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Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ChiefDaddy1: 5:58pm On May 17
Good day everyone, I decided to pursue a Masters in Philosophy from the University of Melbourne.

Please is there anyone that has applied to this university and is the automatic scholarship valid with stipends, also is there any chance the English test can be wave since my degree in the last 5 years and research work is in English which is an option from the school in order to wave the English test.

Please I need advice and guidelines as I am doing it myself for the September intake. Thanks and God bless
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 10:58pm On May 17
ChiefDaddy1:
Good day everyone, I decided to pursue a Masters in Philosophy from the University of Melbourne.

Please is there anyone that has applied to this university and is the automatic scholarship valid with stipends, also is there any chance the English test can be wave since my degree in the last 5 years and research work is in English which is an option from the school in order to wave the English test.

Please I need advice and guidelines as I am doing it myself for the September intake. Thanks and God bless

Ask your question on this thread...

https://www.nairaland.com/3786389/general-australian-student-visa-enquiries

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Bnimz(m): 1:15am On May 18
ideamaster:

But one thing I have noticed about cruise control drivers on the highway, is that they usually set the speed above the speed limit at a value determined by how much faith they have. Haha. You would often find people setting the speed at 110 in a 100 zone.
I tend to add 5 - 9 extra on very long drives and the reasons for that are pretty straightforward...

1. There are hardly any cameras in the bush
2. Its only 1 demerit point for speeds up to 10km/hr above the limit - Thats an "acceptable" risk
3. You have highway patrol guys everywhere, but on the 110 highways, you have to be doing at least 20 above the limit for them to go through the trouble of chasing you.... Under 10 is just too small for them to bother cos it could easily be equipment error, temporary acceleration, and the fine itself is not really worth the stress...

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ChiefDaddy1: 5:20am On May 18
bellong:


Ask your question on this thread...

https://www.nairaland.com/3786389/general-australian-student-visa-enquiries

I have dropped the question but no one is replying and Im in the middle of an application.

I want to be sure how seamless it is to get a PR as a student in Aussie and how many years of post graduate work permit you can get.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 5:35am On May 18
ChiefDaddy1:


I have dropped the question but no one is replying and Im in the middle of an application.

I want to be sure how seamless it is to get a PR as a student in Aussie and how many years of post graduate work permit you can get.

It is easy and not easy at the same time. It is dependent on a number of factors including your course of study which is very important and crucial to qualifying for the process. Your occupation must be on the occupation list and also must meet other points requirements.

Your first step should be to check the PR thread and read about the process and requirements. Studying in Australia will not automatically grant you PR except you meet the requirements.

Goodluck.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ChiefDaddy1: 5:37am On May 18
bellong:


It is easy and not easy at the same time. It is dependent on a number of factors including your course of study which is very important and crucial to qualifying for the process. Your occupation must be on the occupation list and also must meet other points requirements.

Your first step should be to check the PR thread and read about the process and requirements. Studying in Australia will not automatically grant you PR except you meet the requirements.

Goodluck.

Thank you for the swift response. I am going for MPhil in Civil Engineering and its fully funded scholarship.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 5:53am On May 18
ChiefDaddy1:


Thank you for the swift response. I am going for MPhil in Civil Engineering and its fully funded scholarship.

If you have experience in civil engineering and closely related occupations, you can start the process now. Check the PR thread as we are already derailing this thread.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ChiefDaddy1: 6:02am On May 18
bellong:


If you have experience in civil engineering and closely related occupations, you can start the process now. Check the PR thread as we are already derailing this thread.

Okay thanks alot will do asap. Ì am applying for a student visa at the University of Melbourne with fully funded scholarship please do I need to have funds in my account if granted the scholarship?

This is my last question I pronise. God bless you
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 6:48am On May 18
ChiefDaddy1:


Okay thanks alot will do asap. Ì am applying for a student visa at the University of Melbourne with fully funded scholarship please do I need to have funds in my account if granted the scholarship?

This is my last question I pronise. God bless you

If it is an AL1 university, you don't need to provide a bank statement. However, the case officer may choose to ask for it. Not compulsory to include in your application except asked.

