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Hijab: Crisis Looms In LAUTECH Over Alleged Humiliation Of Student(video) / He Was Sacked For Making Bad Comments On Report Cards / Christian Parents, Ifa Priest Protest Against UI School’s Hijab Crisis (2) (3) (4)

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Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Abojupupa: 7:54am On Nov 22, 2018
This piece was written by Fisayo Soyombo:

https://www.thecable.ng/that-hijab-controversy-raging-in-uis-international-school

For two days last week, students of the International School, Ibadan, did not take classes; and it was not down to an industrial action. Well, students of the parent institution — the University of Ibadan (UI) — are at home as well. The plight of UI students is understandable: the Academic ‘Strike’ Union of Universities (ASUU) is on one of its trademark industrial actions as part of its never-ending funding feud with the government. But ISI students experienced a disruption in academic activity due to a needless, in fact irritating, bickering over the propriety of hijabs in a school environment.

For a while, some parents of Muslim pupils of ISI had been trying to convince the management to allow hijab wearing in the school but the management was unwilling to discuss. Frustrated by the continuous snob, the parents took laws into their hands. On November 9, writing under the name International School Muslim Parents’ Forum (ISMPF), they notified the school of their decision to enforce their desire. Three days later, on Monday November 12, some of these parents called their wards to the ISI car park and distributed hijabs to them. The Principal, Mrs Phibean Olowe, sighted them, and instantly ended the ongoing school assembly. The school was shut, technically, for two days, but since resuming, the hijab-donning pupils have not tasted classes. On Wednesday, they were allowed in but locked in the library; on Thursday and Friday, they were turned back altogether.

The Muslim parents argue that their right to hijab comes from the Nigerian Constitution’s recognition of the freedom of association and religion. But the position of the ISI Court of Governors, chaired by the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration) of UI, Professor Abideen Aderinto, is clear. The current dress code will be maintained; ISI is a private school with its own rules; a 55-year-old dress culture will not be upended. The real issues, though, are deeper.

I have read yes and no arguments on the use of hijabs in ISI, but I still haven’t heard — perhaps I haven’t been voracious enough exactly why this apparel is important to the Muslim. What does the hijab represent? Does it harm a Christian, pagan or traditionalist? Does it unsettle the learning environment?

I have been fascinated by the 31st verse of the 24th chapter of the Quran, known as Surah An-Nur (the light), which justifies the use of the hijab:

And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their private parts; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their khimār over their breasts and not display their beauty except to their husband, their fathers, their husband’s fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers or their brothers’ sons, or their sisters’ sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments.

I honestly cannot understand the opposition to an apparel that does nothing other than encourage modesty, humility and sexual purity. For context: I’m Christian; so I have been, so will I forever be.

One underlying reason for the anti-hijab sentiment among some Christians is the feeling that Muslims are trying to dominate Christians. They will deny but if you’re looking for them around you, they are the ones who say hijabs can’t be worn so long nuns or priests aren’t allowed to show up in school in their religious attires. Yet it’s an argument that falls flat before it has ever been shot — because they compare a mere apparel with a full-fledged attire. Religion is no competition; Christians and Muslims shouldn’t be in a battle to outdo each other. If you look further, these people will tell you ISI Muslim parents should take their wards to an Ansar-ud-Deen or Nawar-ud-Deen school. But until a Muslim parent has taken his ward to a St. Peter’s College or a Catholic secondary school, he has done no wrong. ISI is a secular school, hence both Christians and Muslims should be welcome.

I have studied the much-vaunted ISI rules and regulations, and I’m still at a loss how hijab wearing violates the document. The document states clearly how students should be dressed. More importantly, it lists the adornments/ornaments that should not be found on a student. These include: attachments, wigs, weave-on, bangles, necklaces, chains, rings, dangling ear-rings, jeans, pencil trousers and slim-fitted shirts/trousers. Nowhere in that document is the hijab mentioned; tellingly, what this means is that the document is dated and in need of some remodelling.

With ISI standing firm on its rejection of hijabs and Muslim parents also unyielding, it appears the matter is destined for a court. My bet is that ISI would lose — the Muslims can indeed lay claim to violation of a fundamental right of theirs. Section 38 (1) of the Constitution states:

Every person shall be entitled to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, including freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom (either alone or in community with others, and in public or in private) to manifest and propagate his religion or belief in worship, teaching, practice and observance.

