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Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 7:20am On Mar 17, 2019
catchdwind4rmkd:
Nice posts!


Thank you
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by joyoi: 10:25am On Mar 17, 2019
In short sir you really touched a spot with me here, one of the things I fear about moving abroad is all the bully stories we read about and how it affects kids deeply, also their independent level too unlike here where d fear of the cane while growing up will give you sense, this has been like an inner concern for me but then maybe am overthinking and it mite not be as crazy as am making it, in all this is really good cant wait to read the part 2, God bless you

GoodMemory:
If you have kids here are a few tips on kids' schooling.

For many immigrants, the reason for relocating was for their kids to have a better life than they did. So the type of school he/she will attend and his social interaction will be of paramount importance to parents.

In Australia, public schools are excellent. They compete favorably with private schools and there are many public schools that are better than private ones. Many of Melbourne's best schools are government owned located in the Eastern suburb. I think pupils/teacher ratio is pretty much the same in public and private schools, but some parents still prefer to take their kids to private schools for personal reasons. There have been issues of concern on bullying in public schools. I know school authorities frown at bullying but there are more recorded cases of bullying in public schools when compared to private ones. Personally, this is me thinking with my Nigerian brain now, I think the reason why we have fewer cases of bullying in private schools are (1). In terms of number, there are fewer pupils in private schools and so kids are given more attention
(2). Many of the private schools are owned by churches; Catholic, Methodist etc so they instill discipline through the teaching of religion.

Now to fees, If you are here on a PR, government owned schools are free. Private schools, expectedly are not free. There are however fee packages that make things a bit more bearable. If you have more than one kid, you can choose the option of Family Package fee. So regardless of the number of kids you have enrolled in a school, you will pay same fee. For example, if the family fee is $2000/year, you will pay only $2000 even if you had 10 kids attending that school. If you do not have the $2000 lump sum to pay at once, there is an option of instalment spread over 12 months.

Back to the issue of bullying. I have met some parents who constantly impress it on their kids to defend themselves in school. Depending on his age, that might be good idea but it can be misinterpreted by the children so you really have to word it very well and make sure he understands what you are saying. If he/she does not understand, sh/she may become aggressive and the parents might be unconsciously raising a monster. My wife and I once met a Nigerian mother whose kid was very aggressive. He couldn't play with other kids peacefully. This lady was very embarrassed the conduct of her child. She told my wife she raised him not to take any nonsense from other kids. She raised him to hit other kids when they touch his hair in school, when he disagrees with his friends, etc. Well, I am not in a position to tell parents how to raise their kids, but what I tell my kid is as a first line of defense, if any kid is being rude/disrespectful to him, he should tell him firmly to stop! Afterwards he should report that kid to the teacher and when he gets home, he should report same to me and I will take it up from there.

Don't worry if initially your kids do not have friends. It is absolutely normal. Even in Nigeria, kids do not start making friends on their first day in school. Kids generally are very territorial, they love their space and it takes time before they start thawing and making friends.


Their mode of teaching is somewhat different from our system in Nigeria. While we place a lot of emphasis on cerebral knowledge, they tend to develop the student through art/music/communication, and proper understanding of concept. So do not be overly worried if at age 5 he cannot recite 11X11 multiplication table or count 1-1,000,000. You might even start worrying if you hear stories back home(Nigeria) of a 4 year old reciting the whole book of Psalms! Do not let that bother you, there is nothing wrong with the kid. It's just their system here. You can decide to support the teachers' effort by teaching your kids the Nigerian way at home. It's all well and good. There is nothing wrong in the kids becoming super brilliant and ahead of his peers in class.

Assignments are given them usually at the beginning of the week and you are expected to assist them in completing their home work. Assignments are sometimes dropped into your kiddies' google drive account(Imagine, kids have google drive account here..Nigeria wake up!!!!) or an app called Schoolbags. I'm not sure if the app is used all over Australia but I know it is used in Melbourne. Download the app and start getting familiar with it. For about $12/month, you can also subscribe to an online teaching platform called IXL. Check it out. There are tonnes of mathematics and English exercises there for your kids to practice.

To be Continued.....

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bellong: 12:26pm On Mar 17, 2019
@Goodmemory,

thanks for the contributions. Nice to read.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stubbornman(m): 4:10pm On Mar 18, 2019
GoodMemory:
If you have kids here are a few tips on kids' schooling.

For many immigrants, the reason for relocating was for their kids to have a better life than they did. So the type of school he/she will attend and his social interaction will be of paramount importance to parents.

In Australia, public schools are excellent. They compete favorably with private schools and there are many public schools that are better than private ones. Many of Melbourne's best schools are government owned located in the Eastern suburb. I think pupils/teacher ratio is pretty much the same in public and private schools, but some parents still prefer to take their kids to private schools for personal reasons. There have been issues of concern on bullying in public schools. I know school authorities frown at bullying but there are more recorded cases of bullying in public schools when compared to private ones. Personally, this is me thinking with my Nigerian brain now, I think the reason why we have fewer cases of bullying in private schools are (1). In terms of number, there are fewer pupils in private schools and so kids are given more attention
(2). Many of the private schools are owned by churches; Catholic, Methodist etc so they instill discipline through the teaching of religion.

