs, and it can also mean high average engine speeds, leading to more internal wear. On the flip side, a car that has seen 20,000 miles per year of stop-and-go traffic is likely to have soaked in its own heat regularly, potentially aging plastic and rubber pieces in the engine bay prematurely, as well as putting strain on the cooling and lubrication systems—which can also lead to premature engine and transmission wear.
Again, with the newer, higher-mileage car, it’s important to know the history of the specific car you’re buying, and the same tools that help with the older, low-mileage car’s purchase can help here, including Instamotor’s Trust and Safety Report.
Always Get A Mechanical Inspection
Another tool that should be in every used car shopper’s belt is the independent mechanic’s inspection. If you live in any decent-sized city, you will be able to find several mechanics (dozens in larger cities) who will be happy to inspect a potential purchase for any obvious, or even not-so-obvious issues, usually for a minimal fee (often $100 or less). It’s a small price to pay considering the value of the purchase you’re about to make.
So, back to the age-old question: which is better, the low-mileage classic or the high-mileage stunner? Well, it depends…

11 Likes 1 Share

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Princebizzie: 8:55am On Oct 01, 2017
Car mileage are mostly manipulated these days in Nigeria, most car sellers.. Manipulated the mileages of most low mileage cars on their tarmac. Be careful when buying cars

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by nnamdibig(m): 9:04am On Oct 01, 2017
I think I will prefer a tokumbo 98-00 C class to a naija used(or even tokumbo) 2007 C class if am staying in zamfara state or Sokoto state.
It depends on your location, access to spare parts and how the car was used.

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by islandmoon: 9:16am On Oct 01, 2017
OP! be precise because some car have second hand value while you dare not go near a old Nissan Murano or Old BMW

check out these 2006 Mercedez C230 and 1997 C180

those cars will serve me better than most new cars

cost effective, maintenance , price, durability , Nigeria road friendly

I like flashy cars but I cant afford them and I dont want breeze to blow me away on the high way.

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Chartey(m): 9:33am On Oct 01, 2017
Sometimes high mileage does not mean bad mileage.
A car with 100k mileage mostly from interstate travel is better than a car with 60k mileage of short intra-city shuttle provided other things are the same.

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Kokaine(m): 9:51am On Oct 01, 2017
menstrualpad:
Let's have your opinions.
cheap one
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by erico2k2(m): 10:55am On Oct 01, 2017
dokiOloye:
Some seals,rubbers etc in vital areas including d engine and suspension get spoilt with age not necessarily with use and getting an original replacement in Naija na war.
Cos of that,and d other reasons above,I'd take d newer car.
But bearings and suspensions die by wear and tear not with age unless they are biodegradable!.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by menstrualpad: 11:00am On Oct 01, 2017
erico2k2:

But bearings and suspensions die by wear and tear not with age unless they are biodegradable!.
Low mileage wins here

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by erico2k2(m): 11:21am On Oct 01, 2017
menstrualpad:

Low mileage wins here
Exactly, however if I buy a new car with high mileage, i will change few bits that I know dies with high mileage then Im good to go!.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by MabraO: 11:24am On Oct 01, 2017
Pls am I d only one that is having difficulty in understanding this topic

Old car low mileage
New car high mileage

I thought it is
New car no mileage
Old/used car low/high mileage

1 Like

Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by room089: 11:36am On Oct 01, 2017
It simply depends on the size of your pocket!

