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Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 - Travel (20) - Nairaland

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by rainazoe: 4:48am On Jan 14
You are welcome


WoodcrestMayor:
Thanks boss!!!
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by rainazoe: 4:50am On Jan 14
Biko travel o. My passport had less than 3 months expiry and I travelled and came back sef.

gaggle:


Pleassssseeeee guys, biko,ejor any idea.

The scenario is Passport & PR Visa expires June. Travel date is last week of March. Is this a problem as passport validity will be less than 6 months. If it is, does CIC need to be contacted after passport renewal or just travel with the new & old passport that has the visa.

4 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by jabanobi: 6:52am On Jan 14
Please can any one direct me to that list of essentials to buy in nigeria that was put up on the first thread. Need to send it to a family landing soon. I've read through trying to find it, but couldn't. Thanks
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Nasachuky(f): 7:02am On Jan 14
Nasachuky:

I have B.Sc in Biochemistry and masters in Food chemistry and biotechnology, what do I need to practice as a Food scientist?
Winterpeg:

Hi, I'm not a microbiologist but I worked in this line in Nigeria. Here in Canada you can go into food safety and quality assurance as have mentioned. Food safety is also a big deal over here. You might have to do some courses either a diploma or a professional masters in any college or University of your choice to teach you all you need to know. There are also some ISO certification courses you can do. You can also work in a food laboratory either government or private. There are also opportunities as a food inspector. You will need to do some short courses to teach you what you need to know. There are some government agencies that hire microbiologists along this line. You can do your research and apply with your Nigerian degree and you can get lucky.
I have B.Sc in Biochemistry and masters in Food chemistry and biotechnology with experience in the food industry what do I need to practice as a Food scientist in Canada?

3 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by voguemum: 8:10am On Jan 14
salford1:
To the microbiology guy/lady. You did not mention anything about your work experience. A degree in Microbiology opens doors to a lot of other professions like the ones you listed. Therefore, your work experience plus your qualification will determine the sort of bridging program to apply for.

Hi @salford1, I've not had much experience in the laboratory as a microbiologist apart from the experience I got during my 6 months SIWES training out of school when I was in 300L. The work experiences I've had over the years are;
1. Program Assistant in an NGO (maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS related)and;
2. Currently a data analyst at a maternal and child health hospital. That being said, my plan is to go back in line with my course of study my focus being on food safety/quality assurance and i've actully thought going back to school to take some courses will do the trick.

The reason why I brought up the question was because I've always been told that Microbiology isn't a professional course even when my friends and I discuss about the inability to secure a job at a hospital as a microbiologist as a medical laboratory scientists is given preference over us and wanted to know if same applies over there.

I wouldn't also mind taking some courses to fit back into the NGO world ( WHO,UNDP and the likes) as it was such a breeze working with those innocent mothers and children. And please don't judge me because I asked about fitting in as a microbiologist and now diverted to working in an NGO grin I'm just keeping my options open here.

And thanks to @vole and @winterpeg for chipping in

2 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Shokoloko(f): 8:21am On Jan 14
Please can someone verify this

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by voguemum: 8:30am On Jan 14
jabanobi:
Please can any one direct me to that list of essentials to buy in nigeria that was put up on the first thread. Need to send it to a family landing soon. I've read through trying to find it, but couldn't. Thanks

Hi, I hope this helps https://www.nairaland.com/3617393/living-canada-life-canadian-immigrant/246

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by oluphilip2008(f): 9:14am On Jan 14
Good morning great people. Pls which of these food items is frowned at or may not make it through the border if carried as checked in luggage:
Dry fish, frozen palm oil, Milo, milk, egusi, knorr cubes, stock fish, ogbono, indomie noodles, tomato paste, dry vegetables, detergents? Flying Ethiopian air.

I know people mostly cargo these items without problems. But I decided to utilize my luggage allowance since we're total of 7 travellers.

Thank you.

6 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by joo2018: 9:31am On Jan 14
Hi. Replied your post on Friday, but was banned by the spambot, maybe because of the web-link I added.

Good to notice that you got a reply. But as an alternative to @cochtrane's suggestion, in case you get stuck with an airline insisting on 6-months validity, I believe you can land with both a new passport and an old passport containing a Canadian visa as long as you present both together.