Now to fees, If you are here on a PR, government owned schools are free. Private schools, expectedly are not free. There are however fee packages that make things a bit more bearable. If you have more than one kid, you can choose the option of Family Package fee. So regardless of the number of kids you have enrolled in a school, you will pay same fee. For example, if the family fee is $2000/year, you will pay only $2000 even if you had 10 kids attending that school. If you do not have the $2000 lump sum to pay at once, there is an option of instalment spread over 12 months.

Back to the issue of bullying. I have met some parents who constantly impress it on their kids to defend themselves in school. Depending on his age, that might be good idea but it can be misinterpreted by the children so you really have to word it very well and make sure he understands what you are saying. If he/she does not understand, sh/she may become aggressive and the parents might be unconsciously raising a monster. My wife and I once met a Nigerian mother whose kid was very aggressive. He couldn't play with other kids peacefully. This lady was very embarrassed the conduct of her child. She told my wife she raised him not to take any nonsense from other kids. She raised him to hit other kids when they touch his hair in school, when he disagrees with his friends, etc. Well, I am not in a position to tell parents how to raise their kids, but what I tell my kid is as a first line of defense, if any kid is being rude/disrespectful to him, he should tell him firmly to stop! Afterwards he should report that kid to the teacher and when he gets home, he should report same to me and I will take it up from there.

Don't worry if initially your kids do not have friends. It is absolutely normal. Even in Nigeria, kids do not start making friends on their first day in school. Kids generally are very territorial, they love their space and it takes time before they start thawing and making friends.


Their mode of teaching is somewhat different from our system in Nigeria. While we place a lot of emphasis on cerebral knowledge, they tend to develop the student through art/music/communication, and proper understanding of concept. So do not be overly worried if at age 5 he cannot recite 11X11 multiplication table or count 1-1,000,000. You might even start worrying if you hear stories back home(Nigeria) of a 4 year old reciting the whole book of Psalms! Do not let that bother you, there is nothing wrong with the kid. It's just their system here. You can decide to support the teachers' effort by teaching your kids the Nigerian way at home. It's all well and good. There is nothing wrong in the kids becoming super brilliant and ahead of his peers in class.

Assignments are given them usually at the beginning of the week and you are expected to assist them in completing their home work. Assignments are sometimes dropped into your kiddies' google drive account(Imagine, kids have google drive account here..Nigeria wake up!!!!) or an app called Schoolbags. I'm not sure if the app is used all over Australia but I know it is used in Melbourne. Download the app and start getting familiar with it. For about $12/month, you can also subscribe to an online teaching platform called IXL. Check it out. There are tonnes of mathematics and English exercises there for your kids to practice.

To be Continued.....



lol @bolded..... thats where we always get it wrong in nigeria learning times table that we dont need... while our mates in china where making scientific calculator for us to use.. Us we where busy learning how to label the parts of one stupid grasshopper angry angry lol can you imagine??

I've told myself that my kids wont rush education like i did...there are other things to educate them with rather than tell them to count from 1-infinity ... i just tire for our educational system for Naija.

7 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by trastar(f): 4:45am On Mar 19, 2019
Concerning getting a job, I have a few advice but before the advice let me tell you ppl story of my job search.
got in 11th of December. started applying for work like a week after.
O boy! I applied for everything. I started getting calls like the next day after I applied.
I feel like customer service and admin roles are the easiest jobs to get here.
insurance companies are always looking for customer service.
got a job and resumption was on 2ND OF Jan with insurance. did not really like the role cos honestly, I was clueless-knowing next to nothing about insurance and the training was not it at all.
so I still kept applying, still kept going for interviews.

the friend I know here already gave me gist of interviews she went for and she was discriminated against because of color so I was sort of prepared when it happened to me.
and because she is a major success story of how you can start from scratch and work your way up here, I just keyed into her ginger.
I mean her first job was as a receptionist and 5 years down the line, senior HR in a huge multinational, trips abroad, company credit card, iphone X and plenty other gengen. so I just told myself, if she can do it, I can.

So when I went for interview for customer service manager with one company and the CEO came in, saw me, told me to pls wait at coffee shop across the road cos the HR manager that will interview me was not in yet, it pained me but not so much. I was prepared for it.
HR manager later called and told me she was asked to cancel the interview and she is sorry.
minutes later, I saw notification on my linkedin of two different ppl from the company viewing my profile, plus CEO and HR manager too.
in revenge, I clicked on” view profile” for every single person in that company too. we dey view each other noni. but thank God that did not click cos that same day, I had interview with a premium car manufacturing company and I got the job.

Pls note these jobs are all contract based. the pay isn’t bad at all. I get paid per hour but it means you get paid just for the number of hours’ u work for, no leave payment or any of that. I also don’t mind because it means I am not tied to any company and I can keep searching till I find a great place.

So my advice for anyone coming to Sydney is;

1. Blow your own horn during interviews. don’t doubt yourself. the things that won’t impress a Nigerian interviewer impresses them here. The average Nigerian employee normally do roles meant for 3 to 4 people here. so when you are telling them about what your job entailed back home, don’t make it seem small or not a big deal. list and list.