However, it is important you have the minimum fund required in case it is asked.

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ChiefDaddy1: 7:18am On May 18
bellong:


If it is an AL1 university, you don't need to provide a bank statement. However, the case officer may choose to ask for it. Not compulsory to include in your application except asked.

However, it is important you have the minimum fund required in case it is asked.
S

Thank you so much. I was tempted to ask what AL1 is but I did the digging myself and now I understand better.

University of Melbourne is under AL1 university and I think Im good to go. Thanks and God bless you

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Lislekelsey: 4:08pm On May 18
Please I want to know what opportunities are open to me. I studied English Language Education but I don't want to teach. The fear of not getting anything else I'm suited for over there keeps holding me back.


Thank you
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 3:00pm On May 19
ajoyeleke:



pls can I have ur WhatsApp no I want to migrate to Australia and I will like to make some enquiry from u

Why are you quoting multiple people? There is thread for migration, go there and read
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by FBS: 9:11am On May 20
Lislekelsey:
Please I want to know what opportunities are open to me. I studied English Language Education but I don't want to teach. The fear of not getting anything else I'm suited for over there keeps holding me back.


Thank you
You will have to be more elaborate. What are your goals, Objectives, targets?
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by drugcartel: 10:16am On May 29
mamajaz:



...and to add to this chief, I just got to know that going through NZ is a lot easier than registering straight through Oz.
All applications are done online, the Competency assessment program (CAP) which is an equivalent of BP is just NZD 8500 far below Australia 18500 or 11800 in the minimum.
At the end of the day TransTasmania registration will make the person an Oz nurse within 24 hours.
Now, if I had known that 2 years ago, that's the reaaaaallllll chicken on the naija jellof rice.
Suigeneris can check out ambulance officer, residential care officer, disability care officer, health promotion officer, care centre manager etc while weighing all alternatives for 489, Or: Trades, or let your spouse try his/ her luck if you aren't both nurses.
Good morning to all, thanks to bnimz for making Alphadoor's entrance smooth.
Lemme go back to bed again.
...and errmmmm lest I forget, you may decide passing through the Uk to Oz, now that UK is hard hit by brexit, and they are feeling the heat , plus lack of health care workers is eating them up, do IELTS, do CBT, work in the UK, then head for Australia.
Now, don't let too much knowledge spoil my head like bro Paul of the holy book.
Hello Ma, good morning, please can you tell me more about this, I really need info from you and want to send you a pm, can I
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by mamajaz(f): 5:09pm On May 29
drugcartel:

Hello Ma, good morning, please can you tell me more about this, I really need info from you and want to send you a pm, can I

Please, send mail bro.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Olivertripzz: 12:59am On May 30
trastar:
Concerning getting a job, I have a few advice but before the advice let me tell you ppl story of my job search.
got in 11th of December. started applying for work like a week after.
O boy! I applied for everything. I started getting calls like the next day after I applied.
I feel like customer service and admin roles are the easiest jobs to get here.
insurance companies are always looking for customer service.
got a job and resumption was on 2ND OF Jan with insurance. did not really like the role cos honestly, I was clueless-knowing next to nothing about insurance and the training was not it at all.
so I still kept applying, still kept going for interviews.

the friend I know here already gave me gist of interviews she went for and she was discriminated against because of color so I was sort of prepared when it happened to me.
and because she is a major success story of how you can start from scratch and work your way up here, I just keyed into her ginger.
I mean her first job was as a receptionist and 5 years down the line, senior HR in a huge multinational, trips abroad, company credit card, iphone X and plenty other gengen. so I just told myself, if she can do it, I can.

So when I went for interview for customer service manager with one company and the CEO came in, saw me, told me to pls wait at coffee shop across the road cos the HR manager that will interview me was not in yet, it pained me but not so much. I was prepared for it.
HR manager later called and told me she was asked to cancel the interview and she is sorry.
minutes later, I saw notification on my linkedin of two different ppl from the company viewing my profile, plus CEO and HR manager too.
in revenge, I clicked on” view profile” for every single person in that company too. we dey view each other noni. but thank God that did not click cos that same day, I had interview with a premium car manufacturing company and I got the job.