The link that got me banned was to a discussion of the issue on another forum and the CBSA manual that guides the border agents. If you interested in the option, PM so I can forward to you.

gaggle:
Hi all, pls if the validity of one's passport is less than 6 months(say 2-3 months away from expiry date) will they be let into Canada?
If No,is it ok to just renew passport and go. Note that visa and copr is already issued on the yet to expire passport.

Please I will really appreciate if I can get a reply. Thanks
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by voguemum: 10:13am On Jan 14
oluphilip2008:
Good morning great people. Pls which of these food items is frowned at or may not make it through the border if carried as checked in luggage:
Dry fish, frozen palm oil, Milo, milk, egusi, knorr cubes, stock fish, ogbono, indomie noodles, tomato paste, dry vegetables, detergents? Flying Ethiopian air.

I know people mostly cargo these items without problems. But I decided to utilize my luggage allowance since we're total of 7 travellers.

Thank you.

Hi, meat and diary products are not allowed as stated somewhere in part one of this thread.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by wholesomegrace: 10:32am On Jan 14
Obtay:
Thanks much.

Yes ,I read somewhere about that that 2yrs and 10yrs clause.That's kind of against me as my degree is about 12yrs old .In had delved to banking for about 10yrs but wouldn't want to go that route again in canada. Thanks,i do apprecaite your input.I will research for more schools requirement,hopefully I'll get one that will suit me.
.
Cheers



Do a mail and send to the course advisor in targeted schools or call to know the best approach. I am also looking at a career in nursing but its a complete change from everything I've studied and worked in so its either I write the prerequisite high school grade 12 courses which will be combined with university course work or I do a one year pre-health course before I can gain admission.

5 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by blessings2017(m): 10:39am On Jan 14
Sorry @MissChristine I can't fathom this pm thing . I saw you sent a message alongside a couple others but couldn't find it in my mail.
I feel Q&A should be discussed on the forum for reference purposes.

I was actually writing a detailed story (shortlanding-NCA exams- Calgary social life with pics) on MS-word a few weeks back but somehow I lost the file. Been tired and super-busy to start from the scratch again . I guess I'd drop some in at intervals.

Taking a cue from @Vcole's suggestion, I'd start from generality (official website links et al) to particulars if need be.

For every Foreign-trained lawyer (FTL) looking to practice in Canada, you MUST challenge (write) the NCA exams (it's an open-book, no NCA-past-questions handout which has a Pass/Fail grading system where 50 and above 'issa' Pass grin)

Your go-to website: https://flsc.ca/national-committee-on-accreditation-nca/ All the info you need is there.

NCA assessment process: https://flsc.ca/national-committee-on-accreditation-nca/applying-to-the-nca/

five step process involved in each NCA assessment;
1) You submit your application with required documentation and payment;
2) The NCA reviews and assesses your credentials;
3) The NCA notifies you of assignments or deficiencies;
4) You complete your assigned requirements; and
5) The NCA issues a Certificate of Qualification.

NCA is just the first step as each province has it's distinct requirements to apply for admission into their law society. My province of interest is Alberta and if it's yours as well,then you'd find these links useful -

1. https://www.lawsociety.ab.ca/lawyers-and-students/membership-services/internationally-trained-lawyers-and-graduates/

2. https://www.lawsociety.ab.ca/resource-centre/student-resources/beginning-again-internationally-trained-lawyers/

Other FTL's can chip in requirements for other provinces.

I was deliberate not to do a summary by providing official links as I believe if you need to actually read up from the website. I guess that's it for the general section. The other post(s) would address some particular questions with my experience in view.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Dulles25(f): 11:15am On Jan 14
MissChristine:


Hi Blessing.

Oh I’ve got a lot to ask! I sent a pm request earlier.

I’ll like to know more about the following —
i. The accompanying documents for an NCA application
ii. The complexity of the exam, study materials and the recommended number of courses to take in a sitting for a full time worker
iii. If a student visa will be required to write the NCA exams in Canada
iv. The meaning of the phrase “articulating” (or something like that) after obtaining a qualifying certificate
v. The implication of having a qualifying certificate without being a member of the equivalent of an NBA branch
vi. The probability of a qualifying certificate boosting an express entry application
vii. The best way for a legal practitioner with less than 5 years practice experience to emigrate
viii. The approval chances of an in-house counsel planning to emigrate when compared with a lawyer working with a law firm
ix. Which threads are dedicated to foreign trained lawyers in Canada etc

It is definitely a lot of information to ask. But hopefully answers to these questions will also help other people in the legal field hoping to emigrate.

