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20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa - Travel - Nairaland

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UK Plans To Deport 29,000 Nigerians / How To Re-apply For A British Visa / Are you 18-30 years old? No British Visa for You! (2) (3) (4)

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20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by letmein: 6:10pm On Aug 06, 2007
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by swiftycool(m): 4:58pm On Aug 07, 2007
The writer has no plight from what ive read. He is a british citizen
My deductions are simply that most Nigerians who applied for Visas are denied because of any of these

1. They were not well prepared b4 application submission
2. Were not genuine in their visa application intentions
3. Did not meet up the required standards of the Uk Visa they applied 4

it only cautions u to be well prepared to do what u have to do if u are genuine, unfortunately so many Nigerians
are fraudulent sorry to say, so the'll keep getting denied.
The high commision i believe is really doing a honestly good job without fear or favour
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by Tats(m): 5:36pm On Aug 07, 2007
@ Poster,
I don't see the correlation between the topic and the link you have posted. I am aware that the Uk High Commissioner to Nigeria said that 20,000 out of 28,000 Nigerians were denied students visa to the UK: http://www.thisdayonline.com/nview.php?id=85458 .

swiftycool:

The writer has no plight from what ive read. He is a british citizen
My deductions are simply that most Nigerians who applied for Visas are denied because of any of these

1. They were not well prepared before application submission
2. Were not genuine in their visa application intentions
3. Did not meet up the required standards of the Uk Visa they applied 4

it only cautions u to be well prepared to do what u have to do if u are genuine, unfortunately so many Nigerians
are fraudulent sorry to say, so the'll keep getting denied.
The high commision i believe is really doing a honestly good job without fear or favour

You can be as cautious as you like and also very genuine and still get refused a UK visa for some reasons that no one can understand. This does happen daily in Nigeria. Cases of fraud are very high, so results in many genuine people getting rejected for visas. This has made me to believe that when one applies for a visa, there is the tendecy to be deemed guilty of fraud unless you can prove otherwise and therefore be given a visa. I bet you know that every visa applicant to the US is considered an intending immigrant by the embassy, thus, you have to prove otherwise to be given a visa.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by simplyme3(f): 5:38pm On Aug 07, 2007
beause most of them could not fill the application forms correctly - according to the british high commissioner.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by opensource(m): 9:57pm On Aug 07, 2007
the truth is the uk embassy are looking for a reason not to give you a visa whenever you apply.

so just do what you can , seek legal advice from professional immigration lawyers

If you need one I can point one good lawyer to you for advice on filling in

and better still once you do biometrics makes sure you appeal oooooooooooo even if they refuse you , when no right of appeal is given protest ooooo

if you cant do that try and reactify issued by written to the Uk embassy it helps
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by simplyme3(f): 10:12pm On Aug 07, 2007
of course - u want them to open their borders to everyone? imagine 20,000 students from each country all over the world getting to study in the UK in one year.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by swiftycool(m): 10:25am On Aug 08, 2007
simply_me:

of course - u want them to open their borders to everyone? imagine 20,000 students from each country all over the world getting to study in the UK in one year.

Mind u the larger the number of genuine and focused students they are able to admit into their country , the better for them
They have come to realise the fact that the immigration of more graduates into the country has been one of the major economic boosters for them and many other nations are begining to realise this and follow suit.
Why do u think they are giving all international Uk graduates a year to get employement in the uk after studies and probably get a permanent job which will aid in nation building. Check out scotland offering graduates 2 year work without needing a permit after graduation.

While Naija communities are kidnapping expatriates, discouraging investors, giving jobs by ethnicity/ connections and fighting their brothers over natural resources to be used for selfish gains, The developed counties have seen the stuff in our professional graduates and are actually braindraining the nation of its finest, because our nation seems not to know their worth.
So i tell you if they can discover even 30,000 authentic Students applying for study visas they are willing to give them all entry clearances.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by omoge(f): 2:36pm On Aug 08, 2007
some of them lie on their paper work too. I'm very sure lying is one thing that cause problem. Because someone lied on their paperwork, the oyinbos will take it out on others.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by hobgoblin1(m): 12:43pm On Aug 10, 2007
swiftycool:


They have come to realise the fact that the immigration of more graduates into the country has been one of the major economic boosters for them and many other nations are begining to realise this and follow suit.
Why do u think they are giving all international Uk graduates a year to get employement in the uk after studies and probably get a permanent job which will aid in nation building. Check out scotland offering graduates 2 year work without needing a permit after graduation.