Section 42 adds:

A citizen of Nigeria of a particular community, ethnic group, place of origin, sex, religion or political opinion shall not, by reason only that he is such a person:- (a) be subjected either expressly by, or in the practical application of, any law in force in Nigeria or any executive or administrative action of the government, to disabilities or restrictions to which citizens of Nigeria of other communities, ethnic groups, places of origin, sex, religions or political opinions are not made subject;

If the ISI Muslim parents get lawyers who are able to substantially argue the violations of these sections by the rejection of hijab-wearing pupils from school, they have a case. In any case, there are encouraging precedents to suggest how such a case would be decided. Firdaus Amasa caused quite a stir in December 2017 when she insisted on wearing the hijab to her Call to Bar ceremony. The University of Ilorin law graduate was denied entry to the venue and, by extension, the legal profession. However, the Body of Benchers — the professional body concerned with the admission of prospective students into the Nigerian Law School — subsequently approved the use of the Islamic apparel. Amasa eventually attended her Call to Bar in July 2018. A similar case in Lagos public primary and secondary schools could potentially end in an Amasa-esque manner. A Lagos High Court had initially held that denying pupils the chance to wear hijab does not infringe on their constitutional rights. However, this judgement was upturned by the Appeal Court in July 2016. Only last week, the state government wrote schools to remind them hijabs remain allowed until the final determination of the matter by the Supreme Court.

What is happening in ISI is a manifestation of the level of ethnic, religious and associational intolerance not only in the wider University of Ibadan campus but in the society itself. The UI that should be championing freedom of speech and association has banned student unionism for close to two years now. Nothing more than management’s intolerance for dissenting student voice! Its Student Union Building is currently lying fallow. Even the non-political associations in that building, including the Union of Campus Journalists (UCJ), were chased out of their offices like petty thieves — without the chance to pick up just a piece of paper from their archives. That’s the same UCJ that has produced numerous high-grade journalists who have distinguished themselves nationally and internationally. I worry that without a secretariat to run its activities, without the chance to at least retrieve documents containing its rich history, UI risks inflicting a wedge between past and current generations of campus journalists. Long and short, UI is already writing the obituary of campus journalism. Nigerian journalism will suffer the primary damage, while the larger society won’t escape the knock-on effect.

Back to ISI, Nigeria as a heterogeneous country. With 250 ethnic groups who speak more than 250 languages, plus a multi-religious makeup that includes the highest population of Muslims in sub-Saharan Africa, we must stop expecting to look into any secular gathering and see a homogeneously-dressed audience, for example. Yes, look into an ISI and see clusters of neatly-worn hijabs over school uniforms. This is the reality of our diversity; we cannot run away from it. ISI is trying to, but it will be short-lived; the permanent solution would be for ISI to discuss with Muslim parents on how hijabs can be worn neatly, sizably and uniformly such that our religious diversity is represented without compromising the uniformity expected of pupils’ appearance.

Soyombo, former Editor of the TheCable and the International Centre for Investigative Reporting (ICIR), tweets @fisayosoyombo
Re: Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Abojupupa: 8:20am On Nov 22, 2018
Copied.
HIJAB PALAVER IN ISI