Looking forward to receiving a feedback from you or anyone with answers to these questions.


Articling and not articulating I believe you meant, right?
Articling is the period you are attached to a senior in a law firm, or legal departments of a company to acquire the necessary legal experience before practice.
In my country we call it pupillage( it's a 6 months working period after completing bar exams, before being called to the bar. It's a compulsory qualification before you are deemed fit to be called to the bar.)
You are a pupil attached to a master for experience

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by blessings2017(m): 11:56am On Jan 14
MissChristine:


Hi Blessing.

Oh I’ve got a lot to ask! I sent a pm request earlier.

I’ll like to know more about the following —
i. The accompanying documents for an NCA application I evaluated as a FTL, and was asked to provide my University transcript, Law School transcript as well certificate of good standing from the Bar Association/Supreme Court. Please refer to the links in my earlier post. Also of note is that you mentioned being a law graduate which impliedly means you're yet to go to law school and be called as a lawyer. This also means you're an ITLG (Internationally trained law-graduate). While it is possible to apply for the assessment, I however do not know what the requirements you'd be asked as an ITLG.

ii. The complexity of the exam, study materials and the recommended number of courses to take in a sitting for a full time worker
[b]It's an open-book exam. No past questions. Generally what is referred to as past questions could either be what former exam-takers regurgitated as the questions they saw in the exam hall and their answer to it OR past questions of provincial law schools. There is NO model past question or answer from NCA. Study materials are according to the syllabus which is found on the NCA website. Note syllabi change almost yearly alongside the study materials (textbooks, already made notes). Always be alert to this as it can be huge. The recommended textbooks are also on the NCA webiste. If you have too much money, you can buy each of the textbooks and make your personal notes. For me and my kind, we 'rugged' am by buying and sharing written notes. I used Liran notes - https://nca-tutor.com/ncanotes/ If you're lucky you can find someone writing same time with you that can lend theirs to you for free. Also I made maximum use of the law library in Calgary Courthouse. The updated textbooks are always there which you can borrow for weeks[/b]

iii. If a student visa will be required to write the NCA exams in Canada
Your question get as e be sha. But you can challenge the exams so far you de inside Canada legally... student,visitor,EE ( I went through EE) Note that you don't really need to be in Canada to write the exam. There are other exam centres located in some countries which Nigeria is unfortunately not among. I heard there are centres in USA, South Africa and UK

iv. The meaning of the phrase “articulating” (or something like that) after obtaining a qualifying certificate
Articling is internship in it's loose form. In Alberta you article for a year, I'm sure it's same in other provinces amidst other distinct requirements. There's the 6-month CPLEAD program (you write some tests as well) you're required to complete alongside the articling. Also you can apply for your articling duration to be abridged if you have years of experience. When you apply for such, it will go through assessment by the Board

v. The implication of having a qualifying certificate without being a member of the equivalent of an NBA branch
As earlier said, for the NCA, you'd apply for assessment as an ITLG ( Internationally trained Law [b]graduate). What NCA would require from you, I wouldn't know. I applied as FTL (foreign-trained lawyer) likewise everyone else that I know with a legal background . I[/b]

vi. The probability of a qualifying certificate boosting an express entry application
As a law graduate, all you need is your LL.B certificate to claim the maximum point for a professional degree which ranks equal with Masters'. All other things being equal, you're good to go smiley

vii. The best way for a legal practitioner with less than 5 years practice experience to emigrate
EE . 3years give you max point

viii. The approval chances of an in-house counsel planning to emigrate when compared with a lawyer working with a law firm
LOL... I was in-house (4years) before migrating. There is no such distinction

ix. Which threads are dedicated to foreign trained lawyers in Canada etc
Check my earlier post, you'd be properly guided. In addition, I belong to the following Facebook closed-user groups;
National Committee on Accreditation (NCA) – Current and Former Students
NCA students, articling students, & internationally trained lawyers (ITLs)
NCA & BAR STUDENTS
National Committee on Accreditation (NCA) Edmonton and Alberta region. ( for my Alberta people wink
NCA Tutor - National Committee on Accreditation - FLSC



It is definitely a lot of information to ask. But hopefully answers to these questions will also help other people in the legal field hoping to emigrate.

Looking forward to receiving a feedback from you or anyone with answers to these questions.