While Naija communities are kidnapping expatriates, discouraging investors, giving jobs by ethnicity/ connections and fighting their brothers over natural resources to be used for selfish gains, The developed counties have seen the stuff in our professional graduates and are actually braindraining the nation of its finest, because our nation seems not to know their worth.
So i tell you if they can discover even 30,000 authentic Students applying for study visas they are willing to give them all entry clearances.

I feel u jare, we are dividing and they are uniting.

@simply_me
u better go with the those who appreciate your worth.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by rafcrown(m): 8:55am On Jun 09, 2012
The basic truth is that people from Non EU countries are beng targeted as a way of controlling immigration.This is an open secret.Its Non Eu country factor.Universities in UK are losing £Bs annually.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by Flick3(f): 10:22am On Jun 09, 2012
Abeg forget countries like uk jo, and mak U go apply for other countires cos their are many ways to travel people don't know abt
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by Lexusgs430: 5:40am On Jun 10, 2012
Flick3: Abeg forget countries like uk jo, and mak U go apply for other countires cos their are many ways to travel people don't know abt

Like taking a walk through the dessert!!!
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by rafcrown(m): 10:20am On Jun 10, 2012
International students vital to Norfolk regional economy
THIS POST WAS WRITTEN BY CHARLES KELLY ON JUNE 6, 2012
POSTED UNDER: NEWS
Another UK university is urging the government to rethink restrictions on international students who, they claim provide 6 British jobs for every 10 students.
The University of East Anglia has warned that government plans to include international students in a new cap on immigration will have a “terrible” effect on the Norfolk and Norwich economy.
Edward Acton, vice-chancellor of the UEA, last night revealed its 2011 cohort of non-EU students would be worth £35.6m over the duration of their courses, and more than £20m just in their first year, in tuition fees alone.
He said a future reduction in numbers would leave the Norwich university a “much-diminished enterprise” and warned the impact on the city and county as a whole would also be significant.
His comments follow a letter sent to the prime minister by Universities UK, and signed by about 70 university leaders, detailing the economic impact the government’s crackdown could have.
Westminster has pledged to cut net immigration in the UK to less than 100,000 and that policy currently includes international students from non-EU countries.
With the latest immigration figures last month revealed to be a stubbornly-high 250,000, critics fear the only way to reach the target will be to reduce the number of foreign students granted visas.
10 international students were believed to support six jobs in the economy
Prof Acton said the UEA currently had 2,900 non-British students with 2,300 of them coming from outside the European Union. About 1,700 non-EU students joined the university in 2011 alone.
The vice-chancellor said every 10 international students were believed to support six jobs in the economy through their attendance at university and use of services in the community including cinemas, shops, bars and “everything you can think of in Norwich”.
“Cut that and we have a terrible effect on the Norfolk and Norwich economy,” he said. “For local businesses this is a really desirable source of demand. Hobbling it as the Home Office is doing is deeply bad news for the local, regional and national economy.
“At a time when our balance of payments is terrible and employment is ghastly, we will be hobbling what’s become a very, very important source of income.”
Students are one of the biggest sources of migrants in the UK and university leaders say foreign students are already being deterred as it becomes more and more difficult to secure visas.
Prof Acton’s concerns have been echoed by both the political and business worlds.
This week, Norfolk and Suffolk’s business community added its voice to the growing calls to discount international students from net immigration figures.
New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) wrote a letter to David Cameron stressing the need to “capitalise” on the growing trend to study abroad.
In the letter, New Anglia’s chairman Andy Wood said the plans would undermine local enterprise partnerships’ efforts to “remove impediments to the UK’s economic growth.”
He added: “Neither the country nor our university cities can afford the damage that current policy is doing to our position and once-welcoming image in key markets.”
South Norfolk MP Richard Bacon said he also strongly supported the UEA vice-chancellor’s position and knew many of his Westminster colleagues shared his view.