Pls note these jobs are all contract based. the pay isn’t bad at all. I get paid per hour but it means you get paid just for the number of hours’ u work for, no leave payment or any of that. I also don’t mind because it means I am not tied to any company and I can keep searching till I find a great place.

So my advice for anyone coming to Sydney is;

1. Blow your own horn during interviews. don’t doubt yourself. the things that won’t impress a Nigerian interviewer impresses them here. The average Nigerian employee normally do roles meant for 3 to 4 people here. so when you are telling them about what your job entailed back home, don’t make it seem small or not a big deal. list and list.

2. Apply to as many jobs as you can, don’t be discouraged by the nos. just keep applying, its kuku free.

3. They really do not ask to see physical copies of your degree certificates, (even for my husband who is in IT) this means they rely on what you say a lot. But they asked for evidence of IT certifications though. so your destiny na your mouth and cv e dey. not asking anyone to be dishonest and go and list what u did not do or degree u do not have ooo. but be ready to use your mouth to defend whatever you write in cv. this is easier for those of us in the not technical fields. we can easily learn on the job but if you are not a programmer and you claim programmer. Well...

4. Another trick my friend told me was –remove anything with Nigeria in your CV. don’t let them judge u before meeting you. let them at least hear u talk before assuming u can’t offer anything. so a lot of times they call and they don’t even realise experiences I listed were all in Nigeria. I got so many interviews even me sef begin turn them down.

5. Concerning colleagues, if you are like me who thought Nigerians are “bad” when it comes to office politics, be ready for a shocker here. Oyibo ppl gossip pass us. my Gahd! someone will stand now and next minute they are gossiping them. next minute they are smiling at them. If you ever thought they are superior morally, just know now that all of us are humans. na skin color differ.

6. My husband got a job in his field-IT Networking- like two weeks after I got mine. his job is full time and although it took time, he was patient and because I was working, he can afford to be patient. if you can, don’t get caught up doing hustle job that u won’t have time to chase proper jobs in your career line.

7. I felt bad about my accent initially but different ppl form several countries work with me.
South African, Zimbabwean-the only other black person asides myself, etc. everyone get accent so we dey. you need a lot of thick skin and a container load of self-confidence.
8. I am still searching, my mouth is wide now. so yeah..





As a Science Teacher (Physics) with Bsc Ed degree with 2-3years experience.
What subclass of Visa processing is advisable and what's are my chances of getting a job over there.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by frank043(m): 8:24pm On May 31
LONG POST ALERT!!!
Hi all... bellong, bnimz, tyosho, et al... Trust we are all well and keeping safe with family?

I believe I won't be de-railing this wonderful thread, as it was set up for the primary purpose of life/living in Australia.

I have always being pro-migration, and have never for once thought on the contrary. With the way this government is going, I don't see any decent future in sight for myself and family! Have already begun the process, though slow, cos I needed to sort out somethings.

The below was culled out from someone's breakdown of living abroad, I believe in the US. I'd appreciate if we can discuss this in more details and not making generic statements, as you all already are resident in Australia can be specific and truthful to the later.



"Abroad people call me every weekend asking me to send money (not bragging). Many of them are frustrated over there. They work long hours including overtime but the government takes federal, state, city, social security, medicare, medicaid and disability taxes. On top of that, when they buy biscuit, they will still take sales tax. They pay exorbitant rent; those who "own" homes are locked in a loan repayment for 30yrs of which they still have to pay annual taxes for their house. Phone bill can cost over $60 per line, cable $120, internet $80 and they still pay tax on top of it. Burger and chips with soft drink can easily cost you $16 plus tax.

Sure some folks are making over $100,000 theoretically especially healthcare workers in expensive states like California and new York, but by the time they deduct all those taxes from their check, they are left with just $40,000. Then they still have to pay more taxes on every thing they buy. That's not life. It's like a rat wheel, oscillating but not making any progress. I have a cousin who was in the same situation in America, after 10yrs working as a social worker, he returned home and we started up a business. He still regrets all the years he spent slaving away in America. Today, he travels the world on vacation and visiting places he didn't even have time to visit when he was living abroad. It's not too late for Nigerians living abroad to return home; you can make it big here with less stress and you will extend your life span"
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Bnimz(m): 7:19am On Jun 01
frank043:

Hi all... bellong, bnimz, tyosho, et al...

