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NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! - Business - Nairaland

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NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Intrepid01(m): 8:24am On Jun 13
THE possibility of yet another round of systemic failure in the banking industry, raised recently by the Nigerian Deposit Insurance Corporation, calls for quick, concerted pre-emptive action. The revelation by Umaru Ibrahim, managing director of the NDIC, that weak corporate governance and internal controls were tipping the financial sector towards crisis conflated with a similar alarm raised by the International Monetary Fund anchored on weak regulation and adverse operating conditions. With the economy falling short of growth projections, urgent, extraordinary measures should be adopted today to prevent a catastrophe.

Umaru could not mask his apprehension in an address presented on his behalf at the FITC discussion programme in Lagos: despite stringent and elaborate rules, weak corporate governance culture had rebounded in the banking system and, along with ineffectual controls, presented regulators with the possibility of bank failures. For regulators, he said the fear had prompted moves to conduct tests and moves to stave off adversity.

Earlier in March and April this year, the IMF had issued concerns over Nigeria’s continued vulnerability to shocks amid a slow exit from recession, rising debts and its ability to withstand the aftershocks of another global meltdown predicted by leading experts.



Ibrahim’s alert confirmed the long-running fears of systemic upheaval in the banking sector, which barely survived the shocks of 2007-2009 and only after a decisive intervention by the leadership of the Central Bank of Nigeria that prevented failure. The IMF has identified weak regulation as a critical factor in the last few years. In what some see as self-indictment, Godwin Emefiele, the CBN Governor, recently took to warning the deposit money banks of sanctions for round tripping and other sharp practices in the foreign exchange market. The recourse to sermons and warnings demonstrates the crisis of regulation that has for long plagued the country’s financial system. The CBN is armed with enough legal powers to monitor and sanction abuses and misdemeanours by bankers. Lamido Sanusi, as governor (2008 to 2014), proved this when, after stress tests, the central bank removed the boards and managements of eight banks, appointed interim replacements that nursed them until they recovered and were bought by new investors. Sanusi also identified gross insider abuse by directors and managers for the crisis.

Apparently, as the CBN itself has acknowledged, insider abuse is back; sharp practices in the forex market partly blamed for the collapse of 44 banks between 1994 and 2000; money laundering and violation for reporting regulations, as well as false accounting have taken hold in the DMBs.

Can Emefiele prevent systemic distress? Doing so requires, above all else, courage and astuteness. It was the frequent recourse to the CBN’s overnight lending window that alerted Sanusi to the stress in some banks in 2009. In 2017, the bank said, 60 per cent of the average daily N216.34 billion the DMBs borrowed from its Standing Lending Facility was for Intra-Day Lending Facility.

Reports, evidence and testimonies in corruption trials have detailed how regulations and anti-money laundering laws were brazenly violated by bankers to assist high profile public figures loot and hide public funds. These disclosures should have prompted audits, fines and, where necessary, severe sanctions on complicit banks, directors and managers, some of whom have testified to their involvement in court.

The CBN needs to act fast as most Nigerian banks, post-consolidation, are big and a failing one could pull down others. While inefficient banks may go bust in good times without threatening the entire system, an economy that grew only 1.9 per cent in the first quarter of this year, just two quarters separated from a recession, suffered nine million job losses in three years and, with youth unemployment of over 20 per cent, should avoid systemic bank failure. This principle was applied during the 2007/8 meltdown when the United States Treasury gave an initial $700 billion to save some big banks, Italy €17 billion and Britain £500 billion.

The CBN and NDIC should immediately undertake full audits and examinations of the banks; there should be no hesitation to use their considerable powers to remove errant boards and executives. Fraud cases rose by 56.3 per cent in 2017, according to the NDIC, while the CBN stress tests in the same year found rising cases of insider abuse with directors accounting for 40 per cent of the N2.4 trillion non-performing loans in the industry. Emefiele’s CBN should explain why such directors are still in the system and why banks have persistently exceeded the specified five per cent NPLs ratio without serious sanctions. Elsewhere, Germany’s Deutshe Bank was slammed $14 billion by regulators in the US and Europe; by early this year, the world’s top 20 banks, according to a Guardian of London report, had been hit with £252 billion in fines and penalties combined over five years for various violations.

