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Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) - Travel (61) - Nairaland

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Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by TheGuyFromHR: 10:53am On Oct 23
justwise:


I think the opposite is the case

Make una no dey give this line of discussion oxygen.
Sunak is planning some more gifts for us on 27 October, interest rates are going up, rumours of Plan B winter lockdowns are circulating, there are better things to talk about than whether or not those living in warm 32 degree weather in a sadly disintegrating nation are better off than those living in late autumn in the British Isles, apparently spending all their time cleaning elderly people's backsides and spending the bulk of their earnings therefrom on heating their tiny houses.

4 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by TheGuyFromHR: 11:05am On Oct 23
dubaiprince:


Infact both parties are somehow right. Our reasons for coming to the UK are different. Some are here planning never to return to Nigeria while some have plans to return. So buying or building a house in Nigeria is not out of place for someone planning to return. You have easier access to good healthcare, education for kids, saner environment here obviously but discrimination based on race is something I feel will take centuries to go away.

Racial discrimination will always be there.
But that apart, while inserting oneself into any society comes with various degrees of challenges (it is obviously easier the younger one is, and depending on the stage of life (easier to make friends while in university as opposed to at a workplace, for instance)), re-inserting oneself into a society is also not easy.

After spending a few years in a developed country, the transition to Nigeria will be as difficult as some are finding the transition to the UK to be. No matter how you've maintained relationships, many will have moved on, others will become transactional, and so forth. My belief is that wherever you are is home.

5 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by descarado: 11:45am On Oct 23
LagosismyHome:


The irony of it, in old age when you move back to Nigeria you will still feel like a stranger. Just ask those who have gone down this path.

I know 3 family friends who relocated back to Nigeria in their late 60s early 70 years after yearssssss in America. Today all 3 have quietly returned back to America . They just couldn't adjust or feel at home due to years living in an organised society. Visit and living because two completely different experience, they now visit but don't live . Even the visit has stopped as the level of insecurity rises
You will only feel like a stranger if you had cut off friends and families because you are abroad.
Else, it's life as usual.
Or you have been travelling but kept an aloof image that those at home are beneath you.
Your kids if you have any are probably abroad and doing well.
In my place, na you go tire. Activities every week. From burial to church, naming ceremony, marriage, house warming not forgetting village meeting and so many.How will you ever be alone. That's the best way to retire please.
Nothing like having people around you in old age. Not this thing I see here.

4 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by descarado: 11:56am On Oct 23
Uzomarrr123:
I will just drop this advise for anyone looking to migrate newly

Whatever you do , whatever the hustle is

Always remember home , remember to build home !
Some of you have family members depending on you when you migrate, don’t listen to this folks here who have failed in life and some can’t return home for common holidays

Always remember home after a good number of years hustling !!!

E get why

I believe you jare!
Life starts from 50. And the best place to enjoy that is with families and friends. Not abroad and alone. When the kids must have left, who do you have?
Your oyibo friends?
Or your cats and dogs.

If I hear.

My opinion anyway

3 Likes 1 Share

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by LagosismyHome(f): 11:56am On Oct 23
TheGuyFromHR:


Make una no dey give this line of discussion oxygen.
Sunak is planning some more gifts for us on 27 October, interest rates are going up, rumours of Plan B lockdowns are circulating, there are better things to talk about than whether or not those living in warm 32 degree weather in a sadly disintegrating nation are better off than those living in late autumn in the British Isles, apparently spending all their time cleaning backsides and spending the bulk of their earnings on heating their houses.

Which gift on October 27.... i behind on news
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by descarado: 11:59am On Oct 23
Lexusgs430:




Been long I came across his posts....... smiley
When I read trump share skyrocketed, I remembered you.

Remember your people o in paradise grin
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Specialtee: 12:12pm On Oct 23
Hello all.

First of all I want to say thank you to all who keep posting and providing those of us who have newly migrated or planning to with so much valuable information. This thread, especially part 1 has been a treasure trove for me and my family. God bless you all.