2. Apply to as many jobs as you can, don’t be discouraged by the nos. just keep applying, its kuku free.

3. They really do not ask to see physical copies of your degree certificates, (even for my husband who is in IT) this means they rely on what you say a lot. But they asked for evidence of IT certifications though. so your destiny na your mouth and cv e dey. not asking anyone to be dishonest and go and list what u did not do or degree u do not have ooo. but be ready to use your mouth to defend whatever you write in cv. this is easier for those of us in the not technical fields. we can easily learn on the job but if you are not a programmer and you claim programmer. Well...

4. Another trick my friend told me was –remove anything with Nigeria in your CV. don’t let them judge u before meeting you. let them at least hear u talk before assuming u can’t offer anything. so a lot of times they call and they don’t even realise experiences I listed were all in Nigeria. I got so many interviews even me sef begin turn them down.

5. Concerning colleagues, if you are like me who thought Nigerians are “bad” when it comes to office politics, be ready for a shocker here. Oyibo ppl gossip pass us. my Gahd! someone will stand now and next minute they are gossiping them. next minute they are smiling at them. If you ever thought they are superior morally, just know now that all of us are humans. na skin color differ.

6. My husband got a job in his field-IT Networking- like two weeks after I got mine. his job is full time and although it took time, he was patient and because I was working, he can afford to be patient. if you can, don’t get caught up doing hustle job that u won’t have time to chase proper jobs in your career line.

7. I felt bad about my accent initially but different ppl form several countries work with me.
South African, Zimbabwean-the only other black person asides myself, etc. everyone get accent so we dey. you need a lot of thick skin and a container load of self-confidence.
8. I am still searching, my mouth is wide now. so yeah..

43 Likes 10 Shares

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stubbornman(m): 10:12am On Mar 19, 2019
trastar:
Concerning getting a job, I have a few advice but before the advice let me tell you ppl story of my job search.
got in 11th of December. started applying for work like a week after.
O boy! I applied for everything. I started getting calls like the next day after I applied.
I feel like customer service and admin roles are the easiest jobs to get here.
insurance companies are always looking for customer service.
got a job and resumption was on 2ND OF Jan with insurance. did not really like the role cos honestly, I was clueless-knowing next to nothing about insurance and the training was not it at all.
so I still kept applying, still kept going for interviews.

the friend I know here already gave me gist of interviews she went for and she was discriminated against because of color so I was sort of prepared when it happened to me.
and because she is a major success story of how you can start from scratch and work your way up here, I just keyed into her ginger.
I mean her first job was as a receptionist and 5 years down the line, senior HR in a huge multinational, trips abroad, company credit card, iphone X and plenty other gengen. so I just told myself, if she can do it, I can.

So when I went for interview for customer service manager with one company and the CEO came in, saw me, told me to pls wait at coffee shop across the road cos the HR manager that will interview me was not in yet, it pained me but not so much. I was prepared for it.
HR manager later called and told me she was asked to cancel the interview and she is sorry.
minutes later, I saw notification on my linkedin of two different ppl from the company viewing my profile, plus CEO and HR manager too.
in revenge, I clicked on” view profile” for every single person in that company too. we dey view each other noni. but thank God that did not click cos that same day, I had interview with a premium car manufacturing company and I got the job.

Pls note these jobs are all contract based. the pay isn’t bad at all. I get paid per hour but it means you get paid just for the number of hours’ u work for, no leave payment or any of that. I also don’t mind because it means I am not tied to any company and I can keep searching till I find a great place.

So my advice for anyone coming to Sydney is;

1. Blow your own horn during interviews. don’t doubt yourself. the things that won’t impress a Nigerian interviewer impresses them here. The average Nigerian employee normally do roles meant for 3 to 4 people here. so when you are telling them about what your job entailed back home, don’t make it seem small or not a big deal. list and list.

2. Apply to as many jobs as you can, don’t be discouraged by the nos. just keep applying, its kuku free.

3. They really do not ask to see physical copies of your degree certificates, (even for my husband who is in IT) this means they rely on what you say a lot. But they asked for evidence of IT certifications though. so your destiny na your mouth and cv e dey. not asking anyone to be dishonest and go and list what u did not do or degree u do not have ooo. but be ready to use your mouth to defend whatever you write in cv. this is easier for those of us in the not technical fields. we can easily learn on the job but if you are not a programmer and you claim programmer. Well...

4. Another trick my friend told me was –remove anything with Nigeria in your CV. don’t let them judge u before meeting you. let them at least hear u talk before assuming u can’t offer anything. so a lot of times they call and they don’t even realise experiences I listed were all in Nigeria. I got so many interviews even me sef begin turn them down.

5. Concerning colleagues, if you are like me who thought Nigerians are “bad” when it comes to office politics, be ready for a shocker here. Oyibo ppl gossip pass us. my Gahd! someone will stand now and next minute they are gossiping them. next minute they are smiling at them. If you ever thought they are superior morally, just know now that all of us are humans. na skin color differ.

6. My husband got a job in his field-IT Networking- like two weeks after I got mine. his job is full time and although it took time, he was patient and because I was working, he can afford to be patient. if you can, don’t get caught up doing hustle job that u won’t have time to chase proper jobs in your career line.