With reference to write ups concerning wearing of Hijab and subsequent protest by selected Muslim Parents in International School Ibadan (ISI), I hereby make my submission below:
To start with, it's a pity that Muslims do preach that Islam is a Religion of Peace. All what was said in the write ups by Prof Ishaq Akintola (President of Muslim Rights Concern {MURIC}) and Prof Salisu Shehu (Deputy General Secretary, Nigerian Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs {NSCIA}) are all FICTIONS. I don't know why they just don't embrace peace and live with others peacefully with tolerance. And to say that these people spreading all these false news and information are Professors. Their Professorial status was merited via their scholarship and thus are more informed and knowledgeable and should not misinform or mislead others. They are people who are looked up to in the society for proper direction and guidance. The Secondary School, ISI was founded and established by a British-German Educator Kurt Hahn a Christian in October 1963 with funding from USAID, Ford Foundation and donation of land space by the Nigerian Western Regional Government. Most of the pioneer teaching staff were British expatriates’ educators from Gordonstoun in Scotland. The school is a co-educational Boarding and Day School, admitting pupils aged 10 to 16. It was primarily established to meet the need of finding a school with a world class standard comparable to schools in Europe and Northern America for children of expatriates, living and working in Nigeria. It opened its doors to pupils of both expatriates of diverse nationalities and highly placed Nigerians. The social setting that ISI provided attracted more patronage from people of all races. Also the principals who have headed the school have been mostly Reverend Fathers and one Muslim. The first Principal was David S. Snell (1963–1965) of blessed memory; followed by John Gillespie (1965–1968). The longest serving Principal was an Anglican clergy, Archdeacon J.A. Iluyomade (1969–1985) of blessed memory. He was also the first indigenous head of the school. After him was Rev. (Dr.) Dapo Ajayi (1986–1988) also of blessed memory, then Dapo Fajembola (1990–1991) also of blessed memory. Thereafter came the first female Principal, Esther Adetola Smith (1991–2004). After her was R.O. Akintilebo (2006–2007) who was the first Muslim Principal, Dr. M.B Malik (2007–2017) and Phebean O. Olowe (2017-present). It should be stated that between 2004 and 2006 when the school had internal crises and administrative issues a Non-Academic Staff of the University, Mr. Augustine Onwueme of Blessed memory was assigned by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Prof. Odejide as an administrator to manage the affairs of ISI. Mr. Augustine Onwueme was an administrator from June/July, 2004 until his demise in December 2005 on contract basis. The school dress code with the emphasis of no HEAD COVER means no scarf, beret or the hijab. Permit me to say that the wearing of Hijab is not on religious bases but cultural (way of life). The region where the mode of dressing emanated from was in the Middle East which is a desert and thus the need to protect their eyes from blindness due to the sand dust. ISI is a private school not funded by any Government or even the University of Ibadan. The University of Ibadan only manages the affairs and administration of the School thus informing as Chairman of the School Governing Council to be the appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) of the Institution. This is a school where a praying ground is provided for the Muslims to observe their prayers and if you must know it's because of the Muslims that the school closes on Friday by 12.30pm in other for Muslim students to observe Jumat and they are actually been conveyed to the Mosque in the University for prayers. Also on Sundays, as the Christian students have their Fellowship in school, The Muslim Student Society (MSS) of ISI has one of the staff of the school who comes around on Sunday to anchor the fellowship with them on ISI premises. The Islamic Religion Knowledge /Arabic Language Studies was introduced into the school curriculum by Mr. R. O. Akintilebo during his tenure. He initiated this by engaging tutors who came and teach the students on a part time bases. If ISI is discriminating as claimed by the writers, Mr. R. O. Akintilebo would never be employed to head the school as a Principal. His appointment was on merit as he was one of the teachers in the school. Please tell me, is there any discrimination against the Muslims as petitioned by the unrecognized International School Muslim Parents’ Forum (ISMPF)? Why is it so difficult for people to abide by the rules and regulations of a school? No one forced those clamoring for the use of Hijab to bring their kids to ISI. There are lots of Islamic Secondary schools in Oyo state where without any difficulty they can wear their Hijab. The man who started this madness Abdurrahman Balogun (Chairman of International School Muslim Parents’ Forum {ISMPF}, an association not recognized by the school authorities), in ISI who was distributing the Hijab to the girls at the school car park on Monday 12 November, 2018 enrolled his child last year into JSS1. This is his second year in ISI. Following day, Tuesday 13th November the school management had a PTA meeting and parents made their grievances known to the management. Funny enough some of the parents and the Alumni who attended the PTA meeting to speak were Muslims and they emphasized their displeasure by what their Muslim counterparts are causing in the school. I was at that PTA meeting (being a parent whose child has been attending the school for over three years) and I witnessed all that transpired. An email sent in by one Alhaja Basirat Banke Adeniyi was read by the chairman, Lawyer Kazeem Olaniyi of the recognized PTA in the school (also a Muslim), where she expressed her disappointment over the acts of the ISMPF and suggested by mentioning Muslim schools in Ibadan that these aggrieved parents can take their kids to, if they cannot abide by the rules and regulations of ISI. The culprit of this whole madness, Abdurrahman Balogun who wrote the petition about discrimination of the Muslim students in the school and the need to wear hijab was shut down by majority of the parents from talking, for disrupting the peace of the institution which has been established over 55years where the students are all tutored together irrespective of their religion or ethnic differences. Parents at the meeting were even asking what form of discrimination was experienced by these Muslim children, none was ever mentioned. The governing council however met on Wednesday 14 November and gave their final verdict that the school will maintain its status quo one of which is no wearing of any form of head cover and anyone who violates this should not be allowed inside the school premises or the parents should take such kids to other schools where it is permitted to wear any form of head cover such as hijab. The irony about this, is the fact that those parents who are headstrong about the decision of the Governing Council has instructed their daughters to wear the hijab thus hindering their entering the school premises and attending their classes. These are the girls seen outside the school gate with their hijab on, 8 of them in number. While other Muslim parents abided by the school authorities and Governing Council verdict, instructed their girls to remove their hijab so that they can be allowed to enter the school premises and continue with their classes. These other 8 girls have been attending the school without Hijab for years until their parents are woken from their slumber by this spoiler and enemy of peace, Abdurrahman Balogun whom was said to have established the ISI Muslim Parents Association Forum. An illegal association not recognized by the school authorities aside from the PTA. Funny thing is his own child is attending classes. Do you know why? His child is a boy while those who are supporting his cause have their kids to be girls and with the new rule of no wearing of hijab they are denied access into the school. I rest my case. But the question are: Will the wearing of hijab make their girls more brilliant or better still take them to heaven? If the foreign Christians who established the school had said strictly no other person of other religion except from Christianity should attend, maybe this problem would not have emerged. The Muslim parents who are supporting this cause some of them actually got educated through their attendance of mission schools owned by Catholics, Methodist, Baptist and Anglican. I went to St. Louis Girls Secondary School Mokola and the late Arisekola Alao's daughter Fatima who was a junior attended and her other siblings attended ISI. Also the Baale of Bodija Alhaji Rasheed Adesokan two daughters, Folake and Tolani attended my school (St. Louis) in fact Folake was my mate. Although she was taken away in her final year because Folake actually converted to a Christian of her own free will. We have Muslims sending their children to Christian Private owned Universities like Babcock, Bowen, Covenant, Redeemers and so on. Why can’t they agitate for wearing of Hijab in this private owned tertiary institutions, if they can clamour for such in ISI which is equally a private owned Secondary School. At least I know there are Muslim owned universities like Cresecent University in Abeokuta and Fountain University at Osogbo all in South West. One can go on and on about this. It's all optional and choice you don't have to force your own religion doctrines on others violating the laid down rules and then going about spreading false information of discrimination against Muslim students.