Who no like better thing!
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Nebes: 11:54am On Oct 01, 2017
[0816 658 0832quote author=olorunthobby post=60995796]It’s an age-old question, really. Should you buy an older car that hasn’t seen too many miles, or should you opt for a newer model that’s been around the block a few hundred thousand times? The answer is: it depends .
There are many factors other than age and mileage that can (and should) influence your car-buying decision. Which car has the technology you can’t live without? Which car delivers the gas mileage you need? How much money are you prepared to spend on repairs and maintenance? How much money can you afford to spend up front? The list goes on.
You don’t have to be stuck in analysis paralysis, however. There are some simple guidelines that can help you decide which car is right for you, whether it’s a newer car with lots of miles, an older car with low miles, or something in between.
Let’s Start With The Older Car With Low Miles
First of all, what constitutes low miles for an older car? Generally, any car that has seen fewer than 10,000 miles per year since it was new can be considered relatively low-mileage. That means a 15-year-old car might have 150,000 miles and still be a “low-mileage” car—even though it might only have another 20,000 or 30,000 miles, if that, before it needs a major (read: expensive) service.
Some older cars may have seen fewer than 5,000 miles per year, making that 15-year-old example above a 50,000-75,000-mile car. Here, it might seem like a great idea—that older car has a nice vintage look and feel, it appears to be in good shape, and it should have another 75,000-100,000 miles of life in it, at least, right? Well, maybe.
When buying any older car, whatever the mileage, it’s important to learn as much as you can about the history of the car. That 5,000-mile-per-year average might be an honest 5,000 miles each of its 15 years, driven on a short commute, or driven infrequently as a third car, for example. But it might also reflect 15-20,000 miles per year, and a 10-year period where it sat, broken down or simply neglected. Knowing which situation applies to the specific car you’re interested in buying can mean the difference between years of satisfied ownership and a frustrating, time-consuming, expensive lemon.
Even if a car has sat for a long period, however, it may be just fine—again, it comes down to the particular circumstances. Was the car garaged in a temperature-controlled environment? Was it stored outside but shaded and protected from rain? Or was it parked in a grass lot and left to the elements? More importantly, how do you find out?
Figuring out exactly how a car has been treated throughout its life can be a difficult task. Services like CarFax can help, but it can’t give every detail, or explain every gap in the record. That’s why Instamotor pre-screens every car that’s listed through the app. The Trust and Safety Report helps fill in those gaps. Sometimes, you can even find an owner who has maintained their own records on the car, from oil changes to new tire purchases to major repairs and more. Some will even keep log books detailing how they used the car over its life. A car that comes with a binder full of details on its use might command a premium over similar examples, but it may well be worth it for the peace of mind.
Newer Car With Higher Miles?
On the flip side, buying a newer car with higher miles holds its own challenges. Newer cars, being newer, have had fewer opportunities for mistreatment, abandonment, or neglect, so they can often be in much better shape to the naked eye—but that shiny coat of paint and clean interior may hide issues just beneath.
Take a three-year-old car with 60,000 miles, for example. That’s a fairly high-mileage car, but typical of someone with a longer commute. If they maintained it regularly, per the manufacturer’s recommendations, it’s probably a solid buy. But if they cut corners, changing the oil only once a year (or less—it happens), or if the car drove those 20,000 miles per year in a very hot or cold environment, there could be significant mechanical issues that won’t present until farther down the road—after it’s in your driveway and not the original owner’s problem anymore.
Likewise, how the miles are accrued is an important factor. It’s often said that highway miles are easier on a car than city miles, but that’s not always the case. Extended periods at higher speeds can mean more wear on items not commonly replaced, like wheel bearings and hubs, and it can also mean high average engine speeds, leading to more internal wear. On the flip side, a car that has seen 20,000 miles per year of stop-and-go traffic is likely to have soaked in its own heat regularly, potentially aging plastic and rubber pieces in the engine bay prematurely, as well as putting strain on the cooling and lubrication systems—which can also lead to premature engine and transmission wear.
Again, with the newer, higher-mileage car, it’s important to know the history of the specific car you’re buying, and the same tools that help with the older, low-mileage car’s purchase can help here, including Instamotor’s Trust and Safety Report.
Always Get A Mechanical Inspection
Another tool that should be in every used car shopper’s belt is the independent mechanic’s inspection. If you live in any decent-sized city, you will be able to find several mechanics (dozens in larger cities) who will be happy to inspect a potential purchase for any obvious, or even not-so-obvious issues, usually for a minimal fee (often $100 or less). It’s a small price to pay considering the value of the purchase you’re about to make.
So, back to the age-old question: which is better, the low-mileage classic or the high-mileage stunner? Well, it depends…
[/quote]

Well done!! A very pleasant write up.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by DonBobes(m): 12:23pm On Oct 01, 2017
GAZZUZZ:


If same brand, ill take the newer vehicle with higher mileage.

Essential reasons.

1. Body: Newer car should have a body with less or no damage. You can easily replace and engine, transmission, suspension, but a body is not an easy replacement.

2. Interior. Newer car, newer interior.

3. Paintwork. Newer car, better paintwork

4. Suspension. Newer car (driven on good roads) suspension setup will be in good shape, worstcase senarion replace wheel bearings.

