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Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire - Career (3) - Nairaland

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Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Richiez(m): 6:30pm On Jan 01
If only we had 50 Tony Elumelus in Nigeria cool
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by crunchyg(m): 6:31pm On Jan 01
Mizk:
And what are we supposed to do with the info? Because it worked for you doesn't mean we should all take the same route, I'll be intrested if you can ask me of my business ideas and provide necessary funding even if it means I'll pay back with intrest and see if i won't become wealthy, the truth is we're all trying just that we are not as opportuned as he was, he only got lucky.
You sure say you read what is up there before ranting?

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Lexzycane(m): 6:39pm On Jan 01
But these are the days computers gets to sieve out CVs
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by eluquenson(m): 6:40pm On Jan 01
HardBishop:
who can trust a anambra person?. their business successes is often attached with juju.. he must have a covenant with an occultic kingdom.
chai. from sales boy to billionaire.... hmm. something is fishy
He's from Delta state not Anambra. But the bolded is just the truth about him though.
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Nobody: 6:41pm On Jan 01
bjims:


are you saying the CEO read through all the cover letters? Are you saying Tony had the best cover letter? Do you consider if the CEO was in a good mood that day and decided to request for cover letters? When did CEO's have time to seive through cover letters if a letter does not accompany ypur application or something dramatic happens. The three managers connecting with you is luck bro no matter how connected you think you were. In christainity luck is called favour. Dont downplay it. You can be the most talented or most brilliant if favorable time and chance does not happen to you forget it
he didn’t mention if he read all cover letters. We can’t say. He sells himself well, that is why he excelled as a sales person. Imagine when I was being Interviewed, I couldn’t express myself well or I was making blunders, would I be hired? Me being able to communicate is a skill gained by hardwork. There is favor but you have got to be good. Luck is when you go go play Nairabet and you win. Luck happens when you gamble not when you put your effort in selling yourself and making things work
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Nobody: 6:47pm On Jan 01
bjims:


the bolded does it for me. To think majekdom2 says otherwise is probably as a result of his own experience.There were threefirst class in my class, 2 males and one female. All the first class males were bad arse programmers/developers but guess what. One of the guys witha 2.1 who was also one of the bad arse programmers amongst many other gifted programmers we had in class today works with a tech firm in switzerland after being poached from Nigeria. The other guys are doing fine but still in naija but this guy in swiss is on a different level,if that is not luck I wonder what it is.
can I tell you something most first class and high CGPA holders don’t end up very rich. An exception is bill gates tho. People with very high IQ don’t become very wealthy this is because there is a pyschology part of making money. This is because I have to be able to talk you tobmake you do something out of your will. If you have the chance will you ever pay for a service? No, no one wants to loose their money but we always want to make money. It takes some kind of mental power to be able to make money from people while you provide and service to them. Many smart people don’t have this ability. The end up as employees. Is Mark Zuckerberg still writing codes? No! there are many Nigerians able to write the first codes used in building Facebook but more sophisticated codes are being written to improve Facebook. Who are those writing the codes they are first class products. They are best as employees.

2 Likes

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by laivwire(m): 6:48pm On Jan 01
BiafraBushBoy:
Nice one... I will highlight the key points;

1) His cover letter did the magic for him despite not being qualified.

It worked for him and it has worked for me several times also. I can help you design a cover letter and CV that will get you a job this 2019 guaranteed.

Visit https://topwritersden.com/get-cv-free-cover-letter/ for more information.




2) He took up a sales job. Majority of millionaires in the world today started off as sales people. Becoming a sales person has lots of advantage to offer you especially if you intend setting up your own business.

I love sales and I am still selling till date.

Lovely post.

A major advantage I sighted up there was the luck he talked about that gave him an early chance to grab a seat at the elders table (or management cadre if you like). This position opens up the door nd opportunities, more income, exposure, training as well as invaluable contacts. A lot of sales executives today keep grinding at the executive level without getting a chance to make that jump.

His meteoric rise can also be attributed to sharp business acumen and acquisitions. A lot of hardworking folks hardly get that high up without piggybacking on failing enterprises and turning them around.