Find your answers in bold

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Jennypharb1: 2:18pm On Jan 14
blessings2017:


Find your answers in bold

Hi Blessing and Christine, thank you for this information.
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by MissChristine(f): 2:46pm On Jan 14
blessings2017:


Find your answers in bold


Blessing you’re AMAAAAZING! Some of my questions were very random but you still took time out to provide answers.

@Dulles25 I really appreciate your explanation on Articling.

I’ll explore all links shared ASAP.

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Dulles25(f): 3:48pm On Jan 14
blessings2017:


Find your answers in bold

Blessings2017, you indeed live and guide as per your name.
Thank you for this detailed information.
Most of the questions I always had but never asked have been answered.
Today, I feel satisfied.
More blessings.

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Winterpeg: 3:52pm On Jan 14
Nasachuky:

I have B.Sc in Biochemistry and masters in Food chemistry and biotechnology with experience in the food industry what do I need to practice as a Food scientist in Canada?
I really do no know what area of food science you will like to delve into in Canada but I believe that food scientists are those that conduct research on food so I'm thinking you might be talking about going into academia or working in a laboratory that studies and develop new food products or maybe something in that line. The area of food science you are considering and the experience you have will determine what courses you will do just like I think Salford mentioned or sometimes you might not need to go back to school depending on what you already have. I will give an example about my own situation. In Nigeria I worked as a Food safety person for the government and I already have one ISO certification. I mostly did inspections. Here in Canada I applied to the cfia without taking any other courses and I got called to do the recruitment test. So basically evaluate what you have against what is required for the line of work you will like to do here. You can use any of the Canadian job sites to know what is required for the line of work you are interested in. But I have read here about people not having the Canadian experience not getting their desired jobs which sometimes is true while some others get lucky with going back to school. So if you dont want to take chances or if you believe you still have a gap to fill, it's best you take some short courses here in Canada which I believe will open more doors.

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Winterpeg: 4:08pm On Jan 14
voguemum:


Hi @salford1, I've not had much experience in the laboratory as a microbiologist apart from the experience I got during my 6 months SIWES training out of school when I was in 300L. The work experiences I've had over the years are;
1. Program Assistant in an NGO (maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS related)and;
2. Currently a data analyst at a maternal and child health hospital. That being said, my plan is to go back in line with my course of study my focus being on food safety/quality assurance and i've actully thought going back to school to take some courses will do the trick.

The reason why I brought up the question was because I've always been told that Microbiology isn't a professional course even when my friends and I discuss about the inability to secure a job at a hospital as a microbiologist as a medical laboratory scientists is given preference over us and wanted to know if same applies over there.

I wouldn't also mind taking some courses to fit back into the NGO world ( WHO,UNDP and the likes) as it was such a breeze working with those innocent mothers and children. And please don't judge me because I asked about fitting in as a microbiologist and now diverted to working in an NGO grin I'm just keeping my options open here.

And thanks to @vole and @winterpeg for chipping in

I dont think you can work in the hospital here in Canada just as a regular microbiologist. Every profession related to the medical line here is regulated meaning you will need to pass some exams and have a license to practice. However you can work in a hospital as a medical laboratory technologist and specialise in microbiology, I believe there is that option. For you to take this option, you will be doing a whole lot of courses and exams cos like I said it is regulated. But for food safety and quality assurance you can take some short courses and one or two important certifications to set you on your way. Probably after that you can start small in order to learn how things are done in food safety cos it's a whole lot and then work your way up to manager and even go into consulting later if you please. That's all I know, probably someone else might chip in more.

4 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Winterpeg: 5:14pm On Jan 14
oluphilip2008:
Good morning great people. Pls which of these food items is frowned at or may not make it through the border if carried as checked in luggage:
Dry fish, frozen palm oil, Milo, milk, egusi, knorr cubes, stock fish, ogbono, indomie noodles, tomato paste, dry vegetables, detergents? Flying Ethiopian air.

I know people mostly cargo these items without problems. But I decided to utilize my luggage allowance since we're total of 7 travellers.

Thank you.
In addition to what voguemum has mentioned, palm oil, milo. Palm oil is cheap here, you can get them at African stores. My palmoil was frozen and customs in Nigeria still seized it so I don't really know. And might I ask, why would you want to bring detergent from Nigeria? Detergent is cheap here and I am not sure people really hand- wash stuffs here.

7 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Blackbuddy: 5:46pm On Jan 14
Dear fellow Canadian permanent residents, try to pursue your Canadian citizenship as soon as you're eligible.