"Abroad people call me every weekend Many of them are frustrated over there. They work long hours including overtime but the government takes federal, state, city, social security, medicare, medicaid and disability taxes. "

I understand the guy's points though there are a few exaggerations... There is no tax system in the English-speaking world that reduces $100,000 to $40,000.....

However, with that aside, we do have to admit that things are more expensive... But then you earn more money too...

The question is, as an individual, after taxes and all expenses, how much would you be left with as savings in a year if converted to Naira? If your answer is anything over #2 Million, you are already in a better position than over 90% of Nigerians in Nigeria....

With that said the life abroad can be very tempting... Credit is cheap and easy to get, so it is easy to spend money you don't have to buy things you can't afford and get stuck in a rabbit hole of interest payments and debt. This is true no matter how much you make, just look at Nicholas Cage....

Many Nigerians that come here can't handle it, they must have the biggest house, the nicest car, and post pictures online to brag about their "achievements" to people back home...

The problem with this comes in two forms..

1. They are spending money they don't have, an unexpected job loss can send their finances into a death spiral.

2. People back home see them in their big car, quickly punch calculator to convert, Chei, na #10 Million naira car o.... Broda don blow.... Then the demands and requests start pouring in...

Fact is, if you keep your life under control, even minimum wage is enough to live okay on in this country... For example, my annual expenses are way less than minimum wage as a single person, despite making more than minimum wage... And I know a few friends who are like that too.

I can't speak for the married people with kids sha.. maybe Bellong or Alphadoor can explain better.


Lastly, yes, there are taxes, but in my experience, the taxes are the perfect way to complain to Nigerians back home about why there's no money to send to them....

I emphasize different things depending on the point I'm trying to make. If I'm talking to a person who is asking me for money, I emphasize how my annual taxes are higher than his annual salary, how my monthly rent is the same as his annual rent..

But if I'm advising a friend to leave Nigeria, and he says he is making good money in Nigeria, say, (250k/month for example) I switch gears and emphasize how my monthly savings are higher than his monthly salary..


With that said, when you are making a certain amount of money already in Nigeria, it does not make sense to leave for purely financial reasons...as I advised someone on the other thread a few months back..... At around the 600, 700k/month mark, leaving Nigeria ONLY because of money doesn't make as much sense anymore cos your money does a lot more in Nigeria (cos most people are poor and labor is cheap, but oh well)

Regardless, I would still advise anybody who can exit Naija to leave for better standard of living, security and to give yourself and your kids options.

Anyway, very long post mehn... Thats my experience and consequently my opinion on the subject.

16 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by ideamaster(m): 11:23am On Jun 01
frank043:


I have always being pro-migration, and have never for once thought on the contrary. With the way this government is going, I don't see any decent future in sight for myself and family! Have already begun the process, though slow, cos I needed to sort out somethings.

The below was culled out from someone's breakdown of living abroad, I believe in the US. I'd appreciate if we can discuss this in more details and not making generic statements, as you all already are resident in Australia can be specific and truthful to the later.


I want to do a quick calculation. I am using the minimum wage in Australia which is $19.49 but to make it look more realistic, I would apply the 25% casual loading which would make it approx. $24 per hour.

This calculation is for a single person who works normal full time hours. Can people who have families give us a similar calculation for families so we know what it looks like? Thanks

Weekly wage = $24 * 38 hours = $912 (Before tax)

Per year = $912 * 52 = $47,424 (Before tax)

According to the ATO's tax calculator,

Tax on $912 per week is $152

Weekly net pay (take home pay) = 912 - 152 = 760

Yearly tax = 152 * 52 = 7,904 (16.7%)
Yearly take home pay = 760 * 52 = 39,520 (83.3%)

Note that this is minimum wage hence minimum tax. As you earn more, you pay more tax depending on your tax bracket.