Dr. Olufunke Adegoke
Lecturer, Department of Sociology,
University of Ibadan
Re: Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Abojupupa: 8:21am On Nov 22, 2018
*HIJAB PALAVER IN ISI*

*Response to Dr Olufunke Adegoke*

Dear Dr Olufunke Adegoke,

My name is Lateef A Hussain. I used to work as a lecturer in the Department of Physics, University of Ibadan.

I am a Muslim, though it is only Almighty Allah that would determine on the great of judgment who a muslim was.

I used to be the Chairman, University of Ibadan Muslim Community, and, arising from this small role of mine, wrote , in 1991, the Director, Institute of Education and, then, the Chairman, Board of Governors, International School, Ibadan, Professor Obemeata, that Arabic and Islamic Studies be included in the subjects to be taught at the school. Doctor, please, note that ISI was established in 1963 while this humble writer was requesting for those two subjects to be taught in 1991, twenty eight years after.

Professor Obemeata replied giving the conditions under which the two subjects would be taught :

*The UI Muslim Community must pay, in advance , the salaries of the two teachers to teach those subjects for two years*

Humiliation, you would say, doctor?
The UI Muslim Community issued a cheque for N 48,000 to ISI, bearing the humiliation. That, Dr Olufunke Adegoke, was how Arabic and Islamic Studies came to be taught at ISI, but, doctor, you could correct this humble Lateef Hussain if he is wrong.
Furthermore, Ma , for your information, the same struggle was going in the Staff School, University of Ibadan where this same Chairman of the Muslim Community was also requesting for the teaching of the same two subjects and Professor Obemeata, the Director of the Institute, was also Chairman, Board of Governors. This time, the director brought the matter to the board, the reason, which I guess, with hindsight, would become obvious in this narrative.