5. Ownership. Fewer/single owner. Less fear of car being stolen.

CARgOD himself has spoken, who m i.
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by miketayo(m): 12:32pm On Oct 01, 2017
hmmm dats a gud question
Re: Is It Better To Buy A Old Car With Low Mileage Or A Newer One With High Mileage? by Jagermeister(m): 1:05pm On Oct 01, 2017
olorunthobby:
It’s an age-old question, really. Should you buy an older car that hasn’t seen too many miles, or should you opt for a newer model that’s been around the block a few hundred thousand times? The answer is: it depends .
There are many factors other than age and mileage that can (and should) influence your car-buying decision. Which car has the technology you can’t live without? Which car delivers the gas mileage you need? How much money are you prepared to spend on repairs and maintenance? How much money can you afford to spend up front? The list goes on.
You don’t have to be stuck in analysis paralysis, however. There are some simple guidelines that can help you decide which car is right for you, whether it’s a newer car with lots of miles, an older car with low miles, or something in between.
Let’s Start With The Older Car With Low Miles
First of all, what constitutes low miles for an older car? Generally, any car that has seen fewer than 10,000 miles per year since it was new can be considered relatively low-mileage. That means a 15-year-old car might have 150,000 miles and still be a “low-mileage” car—even though it might only have another 20,000 or 30,000 miles, if that, before it needs a major (read: expensive) service.
Some older cars may have seen fewer than 5,000 miles per year, making that 15-year-old example above a 50,000-75,000-mile car. Here, it might seem like a great idea—that older car has a nice vintage look and feel, it appears to be in good shape, and it should have another 75,000-100,000 miles of life in it, at least, right? Well, maybe.
When buying any older car, whatever the mileage, it’s important to learn as much as you can about the history of the car. That 5,000-mile-per-year average might be an honest 5,000 miles each of its 15 years, driven on a short commute, or driven infrequently as a third car, for example. But it might also reflect 15-20,000 miles per year, and a 10-year period where it sat, broken down or simply neglected. Knowing which situation applies to the specific car you’re interested in buying can mean the difference between years of satisfied ownership and a frustrating, time-consuming, expensive lemon.
Even if a car has sat for a long period, however, it may be just fine—again, it comes down to the particular circumstances. Was the car garaged in a temperature-controlled environment? Was it stored outside but shaded and protected from rain? Or was it parked in a grass lot and left to the elements? More importantly, how do you find out?
Figuring out exactly how a car has been treated throughout its life can be a difficult task. Services like CarFax can help, but it can’t give every detail, or explain every gap in the record. That’s why Instamotor pre-screens every car that’s listed through the app. The Trust and Safety Report helps fill in those gaps. Sometimes, you can even find an owner who has maintained their own records on the car, from oil changes to new tire purchases to major repairs and more. Some will even keep log books detailing how they used the car over its life. A car that comes with a binder full of details on its use might command a premium over similar examples, but it may well be worth it for the peace of mind.
Newer Car With Higher Miles?
On the flip side, buying a newer car with higher miles holds its own challenges. Newer cars, being newer, have had fewer opportunities for mistreatment, abandonment, or neglect, so they can often be in much better shape to the naked eye—but that shiny coat of paint and clean interior may hide issues just beneath.
Take a three-year-old car with 60,000 miles, for example. That’s a fairly high-mileage car, but typical of someone with a longer commute. If they maintained it regularly, per the manufacturer’s recommendations, it’s probably a solid buy. But if they cut corners, changing the oil only once a year (or less—it happens), or if the car drove those 20,000 miles per year in a very hot or cold environment, there could be significant mechanical issues that won’t present until farther down the road—after it’s in your driveway and not the original owner’s problem anymore.
Likewise, how the miles are accrued is an important factor. It’s often said that highway miles are easier on a car than city miles, but that’s not always the case. Extended periods at higher speeds can mean more wear on items not commonly replaced, like wheel bearings and hubs, and it can also mean high average engine speeds, leading to more internal wear. On the flip side, a car that has seen 20,000 miles per year of stop-and-go traffic is likely to have soaked in its own heat regularly, potentially aging plastic and rubber pieces in the engine bay prematurely, as well as putting strain on the cooling and lubrication systems—which can also lead to premature engine and transmission wear.
Again, with the newer, higher-mileage car, it’s important to know the history of the specific car you’re buying, and the same tools that help with the older, low-mileage car’s purchase can help here, including Instamotor’s Trust and Safety Report.
Always Get A Mechanical Inspection
Another tool that should be in every used car shopper’s belt is the independent mechanic’s inspection. If you live in any decent-sized city, you will be able to find several mechanics (dozens in larger cities) who will be happy to inspect a potential purchase for any obvious, or even not-so-obvious issues, usually for a minimal fee (often $100 or less). It’s a small price to pay considering the value of the purchase you’re about to make.
So, back to the age-old question: which is better, the low-mileage classic or the high-mileage stunner? Well, it depends…

Did you write this?

This looks like a rendering from Siena.

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