Now using the weekly take home pay of 760

Rent for 1 person - share house or a very cheap 1 bedrom unit = 210 per week

Living expenses for 1 person - including petrol, groceries and maybe even eating out = 250 per week (this is probably an over-estimate for 1 person). If you are able to live on 200 per week, it means you can put away 50 per week for bills

Savings = 760 - 210 - 250 = 300 per week (if you want to pay your tithe or give to charity or support your family, you can probably deduct another 100 and be left with 200 savings per week)

Using 1 Aud = N250

Savings
Weekly = 300 = N75,000
Monthly = 1,200 = N300,000
Yearly = 15,600 = N3,900,000

I will list some periodic expenses that can deplete your savings.

Car registration - an average of $500 every 6 months or $1,000 every year.
Interstate Holidays - $3,000 depending on where you go, lol

If your regular bills have to come out of your savings

Home Internet - 70 per month = $840 per year - this won’t apply if you are in a share house
Mobile phone - 40 per month = $480 per year
Electricity (and gas for those who use gas) = $250 per quarter = $1,000 per year - won’t apply if you are in a share house

Remaining savings = $9,280 =N2,320,000

This is minimum wage, working regular full time hours.

Now as a single person, you can easily get a job that pays you more than $25 per hour, you can get penalties if you work weekends and you can have 2 jobs and work more than 50 hours in a week if you want to.

This would increase your wage and if you smart, it shouldn't really increase your living expenses. Car rego would be the same. Electricity, internet, fuel would be almost the same. You may spend more money going on holidays and going out for fancy dinners but that is it.

What do you guys think about my single person minimum wage calculation? What did I forget?

4 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 1:41pm On Jun 01
frank043:
LONG POST ALERT!!!

"Abroad people call me every weekend asking me to send money (not bragging). Many of them are frustrated over there. They work long hours including overtime but the government takes federal, state, city, social security, medicare, medicaid and disability taxes. On top of that, when they buy biscuit, they will still take sales tax. They pay exorbitant rent; those who "own" homes are locked in a loan repayment for 30yrs of which they still have to pay annual taxes for their house. Phone bill can cost over $60 per line, cable $120, internet $80 and they still pay tax on top of it. Burger and chips with soft drink can easily cost you $16 plus tax.

Bnimz & ideamaster have succinctly summarised your question.

I only want to comment on this part of the post. I cannot question an individual's experience but for whoever migrates to Australia legally as a permanent resident will not under any circumstance call his Nigerian friends to beg for money. The worst that will happen is for the person to live off government welfare and not be calling an arrogant friend in Nigeria to rescue.

If you live as a normal human being, your income should be enough to cater for you. You may not become wealthy on your income, but you will be comfortable.

It is high time for people to understand that not everybody has a vision to become millionaire or wealthy in Nigerian context. Some just want to be comfortable and live stress free. Contentment is paramount to them.

For migration, everybody should first understand the purpose for moving and weigh their options. Some are not moving for economic prosperity. It is not every move is because of economic prosperity.

You should understand why you want to migrate and let that be your motivating factor.

6 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by obainojazz(m): 1:55pm On Jun 01
bellong:


Bnimz & ideamaster have succinctly summarised your question.

I only want to comment on this part of the post. I cannot question an individual's experience but for whoever migrates to Australia legally as a permanent resident will not under any circumstance call his Nigerian friends to beg for money. The worst that will happen is for the person to live off government welfare and not be calling an arrogant friend in Nigeria to rescue.

If you live as a normal human being, your income should be enough to cater for you. You may not become wealthy on your income, but you will be comfortable.

It is high time for people to understand that not everybody has a vision to become millionaire or wealthy in Nigerian context. Some just want to be comfortable and live stress free. Contentment is paramount to them.

For migration, everybody should first understand the purpose for moving and weigh their options. Some are not moving for economic prosperity. It is not every move is because of economic prosperity.

