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Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad - Career (2) - Nairaland

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Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Stormyharper(m): 3:53pm On May 03
Dikaveli:
Breaking news baba ijesha is dead
,?
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Yankee101: 3:56pm On May 03
Nigerians have succeeded abroad in all facets.

Do you abeg, no let anyone influence you

Of course pick good qualities and drop harmful ones

1 Like

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by thebosstrevor1: 3:56pm On May 03
HellAnus:


Just kidding bro. No hard feeling

Sure grin
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by abbey621(m): 3:57pm On May 03
I can tell you from my own experience and from observing many of my Nigerian friends in mmanagement position over here, 90% of what you wrote is plain fallacy. For a Nigerian to reach management position over here it takes a combination of education, experience and confidence. Majority of what you wrote can be summarized as lack of confidence which is very counter productive.

I keep telling people here on Nairaland, why must we generalize? How many Nigerians in management abroad do you know? I'm not talking about management at KFC or Burger King, I'm talking about real management with office and everything. In fact, I would say the biggest hinderance to Nigerians abroad in terms of making it into management is our loud tone of voice and often our ability to take things too seriously.

7 Likes 2 Shares

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by swtdrms(m): 4:05pm On May 03
Cooldiipo:
You are spot on and it will take serious effort to grind one out of all these to be frank. Our people has refuse to treat culture as a revolving door that it is and are stuck with the archaic mentality that is not productivity driven! powerbank for laptop, over ten hours guaranteed and twenty hours possible. Increase your productivity and work when you like. Don't get mistaken for a Yahoo boy because of your generator noise

First of all, always put a paragraph between the content that pertain to the topic of discussion and your product marketing.

Second, how much is the laptop power bank
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Kinkinatus(m): 4:08pm On May 03
Been working in a managerial position with staff (Asians, white, black, 9ja also) in UK since 2002. If you behave professionally, follow the Company policies especially on attendance, equality and diversity, HR policies, act on feedback when it is given, deliver on your agreed goals and work on your self development, you should be fine. All that 9ja cunni cunni moves, leave it in 9ja. If not, you could cause so much unneccessary pain and grief to yourself and your career.

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Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by professore(m): 4:17pm On May 03
Okay
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Coldie(m): 4:20pm On May 03
Majority of those things are done by yoruba people.

In an official environment if u see 5 Nigerians and 3 are yorubas instead of them to acknowledge that there are other people they would just be speaking yoruba through out like other people don't exist.

Igbos try at least to be out going with others but yorubas and hausas anywhere they like forminf clique.

2 Likes

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by merits(m): 4:21pm On May 03
Dikaveli:
Breaking news baba ijesha is dead

Why are you saying this? for God sake.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by neyohh: 4:23pm On May 03
The only way to survive in the corporate west is to be a perpetual ass licker and great at your job.


Black/ white office politics can be dangerous, you won't know who is dishing out the damages and why.

Just keeping it 100 percent!

1 Like

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by BigBashiru: 4:25pm On May 03
TaminaliaCatapa:
Shortcomings of the “Nigerian culture” in official places of management abroad



Oh forgot the main one - lack of respect for time
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 4:34pm On May 03
daewoorazer:


Calm down, I am a manager in Canada....so calm and learn

that doesn't mean anything lol. You're using your own bizarre nigerian-mentality to assume non-Nigerians are bothered by people knowing more than one language or having a culture (which in Nigeria, especially cities, is a mark of stupidity lol)

You've either never been outside of Nigeria or speak in a fake 'American Accent' where you do that frog voice thing and think nobody knows you have an accent. But no non-nigerian is going to advise another person to not speak their language lol. If you're 'a manager' you have jeopardized your 'career' making this post...but you're not and you don't know what I'm talking about because you're in Nigeria where that ignorance is normal. Very foolish thing for someone in 'Canada' to say. Especially Canada lol
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 4:38pm On May 03
abbey621:
I can tell you from my own experience and from observing many of my Nigerian friends in mmanagement position over here, 90% of what you wrote is plain fallacy. For a Nigerian to reach management position over here it takes a combination of education, experience and confidence. Majority of what you wrote can be summarized as lack of confidence which is very counter productive.

I keep telling people here on Nairaland, why must we generalize? How many Nigerians in management abroad do you know? I'm not talking about management at KFC or Burger King, I'm talking about real management with office and everything. In fact, I would say the biggest hinderance to Nigerians abroad in terms of making it into management is our loud tone of voice and often our ability to take things too seriously.

You also don't know what you're talking about because Nigerians are overrepresented in Management in the US and Canada lol.
What do any of you gain pretending you don't live in Nigeria? Just be honest with yourselves. I'm reading these posts and laughing.