See an article just published about a long time PR holder who never bothered to get his Canadian citizenship and got his PR card stolen while abroad on vacation.


For almost 60 years, Cornelis Ruijter has lived as a permanent resident in Canada, having immigrated to the country with his 14 brothers and sisters in 1961.

The Barrie, Ont., man never bothered becoming a full Canadian citizen, but after a theft abroad left him stranded in Europe for five weeks, he has some advice for any other permanent residents.

"Get your Canadian citizenship and get your passport," he said.

Until last year, when he travelled out of the country, Ruijter would bring his Netherlands passport and his permanent resident card, getting around without fail.

But on Nov. 27, while on a family trip in Italy, he says a thief stole both documents.

According to the Canadian government's website, permanent residents are required to have their permanent resident card or a permanent resident travel document to enter the country.

"Once that's gone, you're not getting back into Canada," he said.

After returning to his native country of the Netherlands, tracking down the right offices and filling out the required paperwork, Ruijter arrived back in Toronto on Jan. 7.

Now, he wants to share his experience with other permanent residents who haven't made their citizenship official.

After a few calls, he realized it would take some time to replace them and left his family vacation to go to the Netherlands.


He found out he'd have to travel to Vienna to get a new permanent resident card, so instead he went through the steps to get a new Netherlands passport.

After showing his few remaining pieces of ID — his driver's licence and his health card — officials there processed a passport and had it to him within a week.

The passport then had to travel to Vienna to get a permanent resident stamp so Ruijter could re-enter Canada.

'It can take months'

According to immigration lawyer Mario Bellissimo, five weeks is a good news story for someone in Ruijter's predicament.

"That's as good as it gets," he said.

"It can take months and months to get that documentation, so in his case, Netherlands acted quickly."

Bellissimo said the loss of a permanent resident card can cause serious complications for travellers.

"When someone loses that card, they then have to move de facto to their original travel document, which would be the passport of a country they may not have lived in for 30, 40 years," he said.

The reason for that, the lawyer said, is that authorities need time to confirm people are who they say they are if they don't have formal documents.

Bellissimo has also seen cases of lost permanent resident cards in countries where it's logistically much harder to get a replacement.

"Other countries ... might not have the sophistication yet or the internal infrastructure to produce these documents in a timely way. He could've, if he was from another country, could've been sitting for many, many months; worst case scenario, years," he said.

The lawyer's advice if you're eligible to become a Canadian citizen: Get your passport immediately.

"There's still too many people that don't access that right to apply for citizenship," he said.

"Ultimately it gives you the ability to know that Canada is your permanent home, and in my view, especially with the trends in the world and what's happening, there's nothing more important than that for you and your family."

Back in Canada now, Ruijter and his siblings will be applying for citizenship right away.

"I plan on finishing that off and doing it," he said. "It's a warning for a lot of other people … if they ever lose that permanent resident card, they've got a problem."

Ruijter's wife, Marilyn Ruyter, is also relieved to have him home.

"We're so lucky … Both of us have very large families, lots of friends, lots of contacts," she said.

"I cannot imagine how somebody on their own could've done all this; it was extremely stressful."

In the meantime, there are some perks to being back in Canada that Ruijter planned to enjoy immediately.

"It's been a while since I've had a Timmies … and a good Canadian beer."


Source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/this-ontario-man-has-a-warning-for-permanent-residents-get-your-canadian-citizenship/ar-BBSdutB?ocid=ientp

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Godisincontrol: 6:05pm On Jan 14
oluphilip2008:
Good morning great people. Pls which of these food items is frowned at or may not make it through the border if carried as checked in luggage:
Dry fish, frozen palm oil, Milo, milk, egusi, knorr cubes, stock fish, ogbono, indomie noodles, tomato paste, dry vegetables, detergents? Flying Ethiopian air.

I know people mostly cargo these items without problems. But I decided to utilize my luggage allowance since we're total of 7 travellers.

Thank you.

You can take a look at the link below

http://inspection.gc.ca/food/sfcr/information-for-consumers/travellers/what-can-i-bring-into-canada-/eng/1389648337546/1389648516990#a5

9 Likes 10 Shares

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by blessings2017(m): 6:16pm On Jan 14
Thanks @Jennypharb1 @MissChristine

Thank you @Dulles25 for your kind words.

I hope to share more experiences for any unlocked new stage in my law career.