The politician said international students were “valuable economic assets”, not only in terms of the money generated through tuition fees but also that spent while living over here – and in the current economic climate the country could not afford to damage that.
Mr Bacon said very few international students went on to live and work long term in the UK and the government had to make sure it was concentrating on the right issue.
“They study, they get on a plane, and they go home,” he said. “I’ve not problem with the Home Office decision to break the link between study and full time work in the long term and the other thing I would strongly support is the crackdown on dodgy foreign language colleges. That is an absolute out and out abuse. I don’t think there’s anybody who wouldn’t support that. But that’s different from legitimate supporters of high quality educational institutions.”
Immigration minister Damian Green insisted universities would not be hit by the government’s immigration policy. He said: “There is no limit on the number of genuine students who can come to the UK and our reforms are not stopping them. But we are determined to prevent the abuse of student visas as part of our plans to get net migration down to the tens of thousands.” Source: Norwich Evening News.
UK Universities have finally woken up to the damaging consequences of changes to the Tier 4 immigration Rules.
Many will now face downsizing or even closure, as hundreds of thousands of what Mr Green describes as ’genuine’ students choose to spend their money in Australia, Canada and other countries which are seen to welcome international students.
However, most of the government’s restrictions were aimed not at universities, but at students who wanted to attend a cheaper private college to take a diploma or degree course.
Since July 2010 any international students applying for a visa to a private college are no longer able to work part time in the UK.
As private colleges have closed or had licences withdrawn, thousands of students have been given just 60 days to find another college or get out of the country.
One student who consulted Immigration Adviser Cynthia Barker, of Bison UK, had lost money at two institutions which had closed down. When he tried to join a university he was rejected because he could not obtain a progress report.
Cynthia said:
‘His life was been made a misery by the maze of rules which seemed to trip him up at every turn.
‘First he couldn’t find a university with a start date for his course, which was not easy with a 60 day sentence hanging over his head.
‘Then he had to go back to his parents for more money to change his visa as, unlike the previous rules which would have allowed a change of provider under the same student visa, he had to apply for and qualify a whole new visa.
‘He eventually found a university which would ‘accept’ him, but by this time he did not have the required funds for the exact amount of time in his account in order to apply and pay for another visa.’
Bison UK are now helping him with an appeal be allowed to study in the UK, but the whole experience has severely dented his confidence in the British system.
Thousands of students are suffering due to constant negative student policy changes which are driving fee paying students, and the British jobs they support, away.
Re: 20,000 Nigerians Denied British Visa by jayculbaba: 3:13am On Jun 16, 2012
rafcrown: International students vital to Norfolk regional economy
THIS POST WAS WRITTEN BY CHARLES KELLY ON JUNE 6, 2012
POSTED UNDER: NEWS
Another UK university is urging the government to rethink restrictions on international students who, they claim provide 6 British jobs for every 10 students.
The University of East Anglia has warned that government plans to include international students in a new cap on immigration will have a “terrible” effect on the Norfolk and Norwich economy.
Edward Acton, vice-chancellor of the UEA, last night revealed its 2011 cohort of non-EU students would be worth £35.6m over the duration of their courses, and more than £20m just in their first year, in tuition fees alone.
He said a future reduction in numbers would leave the Norwich university a “much-diminished enterprise” and warned the impact on the city and county as a whole would also be significant.
His comments follow a letter sent to the prime minister by Universities UK, and signed by about 70 university leaders, detailing the economic impact the government’s crackdown could have.
Westminster has pledged to cut net immigration in the UK to less than 100,000 and that policy currently includes international students from non-EU countries.
With the latest immigration figures last month revealed to be a stubbornly-high 250,000, critics fear the only way to reach the target will be to reduce the number of foreign students granted visas.
10 international students were believed to support six jobs in the economy
Prof Acton said the UEA currently had 2,900 non-British students with 2,300 of them coming from outside the European Union. About 1,700 non-EU students joined the university in 2011 alone.