The top priority is to protect customers: the CBN should be proactive and reform itself for efficient monitoring in real time, applying the latest technology tools to weed out corrupt officials that collude with errant bankers. It should wield the big stick and avoid favouritism.

Our banks are not fulfilling the critical role of financial intermediation partly because the operating environment is dominated by government funds, which fuel corruption, rent-taking and rule-breaking while squeezing out the private sector. The government should take the sensible approach of rolling out practical, sustainable policies of privatisation, liberalisation and export promotion to stimulate start-ups, SMEs and massive investment in agriculture, construction, transportation – rail, water and aviation – as well as mining and manufacturing. The financial system will become more efficient when DMBs rely more on private sector funds and less on public sector funds and forex, two toxic streams that have derailed banks from their traditional roles in Nigeria.


http://punchng.com/nigeria-cant-afford-another-bank-distress/

1 Like

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Intrepid01(m): 8:24am On Jun 13
I only hope the CBN Governor would have the required clout to do the needful


@Dominique; this is important
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by MANNABBQGRILLS: 8:30am On Jun 13
Every body shine ya eye!!
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Intrepid01(m): 9:19am On Jun 13
MANNABBQGRILLS:
Every body shine ya eye!!

As in eehn....I pray we see and hear no evil

5 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Sirpaul(m): 2:46pm On Jun 13
.....

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by emeijeh(m): 2:46pm On Jun 13
So what is he saying?


Is another Mavrodi coming to scam us?

7 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by flexyrule(m): 2:47pm On Jun 13
No need panicking... Except if you're among the 2% that own the 90% deposits.

2 Likes 1 Share

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by nabegibeg: 2:47pm On Jun 13
Intrepid01:
THE possibility of yet another round of systemic failure in the banking industry, raised recently by the Nigerian Deposit Insurance Corporation, calls for quick, concerted pre-emptive action. The revelation by Umaru Ibrahim, managing director of the NDIC, that weak corporate governance and internal controls were tipping the financial sector towards crisis conflated with a similar alarm raised by the International Monetary Fund anchored on weak regulation and adverse operating conditions. With the economy falling short of growth projections, urgent, extraordinary measures should be adopted today to prevent a catastrophe.

Umaru could not mask his apprehension in an address presented on his behalf at the FITC discussion programme in Lagos: despite stringent and elaborate rules, weak corporate governance culture had rebounded in the banking system and, along with ineffectual controls, presented regulators with the possibility of bank failures. For regulators, he said the fear had prompted moves to conduct tests and moves to stave off adversity.

Earlier in March and April this year, the IMF had issued concerns over Nigeria’s continued vulnerability to shocks amid a slow exit from recession, rising debts and its ability to withstand the aftershocks of another global meltdown predicted by leading experts.



Ibrahim’s alert confirmed the long-running fears of systemic upheaval in the banking sector, which barely survived the shocks of 2007-2009 and only after a decisive intervention by the leadership of the Central Bank of Nigeria that prevented failure. The IMF has identified weak regulation as a critical factor in the last few years. In what some see as self-indictment, Godwin Emefiele, the CBN Governor, recently took to warning the deposit money banks of sanctions for round tripping and other sharp practices in the foreign exchange market. The recourse to sermons and warnings demonstrates the crisis of regulation that has for long plagued the country’s financial system. The CBN is armed with enough legal powers to monitor and sanction abuses and misdemeanours by bankers. Lamido Sanusi, as governor (2008 to 2014), proved this when, after stress tests, the central bank removed the boards and managements of eight banks, appointed interim replacements that nursed them until they recovered and were bought by new investors. Sanusi also identified gross insider abuse by directors and managers for the crisis.

Apparently, as the CBN itself has acknowledged, insider abuse is back; sharp practices in the forex market partly blamed for the collapse of 44 banks between 1994 and 2000; money laundering and violation for reporting regulations, as well as false accounting have taken hold in the DMBs.

Can Emefiele prevent systemic distress? Doing so requires, above all else, courage and astuteness. It was the frequent recourse to the CBN’s overnight lending window that alerted Sanusi to the stress in some banks in 2009. In 2017, the bank said, 60 per cent of the average daily N216.34 billion the DMBs borrowed from its Standing Lending Facility was for Intra-Day Lending Facility.

