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Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks - Health - Nairaland

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Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks by Marpol: 7:39pm On May 22, 2020
1918 influenza

Key symptoms: fever, nausea, aches, diarrhea
First detection: March 1918
Global cases: 500 million
Global deaths: over 50 million (675,000 in the United States); the death rate was around 2 percent
Transmission: spread through respiratory droplets
Most affected groups: otherwise healthy adults ages 20 to 40
Treatments available: none; antibiotics or antivirals did not yet exist
Vaccines available: none
End of pandemic: summer 1919; mostly due to deaths and higher immunity levels


Seasonal flu

Key symptoms: fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue
Global cases annually: 9 percentTrusted Source of the population, or about 1 billion infections (up to 5 million of which are severe)
Global deaths annually: between 291,000 to 646,000Trusted Source; death rate around 0.1 percent
Transmission: spreads through respiratory droplets; each diagnosed person passes it to 1.3 persons
Most affected groups: older adults and people with compromised immune systems
Treatment available: antiviral medications (Tamiflu, Relenza, Rapivab, Xofluza) to reduce duration and severity of flu
Vaccines available: there are many vaccine optionsTrusted Source available that provide immunity against multiple strains of influenza



2002–2004 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

Key symptoms: fever, respiratory symptoms, cough, malaise
First detection: November 2002 in Guangdong province of China
Global cases: 8,098 casesTrusted Source across 29 countries; 8 U.S. cases
Global deaths: 774; 15 percent mortality rate; no U.S. deathsTrusted Source
Transmission: spread through respiratory droplets and contaminated surfaces
Most affected groups: patients 60 and older had a 55 percent higher death rate
Treatment available: no treatment or cure, but antiviral medications and steroids worked for some people
Vaccine available: a vaccine was ready around the time the pandemic was already ending


2009 (H1N1) flu pandemic

Key symptoms: fever, chills, cough, body aches
First detection: January 2009 in Mexico; April 2009Trusted Source in United States
Global cases: about 24 percent of global population; 60.8 million U.S. cases
Global deaths: over 284,000; 12,469 in the United States; death rate was .02 percent
Most affected groups: children had the highest rates; 47 percentTrusted Source of children between 5 and 19 developed symptoms compared to 11 percent of people ages 65 and up
Treatment available: antiviralsTrusted Source (oseltamivir and zanamivir); most people recovered without complications
Vaccine available: H1N1 vaccine research started April 2009 and a vaccine became available December 2009
End of pandemic: August 2010


2014–2016 Ebola

Key symptoms: fever, aches and pains, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting
First detection: first patient identified December 2013 in Guinea; first outbreak March 2014Trusted Source
Global cases: 28,652 casesTrusted Source across 10 countries
Global deaths: 11,325 deaths; death rate was about 50 percentTrusted Source
Transmission: spread through bodily fluids (blood, sweat, feces) and close contact; most contagious toward end of disease
Most affected groups: 20 percentTrusted Source of all cases occurred in children
Treatment available: none; supportive care was provided, including IV fluids and oral rehydration
Vaccines available: none
End of outbreak: March 2016


Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Key symptoms: cough, fever, shortness of breath; 80 percent of cases are mild
First detection: December 2019 in Wuhan, China
Global cases to date:
Global deaths to date:
Transmission: spreads through respiratory droplets along with feces and other bodily secretions; each person passes it to 2.2 others which will likely fall as containment and quarantine efforts increase
Most affected groups: adults over 65 with underlying health conditions; children seem to be spared and are experiencing milder symptoms (in China, children account for just 2.4 percent of cases)
Treatments available: none; supportive care is provided, pain relievers and fever reducers can alleviate symptoms, and antibiotics can help treat secondary bacterial pneumonia and antivirals used with other viruses are being administered to help with recovery
Vaccines available: none yet; a vaccine will likely be ready in about one year
Re: Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks by Nobody: 7:45pm On May 22, 2020
sad
Re: Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks by Nobody: 7:46pm On May 22, 2020
Marpol:
1918 influenza

