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Health Impacts Of Medical Marijuana - Health - Nairaland

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Health Impacts Of Medical Marijuana by Kweenuwa: 10:26am On Jul 16, 2018
Medical marijuana or Medical cannabis is not fully accepted in many parts of the world. Recently the health impacts of medical marijuana is raving as a new survey, reported it reduced pain and decreased the need for opioid painkillers.

Medical cannabis are forms of cannabis recommended by doctors to the patients. Research have shown that cannabis is valuble in treating chronic pains, stimulates appetite, nausea, weight loss, and can be used to treat glaucoma, irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease.

Another patient put it this way: "It [medical marijuana] is extremely effective and has allowed me to function in my work and life again. It has not completely taken away the pain, but allows me to manage it."

Study co-author Dr. Diana Martins-Welch said, "The impact of medical marijuana was overwhelmingly positive. Medical marijuana led them to taking less medications overall -- opioids and non-opioids -- and they had better function and better quality of life." Martins-Welch is a physician in the division of geriatric and palliative medicine at Northwell Health, in Great Neck, N.Y.

The biggest complaint the researchers heard about medical marijuana was the cost. "It's an out-of-pocket expense. Insurance doesn't cover it because it's federally illegal," Martins-Welch explained.

As for unwelcome side effects, Martins-Welch said sedation was what she heard about the most. "A lot of people don't like feeling sleepy," she said.

It's also important to work with your doctor to find the right dose, since pain experts say that too little or too much doesn't ease pain.

"Every state has its own laws, like what a qualifying condition is. There are a lot of differences. And you can't take a product from one state and cross another state line," Martins-Welch said.
Medical marijuana is different than just picking up some pot and smoking it.

The Study

The study included a 20-question survey of nearly 150 seniors who had used medical marijuana for chronic pain. The seniors had received their medical marijuana from dispensaries in New York or Minnesota.

The average age of the seniors was 61 to 70, and 54 percent were female. Many (45 percent) used a vaporized oil in an e-cigarette device. Twenty-eight percent used a medical marijuana pill.

Twenty-one percent said they used medical marijuana daily, while 23 percent said they used it twice a day. Another 39 percent said they used it more than twice a day, the researchers noted.

"The goal with medical marijuana is to find the dose that gives a therapeutic benefit without a high, or slowing reaction time or causing sedation," Martins-Welch said. "To find that right dose, we start low and go slow."



In fact, it's important to work with a doctor because there's a "therapeutic window" with THC, the active component in marijuana that causes the high, according to Dr. Mark Wallace, a board member of the American Pain Society.

If you get a dose that's within that window, the pain is relieved. If you get too little, you won't get pain relief, and if you go over the therapeutic window, pain is actually worsened, Wallace explained.






http://medfort.com.ng/health-impacts-of-medical-marijuana/
Re: Health Impacts Of Medical Marijuana by Ojietune: 12:18pm On Jul 16, 2018
Kweenuwa:
Medical marijuana or Medical cannabis is not fully accepted in many parts of the world. Recently the health impacts of medical marijuana is raving as a new survey, reported it reduced pain and decreased the need for opioid painkillers.

Medical cannabis are forms of cannabis recommended by doctors to the patients. Research have shown that cannabis is valuble in treating chronic pains, stimulates appetite, nausea, weight loss, and can be used to treat glaucoma, irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease.

Another patient put it this way: "It [medical marijuana] is extremely effective and has allowed me to function in my work and life again. It has not completely taken away the pain, but allows me to manage it."

Study co-author Dr. Diana Martins-Welch said, "The impact of medical marijuana was overwhelmingly positive. Medical marijuana led them to taking less medications overall -- opioids and non-opioids -- and they had better function and better quality of life." Martins-Welch is a physician in the division of geriatric and palliative medicine at Northwell Health, in Great Neck, N.Y.

The biggest complaint the researchers heard about medical marijuana was the cost. "It's an out-of-pocket expense. Insurance doesn't cover it because it's federally illegal," Martins-Welch explained.

As for unwelcome side effects, Martins-Welch said sedation was what she heard about the most. "A lot of people don't like feeling sleepy," she said.

It's also important to work with your doctor to find the right dose, since pain experts say that too little or too much doesn't ease pain.

"Every state has its own laws, like what a qualifying condition is. There are a lot of differences. And you can't take a product from one state and cross another state line," Martins-Welch said.
Medical marijuana is different than just picking up some pot and smoking it.

The Study

The study included a 20-question survey of nearly 150 seniors who had used medical marijuana for chronic pain. The seniors had received their medical marijuana from dispensaries in New York or Minnesota.

The average age of the seniors was 61 to 70, and 54 percent were female. Many (45 percent) used a vaporized oil in an e-cigarette device. Twenty-eight percent used a medical marijuana pill.

Twenty-one percent said they used medical marijuana daily, while 23 percent said they used it twice a day. Another 39 percent said they used it more than twice a day, the researchers noted.

"The goal with medical marijuana is to find the dose that gives a therapeutic benefit without a high, or slowing reaction time or causing sedation," Martins-Welch said. "To find that right dose, we start low and go slow."



In fact, it's important to work with a doctor because there's a "therapeutic window" with THC, the active component in marijuana that causes the high, according to Dr. Mark Wallace, a board member of the American Pain Society.

If you get a dose that's within that window, the pain is relieved. If you get too little, you won't get pain relief, and if you go over the therapeutic window, pain is actually worsened, Wallace explained.






http://medfort.com.ng/health-impacts-of-medical-marijuana/




cannabis should be legalise
Re: Health Impacts Of Medical Marijuana by ashleysummer: 1:45pm On Aug 14, 2018
Personally, I have met people who smoke for medical reasons and I have also met people who smoke just to get high.
Smoking to relieve pain and gain appetite is very effective. It's very important if not vital to find a reliable Cannabis Licensed Producer Canada to get the desirable effect.

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