7. I felt bad about my accent initially but different ppl form several countries work with me.
South African, Zimbabwean-the only other black person asides myself, etc. everyone get accent so we dey. you need a lot of thick skin and a container load of self-confidence.
8. I am still searching, my mouth is wide now. so yeah..






Nice one dear!!!
what culture shock have you encountered since your landing

i am actually enjoying the cooperation coming from this thread now....thanks to everyone for your input... just keep it coming!!!

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by firpemi(f): 11:02am On Mar 19, 2019
A good read, I am happy the thread is bubbling again. wish you a fruitful stay

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Wesrene: 12:36pm On Mar 19, 2019
Pls for a civil engineer which visa is he eligible for and what state is best to ask for EOI
stifo2012:
Congrats

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 12:42pm On Mar 19, 2019
bellong:
@Goodmemory,

thanks for the contributions. Nice to read.

You are welcome
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 12:55pm On Mar 19, 2019
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
If you are going to live in Melbourne and would be using public transport, download the PTV app to your phone.
You might also want to have this train route (pdf format) on your phone or a hard copy printed and kept in your wallet.

https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/assets/PDFs/Maps/Network-maps/0bc94c22f8/PTV_MetropolitanTrainNetworkMap_August2018.pdf


If you are going to be commuting to work daily using public transport, I'd advise you sign up on Manage Myki and register your myki card. You can either buy 7 days, 21 days pass, etc. Use your credit or debit card to load your myki card. Please allow about 30 minutes for the myki card to be topped up before you get on the train. You can also set up auto top up, so you don’t have to worry about topping up every now and then.

I have noticed, the train arrival time is sometimes later than the universal time (if there is anything like that). They might have done that to help passengers. Trains also sometimes arrive late. So, if you are rushing to catch a train and you think you are late, don’t give up, you might still make it. lol
On the flip side, I once thought I was late, I ran down the escalators and without checking the electronic board, I jumped into the train that just pulled up. As soon as I sat down, I picked up my phone and started watching musicals. I had been using that train line for a few months so without train announcements, or me looking up to check the train stops, I know when to start getting ready to get off the train. So, after 30 minutes in the train, I finally looked up and ops! I was in the wrong train in an area I didn’t recognize at all. I dashed out at the next stop not knowing where to catch the train bound to my station. At that time, it was 5:50pm. School After Care closes at 6pm! By 6pm, I was in the middle of nowhere. My phone went haywire with calls from the school After Care. By the time I made it to my kids’ school, it was 6:35pm!
I was slapped with a penalty of $140. ($2/min/child). Painful heh?

Driver’s Licence

If you have a Nigerian driver’s licence or any other driver licence not recognized, the first step is to book an appointment for its verification. In my case, it took a few minutes to “verify” as nothing was done other than to ask for identification(passport) and proof of address. I understand in some cases, they might write the embassy to verify the authenticity of your licence. So, make sure it is genuine.
Next stage is to book an appointment for the Learners Permit Test. You can book the appointment there, call VicRoads on the phone or do it online.

The learners permit test is a multiple choice computer-based test. Practice the test from this link. You are only ready for the test once you start scoring 90-100% in the practice test.
https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/licences/your-ls/get-your-ls/lpt
Next is the Hazard Perception Test. It is a computer test that simulates driving under different road conditions. It tests your knowledge of road hazards and how quickly you can respond to them. Many people find this hard. There are a few practice tests online.

https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/licences/your-ps/get-your-ps/hazard-perception-test

The third and final stage is the actual driving test. It is a very simple test. A lot of people fail because they either fail to practice or they fail to pay attention to the tips and tricks of passing the test.
Below are a few tips on passing the driving test. Note that this is not an exhaustive list.

Head Check
During the test, there will be lots of “turn right’, turn left”. Make sure to use your mirror a lot. The test instructor wants to make sure you are turning your head and not your eyes while performing head check. If your head is still, and you are only rolling your eyes left and right, you may fail the test. So, when he/she says, “turn right” make sure to check the mirror by moving your head, and at times your upper body right and left. There have been cases where ladies had to wear big dangling earrings just to make it obvious they are turning their heads (talk about women wayo…Just kidding oo). Make sure to also look over your shoulder when navigating blind spots too.

3-Point Turn or Parallel Parking
You will be required to do 3-Point Turn or the dreaded Parallel Parking. Practice these two very well. I personally think 3-Point Turn is easier. There are hundreds of videos on youtube that demonstrate parallel parking and 3-Point.

Changing Lanes
When you are asked to change lanes, look at the mirrors first before indicating. You do not want to indicate before you ensure it is safe to change lanes.

Speed Limit
Stay within speed limits. You will drive on a 40km/h, 60km/h and at times 80-100km/h road. Whatever the case, do not exceed the speed limit.

Traffic Light
Never drive through red light at the traffic lights. This a major one. If you drive through the red light, you have failed the test. the instructor will discontinue the test immediately. Please take it seriously.

Landed Seniors in NSW, South Australia and Queensland etc, can also give us tips about the process in their parts of Australia.