Reports, evidence and testimonies in corruption trials have detailed how regulations and anti-money laundering laws were brazenly violated by bankers to assist high profile public figures loot and hide public funds. These disclosures should have prompted audits, fines and, where necessary, severe sanctions on complicit banks, directors and managers, some of whom have testified to their involvement in court.

The CBN needs to act fast as most Nigerian banks, post-consolidation, are big and a failing one could pull down others. While inefficient banks may go bust in good times without threatening the entire system, an economy that grew only 1.9 per cent in the first quarter of this year, just two quarters separated from a recession, suffered nine million job losses in three years and, with youth unemployment of over 20 per cent, should avoid systemic bank failure. This principle was applied during the 2007/8 meltdown when the United States Treasury gave an initial $700 billion to save some big banks, Italy €17 billion and Britain £500 billion.

The CBN and NDIC should immediately undertake full audits and examinations of the banks; there should be no hesitation to use their considerable powers to remove errant boards and executives. Fraud cases rose by 56.3 per cent in 2017, according to the NDIC, while the CBN stress tests in the same year found rising cases of insider abuse with directors accounting for 40 per cent of the N2.4 trillion non-performing loans in the industry. Emefiele’s CBN should explain why such directors are still in the system and why banks have persistently exceeded the specified five per cent NPLs ratio without serious sanctions. Elsewhere, Germany’s Deutshe Bank was slammed $14 billion by regulators in the US and Europe; by early this year, the world’s top 20 banks, according to a Guardian of London report, had been hit with £252 billion in fines and penalties combined over five years for various violations.

The top priority is to protect customers: the CBN should be proactive and reform itself for efficient monitoring in real time, applying the latest technology tools to weed out corrupt officials that collude with errant bankers. It should wield the big stick and avoid favouritism.

Our banks are not fulfilling the critical role of financial intermediation partly because the operating environment is dominated by government funds, which fuel corruption, rent-taking and rule-breaking while squeezing out the private sector. The government should take the sensible approach of rolling out practical, sustainable policies of privatisation, liberalisation and export promotion to stimulate start-ups, SMEs and massive investment in agriculture, construction, transportation – rail, water and aviation – as well as mining and manufacturing. The financial system will become more efficient when DMBs rely more on private sector funds and less on public sector funds and forex, two toxic streams that have derailed banks from their traditional roles in Nigeria.


http://punchng.com/nigeria-cant-afford-another-bank-distress/




This is madness

1 Like

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by theoldpretender(m): 2:47pm On Jun 13
Oil has fallen

Basically, when oil was high...the money rolled in, and banks rejoiced.

Now oil has fallen....and the money is not there...


Plus

Ibrahim’s alert confirmed the long-running fears of systemic upheaval in the banking sector, which barely survived the shocks of 2007-2009 and only after a decisive intervention by the leadership of the Central Bank of Nigeria that prevented failure. The IMF has identified weak regulation as a critical factor in the last few years. In what some see as self-indictment, Godwin Emefiele, the CBN Governor, recently took to warning the deposit money banks of sanctions for round tripping and other sharp practices in the foreign exchange market. The recourse to sermons and warnings demonstrates the crisis of regulation that has for long plagued the country’s financial system. The CBN is armed with enough legal powers to monitor and sanction abuses and misdemeanours by bankers. Lamido Sanusi, as governor (2008 to 2014), proved this when, after stress tests, the central bank removed the boards and managements of eight banks, appointed interim replacements that nursed them until they recovered and were bought by new investors. Sanusi also identified gross insider abuse by directors and managers for the crisis.

Apparently, as the CBN itself has acknowledged, insider abuse is back; sharp practices in the forex market partly blamed for the collapse of 44 banks between 1994 and 2000; money laundering and violation for reporting regulations, as well as false accounting have taken hold in the DMBs.

Can Emefiele prevent systemic distress? Doing so requires, above all else, courage and astuteness. It was the frequent recourse to the CBN’s overnight lending window that alerted Sanusi to the stress in some banks in 2009. In 2017, the bank said, 60 per cent of the average daily N216.34 billion the DMBs borrowed from its Standing Lending Facility was for Intra-Day Lending Facility.