Key symptoms: fever, nausea, aches, diarrhea
First detection: March 1918
Global cases: 500 million
Global deaths: over 50 million (675,000 in the United States); the death rate was around 2 percent
Transmission: spread through respiratory droplets
Most affected groups: otherwise healthy adults ages 20 to 40
Treatments available: none; antibiotics or antivirals did not yet exist
Vaccines available: none
End of pandemic: summer 1919; mostly due to deaths and higher immunity levels


Seasonal flu

Key symptoms: fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue
Global cases annually: 9 percentTrusted Source of the population, or about 1 billion infections (up to 5 million of which are severe)
Global deaths annually: between 291,000 to 646,000Trusted Source; death rate around 0.1 percent
Transmission: spreads through respiratory droplets; each diagnosed person passes it to 1.3 persons
Most affected groups: older adults and people with compromised immune systems
Treatment available: antiviral medications (Tamiflu, Relenza, Rapivab, Xofluza) to reduce duration and severity of flu
Vaccines available: there are many vaccine optionsTrusted Source available that provide immunity against multiple strains of influenza



2002–2004 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

Key symptoms: fever, respiratory symptoms, cough, malaise
First detection: November 2002 in Guangdong province of China
Global cases: 8,098 casesTrusted Source across 29 countries; 8 U.S. cases
Global deaths: 774; 15 percent mortality rate; no U.S. deathsTrusted Source
Transmission: spread through respiratory droplets and contaminated surfaces
Most affected groups: patients 60 and older had a 55 percent higher death rate
Treatment available: no treatment or cure, but antiviral medications and steroids worked for some people
Vaccine available: a vaccine was ready around the time the pandemic was already ending


2009 (H1N1) flu pandemic

Key symptoms: fever, chills, cough, body aches
First detection: January 2009 in Mexico; April 2009Trusted Source in United States
Global cases: about 24 percent of global population; 60.8 million U.S. cases
Global deaths: over 284,000; 12,469 in the United States; death rate was .02 percent
Most affected groups: children had the highest rates; 47 percentTrusted Source of children between 5 and 19 developed symptoms compared to 11 percent of people ages 65 and up
Treatment available: antiviralsTrusted Source (oseltamivir and zanamivir); most people recovered without complications
Vaccine available: H1N1 vaccine research started April 2009 and a vaccine became available December 2009
End of pandemic: August 2010


2014–2016 Ebola

Key symptoms: fever, aches and pains, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting
First detection: first patient identified December 2013 in Guinea; first outbreak March 2014Trusted Source
Global cases: 28,652 casesTrusted Source across 10 countries
Global deaths: 11,325 deaths; death rate was about 50 percentTrusted Source
Transmission: spread through bodily fluids (blood, sweat, feces) and close contact; most contagious toward end of disease
Most affected groups: 20 percentTrusted Source of all cases occurred in children
Treatment available: none; supportive care was provided, including IV fluids and oral rehydration
Vaccines available: none
End of outbreak: March 2016


Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Key symptoms: cough, fever, shortness of breath; 80 percent of cases are mild
First detection: December 2019 in Wuhan, China
Global cases to date: Over 127,000 cases
Global deaths to date: Over 4,700; the global death rate is estimated at 3.4 percentTrusted Source, but certain areas are seeing a death rate of just 0.4 percent
Transmission: spreads through respiratory droplets along with feces and other bodily secretions; each person passes it to 2.2 others which will likely fall as containment and quarantine efforts increase
Most affected groups: adults over 65 with underlying health conditions; children seem to be spared and are experiencing milder symptoms (in China, children account for just 2.4 percent of cases)
Treatments available: none; supportive care is provided, pain relievers and fever reducers can alleviate symptoms, and antibiotics can help treat secondary bacterial pneumonia and antivirals used with other viruses are being administered to help with recovery
Vaccines available: none yet; a vaccine will likely be ready in about one year
Global death of covid-19 is 4,700..? Where did you get that fake statistics from OP? shocked
Re: Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks by Henryjr(m): 8:18pm On May 22, 2020
fairfora:
Global death of covid-19 is 4,700..? Where did you get that fake statistics from OP? shocked

He simply didn't update the information from wherever he copied it from. Obviously, this was written when the cases were at that level.

Quite informative though
Re: Here’s How COVID-19 Compares To Past Outbreaks by GAZZUZZ(m): 9:14pm On May 22, 2020
quite obvious we didn't have enough info before shutting down the country.

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