24 Likes 5 Shares

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stifo2012: 2:03pm On Mar 19, 2019
189, 190 & 489.

It depends on the total points you are able to get which is a function of your education, age, work experience etc

Wesrene:
Pls for a civil engineer which visa is he eligible for and what state is best to ask for EOI
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stepo707: 3:46pm On Mar 19, 2019
trastar:
Concerning getting a job, I have a few advice but before the advice let me tell you ppl story of my job search.
got in 11th of December. started applying for work like a week after.
O boy! I applied for everything. I started getting calls like the next day after I applied.
I feel like customer service and admin roles are the easiest jobs to get here.
insurance companies are always looking for customer service.
got a job and resumption was on 2ND OF Jan with insurance. did not really like the role cos honestly, I was clueless-knowing next to nothing about insurance and the training was not it at all.
so I still kept applying, still kept going for interviews.

the friend I know here already gave me gist of interviews she went for and she was discriminated against because of color so I was sort of prepared when it happened to me.
and because she is a major success story of how you can start from scratch and work your way up here, I just keyed into her ginger.
I mean her first job was as a receptionist and 5 years down the line, senior HR in a huge multinational, trips abroad, company credit card, iphone X and plenty other gengen. so I just told myself, if she can do it, I can.

So when I went for interview for customer service manager with one company and the CEO came in, saw me, told me to pls wait at coffee shop across the road cos the HR manager that will interview me was not in yet, it pained me but not so much. I was prepared for it.
HR manager later called and told me she was asked to cancel the interview and she is sorry.
minutes later, I saw notification on my linkedin of two different ppl from the company viewing my profile, plus CEO and HR manager too.
in revenge, I clicked on” view profile” for every single person in that company too. we dey view each other noni. but thank God that did not click cos that same day, I had interview with a premium car manufacturing company and I got the job.

Pls note these jobs are all contract based. the pay isn’t bad at all. I get paid per hour but it means you get paid just for the number of hours’ u work for, no leave payment or any of that. I also don’t mind because it means I am not tied to any company and I can keep searching till I find a great place.

So my advice for anyone coming to Sydney is;

1. Blow your own horn during interviews. don’t doubt yourself. the things that won’t impress a Nigerian interviewer impresses them here. The average Nigerian employee normally do roles meant for 3 to 4 people here. so when you are telling them about what your job entailed back home, don’t make it seem small or not a big deal. list and list.

2. Apply to as many jobs as you can, don’t be discouraged by the nos. just keep applying, its kuku free.

3. They really do not ask to see physical copies of your degree certificates, (even for my husband who is in IT) this means they rely on what you say a lot. But they asked for evidence of IT certifications though. so your destiny na your mouth and cv e dey. not asking anyone to be dishonest and go and list what u did not do or degree u do not have ooo. but be ready to use your mouth to defend whatever you write in cv. this is easier for those of us in the not technical fields. we can easily learn on the job but if you are not a programmer and you claim programmer. Well...

4. Another trick my friend told me was –remove anything with Nigeria in your CV. don’t let them judge u before meeting you. let them at least hear u talk before assuming u can’t offer anything. so a lot of times they call and they don’t even realise experiences I listed were all in Nigeria. I got so many interviews even me sef begin turn them down.


5. Concerning colleagues, if you are like me who thought Nigerians are “bad” when it comes to office politics, be ready for a shocker here. Oyibo ppl gossip pass us. my Gahd! someone will stand now and next minute they are gossiping them. next minute they are smiling at them. If you ever thought they are superior morally, just know now that all of us are humans. na skin color differ.

6. My husband got a job in his field-IT Networking- like two weeks after I got mine. his job is full time and although it took time, he was patient and because I was working, he can afford to be patient. if you can, don’t get caught up doing hustle job that u won’t have time to chase proper jobs in your career line.

7. I felt bad about my accent initially but different ppl form several countries work with me.
South African, Zimbabwean-the only other black person asides myself, etc. everyone get accent so we dey. you need a lot of thick skin and a container load of self-confidence.
8. I am still searching, my mouth is wide now. so yeah..




Trastar please help me understand this part.Do you mean on the CV, i remove all the experiences of Nigeria, or just list the experiences but remove the location from the CV?
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 11:16pm On Mar 19, 2019
stepo707:

Trastar please help me understand this part.Do you mean on the CV, i remove all the experiences of Nigeria, or just list the experiences but remove the location from the CV?

What she meant was for you to remove the word "Nigeria" from your CV. Do not remove experience acquired in Nigeria. This is to prevent interviewers from prejudging you. However be ready to tell the truth during the interview or anytime the question of location comes up.

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 1:23am On Mar 20, 2019
stubbornman:



Nice one dear!!!
what culture shock have you encountered since your landing

i am actually enjoying the cooperation coming from this thread now....thanks to everyone for your input... just keep it coming!!!

For me:
Outdoor culture. It means a lot to Aussies. Eating out means a lot to them. I'm tired of answering the question "what do you have planned for the weekend?" What else do I have have planned? I'll be with the family and watch movies...lol. If you give such a response twice, they will see you as a boring person.. lol. If you tell them you are going on some trip to see kangaroo and koala... viola! you will be their friend because on Monday morning, they will cluster around you to hear "gists"

Another culture shock is how everything works. Australia is one giant machine with different parts like centrelink, medicare, tax, etc. one part goes into another. How they have managed to create a society where things work is a shock to me.