God bless us all smiley

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Dulles25(f): 6:37pm On Jan 14
blessings2017:
Thanks @Jennypharb1 @MissChristine

Thank you @Dulles25 for your kind words.

I hope to share more experiences for any unlocked new stage in my law career.

God bless us all smiley

I will be following. Thanks for the precedence and all the best.

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by vascey(m): 6:54pm On Jan 14
Robert Half 2019 salary survey for Finance professionals in Canada.

Comes in handy for salary negotiations

https://www.roberthalf.ca/en/salary-guide

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Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Debsify: 7:04pm On Jan 14
Blackbuddy:
Dear fellow Canadian permanent residents, try to pursue your Canadian citizenship as soon as you're eligible.

What if the passport gets stolen?
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by oluphilip2008(f): 7:39pm On Jan 14
Godisincontrol:


You can take a look a the link below

http://inspection.gc.ca/food/sfcr/information-for-consumers/travellers/what-can-i-bring-into-canada-/eng/1389648337546/1389648516990#a5

Thanks very much for the link @Godisincontrol. I got all the info I needed right there.

A big thanks to @Voguemum and @Winterpeg. Your info was quite useful.

2 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Blackbuddy: 8:03pm On Jan 14
Debsify:
What if the passport gets stolen?

Hi, any Canadian embassy or consulate worldwide can re-issue a Canadian passport after due checks. PR cards are issued centrally by only IRCC in Canada, hope this answers your question .

Looking forward to getting my Canadian passport soon smiley

29 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by einsteino(m): 8:39pm On Jan 14
joo2018:
Sorry about the phone crash. Pls work on the tutorial afresh. May you always remain blessed!

Ramj:

Please do.

We would be waiting Gracias

joo2018:

Sorry about the phone crash. Pls work on the tutorial afresh. May you always remain blessed!

Luce:

Sorry about your friend, may the person’s soul Rest In Peace.
About the presto, yeah that’s what I meant when I said you would have to pay a new 3 dollar value when you cross to another city but so far I haven’t spent more than 6dollars in a day per city but I definitely can’t wait to hear your tips about cheaper fares.

Thanks y'all, I would write one soon as I gather enough pic aids.

2 Likes

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by gaggle: 9:32pm On Jan 14
[quote author=joo2018 post=74745425]Hi. Replied your post on Friday, but was banned by the spambot, maybe because of the web-link I added.

Good to notice that you got a reply. But as an alternative to @cochtrane's suggestion, in case you get stuck with an airline insisting on 6-months validity, I believe you can land with both a new passport and an old passport containing a Canadian visa as long as you present both together.

The link that got me banned was to a discussion of the issue on another forum and the CBSA manual that guides the border agents. If you interested in the option, PM so I can forward to you.




Ok, thanks so much. Sorry about the ban.

1 Like

Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Debsify: 10:27pm On Jan 14
Blackbuddy:


Hi, any Canadian embassy or consulate worldwide can re-issue a Canadian passport after due checks. PR cards are issued centrally by only IRCC in Canada, hope this answers your question.
yeah thanks
Re: Living In Canada/Life As A Canadian Immigrant Part 2 by Nasachuky(f): 10:27pm On Jan 14
Winterpeg:

I really do no know what area of food science you will like to delve into in Canada but I believe that food scientists are those that conduct research on food so I'm thinking you might be talking about going into academia or working in a laboratory that studies and develop new food products or maybe something in that line. The area of food science you are considering and the experience you have will determine what courses you will do just like I think Salford mentioned or sometimes you might not need to go back to school depending on what you already have. I will give an example about my own situation. In Nigeria I worked as a Food safety person for the government and I already have one ISO certification. I mostly did inspections. Here in Canada I applied to the cfia without taking any other courses and I got called to do the recruitment test. So basically evaluate what you have against what is required for the line of work you will like to do here. You can use any of the Canadian job sites to know what is required for the line of work you are interested in. But I have read here about people not having the Canadian experience not getting their desired jobs which sometimes is true while some others get lucky with going back to school. So if you dont want to take chances or if you believe you still have a gap to fill, it's best you take some short courses here in Canada which I believe will open more doors.
Thank you so much for your response. I work as a Quality control analyst here in Nigeria but I will like to narrow my career path to developing new products and human nutrition, will also like to do my PhD hopefully. food science offers unlimited opportunities and I believe one can always navigate around each food sector.

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