Secondly, I will like to contribute this important information, as my own way of helping out as well. It comes in form of a warning, Please do not send your BRP to the DVLA at this time in the name of applying for a provisional licence, if you have any intentions of travelling or using it to apply for work within at least 6 months. There are terrible delays at this time, people are having to cancel weddings, not able to visit sick parents, not being able to get a job or work etc because the DVLA is holding their BRP or passport and there is no way to contact them to send it back earlier. A quick Twitter search will show you hundreds of people who are crying out of frustration with only bots giving them standard replies. My advice is not to apply for your provisional licence yet, enter bus, train and uber and postpone your application till you don't need the BRP for at least 6 months to even a full year! Also when you do send it, pay extra to send it by special delivery signed for mail ( to and fro) so that if anything happens along the way, you have evidence it was sent to them and also that you included a signed for, self-addressed envelope to them to send it back.
I also applied and my BRP has been with them since August, I am hoping and praying they return it soon by God's grace because the matter has now become one that requires God's intervention.

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Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by dubaiprince: 12:41pm On Oct 23
TheGuyFromHR:


Racial discrimination will always be there.
But that apart, while inserting oneself into any society comes with various degrees of challenges (it is obviously easier the younger one is, and depending on the stage of life (easier to make friends while in university as opposed to at a workplace, for instance)), re-inserting oneself into a society is also not easy.

After spending a few years in a developed country, the transition to Nigeria will be as difficult as some are finding the transition to the UK to be. No matter how you've maintained relationships, many will have moved on, others will become transactional, and so forth. My belief is that wherever you are is home.

Your opinion that wherever you are is home is respected. My opinion is that wherever you are and not treated as equals is not home. You can't collect immigration health surcharge and tax me equally as a citizen then when it comes to benefits, you give me limited options under the guise of NRPFs. Don't let me even go to what happens in the workplace. Even with British passport, I can't call it home. Even well known blacks like Rashford, Saka, Ian Wright, Alex Scott etc have their stories on what they had to fight growing up and they are still fighting it. We all know we are not welcome (let's not hide it) but unfortunately, their economy can't work without migrants. My opinion.

2 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by dubaiprince: 12:47pm On Oct 23
descarado:

You will only feel like a stranger if you had cut off friends and families because you are abroad.
Else, it's life as usual.
Or you have been travelling but kept an aloof image that those at home are beneath you.
Your kids if you have any are probably abroad and doing well.
In my place, na you go tire. Activities every week. From burial to church, naming ceremony, marriage, house warming not forgetting village meeting and so many.How will you ever be alone. That's the best way to retire please.
Nothing like having people around you in old age. Not this thing I see here.

You captured it well. Don't shred all your relationships. You enter UK, small time you change number, start to block people up and down (even those that don't disturb you). I don't have is I don't have. If you don't let them know what you are facing, how will they know?
Of course when you go back, there will be nobody to approach.

1 Like

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by mizGene(f): 1:01pm On Oct 23
Specialtee:
Hello all.

First of all I want to say thank you to all who keep posting and providing those of us who have newly migrated or planning to with so much valuable information. This thread, especially part 1 has been a treasure trove for me and my family. God bless you all.

Secondly, I will like to contribute this important information, as my own way of helping out as well. It comes in form of a warning, Please do not send your BRP to the DVLA at this time in the name of applying for a provisional licence, if you have any intentions of travelling or using it to apply for work within at least 6 months. There are terrible delays at this time, people are having to cancel weddings, not able to visit sick parents, not being able to get a job or work etc because the DVLA is holding their BRP or passport and there is no way to contact them to send it back earlier. A quick Twitter search will show you hundreds of people who are crying out of frustration with only bots giving them standard replies. My advice is not to apply for your provisional licence yet, enter bus, train and uber and postpone your application till you don't need the BRP for at least 6 months to even a full year! Also when you do send it, pay extra to send it by special delivery signed for mail ( to and fro) so that if anything happens along the way, you have evidence it was sent to them and also that you included a signed for, self-addressed envelope to them to send it back.
I also applied and my BRP has been with them since August, I am hoping and praying they return it soon by God's grace because the matter has now become one that requires God's intervention.