How majority drive within speed limit without the presence of police or patrol cars was a shock to me.

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Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Alphadoor: 2:35am On Mar 20, 2019
GoodMemory:


For me:
Outdoor culture. It means a lot to Aussies. Eating out means a lot to them. I'm tired of answering the question "what do you have planned for the weekend?" What else do I have have planned? I'll be with the family and watch movies...lol. If you give such a response twice, they will see you as a boring person.. lol. If you tell them you are going on some trip to see kangaroo and koala... viola! you will be their friends because on Monday morning, they will cluster around you to hear "gists"

Another culture shock is how everything works. Australia is one giant machine with different parts like centrelink, medicare, tax, etc. one part goes into another. How they have managed to create a society where things work is a shock to me.

How majority drive within speed limit without the presence of police or patrol cars was a shock to me.


Definitely not in Sydney grin grin
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Alphadoor: 2:43am On Mar 20, 2019
Omooloriredade:
After one year...

Pros: God is ever faithful. Whatever your story.....It will end in praise

Cons:
1. Excessive liberalism.
2. Cultural shock.
3. Driver's licence is Gold........hahaha
4.. Minor racism (or maybe not) mostly from Asians.

Reaction - ki lon seleyi? Kora ku nibi yi juh (what's doing this one? Comot for here juh)

But I have repented now, so I smile and act like nothing happened. Australia is home to all of us now. No need to fan the embers of hatred/discord for the sake of our children.


Bye tongue

True Talk.
Strangely more appreciated than international passport in most cases

2 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 2:51am On Mar 20, 2019
Alphadoor:


Definitely not in Sydney grin grin

Really? I have not been to Sydney. In Melbourne, motorists seldom exceed speed limit.

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by FBS: 3:36am On Mar 20, 2019
Alphadoor:


True Talk.
Strangely more appreciated than international passport in most cases
They don't even care about your passport sef. lol. Your DL is the koko. cheesy

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by FBS: 3:37am On Mar 20, 2019
Alphadoor:


Definitely not in Sydney grin grin
Drove in Sydney and just couldn't wait to get out. Omo, madness full that place o! cameras everywhere yet some people just dont give a toss. cheesy

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Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by FBS: 3:40am On Mar 20, 2019
GoodMemory:


For me:
Outdoor culture. It means a lot to Aussies. Eating out means a lot to them. I'm tired of answering the question "what do you have planned for the weekend?" What else do I have have planned? I'll be with the family and watch movies...lol. If you give such a response twice, they will see you as a boring person.. lol. If you tell them you are going on some trip to see kangaroo and koala... viola! you will be their friend because on Monday morning, they will cluster around you to hear "gists"

Another culture shock is how everything works. Australia is one giant machine with different parts like centrelink, medicare, tax, etc. one part goes into another. How they have managed to create a society where things work is a shock to me.

How majority drive within speed limit without the presence of police or patrol cars was a shock to me.

hahahaha
Still can't get my head around people planning events like 3 months ahead. I'm always like Woot da... cheesy
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by bligs: 5:20am On Mar 20, 2019
GoodMemory:


For me:
Outdoor culture. It means a lot to Aussies. Eating out means a lot to them. I'm tired of answering the question "what do you have planned for the weekend?" What else do I have have planned? I'll be with the family and watch movies...lol. If you give such a response twice, they will see you as a boring person.. lol. If you tell them you are going on some trip to see kangaroo and koala... viola! you will be their friend because on Monday morning, they will cluster around you to hear "gists"

Another culture shock is how everything works. Australia is one giant machine with different parts like centrelink, medicare, tax, etc. one part goes into another. How they have managed to create a society where things work is a shock to me.

How majority drive within speed limit without the presence of police or patrol cars was a shock to me.

Speed cameras, once fined $198 for 87km/p in 80km/p region and got a point deducted, nobody will tell to drive within the speed limit next time, although many people still exceed the speed limit where there is no camera.

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by trastar(f): 7:19am On Mar 20, 2019
stubbornman:



Nice one dear!!!
what culture shock have you encountered since your landing

i am actually enjoying the cooperation coming from this thread now....thanks to everyone for your input... just keep it coming!!!

Zebra crossing! I might never get used to this..I'd be standing there waiting for road to clear and they will.park too. Refusing to go until I cross.

Another one is ppl wearing the shortest of shorts. Like sometimes I'm looking at part of their bumbum and it's like normal thing. Small sun and everyone has removed cloth..�

14 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Royal54(m): 8:07am On Mar 20, 2019
JewelStone:
Congrats on your job and move to Sydney.

P.S I'm on mat leave and happy to connect with fellow Sydneysiders.

@ Jewelstone, do you mind if I send you a PM, please?

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stubbornman(m): 8:55am On Mar 20, 2019
trastar:


Zebra crossing! I might never get used to this..I'd be standing there waiting for road to clear and they will.park too. Refusing to go until I cross.