The vice-chancellor said every 10 international students were believed to support six jobs in the economy through their attendance at university and use of services in the community including cinemas, shops, bars and “everything you can think of in Norwich”.
“Cut that and we have a terrible effect on the Norfolk and Norwich economy,” he said. “For local businesses this is a really desirable source of demand. Hobbling it as the Home Office is doing is deeply bad news for the local, regional and national economy.
“At a time when our balance of payments is terrible and employment is ghastly, we will be hobbling what’s become a very, very important source of income.”
Students are one of the biggest sources of migrants in the UK and university leaders say foreign students are already being deterred as it becomes more and more difficult to secure visas.
Prof Acton’s concerns have been echoed by both the political and business worlds.
This week, Norfolk and Suffolk’s business community added its voice to the growing calls to discount international students from net immigration figures.
New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) wrote a letter to David Cameron stressing the need to “capitalise” on the growing trend to study abroad.
In the letter, New Anglia’s chairman Andy Wood said the plans would undermine local enterprise partnerships’ efforts to “remove impediments to the UK’s economic growth.”
He added: “Neither the country nor our university cities can afford the damage that current policy is doing to our position and once-welcoming image in key markets.”
South Norfolk MP Richard Bacon said he also strongly supported the UEA vice-chancellor’s position and knew many of his Westminster colleagues shared his view.
The politician said international students were “valuable economic assets”, not only in terms of the money generated through tuition fees but also that spent while living over here – and in the current economic climate the country could not afford to damage that.
Mr Bacon said very few international students went on to live and work long term in the UK and the government had to make sure it was concentrating on the right issue.
“They study, they get on a plane, and they go home,” he said. “I’ve not problem with the Home Office decision to break the link between study and full time work in the long term and the other thing I would strongly support is the crackdown on dodgy foreign language colleges. That is an absolute out and out abuse. I don’t think there’s anybody who wouldn’t support that. But that’s different from legitimate supporters of high quality educational institutions.”
Immigration minister Damian Green insisted universities would not be hit by the government’s immigration policy. He said: “There is no limit on the number of genuine students who can come to the UK and our reforms are not stopping them. But we are determined to prevent the abuse of student visas as part of our plans to get net migration down to the tens of thousands.” Source: Norwich Evening News.
UK Universities have finally woken up to the damaging consequences of changes to the Tier 4 immigration Rules.
Many will now face downsizing or even closure, as hundreds of thousands of what Mr Green describes as ’genuine’ students choose to spend their money in Australia, Canada and other countries which are seen to welcome international students.
However, most of the government’s restrictions were aimed not at universities, but at students who wanted to attend a cheaper private college to take a diploma or degree course.
Since July 2010 any international students applying for a visa to a private college are no longer able to work part time in the UK.
As private colleges have closed or had licences withdrawn, thousands of students have been given just 60 days to find another college or get out of the country.
One student who consulted Immigration Adviser Cynthia Barker, of Bison UK, had lost money at two institutions which had closed down. When he tried to join a university he was rejected because he could not obtain a progress report.
Cynthia said:
‘His life was been made a misery by the maze of rules which seemed to trip him up at every turn.
‘First he couldn’t find a university with a start date for his course, which was not easy with a 60 day sentence hanging over his head.
‘Then he had to go back to his parents for more money to change his visa as, unlike the previous rules which would have allowed a change of provider under the same student visa, he had to apply for and qualify a whole new visa.
‘He eventually found a university which would ‘accept’ him, but by this time he did not have the required funds for the exact amount of time in his account in order to apply and pay for another visa.’
Bison UK are now helping him with an appeal be allowed to study in the UK, but the whole experience has severely dented his confidence in the British system.
Thousands of students are suffering due to constant negative student policy changes which are driving fee paying students, and the British jobs they support, away.

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