Thanks for this update.
Is it in all cases the require one to send the BRP? The idea alone puts me off...quite surprising they don't have a more efficient process for validating applicants identity.
I was hoping to apply for one early November and hopefully get the prov license before month end but now I will have to really reassess my options...

1 Like

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by oluayebenz: 1:05pm On Oct 23
dubaiprince:


You captured it well. Don't shred all your relationships. You enter UK, small time you change number, start to block people up and down (even those that don't disturb you). I don't have is I don't have. If you don't let them know what you are facing, how will they know?
Of course when you go back, there will be nobody to approach.

Hmmmm cry
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by TheGuyFromHR: 1:12pm On Oct 23
dubaiprince:


Your opinion that wherever you are is home is respected. My opinion is that wherever you are and not treated as equals is not home. You can't collect immigration health surcharge and tax me equally as a citizen then when it comes to benefits, you give me limited options under the guise of NRPFs. Don't let me even go to what happens in the workplace. Even with British passport, I can't call it home. Even well known blacks like Rashford, Saka, Ian Wright, Alex Scott etc have their stories on what they had to fight growing up and they are still fighting it. We all know we are not welcome (let's not hide it) but unfortunately, their economy can't work without migrants. My opinion.

If you come at it from that angle, can you really say that everyone has equal opportunities in Nigeria?
We know that's not true, without needing to go into details.

Secondly, when I referred to a feeling of being at home, I was referring to the fact that I feel just as comfortable taking an early morning walk in my area for instance as I did on the streets of my estate back in Lagos. I am of course well aware that some of the people out walking their dogs who nod or smile to you when you meet may have other things in mind when they see a tall, slightly overweight black man walking towards them at a brisk pace, and I am well aware that jogging/brisk walking while black is not a recommended activity in some parts of the world, but I feel comfortable in my environment. Back in Lagos, there are also several things I could not do, places to which I could not go or hours at which I could not be out and about.

Nigeria is the place where I grew up, spent my formative years and so forth, and that counts for something in terms of shaping one's experiences (even though I've long since jettisoned the greater part of the Nigerian groupthink, most of which isn't in any way useful), but were I to return there in 20 years' time, it would initially feel more alien than the UK is now because it is no longer my home.

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Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by TheGuyFromHR: 1:15pm On Oct 23
LagosismyHome:


Which gift on October 27.... i behind on news

Autumn Budget.
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by amanze54: 1:23pm On Oct 23
descarado:


I believe you jare!
Life starts from 50. And the best place to enjoy that is with families and friends. Not abroad and alone. When the kids must have left, who do you have?
Your oyibo friends?
Or your cats and dogs.

If I hear.

My opinion anyway

Men I look at that your line "from 50" then I concur and I can't foresee warm blooded man like me will leave African communal life style that suit old age and old bone to cold lonely and and segregated society. You are right, keep your Nigerian friends and family contact active, cos finally communal life style is the best way to retire than the grief I see at the faces of this white elders in care homes

2 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by dubaiprince: 2:19pm On Oct 23
TheGuyFromHR:


If you come at it from that angle, can you really say that everyone has equal opportunities in Nigeria?
We know that's not true, without needing to go into details.

Secondly, when I referred to a feeling of being at home, I was referring to the fact that I feel just as comfortable taking an early morning walk in my area as I did on the streets of my estate back in Lagos. I am of course well aware that some of the people out walking their dogs who nod or smile to you when you meet may have other things in mind when they see a tall, slightly overweight black man walking towards them at a brisk pace, and I am well aware that jogging/brisk walking while black is not a recommended activity in some parts of the world, but I feel comfortable in my environment. Back in Lagos, there are also several things I could not do, places to which I could not go or hours at which I could not be out and about.