Only someone that's in Nigeria would say something as pathetic as 'real management with office and everything' LOL. Nobody that has left Nigeria for more than 6 months would say the nonsense you're saying LOL. A KFC/BK manager is a salaried position your slowpoke lol dumb.

In what inch of Canadian or US soil have Nigerians ever struggled to become managers in? Show me where you're getting this problem from.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 4:44pm On May 03
Justice3000:
I'm gonna keep this... I'm off abroad soon.

don't listen to these fools lol. Be you, be yourself, be confidently Nigerian. People will be very interested in learning about you and your culture/country and will ask you to teach them words in your language daily.

The people typing this haven't reach murtala muhammed talkless of Benin Republic. Someone is here saying they're a manager in Canada and you shouldn't speak your language, meanwhile if you speak a language other than English in that same Canada they will pay you 15% more for having that skill. You will learn that it is only in Nigeria that people see having an identity as a disease.

2 Likes

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by meobizy(f): 4:46pm On May 03
I wanted to add poor time management until I realized that we quickly adapt to keeping on time just like we get used to harsh environments. A regular Nigerian who’ll appear for an event two hours late is prone to stay diligently in queues and attend appointments a few minutes early when living abroad. Survival is in our nature — imbibing the needed skills is crucial to achieving it.

I swear, I love this new font. It’s a case of something you never knew you needed until you saw it.

1 Like

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Cousin9999: 5:01pm On May 03
Nonsense.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Durklil: 5:03pm On May 03
Oh
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Kebbiprince: 5:04pm On May 03
Coldie:
Majority of those things are done by yoruba people.

In an official environment if u see 5 Nigerians and 3 are yorubas instead of them to acknowledge that there are other people they would just be speaking yoruba through out like other people don't exist.

Igbos try at least to be out going with others but yorubas and hausas anywhere they like forminf clique.
Exactly, when I served. We were 8 groups of me hausa/Fulani with one igbo. The rest were yorubas. Even when we were on official assignment they kept speaking Yoruba and did not care if I and the igbo guy existed. Very childish and annoying

1 Like

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Hogan17: 5:12pm On May 03
whytediamond:


No be everything dem dey use play
Leave am , na small boy
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by abbey621(m): 5:13pm On May 03
Ofodirinwa:


You also don't know what you're talking about because Nigerians are overrepresented in Management in the US and Canada lol.
What do any of you gain pretending you don't live in Nigeria? Just be honest with yourselves. I'm reading these posts and laughing.

Only someone that's in Nigeria would say something as pathetic as 'real management with office and everything' LOL. Nobody that has left Nigeria for more than 6 months would say the nonsense you're saying LOL. A KFC/BK manager is a salaried position your slowpoke lol dumb.

In what inch of Canadian or US soil have Nigerians ever struggled to become managers in? Show me where you're getting this problem from.

You're so ignorant, is it about being salaried or getting paid respectable figures. Average KFC manager makes less than $50,000 a year before taxes, if you believe this is a salary worthy of a manager then you're even more daft than I imagined! My mother was a KFC manager for 4 years before going back to school and venturing into healthcare, my father Burger King manager for 6 years before completing his masters and working for the US government. The rubbish you wrote above is for your own pocket. Nigerians are overrepresented in management in US and Canada....did you pull this statistic out of your ass? Nigerians are not even in the top 5 in terms of representation. We have White American males, white American females, black American male, Asians, black American females, Latinos and then you can start talking about Nigerian or Northern African countries/Arabs.

As a seasoned I.T. auditor who has found himself in management, I can count the number of Nigerians that are managers in the I.T field, even sectors like healthcare where we expect Nigerians to dominate because of its allure, we often find that Nigerians shy away from management and are content with just being nurses. From Grady hospital to Emory and Northside here in Atlanta, the number of Nigerians that are managers or supervisors represents less than 10%, if this is what you call overrepresentation then you're high on cheap pepsi!

5 Likes

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by optimusprime2(m): 5:36pm On May 03
TaminaliaCatapa:
Shortcomings of the “Nigerian culture” in official places of management abroad



Plus the sense of entitlement...
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 5:38pm On May 03
abbey621:


You're so ignorant, is it about being salaried or getting paid respectable figures. Average KFC manager makes less than $50,000 a year before taxes, if you believe this is a salary worthy of a manager then you're even more daft than I imagined! My mother was a KFC manager for 4 years before going back to school and venturing into healthcare, my father Burger King manager for 6 years before completing his masters and working for the US government. The rubbish you wrote above is for your own pocket. Nigerians are overrepresented in management in US and Canada....did you pull this statistic out of your ass? Nigerians are not even in the top 5 in terms of representation. We have White American males, white American females, black American male, Asians, black American females, Latinos and then you can start talking about Nigerian or Northern African countries/Arabs.