You should understand why you want to migrate and let that be your motivating factor.
I'm sure it depends on the abroad.. India, Cyprus are all abroad.. most legit naija guys here won't beg for money.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by obainojazz(m): 2:06pm On Jun 01
ideamaster:


I want to do a quick calculation. I am using the minimum wage in Australia which is $19.49 but to make it look more realistic, I would apply the 25% casual loading which would make it approx. $24 per hour.

This calculation is for a single person who works normal full time hours. Can people who have families give us a similar calculation for families so we know what it looks like? Thanks

Weekly wage = $24 * 38 hours = $912 (Before tax)

Per year = $912 * 52 = $47,424 (Before tax)

According to the ATO's tax calculator,

Tax on $912 per week is $152

Weekly net pay (take home pay) = 912 - 152 = 760

Yearly tax = 152 * 52 = 7,904 (16.7%)
Yearly take home pay = 760 * 52 = 39,520 (83.3%)

Note that this is minimum wage hence minimum tax. As you earn more, you pay more tax depending on your tax bracket.

Now using the weekly take home pay of 760

Rent for 1 person - share house or a very cheap 1 bedrom unit = 210 per week

Living expenses for 1 person - including petrol, groceries and maybe even eating out = 250 per week (this is probably an over-estimate for 1 person). If you are able to live on 200 per week, it means you can put away 50 per week for bills

Savings = 760 - 210 - 250 = 300 per week (if you want to pay your tithe or give to charity or support your family, you can probably deduct another 100 and be left with 200 savings per week)

Using 1 Aud = N250

Savings
Weekly = 300 = N75,000
Monthly = 1,200 = N300,000
Yearly = 15,600 = N3,900,000

I will list some periodic expenses that can deplete your savings.

Car registration - an average of $500 every 6 months or $1,000 every year.
Interstate Holidays - $3,000 depending on where you go, lol

If your regular bills have to come out of your savings

Home Internet - 70 per month = $840 per year - this won’t apply if you are in a share house
Mobile phone - 40 per month = $480 per year
Electricity (and gas for those who use gas) = $250 per quarter = $1,000 per year - won’t apply if you are in a share house

Remaining savings = $9,280 =N2,320,000

This is minimum wage, working regular full time hours.

Now as a single person, you can easily get a job that pays you more than $25 per hour, you can get penalties if you work weekends and you can have 2 jobs and work more than 50 hours in a week if you want to.

This would increase your wage and if you smart, it shouldn't really increase your living expenses. Car rego would be the same. Electricity, internet, fuel would be almost the same. You may spend more money going on holidays and going out for fancy dinners but that is it.

What do you guys think about my single person minimum wage calculation? What did I forget?
.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by frank043(m): 8:46pm On Jun 01
Bnimz:


I understand the guy's points though there are a few exaggerations... There is no tax system in the English-speaking world that reduces $100,000 to $40,000.....

However, with that aside, we do have to admit that things are more expensive... But then you earn more money too...

Many thanks Bnimz!!!

Like bellong said, you have said it all very well succinctly.

I can now further break it down to some junior colleagues that yearn for such info, being that this is coming from the horse's mouth.

Thanks again.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by frank043(m): 8:54pm On Jun 01
ideamaster:


I want to do a quick calculation. I am using the minimum wage in Australia which is $19.49 but to make it look more realistic, I would apply the 25% casual loading which would make it approx. $24 per hour.


Many thanks ideamaster!

This is so so detailed that I had to read it over and over and over to ensure I properly digest it. I could never have come up with this quality of argument.

Honestly, I'm very impressed and touched at the selfless efforts you all are making to ensure that we over here can take that bold decision to migrate, as we all know migrating and leaving everything behind ain't an easy task.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bligs: 9:00pm On Jun 01
ideamaster:


I want to do a quick calculation. I am using the minimum wage in Australia which is $19.49 but to make it look more realistic, I would apply the 25% casual loading which would make it approx. $24 per hour.

