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How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? - Travel - Nairaland

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How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by AllenSpencer: 12:36pm On Dec 29, 2018
Eugene Gray Eugene Gray, lives in Canada

Culled From Quora


Canadian PR hasn’t changed my life yet. I used to work at The Boston Consulting Group, KPMG, Discovery Channel and Google outside Canada, but I wasn’t happy to live/work in European and Eastern European countries/offices. I didn’t belong there. I dreamed of Canada since I was a kid, started planning immigration in 2007, understood how it works and what I needed to improve to be eligible and pass through the process. Several years ago the Express Entry program was launched and I applied in the beginning of 2017. Everything was transparent and clear. As for internal transfers within Google or other companies, they were available, but not to Canada. This was the first signal for me.

Before I moved to my new home. I’ve travelled to major cities prior immigration as a temporary resident to learn more about the culture, job opportunities and places. I found that so many people were doing low-profit business and they weren't satisfied about that. Some of them told me in person, others wrote on Quora, that it’s incredibly hard here to find a good job. I said ‘Hah, it’s hard everywhere’. And this assumption was incorrect. Most of people failed to find meaningful jobs. And one day a ‘good’ person said: ‘This country is for losers, what are you doing here with your experience? go to California!’ I thought this guy was an idiot and I stopped communicating with him after that conversation. It was the second signal for me. Since I dreamed about Canada for a long period of time, I shared Canadian values and believed that one day I will truly belong here. The only thing I needed is to find my way up.


Once I became a PR and got my SIN
, I discovered that there were so many artificial barriers created by Canadians to protect their country / community against ‘foreign workers-invaders’. It sounds relevant to many countries, but this was a huge cultural shock for me. These barriers are well-known as Canadian Experience, lack of communication skills (you must be a native speaker to get a good job), some sort of ‘local’ skills, licensing in many industries is a norm (you must be certified to do what you do, and in majority cases you pay money and waste your time to learn what you’ve already known), only Canadian education is considered as education by many employers, and of course a Canadian-born pride, there is nothing wrong to be a proud Canadian, but only Canadians say it all the time and everywhere, I didn’t hear it from any other nation. Having these qualities will definitely increase your chances to find a meaningful and well-paid job. But it sounds like a discrimination in the 21st century. I conducted a research on this topic. I created two authentic profiles - one for a recent immigrant with a foreign name, who earned a degree from a prestigious Canadian university, but without Canadian experience, and another one with a local name, who was a Canadian-born, with similar skills, Canadian degrees and local work experience. Results were awesome - a response rate via online applications was 2 times higher for a Canadian-born applicant, and processing time was much slower for a PR. Tested region - Toronto, GTA. upd: There was another research on this topic, conducted by Philip Oreopoulos and Diane Dechief (2011) Why do some employers prefer to interview Matthew, but not Samir? New evidence from Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. This was the third signal for me.

Before coming to Canada I knew several people and they were interested in my experience, they told me that I had to finish my PR process and get SIN before we could go any further. So I did my homework and knew that job market is a hard candy. Once I completed all required immigration procedures, another thing was discovered - I could penetrate the market with my experience and skills, but all meaningful positions were 'reserved' for Canadians 99.9%. I've applied for 30+ positions during several months via network and online, and I had interviews with 20% of them. However every time there were 'better candidates'. After understanding the problem, I decided to apply for a Canadian degree and build stronger relations with Canadian experts. I told myself - if you want a meaningful job, you have to be a 'better candidate'.

Coming back to your question - did it really change my life? It doesn’t look like my adaptation is over, but it took much longer than I initially thought. I hope there will be something positive in the end. If it exists, I will find what I want in Canada or continue my search elsewhere.

Thanks to everyone who read, upvoted, commented or subscribed. This is a very important problem for many people immigrating Canada. I hope my answers will help you to analyze risks and opportunities. I don’t blame Canada or Canadian companies for doing this. This is a great business model and politics, however as an immigrant I'm feeling same pain, as many of you, and cutting my way through.


https://www.quora.com/How-did-Canadian-PR-change-your-life

4 Likes

Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by speedyconnect3: 8:45pm On Dec 29, 2018
Let me park here shocked sad
Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Kenekingisback: 10:22pm On Dec 29, 2018
But where is lalasticlala sef angry
Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Mizwisdom(f): 8:22am On Dec 30, 2018
Life smh
Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Nobody: 5:11am On Jan 02, 2019
Mizwisdom:
Life smh
Don't smh. Thought you stay there too.