Honestly too, not everyone can be good business people. Some folks are built to lecture, some.to code, some to preach etc but the comfort in that is there is no discipline or tase you can engage in today that you can’t hammer.

We ought to keep grinding with streamlined focus and big dreams
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by BiafraBushBoy(m): 6:56pm On Jan 01
Adek15:
I've seen many advert on sales job but I really don't understand the criteria to be one. Is it same as marketing job technically?

In Nigeria?

YES

Abroad?

NO...

NO blame Nigerians, Sales and Marketing are technically different... But we no send for here...
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by bigiyaro(m): 7:05pm On Jan 01
BiafraBushBoy:
Nice one... I will highlight the key points;

1) His cover letter did the magic for him despite not being qualified.

It worked for him and it has worked for me several times also. I can help you design a cover letter and CV that will get you a job this 2019 guaranteed.

Visit https://topwritersden.com/get-cv-free-cover-letter/ for more information.



2) He took up a sales job. Majority of millionaires in the world today started off as sales people. Becoming a sales person has lots of advantage to offer you especially if you intend setting up your own business.

I love sales and I am still selling till date.

Lovely post.
selling is the best job in the world but most people don't know it.
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by sundayoga(m): 7:21pm On Jan 01
Meanwhile check my signature
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Elliot2(m): 7:34pm On Jan 01
Mizk:
And what are we supposed to do with the info? Because it worked for you doesn't mean we should all take the same route, I'll be intrested if you can ask me of my business ideas and provide necessary funding even if it means I'll pay back with intrest and see if i won't become wealthy, the truth is we're all trying just that we are not as opportuned as he was, he only got lucky.
this is 2019 so use ur head!
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by traihit: 7:37pm On Jan 01
bjims:


are you saying the CEO read through all the cover letters? Are you saying Tony had the best cover letter? Do you consider if the CEO was in a good mood that day and decided to request for cover letters? When did CEO's have time to seive through cover letters if a letter does not accompany ypur application or something dramatic happens. The three managers connecting with you is luck bro no matter how connected you think you were. In christainity luck is called favour. Dont downplay it. You can be the most talented or most brilliant if favorable time and chance does not happen to you forget it

That person might not understand your point but I get it. It takes someone who has seen hardworking people dying without any reward for their zeal to understand the place of luck. That's why it's difficult to emulate any American billionaire, it takes more than hardwork.

However, there are some attitudes in people which draws things like 'luck' to their lives.

3 Likes

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by fizzy4luv(m): 7:37pm On Jan 01
My own take away is Someone took a chance on MR Tony Elumelu, that chance is what many Nigerian graduates lack access to. Majority of the current top echelon of companies were all given opportunities that they themselves have turnaround to erase.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by TheMainMan: 7:45pm On Jan 01
maxtop:
We all have a story to tell but until you make it there's nothing to tell cuz it just won't be fascinating. I still sell pure water in traffic but nobody cares but whenever I make it'll be good story.

Make I go hussle
your hustle go pay one day... Never give up and trust GOD
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by nwakaibeya1: 8:43pm On Jan 01
Every progress has.A spiritual root,evil or good and very many people progress through evil roots by self or by proxy that are never revealed to ordinary humans ? Even if you claim to be Born again or prophet or pastor what is restitution to you?what you swallowed to be rich who has taken it away from your stomach?
Who on earth reveals his nor her secret journey to progress?thats why we keep informing you that no matter how people pretends and even quote bible from Genesis to revelation and do wonders its only at night that we know who is who ,evil or good. Mathew 13,13-15..Money,wealth doesn't change people ? It unlocks the real character that was jailed by poverty ,propelled by evil people and hidden nations#Money Truth#
#MoneyPreneur#Making money is highly spiritual and no human being makes wealth, money without being spiritually evil or good by self or proxy, knowingly or unknowingly.very many people wealthy are Evil and they have eyes to see who talks as evil dominates the human Space###

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by FunctionX(m): 8:51pm On Jan 01
Gaspardd:

This ur moniker is funny to me
I don't understand how it could be funny tongue
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Gaspardd(m): 9:02pm On Jan 01
FunctionX:

I don't understand how it could be funny tongue
I follow a crypto currency NPRS, last week they announced they re swapping to functionX, could it be coincidence?
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by FunctionX(m): 9:11pm On Jan 01
Gaspardd:

I follow a crypto currency NPRS, last week they announced they re swapping to functionX, could it be coincidence?
Well I got it while I was in the university solving functions and derivatives. A friend started calling me that after I helped put him through on the topic. Since then the name stuck. I kinda liked it and adopted it.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by olisaEze(m): 9:17pm On Jan 01
HardBishop:
who can trust a anambra person?. their business successes is often attached with juju.. he must have a covenant with an occultic kingdom.

chai. from sales boy to billionaire.... hmm. something is fishy

He’s from Delta state not Anambra State. Stay away from house wives tales n gossips
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by chiedozie198100: 9:21pm On Jan 01
superior1:
He made a huge cash off zenith, illegitimately but smartly

my guy, the entire banking industry thrives on illegitimacy.

if you know you know.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by ChiFada(m): 10:14pm On Jan 01
Mizk:
And what are we supposed to do with the info? Because it worked for you doesn't mean we should all take the same route, I'll be intrested if you can ask me of my business ideas and provide necessary funding even if it means I'll pay back with intrest and see if i won't become wealthy, the truth is we're all trying just that we are not as opportuned as he was, he only got lucky.

Please, did you read the post? Kindly read the post and modify your comment.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by propsvila: 10:16pm On Jan 01
These are the type of people that supposed to be Nigeria's president. Not PMB who cannot even boast of secondary school certification.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by rapid101(m): 10:26pm On Jan 01
Most of dis billionaire don't do any tin spectacular

It jst the two skills de use which is
80/20 rule (time management)

And

rule 72 (money management)

If u can work with dis rules
In d shortest time
U ll b a billionaire
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by BalogunIdowu(m): 10:32pm On Jan 01
I most appreciate the fact that he hammered on luck.
Most people think their success is based on their hard work alone!
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by TEYA: 10:48pm On Jan 01
majekdom2:
can I tell you something most first class and high CGPA holders don’t end up very rich. An exception is bill gates tho. People with very high IQ don’t become very wealthy this is because there is a pyschology part of making money. This is because I have to be able to talk you tobmake you do something out of your will. If you have the chance will you ever pay for a service? No, no one wants to loose their money but we always want to make money. It takes some kind of mental power to be able to make money from people while you provide and service to them. Many smart people don’t have this ability. The end up as employees. Is Mark Zuckerberg still writing codes? No! there are many Nigerians able to write the first codes used in building Facebook but more sophisticated codes are being written to improve Facebook. Who are those writing the codes they are first class products. They are best as employees.
University education is overrated. The bolded is not necessarily true. Many programmers are not university graduates and are way far better at coding than the typical first class graduates.

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by TEYA: 10:49pm On Jan 01
Mizk:
And what are we supposed to do with the info? Because it worked for you doesn't mean we should all take the same route, I'll be intrested if you can ask me of my business ideas and provide necessary funding even if it means I'll pay back with intrest and see if i won't become wealthy, the truth is we're all trying just that we are not as opportuned as he was, he only got lucky.
Go back and read the post. This time slowly.
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by modupe2: 11:13pm On Jan 01
Inspiring.....

[Qquote author=gisthabit post=74354260]Tony Onyemaechi Elumelu is a Nigerian economist, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. He is the chairman of Heirs Holdings, the United Bank for Africa, Transcorp and founder of The Tony Elumelu Foundation.

According to him, below is a brief story of his success on how he rose from the being a poor and hungry salesman to a business mogul and a billionaire as a result of hard work and luck.

In business, the role luck plays in success and personal achievement is rarely discussed. If luck is mentioned, it is done with slight condescension, and usually dismissed as a product of hard work, not deserving significant attention. While hard work is paramount – and I have written extensively about the importance of working hard – history and my own experiences show that there is often a large element of success that hard work alone can not explain. It is simply not true that “you make your own luck.”

I started my career as a salesman, a copier salesman to be specific, young, hungry, and hardworking, but the reality was that I was just one of the thousands of young Nigerian graduates, all eager to succeed. How did I get from there to where I am now? Of course, hard work, resilience, a long-term vision – but also luck.

