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Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry - Culture (3) - Nairaland

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Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by Nobody: 7:45pm On Nov 08, 2011
E-Engineer:

@op, [b]are u celebrating half castes [/b]or are u trying to enlighten us

well not bad, i thought ramsey noah's father was egyptian, are u sure its iranian

She's not. She's trying to rebut the ediotic threads that Nigerian men put up about Nigerian men not extending their horizon beyond NIgerian men.
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by anonymous6(f): 2:42pm On Nov 09, 2011
Inked_Nerd:


I hope you know when you use the term 'half caste', its no different from you a black person being called a nigger or calling someone saying mulatto, quadroon, and octoroon which by the way are also derogatory. The word was coined to refer to individuals not fitting into the ranking system and considered undeserving of any social acceptability--traditionally less ostracised but more ridiculed than outcasts. In the past, people of color often times were generally seen as not being human beings so the terms in its origination is meant to degrade an individual. It's almost as though you [when I say 'you', I don't mean specifically mean you E-Engineer] are saying that someone is a dilluted form of the human species.


You have a point but in Nigeria they just use the word half-caste to identify mixed race people, not as a insult. The word Mulatto is still used as a common term in Latin America, even by governments there and in Africa(except south Africa, and a few other southern african countries it is used) the word half-caste is used. Most Nigerians are used to saying it & I doubt it will ever stop. Most of the people who bring up the problem with it are in the western world but in Africa the only meaning they connected to it is mixed race so I don't think it is fair to criticize him for using the word.

I would also like to add that the word Nigger really had it's birth and genesis from America when the white masters were degrading african slaves & their african americans slave descendants, now the word has spread around the world(negatively & for popularity in the entertainment business), however it's usage is more north american, particularly America but african americans use the word against each other as if it is nothing and by african american rappers, and etc. I have seen african americans & Hispanic americans, especially the youths use the word to greet each other as if it's a positive word, black american entertainers use it in their music & black Hollywood music and etc:

[b]"Imagine if Mr. Rogers began his show off with the song, won’t you be mine, won’t you be mine, please won’t you be my nigga. He would have been the recipient of a severe backlash that would have had his show off the air in 24 days rather than the 24 years he was on the air in the US (1967-2001). This is partly because the word “nigga” in American vernacular, that goes back several centuries, was originally used exclusively in a derogatory sense to denigrate, psychologically subjugate, and to mentally scar the individual identities of blacks in the United States by white aggressors. It was a word that the European settlers used to dehumanize, demoralize and weaken the spirits of defenseless Africans and their slave families. The word continued to be publicly used after Emancipation, and during the civil rights period in the 20th Century it was popular with Southern Democrats. George Wallace publicly used it as he campaigned on the segregation ticket when he was elected governor of Alabama in 1966.

It was not until the 1970s that whites publicly diminished the use of that word as the political will of the country was telling us that the word “nigga” was unacceptable in any context. Nearly 370 years later the word became unacceptable and offensive in public speech. A successful effort to remove that word from our imaginations took form, but did it?

The word “nigga” not only has never left our vocabulary, but it is becoming increasingly popular in recent years. In addition, other racial denigrations have become popular in mainstream speech. For example, Shaquille O’Neal, the center for the Los Angeles Lakers said, “tell Yao Ming, ching, chinh chong” when asked about playing against him in an upcoming game. Although many from the Asian community were offended, Shaquille O’Neal did not suffer a serious backlash and his endorsement deals were never in jeopardy (Nestle, Burger King, Swatch Watch, Radio Shack, etc). The word “chink” has appeared on T-shirts, and “white boys” has replaced the 1970s word “honky” for white Americans. Maxine Waters, black Congresswoman and Donna Brazile, black Democratic Strategists have both publicly used the word “white boys” with absolutely zero backlash. Waters once said, “I don’t see them slamming young white boys on the hoods of police cars” when referring to a questionable use of force by an Inglewood Police officer in Los Angeles County during 2002.