1 Like

Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Laryne(m): 7:26pm On May 12, 2019
AllenSpencer:
Eugene Gray Eugene Gray, lives in Canada

Culled From Quora


Canadian PR hasn’t changed my life yet. I used to work at The Boston Consulting Group, KPMG, Discovery Channel and Google outside Canada, but I wasn’t happy to live/work in European and Eastern European countries/offices. I didn’t belong there. I dreamed of Canada since I was a kid, started planning immigration in 2007, understood how it works and what I needed to improve to be eligible and pass through the process. Several years ago the Express Entry program was launched and I applied in the beginning of 2017. Everything was transparent and clear. As for internal transfers within Google or other companies, they were available, but not to Canada. This was the first signal for me.

Before I moved to my new home. I’ve travelled to major cities prior immigration as a temporary resident to learn more about the culture, job opportunities and places. I found that so many people were doing low-profit business and they weren't satisfied about that. Some of them told me in person, others wrote on Quora, that it’s incredibly hard here to find a good job. I said ‘Hah, it’s hard everywhere’. And this assumption was incorrect. Most of people failed to find meaningful jobs. And one day a ‘good’ person said: ‘This country is for losers, what are you doing here with your experience? go to California!’ I thought this guy was an idiot and I stopped communicating with him after that conversation. It was the second signal for me. Since I dreamed about Canada for a long period of time, I shared Canadian values and believed that one day I will truly belong here. The only thing I needed is to find my way up.


Once I became a PR and got my SIN
, I discovered that there were so many artificial barriers created by Canadians to protect their country / community against ‘foreign workers-invaders’. It sounds relevant to many countries, but this was a huge cultural shock for me. These barriers are well-known as Canadian Experience, lack of communication skills (you must be a native speaker to get a good job), some sort of ‘local’ skills, licensing in many industries is a norm (you must be certified to do what you do, and in majority cases you pay money and waste your time to learn what you’ve already known), only Canadian education is considered as education by many employers, and of course a Canadian-born pride, there is nothing wrong to be a proud Canadian, but only Canadians say it all the time and everywhere, I didn’t hear it from any other nation. Having these qualities will definitely increase your chances to find a meaningful and well-paid job. But it sounds like a discrimination in the 21st century. I conducted a research on this topic. I created two authentic profiles - one for a recent immigrant with a foreign name, who earned a degree from a prestigious Canadian university, but without Canadian experience, and another one with a local name, who was a Canadian-born, with similar skills, Canadian degrees and local work experience. Results were awesome - a response rate via online applications was 2 times higher for a Canadian-born applicant, and processing time was much slower for a PR. Tested region - Toronto, GTA. upd: There was another research on this topic, conducted by Philip Oreopoulos and Diane Dechief (2011) Why do some employers prefer to interview Matthew, but not Samir? New evidence from Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. This was the third signal for me.

Before coming to Canada I knew several people and they were interested in my experience, they told me that I had to finish my PR process and get SIN before we could go any further. So I did my homework and knew that job market is a hard candy. Once I completed all required immigration procedures, another thing was discovered - I could penetrate the market with my experience and skills, but all meaningful positions were 'reserved' for Canadians 99.9%. I've applied for 30+ positions during several months via network and online, and I had interviews with 20% of them. However every time there were 'better candidates'. After understanding the problem, I decided to apply for a Canadian degree and build stronger relations with Canadian experts. I told myself - if you want a meaningful job, you have to be a 'better candidate'.

Coming back to your question - did it really change my life? It doesn’t look like my adaptation is over, but it took much longer than I initially thought. I hope there will be something positive in the end. If it exists, I will find what I want in Canada or continue my search elsewhere.

Thanks to everyone who read, upvoted, commented or subscribed. This is a very important problem for many people immigrating Canada. I hope my answers will help you to analyze risks and opportunities. I don’t blame Canada or Canadian companies for doing this. This is a great business model and politics, however as an immigrant I'm feeling same pain, as many of you, and cutting my way through.


https://www.quora.com/How-did-Canadian-PR-change-your-life


Where did you copy this one from?

1 Like

Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Longlife234: 3:56am On May 18, 2019
I am presently in the US.came in 2017. Which means I have over stayed my Visa. I want to apply for Canadian Express Entry. What are my chances?
Re: How Did Canadian PR Change Your Life? by Nobody: 5:00pm On May 18, 2019
Longlife234:
I am presently in the US.came in 2017. Which means I have over stayed my Visa. I want to apply for Canadian Express Entry. What are my chances?
Look for a certified agent to answer that. Remember Trump is coming for you! Beware

1 Like

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