This calculation is for a single person who works normal full time hours. Can people who have families give us a similar calculation for families so we know what it looks like? Thanks

Weekly wage = $24 * 38 hours = $912 (Before tax)

Per year = $912 * 52 = $47,424 (Before tax)

According to the ATO's tax calculator,

Tax on $912 per week is $152

Weekly net pay (take home pay) = 912 - 152 = 760

Yearly tax = 152 * 52 = 7,904 (16.7%)
Yearly take home pay = 760 * 52 = 39,520 (83.3%)

Note that this is minimum wage hence minimum tax. As you earn more, you pay more tax depending on your tax bracket.

Now using the weekly take home pay of 760

Rent for 1 person - share house or a very cheap 1 bedrom unit = 210 per week

Living expenses for 1 person - including petrol, groceries and maybe even eating out = 250 per week (this is probably an over-estimate for 1 person). If you are able to live on 200 per week, it means you can put away 50 per week for bills

Savings = 760 - 210 - 250 = 300 per week (if you want to pay your tithe or give to charity or support your family, you can probably deduct another 100 and be left with 200 savings per week)

Using 1 Aud = N250

Savings
Weekly = 300 = N75,000
Monthly = 1,200 = N300,000
Yearly = 15,600 = N3,900,000

I will list some periodic expenses that can deplete your savings.

Car registration - an average of $500 every 6 months or $1,000 every year.
Interstate Holidays - $3,000 depending on where you go, lol

If your regular bills have to come out of your savings

Home Internet - 70 per month = $840 per year - this won’t apply if you are in a share house
Mobile phone - 40 per month = $480 per year
Electricity (and gas for those who use gas) = $250 per quarter = $1,000 per year - won’t apply if you are in a share house

Remaining savings = $9,280 =N2,320,000

This is minimum wage, working regular full time hours.

Now as a single person, you can easily get a job that pays you more than $25 per hour, you can get penalties if you work weekends and you can have 2 jobs and work more than 50 hours in a week if you want to.

This would increase your wage and if you smart, it shouldn't really increase your living expenses. Car rego would be the same. Electricity, internet, fuel would be almost the same. You may spend more money going on holidays and going out for fancy dinners but that is it.

What do you guys think about my single person minimum wage calculation? What did I forget?
You forget to chip in tax return at the end of every financial year and superannuation (retirement benefits) unlike naija that your retirement benefits will be hanging in limbo for God knows when.

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Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by frank043(m): 9:04pm On Jun 01
bellong:


Bnimz & ideamaster have succinctly summarised your question.

I only want to comment on this part of the post. I cannot question an individual's experience but for whoever migrates to Australia legally as a permanent resident will not under any circumstance call his Nigerian friends to beg for money. The worst that will happen is for the person to live off government welfare and not be calling an arrogant friend in Nigeria to rescue.


Chief bellong, I hail thee bro!!!

Millions of thanks for your ever sincere guide and invaluable advise flying all over nairaland. Really very grateful.

It's high time those of us here really call to mind why we do wana migrate, as majority don't have any clue as to why and still remain in the dark after migrating.

I'd be sharing your words here with those that need to understand why they would wana take that giant stride.

As my migration process advances, I'd be reaching out to you for some particular clarifications.

God bless you bro.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by frank043(m): 7:11am On Jun 02
bligs:

You forget to chip in tax return at the end of every financial year and superannuation (retirement benefits) unlike naija that your retirement benefits will be hanging in limbo for God knows when.

Wow!!!

So, this too is part of the unending gains

Please bligs, could you further break this down in details (in numbers precisely, as I connect with number easily), just like ideamaster, bnimz and bellong did?

Many thanks for your input...
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 7:40am On Jun 02
frank043:


Wow!!!

So, this too is part of the unending gains

Please bligs, could you further break this down in details (in numbers precisely, as I connect with number easily), just like ideamaster, bnimz and bellong did?

Many thanks for your input...

Superannuation is similar to the Pension fund deducted from salary in Nigeria. The process is similar. 9.5% minimum of your fortnightly, weekly or monthly salary, which is the standard and mostly practised, (some organisations including Federal agencies do up to 17.5% or more) is paid into your nominated super fund agency. This money is not deducted from your salary but paid in addition to it. It goes to super fund account against retirement.

Tax return is not set in stone. It is where you declare your annual income and tax paid to the government. If you overpay based on your income, you get refunded the excess.

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