But for non-blacks using the word “nigga,” one can expect a certain level of backlash regardless of the contexts. Ironically though, elements of our popular culture are bombarded with the word “nigga” everyday and there is no doubt that the word has not escaped the vocabulary of blacks, young and old, from the inner cities to the ivory towers, among the underclass and elite. In what context do blacks use this word today, and do their justifications of the use of the word create a double standard where non-blacks are vilified when the word “slips” from their mouths? How and why has the word become socially acceptable among blacks? Brandi Polk, undergraduate at California State University, Los Angeles said, “blacks should be the only ones that can say that word,” and this view, extremely popular among blacks, has created for others a double standard. If the word is highly distasteful and unpleasant, some believe (mostly non-blacks); the word should not be used by anyone, especially in public settings. Let’s examine the popular uses of the word “nigga” among blacks today."[/b]
http://www.streetgangs.com/race/wont-you-please-be-my-nigga-double

[b]"DETROIT (AP/Black Press staff reports) -There was no mourning at this funeral. Hundreds of onlookers cheered Monday afternoon as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People put to rest a long-standing expression of racism by holding a public burial for the N-word during its annual convention.

In perhaps the most memorable civic gesture since former NAACP president Bruce S. Gordon (l) managed to get President George Bush to visit their 90th annual meeting in Washington, DC last year, delegates from across the country marched from downtown Detroit's Cobo Center to Hart Plaza to say a long over due goodbye to the N word. Two Percheron horses pulled a pine box adorned with a bouquet of fake black roses and a black ribbon printed with a derivation of the word.

The coffin is to be placed at historically black Detroit Memorial Park Cemetery and will have a headstone.

"Today we're not just burying the N-word, we're taking it out of our spirit," said Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. "We gather burying all the things that go with the N-word. We have to bury the 'pimps' and the 'hos' that go with it."

He continued: "Die N-word, and we don't want to see you 'round here no more."

The N-word has been used as a slur against blacks for more than a century. It remains a symbol of racism, but also is used by blacks when referring to other blacks, especially in comedy routines and rap and hip-hop music.

"This was the greatest child that racism ever birthed," the Rev. Otis Moss III, assistant pastor at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, said in his eulogy.

Public discussion on the word's use increased last year following a tirade by "Seinfeld" actor Michael Richards, who used it repeatedly during a Los Angeles comedy routine and later issued a public apology.

The issue about racially insensitive remarks heated up earlier this year after talk show host Don Imus described black members of the Rutgers University women's basketball team as "nappy-headed hos" on April 4.

Natalie Gilmore, Black Press Magazine Summer Editorial InternHip Hop community find continued use for "N" word

During an interview with Grammy-award winning rapper, Rhymefest, he said, "Rappers are the new civil rights leaders."

He went on to say that he will attempt to rid himself of the use the "N" word, but it may resurface because he "make[s] music for people who use the word in their lives."

At the BET Awards nominees day in May, rappers 50 Cents and T.I. fought back against journalists who questioned their usage of the word. In the podcast that runs on BlackPressRadio.com entitled, "Celebrities fight back," T.I. said, "There people like this in the word and as long as this fact exists I think rappers deserve the right to talk about it."

During the BET Awards a few weeks ago, many celebrities defied the traditionally leaders and used the word in their Q&A sessions with the press, even though they knew they were being recorded. Charlie Murphy, host of the embattled BET program, "Hot Ghetto Mess," said he has no issue with the word and plans to continue to use it.

"It's not going anywhere," said Murphy, who gain famed on the Dave Chapelle Show which was criticized for its heavy humor toward jokes about Black people.

Black leaders, including the Revs. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, have challenged the entertainment industry and the American public to stop using the N-word and other racial slurs. Minister and rap icon Kurtis Blow called for people, especially young people, to stop buying music by artists who use offensive language.

"They wouldn't make rap songs if you didn't buy them. Stop supporting the stuff you don't want to hear," said Blow, who is credited with helping create the genre's popularity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. I've never used the N-word and I've recorded over 150 rap songs. I've never used profanity. It's possible you can use hip-hop and not offend anyone."