Another one is ppl wearing the shortest of shorts. Like sometimes I'm looking at part of their bumbum and it's like normal thing. Small sun and everyone has removed cloth..�

Lol @zebra crossing , it will even take someone like me that hardly uses the pedestrain to get use to the zebra stuff..... they should have a cheetah crossing for people like us that uses usain bolt's speed to cross the road grin grin .... Nice experience you've got there, just keep it coming if you have more

5 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by stubbornman(m): 9:00am On Mar 20, 2019
GoodMemory:


For me:
Outdoor culture. It means a lot to Aussies. Eating out means a lot to them. I'm tired of answering the question "what do you have planned for the weekend?" What else do I have have planned? I'll be with the family and watch movies...lol. If you give such a response twice, they will see you as a boring person.. lol. If you tell them you are going on some trip to see kangaroo and koala... viola! you will be their friend because on Monday morning, they will cluster around you to hear "gists"

Another culture shock is how everything works. Australia is one giant machine with different parts like centrelink, medicare, tax, etc. one part goes into another. How they have managed to create a society where things work is a shock to me.

How majority drive within speed limit without the presence of police or patrol cars was a shock to me.


Oyibo people and yeye play ...you wey go dey look the kangaroo dey see bush meat grin cheesy

Australia is a very developed country ...things working smoothly shouldnt come as a surprise.... well being stucked in NIgeria for a long time it should

1 Like

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Nobody: 9:34am On Mar 20, 2019
Is there no social worker that got into Australia with 189 PR visa. Cos all I see is engineer, IT, Finance, Agricultural etc.
Please Social Worker share your own story so we in that career can understand as we plan to come there.
How you got integrated into the profession.
Please also state your experience in Nigeria before travelling too and how or if that influenced any job opportunities for you in Australia.
Thanks.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Dharmie02: 9:54am On Mar 20, 2019
[quote author=trastar post=76814219]

Zebra crossing! I might never get used to this..I'd be standing there waiting for road to clear and they will.park too. Refusing to go until I cross.

@ Trastar, that Zebra crossing got me. I remember the first time I used Zebra crossing on OAU campus. Please, I have a question MA.
For these job vacancies, do they consider people 's age during recruitment? I asked this cos u know this our naija ppl that will say 'not more than 28 years, 8years experience etc'should apply for jobs
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Wesrene: 9:40pm On Mar 20, 2019
Pls belong what's your advice on visa for engineer 190 489 or 189 what's there benefits and limitations...
bellong:


Apologies bro, I don't reside in Adelaide anymore.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by Wesrene: 10:32pm On Mar 20, 2019
Which state are u...pls what's your advice on visa 190 and 489
GoodMemory:
To encourage others who are planning to move to Australia, here's my story and lessons from life Down Under

Landed Feb 2018 with the family. We struggled a bit to get accommodation, so we had an extended stay in a hotel. We eventually got one. How did we do it? Well, after several rejections, we resorted to Gumtree. We targeted adverts where present occupiers were looking for tenants to complete their lease terms.
Landlords/Agents were less strict on documentation and particularly the much dreaded "rental history’. Within a few days, we got a place for about $350/week. So, first lesson: Don't get stuck with realestateview, try other avenues.

I had sent out many job applications offshore but none of them received the attention of recruiters and HR, but as soon as we landed, I started getting invitation for interviews.
My tactics was to send the application late in the night or first thing in the morning. I found this was helpful as recruiters, most times respond to applications on first come first serve basis. I even tested these many times. Applications sent out in the afternoon received less attention when compared to the ones I submitted in the morning. Second lesson, timing is very important.

With regards to CVs, while good formatting, easy readability etc are very important, the content of your CV is far more important than anything else. Though I am an advocate of brevity, but an oversimplified CVs will not convey the proper message as well. The length of your CV should be proportional to the years of experience you have. If you have 10 years’ experience, I believe you will be doing yourself an injustice by submitting a 2-3-page CV. Lesson 3, a good, well formatted CV with great content will get you more interviews and consequently a job.

There are web hoisting platforms where you can create a free website for yourself. I developed a free one for myself and populated it with a lot of information. I even added photos and details that CVs would not accommodate. The free website was my complete profile. I then add the link to my CV. Think of special things you did for your previous companies. If you have proofs such as photos, testimonials, letters of commendation, upload on the website. It is free to create. Lesson 4: Market yourself apologetically.


There is a psychological aspect to job search in Australia. Your first barrier is the colour of your skin. You cannot change your race, so it is what it is. The second challenge are fellow Africans who are quick to advise you to dump your profession for something else. Well, while such advice might be coming from a good heart with a good intention, I personally feel you should try and try harder to clinch a job in your field before you try something else. You may have to attend more than one interviews so don’t be discouraged. I remember one job I was being considered for. I had aced the first two interviews; the last stage was to meet one of the directors of the company. I was confident I would get the job. The interviewer walked in, I stood up, shook hands with her and sat down. She re-positioned her PC monitor so I could see it and asked me to solve her problem. I am an advanced excel user, I even write VBA/macros. Even though that wasn’t the core job description, advanced knowledge of excel was part of it I floundered a bit, tried to think but while I was thinking, she walked to the door and held open the door. She said "it was nice meeting you!" I stood up and walked out without a word. You will receive several rejection emails but don’t get discouraged. Keep pushing you will get it. So, fourth lesson is: please don’t listen to naysayers! Do not listen to people who tell you that you cannot get a corporate job in Australia.
I got a job right after the ugly encounter between the director and myself. My wife also got a job a few months after.