Nigeria is the place where I grew up, spent my formative years and so forth, and that counts for something in terms of shaping one's experiences (even though I've long since jettisoned the greater part of the Nigerian groupthink, most of which isn't in any way useful), but were I to return there in 20 years' time, it would initially feel more alien than the UK is now because it is no longer my home.
We have different opinions on where we see as home and I respect that. We have our lives differently planned and trust in those plans. so whichever route we take, we are all not wrong.

2 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by TheGuyFromHR: 2:26pm On Oct 23
dubaiprince:

We have different opinions on where we see as home and I respect that. We have our lives differently planned and trust in those plans. so whichever route we take, we are all not wrong.

Good man.

1 Like

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by mrcodebreaker: 3:23pm On Oct 23
Specialtee:
Hello all.

First of all I want to say thank you to all who keep posting and providing those of us who have newly migrated or planning to with so much valuable information. This thread, especially part 1 has been a treasure trove for me and my family. God bless you all.

Secondly, I will like to contribute this important information, as my own way of helping out as well. It comes in form of a warning, Please do not send your BRP to the DVLA at this time in the name of applying for a provisional licence, if you have any intentions of travelling or using it to apply for work within at least 6 months. There are terrible delays at this time, people are having to cancel weddings, not able to visit sick parents, not being able to get a job or work etc because the DVLA is holding their BRP or passport and there is no way to contact them to send it back earlier. A quick Twitter search will show you hundreds of people who are crying out of frustration with only bots giving them standard replies. My advice is not to apply for your provisional licence yet, enter bus, train and uber and postpone your application till you don't need the BRP for at least 6 months to even a full year! Also when you do send it, pay extra to send it by special delivery signed for mail ( to and fro) so that if anything happens along the way, you have evidence it was sent to them and also that you included a signed for, self-addressed envelope to them to send it back.
I also applied and my BRP has been with them since August, I am hoping and praying they return it soon by God's grace because the matter has now become one that requires God's intervention.


Omo this is facts sha. I am still waiting for mine applied in July. Estimate was 2 months but lets see. I have a trip for January so I dey hope dey e come out oh.
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Newwoman: 5:11pm On Oct 23
Travelling after 1month of receiving visa have any disadvantage because it was clearly stated in the passport that we have 90days to enter uk. should have gone earlier but we are still trying to get a suitable accomodation for family of 4. Spouse has already gone. And secondly trying to get accomodation in edinburgh but it has been on rejection to the other. Please i need an advice on this thanks.@justwise
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Newwoman: 5:13pm On Oct 23
Please i need advice on the above. Thanks so much
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by deept(m): 7:41pm On Oct 23
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Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Lexusgs430: 9:45pm On Oct 23
It's a convenience to drive a vehicle legally.... PLEASE don't drink and drive....... If caught by the police, your punishment would just be with the court system..........

If you cause any form of accident, your insurance would be deemed null and void (with liability to only the 3rd party) & the insurance company would chase you for compensation......... It can get really costly...... wink

1 Like

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by DisGuy: 10:48pm On Oct 23
Newwoman:
Travelling after 1month of receiving visa have any disadvantage because it was clearly stated in the passport that we have 90days to enter uk. should have gone earlier but we are still trying to get a suitable accomodation for family of 4. Spouse has already gone. And secondly trying to get accomodation in edinburgh but it has been on rejection to the other. Please i need an advice on this thanks.@justwise

You might want to rephrase your question. Or you were replying to someone?

1 Like

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by mdeeokoye: 10:54pm On Oct 23
IamE:
Dear @Katherine98
@Aphrodite007
@jtech17
@mdeeokoye
@fatima04
And all tech enthusiast willing to start or further their career in UK..
Aside Nursing, Tech seem to be the next big thing and most of us who have a little knowledge about it do not know how to fix ourself into thé system..