The Rev. Wendell Anthony, pastor of Detroit's Fellowship Chapel and member of the NAACP national board of directors, said the efforts were not an attack on young people or hip-hop.

He said they were a commentary on the culture the genre has produced.

"We're not thugs. We're not gangstas," Anthony told the crowd. "All of us has been guilty of this word. It's upon all of us to now kill this word."

The NAACP has been criticized with being out of touch with young blacks, but Tiffany Tilley said the organization is moving in the right direction.

"This is a great start," the 30-year-old Detroit resident said. "We need to continue to change the mentality of our people. It may take a generation, but it's definitely the movement we have to take."

The NAACP held a symbolic funeral in Detroit in 1944 for Jim Crow, the systematic, mostly Southern practice of discrimination against and segregation of blacks from the end of post-Civil War Reconstruction into the mid-20th century. While odds are very slim that the "N" word will never leave American culture, it was nice to see the funeral if for no other reason than what it symbolized."[/b]
http://www.blackpress.org/naacp.htm

1 Like

Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by anonymous6(f): 4:06pm On Nov 09, 2011
Inked_Nerd:


I hope you know when you use the term 'half caste', its no different from you a black person being called a nigger or calling someone saying mulatto, quadroon, and octoroon which by the way are also derogatory. The word was coined to refer to individuals not fitting into the ranking system and considered undeserving of any social acceptability--traditionally less ostracised but more ridiculed than outcasts. In the past, people of color often times were generally seen as not being human beings so the terms in its origination is meant to degrade an individual. It's almost as though you [when I say 'you', I don't mean specifically mean you E-Engineer] are saying that someone is a dilluted form of the human species.


You have a point but in Nigeria they just use the word half-caste to identify mixed race people, not as a insult. The word Mulatto is still used as a common term in Latin America, even by governments there and in Africa(except south Africa, and a few other southern african countries it is used) the word half-caste is used. Majority of Nigerians in Nigeria & abroad to a extent are used to saying it & I doubt it will ever stop. Most of the people who bring up a problem about it are in the western world but in Nigeria it isn't a problem because the only meaning they connected to it is mixed race so I don't think it is fair to criticize him for using the word.
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpia1: 12:27am On Nov 08, 2012
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpia1: 12:29am On Nov 08, 2012


dont know if the last two pictures are nigerian women however.
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by Nobody: 12:08pm On Nov 08, 2012
Tomy sotomayor was sooo right about some of us black women. Smh.
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by itstpia8: 3:48pm On Dec 16, 2014
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Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by folameme(f): 8:04am On Dec 20, 2014
This is beautiful,my grandma was so fair during her life time she was always referred to as"oyinbo"even my dad,and he passed it down to we his children. I guess in their ancestral line,there's gonna be some sort of white man's blood in it lol,the pictures are beautiful
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by itstpia100: 6:11am On Dec 22, 2014
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Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiadotcom: 6:10am On Jun 01, 2015
folameme:
This is beautiful.ma grandma was soooo fair during her life time she was always referred to as*oyinbo*,even my dad,and he passed it down to we he's children. I guess in their ancestral line,there's gonna be some sort of white man's blood in it lol


Its possible , although sometimes its hard to tell, since lightness could either be naturally african or genetically passed down from a foreign ancestor
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiadotcom: 7:19pm On Jun 24, 2015

1 Like

Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiander: 11:08pm On Jul 09, 2015
Isa Messiah, model with possible maternal Nigerian ancestry (Ethiopian on her father's side).


Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiander: 11:20pm On Jul 30, 2015
tpia5:
cameroonian father, nigerian mother



of sweet mother fame.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mecNrIaWOA
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiander: 11:21pm On Jul 30, 2015
Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by itstpia8: 8:46pm On Apr 23, 2016
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Re: Mixed Nigerians with maternal Nigerian ancestry by tpiah01: 11:14pm On May 09, 2016
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