For as Professor Obemeata brought up the subject, a member of the board and, then, I think, the Head, Department of Adult Education, Professor Akinpelu, as quick as a snake, spoke to support the muslim request and, surprisingly, mentioned that he had warned the director, Professor Obemeata, just before the meeting not to sneer at the request of the muslim community. The director was taken aback and sought indirectly the support of Lateef Hussain who was also at the meeting representing Senate. Lateef Hussain refused to back the director trying to take cover from the stinging words of Professor Akinpelu, and , indeed, Hussain told the meeting he was there to represent Senate, not Muslims. So, without the muslim community paying any amount this time, the teaching of Arabic and Islamic Studies began at the Staff School.

Should Dr Adegoke wish to correct Lateef Hussain here too, the doctor would be welcome. Now to one or two things before conclusion.

*One:* At that meeting of the Staff School Board of Governors that day, Hussain distributed freely the letter of Professor Obemeata asking for the Muslim Community to pay before Arabic and Islamic Studies could be taught in ISI, as an aside, and many asked if Christian parents were asked to pay before Christian Religious Studies was taught at ISI.

*Two:* Hussain would not know if any of Professors Obemeata and Akinpelu are still alive, but, if not, may God Almighty visit Hussain with His wrath in its worst form if Hussain, in this narrative, had lied against any of the two Professors.

Finally, Dr Olufunke Adegoke, I hope you will agree with me if I state that may God Almighty reward all of us adequately according to our deeds.

I am, humbly,
Lateef A Hussain
Professor of Physics (Rtd), University of Ibadan
Chairman Parents Teachers Association, ISI (1991 -2001 )
WhatsApp 0818 100 0032
Re: Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Nobody: 8:30am On Nov 22, 2018
Excuse yourself sir, you don't understand what you are saying. Kindly read through your quranic citation and tell me whom the hijab is meant for according to the quran, A (married) woman or a girl child?

In your own words
"I have been fascinated by the 31st verse of the 24th chapter of the Quran, known as Surah An-Nur (the light), which justifies the use of the hijab:

And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their private parts; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their khimār over their breasts and not display their beauty except to their husband, their fathers, their husband’s fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers or their brothers’ sons, or their sisters’ sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments."
Re: Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Abojupupa: 11:41am On Nov 22, 2018
#From_a_Muslim_Parent

HIJAB PALAVER IN ISI: MATTERS ARISING

As a parent of students of ISI who believe in the call for the use of hijab in the school, I consider it appropriate to put forth some points. I also realised that I need to state the following in order to place my submission in the right context;

1. The call for use of hijab in ISI is solely because it is an inalienable right that of the Muslim girls. Islam requires that all Muslim women use the hijab; the constitution of Nigeria guarantees the right to use it.

2. Not all Muslims conform to the codes of Islam in the same manner; hence the call is for the Muslim girls who are willing to use it.

3. I found it difficult to understand why someone would say my child is not entitled to such a right because (s)he feels so. Why play ‘the dog in the manger’? I was stunned beyond imagination when a parent, at the PTA meeting, said his child cannot be in the same class with a hijab-wearing girl! How would my girl’s hijab disturb his child in the same class? How did we get to this level of hatred for one another because we express different religions? This is a time bomb!

4. When someone, at the PTA meeting, encouraged the ISI school management to go to court on the matter, the Christians shouted thunderous No! In essence, they are opposed to civil way of resolution and rely on their ability/capacity to force their ways of life on the Muslims.

5. It was the ISI management that disrupted school activities and not the Muslim parents. At the PTA meeting, we were told that the school administration decided to withhold their services because some girls used hijab.

6. The colonial missionaries deprived our fathers access to education; they gave them the option of either changing their faith or get educated. The next generation that ventured into education were oppressed by imposing Christian doctrines on them, vestiges of which still remain till today. The Muslims have been subjected to generational oppression. I assert the way the ISI administration’s intent is to perpetuate the generational oppression on our children. This has to stop at a point in time.

7. ISI is not a secular school; it is a multi-religion community, which is why Christian Religious Knowledge and Islamic Studies are taught in the school. A secular system does not recognise any religion.