About groceries. We found it cheaper to eat Nigerian food. This is what I mean. Nigerian foodstuffs worth $300 lasts more than 6 weeks but an equivalent amount in Coles or any of the giant retailers, for example doesn’t even last one week. The only thing we buy in the big retail shops are non-edible stuffs toiletries and ijekuje(Biscuits..etc) Lesson 5: If you are an irredeemable lover of Nigerian food (which Nigerian isn’t anyway), invest in local food.

Public transportation is good but if you have a family, and can afford a car, buy one. With $2500, you can get a decent car to buy. Try as much as possible to buy a car that comes with a Road Worthy Certificate (RWC). I bought a car for $2500 without an RWC the week we landed. I can’t renew the registration since I must provide RWC and the cost of getting one after repairs on the car comes to $2000! So Lesson 6: buy a car with RWC.

Australia is an expensive country. At some point, you might find the need for a side job. I registered a company, though I haven’t done much because I travel a lot. I have met Africans who run their own thing and are very successful. If there is something you are passionate about, register a company and start right away. There are lots of potentials in Australian market. The stories of racism should be the least thing to deter you from going after your dreams.


I have to mention this. You might be surprised to find it hard to make friends here, especially with Africans. Don’t let it bother you. Just concentrate. There are friends I haven’t seen since I came. Everyone is busy or pretending to be busy. You will find instances where you want to meet a friend and he says, “hmmm...I will be free ending of next month”. Lol. You will be like “ending of next month? Are you traveling?’ He will reply: “No, I’m just busy, I have a few things to sort out”. Well, you have to get used to getting long notice before you can meet most people. Make friends with Africans and non Africans as well otherwise, you will be terribly bored. Try to make friends with everyone. Join clubs, do stuffs. Lesson 7: Don’t let anyone, especially fellow Africans restrict your enjoyment. Enjoy Australia. Life is too short.

Many things happened while trying to settle down, I do not have them handy, but as time goes on, I will update you guys.
If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 12:07am On Mar 21, 2019
Wesrene:
Which state are u...pls what's your advice on visa 190 and 489

I am in Melbourne, Victoria.

190
https://archive.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa-1/190-


189
https://archive.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa-1/189-

489
https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-regional-provisional-489

189 is the most flexible of the 3 in that it there's no restriction in location. You can live anywhere in Australia. 190, you have to live in the nominated state for 2 years before you can move elsewhere.
I'm guessing you are an engineer so I will recommend 189 or 190,if your nominated state is NSW, Victoria and WA. Those are the states where you would easily find employment as an engineer.
Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by trastar(f): 2:10am On Mar 21, 2019
[quote author=Dharmie02 post=76818264][/quote]

That age thing? Another culture shock.
Both jobs, I had ppl who are close to 50 apply and get it. My colleague is celebrating 50th b-day in India as we speak.
As long as you can do the job I guess no one cares

3 Likes

Re: Living In Australia/life As An Australian Immigrant by GoodMemory: 2:42am On Mar 21, 2019
Part 2 – Kid’s school

There is a periodic parent/teacher meeting. In most schools in Australia, you have to book online a time session with your kid’s teacher. It’s usually for 15 minutes. In those 15 minutes, you will have the opportunity to discuss with the educator your child’s progress in school. For some weird reasons, I notice they expect parents to do more than the teachers. After discussing your kids academic progress, do not forget to ask how he’s faring socially. Ask the teacher if your kid has friends or not. Note: Australian teachers won’t expressively say your child isn’t socializing well. You will only pick the negative answer from his reluctance to answer the question. When it starts with “hmmmm…”, just know you have to start paying attention to his social life. While I agree that it is the responsibility of the teacher to make sure kids socialize, I want to say parents should share in that responsibility too. I will tell you what I did on one instance. It was Teachers’ Day. I put a call across to the admin department of my kids’ school and requested to speak with the principal. When she picked it, I introduced myself and I said “I want to specially thank you and all your teachers in the school for the tremendous work you are doing. My son has made giant stride in a short time. Happy Teachers’ Day.” For some minutes, she was dumbfounded. She said. Wow! “We haven’t received this call in a while”. She thanked me, and we exchanged pleasantries.
When I showed up in the school later that day to pick my kids, I was the star of the day. Teachers thronged me in appreciation of the call. I’m sure my kids would be proud of their dad and other kids would be envious of them. We are immigrants and people around here go about with agelong stereotypes. We therefore should do more (unfortunately, but it is what it is) to break it, in as much as Nigeria isn’t getting things right and we intend to make Australia home for now.

Wife occasionally takes a leave day at work, so she can volunteer to help school sort out and rearrange books. I might be wrong, but I think all these send messages to the school that we care about the kids as much as other parents care about their kids and as such cannot be messed with. It also sends a message to potential bullies.

Seniors, I will be happy to read about your experience in this regard too.

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