Reports, evidence and testimonies in corruption trials have detailed how regulations and anti-money laundering laws were brazenly violated by bankers to assist high profile public figures loot and hide public funds. These disclosures should have prompted audits, fines and, where necessary, severe sanctions on complicit banks, directors and managers, some of whom have testified to their involvement in court.


Nigerians don't like following the laws...

2 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by enemyofprogress: 2:48pm On Jun 13
I keep my money inside my wallet



Please guys is it a cream for a young man to marry a window?

2 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by LazyNairalander(m): 2:48pm On Jun 13
Invest! I said invest!! I repeat invest!!!

Check my signature
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by maxtop(m): 2:48pm On Jun 13
Whoever have the data to read this epistle should please summarize it in one sentence. I can't come and kill myself on top useless banking sector we are operating.
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by emeijeh(m): 2:48pm On Jun 13
enemyofprogress:
I keep my money inside my wallet



Please guys is it a cream for a young man to marry a window?

Cream ko, pomade ni

13 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by reantv(m): 2:51pm On Jun 13
shocked shocked shocked shocked

Own your dream today at our now selling homes at Karimo District(FCT) by Turkish Hospitals. See signature for details.

Dynamic JT Homes
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Zico5(m): 2:51pm On Jun 13
Another mass sack on the horizon for bank workers. I shake my head.
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Jabioro: 2:51pm On Jun 13
Na today! We go survived am..
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by mary002: 2:53pm On Jun 13
Yes, we all know the banks that will soon go under. Click on the link on my signature if you are contemplating going into export business.
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Ruddyman(m): 2:57pm On Jun 13
mary002:
Yes, we all know the banks that will soon go under. Click on the link on my signature if you are contemplating going into export business.

Please which of the banks do you think have issues?
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by zombieHUNTER: 2:58pm On Jun 13
Instability everywhere


Buhari Nigeria on the brink
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Ruddyman(m): 2:58pm On Jun 13
Anybody with accurate data on Nigeria Banks health should come 4ward
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by Nevee: 2:59pm On Jun 13
Lol! My grouse, if any, would be with the so called “external auditors” that get paid huge amount in millions just to carry out an exercise we don’t get to see it’s effectiveness. Truth is bankers are VERY smart and intelligent and it reflects in virtually all they do. If they engage in any form of fraud whatsoever, it would be almost impossible for any auditor to find out. Don’t blame them. It takes someone at least as smart as them to detect their antics. Despite Oceanic, Intercontinental and other failed banks being audited while huge fraud was being pretreated, it took another banker (Sanusi) to detect what was going on and dragging Cecilia Ibru, Erastus Akingbola and co to court. Meanwhile, our auditors were busy “cashing out” and it seemed they were just being paid to write that true and fair view statement.

I think audit is fast outliving it’s purpose and it’s high time we started sourcing other viable alternatives.

9 Likes

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by faithfull18(f): 3:06pm On Jun 13
Hmm,quite lengthy.
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by yomi007k(m): 3:08pm On Jun 13
A dysfunctional nation indeed.

Smh
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by KrystosCJ(m): 3:12pm On Jun 13
Fraud cases rose by 56.3 per cent in 2017, according to the NDIC, while the CBN stress tests in the same year found rising cases of insider abuse with directors accounting for 40 per cent of the N2.4 trillion non-performing loans in the industry. Emefiele’s CBN should explain why such directors are still in the system and why banks have persistently exceeded the specified five per cent NPLs ratio without serious sanctions.

The single most deadly form of cancer that kills banks or any other institution is fraud. Fraud perpetrated by insiders who are influential in the system will almost always be endemic, unless there is a firm decision to, discarding loyalty and discretion, root out and sanction them appropriately.

It should not be surprising to most workers in the financial world that the brunt of sanctions are skewed toward the junior workers. Senior officials are seldom touched yet they are the ones who are responsible for much of the financial malfeasance that is detected.

If CBN knows and protects these errant people, who will call the CBN to order?

1 Like

Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by maximunimpact(m): 3:12pm On Jun 13
which on is "impending loom"?
Re: NDIC Raises Alarm On Impending Loom In The Banking Sector!!! by chieveboy(m): 3:15pm On Jun 13
"Impending loom"?

What tautology

3 Likes

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