8. ISI allowed the teaching of Islamic Studies after 43 years of its existence, whereas Bible knowledge has been taught from inception. Even at that, the University of Ibadan Muslim community paid the salaries of the Islamic Studies teachers for two years. Where is fairness here?

9. Preventing hijab use in ISI hitherto is a tradition. There is no mention of “No to use of head cover” in ISI’s School Rules and Regulations.

10. An international school should be accommodating of the expected diversity in humanity than is displayed in this scenario. Some parents expressed that it is of Christian orientation and should remain so; this is localising the international school. It is not good for the institution.

11. Peace should be based on justice and not a situation where some people lord their desires over others while the oppressed go to silence grudgingly. That is peace of the graveyard!

I was surprised when I saw the write up of a sociology scholar of University of Ibadan on this matter. The basis of my apprehension is that when the government decides to do things right, they would consult the scholars in order to provide evidence-based policies. If her submissions in the write-up represent the mind of a sociology scholar in Nigeria, this truly calls for concern.

To be specific, I found the following submission of hers quite disturbing;

1. My understanding of her statement _“If the foreign Christians who established the school had said strictly no other person of other religion except from Christianity should attend, maybe this problem would not have emerged”_ is that Muslims should consider it a privilege to be allowed any stake in that school. If this is what she meant, I am quite dazed and wondered if her career is sufficient to tame her bigotry. This probably informed her misplaced ‘advice’ of where Muslim parents should have taken their children. I expect her to know that segregating our children in such tender ages will not lead to any good for our society in the nearest future. Children of different religious affiliations should relate and appreciate the differences so that they can learn to tolerate one another in the larger society. It is surprising that a sociology scholar was actually speaking against what she should be speaking for!

2. The submission that _“the Muslim parents who are supporting this cause some of them actually got educated through their attendance of mission schools owned by Catholics, Methodist, Baptist and Anglican”_ suggests that she expects the Muslims to have been attenuated enough not to see the need to ask for the right of their children. Yes, we were forced to join the Christian fellowship sessions at schools; some of us still have Songs of Praise rhymes in our memories till now, but oppression will have to come to an end at a point in time. Her knowledge of society should have taught her that at a point in time, a people will become conscious of their identity and would want to express it.

3. Her reference to the call for hijab use as madness revealed her bigotry. A competent sociologist should appreciate a potent voice of disagreement and should advice the powers that be to address it. To disregard genuine complaints, and call it madness is to wait for implosion that may lead to social disharmony. By attempting to muffle voices of disagreement or treating genuine complaints with dismissal is to call for societal upheaval. This is basically because those who have come to the consciousness of their rights cannot be repressed all the time.

4. When the sociology scholar ventured to state that _“Permit me to say that the wearing of Hijab is not on religious bases but cultural (way of life). The region where the mode of dressing emanated from was in the Middle East which is a desert and thus the need to protect their eyes from blindness due to the sand dust”_, I marvelled at the display of ignorance. How can such a scholar arrogate to herself the authority to guide people of other religion in which she knows nothing about? Qur’aan 24 verse 31 gave specific instruction about the use of hijab.

I hereby submit that we found ourselves in this multi-religious society, not by our choice but by divine design; what we make of it is up to us. Let us live and allow others to live. Tolerance is the watch word; I my right does not infringe on yours there is no need for you to try to stop me from having right.

Akande Lasisi is a Muslim Parent
Re: Comments On Ui Hijab Crisis by Abojupupa: 11:44am On Nov 22, 2018
penisilin:
Excuse yourself sir, you don't understand what you are saying. Kindly read through your quranic citation and tell me whom the hijab is meant for according to the quran, A (married) woman or a girl child?

In your own words
"I have been fascinated by the 31st verse of the 24th chapter of the Quran, known as Surah An-Nur (the light), which justifies the use of the hijab:

And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their private parts; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their khimār over their breasts and not display their beauty except to their husband, their fathers, their husband’s fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers or their brothers’ sons, or their sisters’ sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments."
Parents have a duty to teach their children these from childhood so that they get used to it. They won't wait until the child is defiled as is commonplace noe, or let the child turn prostitute before they are taught. Teaching starts in earnest!

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