A year after earning a Master’s degree in Economics from the University of Lagos, I applied to join a new generation bank, Allstates Trust Bank. The bank’s one-page newspaper advertisement demanded a minimum of a Second Class Upper result, but I applied regardless, submitting a cover letter and filled out application with my Second Class Lower Economics result.

By a stroke of luck, my application was reviewed by the Chairman/CEO, a painstaking man who carefully read my cover letter and was drawn to the confidence in my words. “I know I may not have met the qualifying criteria for the advertised roles, but I am intelligent, driven, ambitious and I will make the bank proud. My Second Class Lower result does not demonstrate the full extent of my intelligence and ability, and I know I can do so much more.” He read those words and took a chance on me. Though “unqualified”, he decided to throw me a lifeline, an opportunity.

I was invited to join the shortlist, followed by a long series of interviews and even more tests. At the end of a very rigorous process, I received good news – I had a place as an entry-level analyst. Even now, I wonder: What if the Founder had not personally gone through my application? What if my application was rejected at the very beginning? What if I never got the opportunity to work at Allstates Trust Bank?

The story continues: Within 12 months at the bank, aged 27, I went from analyst to branch manager – the youngest ever bank branch manager at the time. I was hard working, energetic, creative and prioritised getting things done, but it was also good fortune that my bosses Toyin Akin-Johnson and Ebitimi Banigo took notice, and then, believed in me. They took a chance on me by appointing me as branch manager after an incredibly short time in the bank. They recognised in me the raw materials needed to make a good leader and were prepared to invest in me and my ability. My rise to Branch Manager within a short period is a great story but I know in my heart, I was lucky, as well as deserving.

This position of branch manager was a solid platform which launched me into several top leadership roles. When we, a small group of hungry, determined, young outsiders, took over struggling Crystal Bank, it was as a direct result of the preparedness and exposure that we received early from our superiors and mentors. Without the intervention and goodwill of these pe
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Ugosample(m): 11:21pm On Jan 01
eluquenson:
He's from Delta state not Anambra. But the bolded is just the truth about him though.

and you know this how?

So nobody can succeed in Nigeria without getting his hands dirty? ?

That's the prevalent mentality in that zoo tho, so I'm not surprised

1 Like

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Hedonini: 11:25pm On Jan 01
Give it to him, he is smart and he packaged himself well. But he conveniently failed to mention the illicit schemes that catapulted him to wealth. Notice how there's a big gap in the story - jumping from being a branch manager to acquiring a bank?

That's the problem with Nigerian 'success stories'. Always too many gaps. Too many unexplained 'one things' always lead to another.

By the way, whatever happened to the flamboyant Ebitimi Banigo and his toffee-nosed wife Pelebo?

2 Likes

Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by koyyes: 11:35pm On Jan 01
Thief!
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Adek15(m): 11:44pm On Jan 01
BiafraBushBoy:


In Nigeria?

YES

Abroad?

NO...

NO blame Nigerians, Sales and Marketing are technically different... But we no send for here...
OK. Thank you for the reply. That route is not for me though
Re: Tony Elumelu: The Sales Boy Turned Billionaire by Saig: 1:05am On Jan 02
gisthabit:
Tony Onyemaechi Elumelu is a Nigerian economist, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. He is the chairman of Heirs Holdings, the United Bank for Africa, Transcorp and founder of The Tony Elumelu Foundation.

According to him, below is a brief story of his success on how he rose from the being a poor and hungry salesman to a business mogul and a billionaire as a result of hard work and luck.

In business, the role luck plays in success and personal achievement is rarely discussed. If luck is mentioned, it is done with slight condescension, and usually dismissed as a product of hard work, not deserving significant attention. While hard work is paramount – and I have written extensively about the importance of working hard – history and my own experiences show that there is often a large element of success that hard work alone can not explain. It is simply not true that “you make your own luck.”

I started my career as a salesman, a copier salesman to be specific, young, hungry, and hardworking, but the reality was that I was just one of the thousands of young Nigerian graduates, all eager to succeed. How did I get from there to where I am now? Of course, hard work, resilience, a long-term vision – but also luck.