As a seasoned I.T. auditor who has found himself in management, I can count the number of Nigerians that are managers in the I.T field, even sectors like healthcare where we expect Nigerians to dominate because of its allure, we often find that Nigerians shy away from management and are content with just being nurses. From Grady hospital to Emory and Northside here in Atlanta, the number of Nigerians that are managers or supervisors represents less than 10%, if this is what you call overrepresentation then you're high on cheap pepsi!

You grew up in a household with 2 adults. Both of them were managers. But in your brain me saying Nigerians are overrepresented in Management is something hard for you to count. Both of them then ended up getting their doctorate or masters but because you relish in self-pity you're in a thread that addresses such people as losers and not real managers trying to prove how your father and mother were fools.

But since you're into IT audit, here's some data for your dense skull.

Average base salary
Data source tooltip for average base salary. Data source tooltip for average base salary.
18.1k salaries reported, updated at April 29, 2021
$56,856
per year
The average salary for a manager is $56,856 per year in the United States and $10,000 cash bonus per year.
https://www.indeed.com/career/manager/salaries

the average fastfood manager makes the median for managers across the country. But you people are in Nigeria using for father's data to say 'my father was a manager' LOL











10 Nigerians who are big shots in Silicon Valley

TITILOLA OLUDIMUAPRIL 20, 2017

There is an unofficial saying that Nigerians are everywhere on the face of the earth, doing big things. Did you know there are Nigerians pulling major weight in major tech companies in Silicon Valley like Apple? Most people didn’t.

We took out time to make a list of Nigerians that have ingrained themselves in the Silicon Valley tech circuit through their positions.

Remi Dada


Remi is the head of B2C product marketing of YouTube, Sub-Saharan Africa; he was formerly the head of B2C product Marketing, Nigeria at Google.

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He holds two degrees; a BSc in Architectural studies, and an MBA from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and Howard University respectively.

He studied Architecture at the University of Illinois and studied Marketing three years after at Howard. He has over 10 years of experience in designing and constructing innovative and collaborative tech office spaces.

Mojolaoluwa Aderemi-Makinde
Silicon Valley big shot; Mojolaoluwa

Mojolaoluwa is a business strategy and development professional with over 11 years experience across various sectors including technology, finance, retail, media among others. She is currently the Industry Manager- eCommerce (Travel and Retail) and Finance at Google.

She has a background in Computer science from the University of Lagos and holds a Masters degree in Management and Strategic Information Systems from the University of Bath, United Kingdom.

Ime Archibong
Silicon Valley big shot, Ime Archibong speaking at the Facebook Fireside Chat in Lagos

Ime Archibong is the Director, Strategic partnerships at Facebook. He leads a team focused on accelerating Facebook’s product strategy by establishing partnerships, driving products integrations and unlocking new business opportunities with leading companies across multiple industries and sectors.

He and his team have worked on everything related to Facebook including the Messenger app. He played a significant role in Mark Zuckerberg’s visit to Nigeria.

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Prior to joining Facebook, he was an Advanced Technology Business development Professional at IBM for a little over 3 years.

He is an alumnus of YALE University where he studied computer Science and electrical engineering and holds an MBA from the Stanford University of Business.

Nnamdi Abraham-Igwe


Nnamdi has been the Emerging markets Lead at Google since 2012.
He started his career at Google in 2004 where he was a network engineer and has since climbed up the ladder to hold a lead position.

Nnamdi holds a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. He took a project management course at Stanford University and then proceeded to get an M.S in Telecommunications (minor computer science) from the California State University, East-bay.

Chukwuemeka Afigbo
Emeka speaking on Facebook free basics in Lagos

Chukwuemeka Afigbo formerly worked at Google before joining Facebook. He worked at Google until 2015 before being replaced by Aniedi Udo-Obong. Emeka is the manager, Strategy Product Partnership [/b]focused on helping developers in Africa and the Middle-East succeed by leveraging Facebook’s platforms.

He was also instrumental in Mark Zuckerberg’s visit to Nigeria. He’s an alumnus of Command Secondary School, Abakaliki and the University of Nigeria, Nsukka where he studied Electronic Engineering.

Bayodele Olutu
Bayodele Olotu

[b]Bayodele is the Product Manager- Chrome and Android at Google
, North America. Prior to joining Google, Bayodele was the design, planning and optimization lead at Ericsson. He also previously worked at Celtel and Zain Nigeria and also at Huawei Technologies Nigeria.