Please if you are viewing this and you already in the UK tech space, your contribution is needed too.

Can someone please create a thread for this purpose. my account is quite new and may not be able to create a thread.
Thanks @justwise

Been a while, so from my experience so far. Having previous tech experience puts you in a commanding position for interviews and co and also an opportunity to show what you can do. Recently I have had a good number of friends come in from Naija from the company I work, they have seen that Nigerian devs are really good and our tech eco system is doing really well but you have to know your stuff. I see Nigeria becoming the new India in terms of tech in no distant time so if you have good experience you will get in easily here or if you get in here with a dependant visa you can actually get that sponsorship job really fast. Blending in might take a while depending on how fast you can but the base work is the same, same coding and all but a bit more organised here and they take their time here a lot. For those that have no experience, I would advise you do lots of practise, if you have friends that are developers in Naija, link up with them, get side Gigs even if it’s for free, do it get the experience package it very well on your Cv, even if after school you do not get a sponsored job after school start with any dev job you see, get the experience and then chase the sponsorship jobs, recruiters here are very keen about having Uk experience as well because they have that feeling you have had some form of validation to an extent.
I have found out that not so many firms sponsor yeah, the ones that do not sponsor do very interesting stuffs and also use some amazing tech stack. Does not matter which language you do, there are lots of openings for different stack just know one very well and you would be fine. I’m my opinion in tech they need you more that you need them always bear that in mind and have that mind set in your interview, it worked for me �!
Lastly getting the job is kinda the easy part, keeping the job is kinda more difficult cos you have to be on top of your game and also have to go the extra mile!

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Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by DisGuy: 11:00pm On Oct 23
Lexusgs430:
It's a convenience to drive a vehicle legally.... PLEASE don't drink and drive....... If caught by the police, your punishment would just be with the court system..........

If you cause any form of accident, your insurance would be deemed null and void (with liability to only the 3rd party) & the insurance company would chase you for compensation......... It can get really costly...... wink

So true. Driving when not properly licensed or insured is one of the fastest way to get into the bad books.

It can be so tempting to think one will get away with things like getting inadequate insurance, driving without proper license
An acquaintance who's not sorted out his papers got caught drink driving last week- using his brothers license!
Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Lexusgs430: 11:10pm On Oct 23
DisGuy:


So true. Driving when not properly licensed or insured is one of the fastest way to get into the bad books.

It can be so tempting to think one will get away with things like getting inadequate insurance, driving without proper license
An acquaintance who's not sorted out his papers got caught drink driving last week- using his brothers license!



Plenty wàhálà for dead bodi.........

- No licence
- No insurance
- Drink driving
- Documentation issue
- Impersonation

His brother should expect an interview from the police........

He would have to pay to release vehicle from car pound...... What an expensive error.......... (Let's assume)....... grin

Even prayers, fasting and vigil, would not save him....... wink

2 Likes

Re: Living In The Uk-life Of An Immigrant (part 2) by Ticha: 3:30am On Oct 24
Uzomarrr123:

Show me what asset you own in that UK
After staying 10yrs there

Sister just rest in Jesus name !

Those that are wise and smart understand my point !!!

As for me and my family
We are covered anywhere , be it home or abroad.

As at last count - 7 properties in the UK and in New Zealand (4/3). In the process of buying a flat for my brother in Glasgow so he can get out of rented. We were both head hunted from the UK to NZ as well. In 16 months time, we also qualify for NZ citizenship then we'll return home (to the UK) so my children can attend secondary school. Their futures and ours is sorted financially and otherwise.

I am agree I am not wise. Thank Bleep for that if the wiseness means wasting money building in Nigeria when I don't live there and have zero plans of ever living there.

PS - 17th year out of Nigeria and I have to say I have done very very well for myself and my siblings. All sorted, educated at my expense (2 in the UK) and happily living our best lives.

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