A year after earning a Master’s degree in Economics from the University of Lagos, I applied to join a new generation bank, Allstates Trust Bank. The bank’s one-page newspaper advertisement demanded a minimum of a Second Class Upper result, but I applied regardless, submitting a cover letter and filled out application with my Second Class Lower Economics result.

By a stroke of luck, my application was reviewed by the Chairman/CEO, a painstaking man who carefully read my cover letter and was drawn to the confidence in my words. “I know I may not have met the qualifying criteria for the advertised roles, but I am intelligent, driven, ambitious and I will make the bank proud. My Second Class Lower result does not demonstrate the full extent of my intelligence and ability, and I know I can do so much more.” He read those words and took a chance on me. Though “unqualified”, he decided to throw me a lifeline, an opportunity.

I was invited to join the shortlist, followed by a long series of interviews and even more tests. At the end of a very rigorous process, I received good news – I had a place as an entry-level analyst. Even now, I wonder: What if the Founder had not personally gone through my application? What if my application was rejected at the very beginning? What if I never got the opportunity to work at Allstates Trust Bank?

The story continues: Within 12 months at the bank, aged 27, I went from analyst to branch manager – the youngest ever bank branch manager at the time. I was hard working, energetic, creative and prioritised getting things done, but it was also good fortune that my bosses Toyin Akin-Johnson and Ebitimi Banigo took notice, and then, believed in me. They took a chance on me by appointing me as branch manager after an incredibly short time in the bank. They recognised in me the raw materials needed to make a good leader and were prepared to invest in me and my ability. My rise to Branch Manager within a short period is a great story but I know in my heart, I was lucky, as well as deserving.

This position of branch manager was a solid platform which launched me into several top leadership roles. When we, a small group of hungry, determined, young outsiders, took over struggling Crystal Bank, it was as a direct result of the preparedness and exposure that we received early from our superiors and mentors. Without the intervention and goodwill of these people in my career, I would not have been prepared to take on far greater roles. These learning opportunities laid the pathway to future achievements. To put simply, I was lucky enough to be identified and trusted so early on in my career, and this put me on a unique road to success. I keep this in mind – it is humbling and also drives much of what I do today.

When I left UBA as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) in 2010 to pursue other interests, I made a vow that through the Tony Elumelu Foundation, I would “institutionalise” luck and democratise access to opportunities for young Africans. I promised to leverage the success I have enjoyed, to spread luck and hope, provide opportunities and to empower the next generation of African entrepreneurs to succeed. Without luck in my early career, I would not be the man that I am today. I am a leader and philanthropist today because I encountered people who gave me a chance early in my career. It has been a lifetime goal to pay this forward in a transformative and impactful way.

Over the past three decades I have spent as a banker, investor, and turnaround expert, I have had the opportunity to meet thousands of entrepreneurs, like me. Many of them are young people with incredible dreams and business ideas but without the experience or access to mentoring and support required to build successful businesses. But most importantly, they have not yet been exposed to the right opportunity.

Our entrepreneurs are hard at work across the continent, identifying gaps in the market for specific products and services, and bridging these gaps with their innovation and ingenuity. Yet, many of these budding entrepreneurs often lack the capital, the networks, the training, the support to take their small business to national or regional scale. All they need is a helping hand, some luck, someone to believe in them and take a chance on them.

This is what the Tony Elumelu Foundation offers: a platform that empowers African entrepreneurs with opportunities ranging from business management training to mentoring, to funding to networking – championing their cause and giving them a global voice to actualise their ambitions. This is precisely why I launched the USD$100 million Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship Programme to empower the next generation of African entrepreneurs. Indeed, their businesses may become the next UBAs (United Bank for Africa).

So, when I am asked, “Tony, why are you and your family doing this? What is in it for you?” I smile and recount my own story of luck. Luck is real, it is powerful, and I am committed to spreading it as far as I can. I am a beneficiary of luck, and I am passionate about sharing it across the continent, to all 54 countries.

Source: http://gisthabit.com/tony-elumelu-the-sales-boy-turned-billionaire/


This is inspiring. this paper certificate of a thing..class of degree does not always reflect the ability and intelligennce of an individual. Let's focus more on what people can do and give them the opportunity than writing them off at mere sight of their certificates

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