He studied mechanical engineering at Obafemi Awolowo University. He holds an MBA, business administration and project management from the Manchester Business School.

Morin Oluwole
Silicon Valley big shot, Morin Oluwole

Morin is the head of Luxury at Facebook and Instagram [/b]where she manages Facebook and Instagram’s global luxury client partnerships. Prior to landing her current role, she was the business lead to the VP Global Marketing Solutions.

She holds a BA and MA from Stanford University in Human Biology and sociology and an MA in Management from Columbia University.

[b]Morin speaks 5 languages and has lived in three different continents.
She joined Facebook when it was a small startup of 200 people.

Bunmi Banjo
Bunmi Banjo at Google office
Photo Credit: Memeburn
Bunmi is the head of Brand, Reputation and Digital skills, sub-Saharan Africa at Google where she leads a team that drives the company’s effort to equip millions of SMEs with Digital skills for jobs and business growth.

She started her career at Google as the Head of SMB marketing, Google Nigeria. She is an alumnus of the University of Toronto where she majored in Psychology and Biology.

Yinka Somotun
Yinka Somotun is the Senior Director, Global Procurement at Oracle. He leads a worldwide team of contract professionals in five international locations responsible for negotiating and managing Oracle’s procurement contracts.

He has a background in Law; a Bachelor’s degree and a Masters degree in Law from the Lagos State University and the University of Lagos respectively. He had previously played legal roles in Texaco and Chevron.

Olaoluwa Okelola


Olaoluwa Okelola is one of the few Nigerian-born software engineers at Facebook. Before he joined Facebook in 2007, he worked as an engineering intern at Google from May 2006 until August 2006 and prior to that, he was an intern at Microsoft.

Olaoluwa is from Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. Having completed his secondary education at the International School Ibadan, Okelola proceeded to Avi-Cenna International School and Howard University, Washington DC, to complete his secondary and university education respectively. He holds a degree in Systems and Computer science.

Olaoluwa has a good relationship with Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

The presence of these remarkable Nigerians calling shots in big tech companies in Silicon Valley is evidence that Nigerians are one smartest set of people on planet earth. However, Nigerians can do more to become more by chasing their dreams and aspiring to attain remarkable heights.

Do you know any other Nigerian who plays a lead role in Silicon Valley? Please let us know in the comments section below and we will update this list accordingly.

https://techpoint.africa/2017/04/20/nigerian-big-shots-silicon-valley/



IT Auditor ^Explain that.

1 Like

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Icumsa45(m): 5:39pm On May 03
Kebbiprince:

Exactly, when I served. We were 8 groups of me hausa/Fulani with one igbo. The rest were yorubas. Even when we were on official assignment they kept speaking Yoruba and did not care if I and the igbo guy existed. Very childish and annoying

That's Yoruba for you, even the most enlightened of them carries that behaviour.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 5:39pm On May 03
Nigerian managers are 10% In Atlanta while the Nigerian population in Atlanta isn't even 1% of the city's total population. ST UPID fool.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Kebbiprince: 5:40pm On May 03
Icumsa45:


That's Yoruba for you, even the most enlightened of them carries that behaviour.
And they think it cool, that's too bad
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Ofodirinwa: 5:43pm On May 03
Icumsa45:


That's Yoruba for you, even the most enlightened of them carries that behaviour.

Yoruba people are very intelligent. They know they have a language and a father. You not knowing you have a language is not their problem. Two Yoruba ppl will be speaking to each other in the language they both prefer, but you are faulting them because you can't listen into a conversation you were not invited to.

How delusional does someone have to be to think that someone else will stop speaking their language because you entered a room. Who invited you?

2 Likes

Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Icumsa45(m): 5:48pm On May 03
Ofodirinwa:


Yoruba people are very intelligent. They know they have a language and a father. You not knowing you have a language is not their problem. Two Yoruba ppl will be speaking to each other in the language they both prefer, but you are faulting them because you can't listen into a conversation you were not invited to.

How delusional does someone have to be to think that someone else will stop speaking their language because you entered a room. Who invited you?

In the midst of other ethnic groups? You didn't follow the mention of the previous commenter before me.
Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by Tinykoko: 5:52pm On May 03
Thank you so much for this



TaminaliaCatapa:
Shortcomings of the “Nigerian culture” in official places of management abroad


Re: Shortcomings Of The “Nigerian Culture” In Official Places Of Management Abroad by wandeay: 5:54pm On May 03
But indians working in foreign lands exhibit more of these qualities and everyone is still cool with it, they hardly speak English with each other, and they befriend theirselves over other nationalities,

Anyway, these are good and useful tips.

2 Likes

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