Welcome, Guest: Register On Nairaland / LOGIN! / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 3,167,843 members, 7,869,615 topics. Date: Monday, 24 June 2024 at 05:38 AM

Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? - Culture - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Culture / Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? (178 Views)

Christmas In Nigerian Languages: Cultural Diversity / How Many Nigerian Languages Can You Speak? / Languages Spoken In Each Of The 36 States In Nigeria (2) (3) (4)

(1) (Reply) (Go Down)

Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by Yashita: 8:57am On Apr 06
I want to carry out a survey on these Nigerian languages:

1. Tiv
2. Ijaw
3. Edo
4. Fulfulde/fulani
5. Kanuri
6. Ibibio
7. Hausa
8. Igbo
9. Yoruba

1. Are these languages still taught in schools in their various locations?

2. Are the indigenes/originators of these languages still keen on passing their culture/language to their younger generations?

3. If yes to question 2, are people willing to attend free classes to learn their historical languages?

4. Are people willingly to pay little amounts to send their children to their language classes?

5. Any economic value of learning these languages?


Please help me answer these questionnaire, it’s a survey/research I’m working on.

MOD, please help me to push to limelight. Thank you 🙏

1 Like

Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by TUANKU(m): 9:08am On Apr 06
Here as an observer. cool
Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by Dancebreaker: 10:29am On Apr 06
Yes, they are ALL still important.

Some are taught in some areas but funding is poor.

Economically, these languages are still used in rural areas (where over 50% of Nigerians still live) for communication and commerce.

Yes, ready to learn more for free or even pay.

Personally, certainly for Edo/Benin (and other Edoid languages like Urhobo/Isoko, Esan, Afemai, etc) Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo.

BUT colonial mentality and elitist behaviour of educated parents make them believe that English is superior. It is not.

Seun, Myndd and mods, FT please. This is about our culture.

2 Likes

Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by OKAIGHELE: 11:32am On Apr 06
Indeed, these were our nine national languages of colonial era and early independent rule.

1. I know Edo which i come from is still taught in schools. In fact for Edo , It is even taught in all public and majority of private schools up to junior secondary school level.

2. Albeit, before now, some of our elites may not want their children to learn Edo first because they don’t want their children to have issues with pronunciation when speaking English, but many a times, they never get to learn it at all. But of late, our elders, Oba who sense a dearth of the language have started speaking for Edos to take learning the language very personal.

As a result of that consciousness and awakening, there has been positive movement towards that effect as scholars who are educated in Edo language has taken to YouTube as a means to teach Edo people and youth who were born in Nigeria/those who were born outside who seem not to have a full grasp of the language how to communicate in it effectively .


3. Since It is basically free as it is on YouTube, i have seen many positive reactions from those Binis who were born abroad and are willing to learn the language. How did i know this? Some of the comments one YouTube below these videos attest to that fact. You see people thanking the organizers of such programs in the comments, talking of how they migrated when they were just two With their parents but they are getting better etc


4. I don’t know of any language classes in Benin city, except the fact that Edo language is taught in all public schools and majority of private schools in Benin city from primary one to jss3. And also large number of Edo language lesson videos on YouTube.

5. There are economic advantages in learning all languages no matter how small it may seem. We are great farmers, and in our villages, many old people especially women still do not have proficiency when speaking pidgin and certainly would sell for a cheaper price for one speaking in her language than another speaking in pidgin.


I lost my maternal grandmother last year, she was 84 years old, she couldn’t communicate in English or pidgin even though her husband read English and literature at the university of Lagos. Some of us who stayed with her compulsorily had to learn Edo in our generation in order to communicate with her,


She sold food provisions while she was alive, garri, yam etc as they were great farmers too. Whenever a non Edo is around to buy her products, she will call on any of us to interpret what the person is saying for her. Overtime some of her consistent customers had to learn Edo as a result so they would be able to communicate with her effectively . She certainly would have sold her products at a cheaper price for someone that she would not need an interpreter to communicate to.

1 Like

Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by brainycaleb(m): 11:53am On Apr 06
How many times do we need to call the mods to take a topic like this to FP Isn't it worthy enough

1 Like

Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by Yashita: 12:13pm On Apr 06
Dancebreaker:
Yes, they are ALL still important.

Some are thought in some areas but funding is poor.

Economically, these languages are still used in rural areas (where over 50% of Nigerians still live) for communication and commerce.

Yes, ready to learn more for free or even pay.

Personally, certainly for Edo/Benin (and other Edoid languages like Urhobo/Isoko, Esan, Afemai, etc) Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo.

BUT colonial mentality and elitist behaviour of educated parents make them believe that English is superior. It is not.

Seun, Myndd and mods, FT please. This is about our culture.

Some positive feedback. Thank you for this
Re: Are These Nigerian Languages Still Important To Learn? by Yashita: 12:13pm On Apr 06
OKAIGHELE:
Indeed, these were our nine national languages of colonial era and early independent rule.

1. I know Edo which i come from is still taught in schools. In fact for Edo , It is even taught in all public and majority of private schools up to junior secondary school level.

2. Albeit, before now, some of our elites may not want their children to learn Edo first because they don’t want their children to have issues with pronunciation when speaking English, but many a times, they never get to learn it at all. But of late, our elders, Oba who sense a dearth of the language have started speaking for Edos to take learning the language very personal.

As a result of that consciousness and awakening, there has been positive movement towards that effect as scholars who are educated in Edo language has taken to YouTube as a means to teach Edo people and youth who were born in Nigeria/those who were born outside who seem not to have a full grasp of the language how to communicate in it effectively .


3. Since It is basically free as it is on YouTube, i have seen many positive reactions from those Binis who were born abroad and are willing to learn the language. How did i know this? Some of the comments one YouTube below these videos attest to that fact. You see people thanking the organizers of such programs in the comments, talking of how they migrated when they were just two With their parents but they are getting better etc


4. I don’t know of any language classes in Benin city, except the fact that Edo language is taught in all public schools and majority of private schools in Benin city from primary one to jss3. And also large number of Edo language lesson videos on YouTube.

5. There are economic advantages in learning all languages no matter how small it may seem. We are great farmers, and in our villages, many old people especially women still do not have proficiency when speaking pidgin and certainly would sell for a cheaper price for one speaking in her language than another speaking in pidgin.


I lost my maternal grandmother last year, she was 84 years old, she couldn’t communicate in English or pidgin even though her husband read English and literature at the university of Lagos. Some of us who stayed with her compulsorily had to learn Edo in our generation in order to communicate with her,


She sold food provisions while she was alive, garri, yam etc as they were great farmers too. Whenever a non Edo is around to buy her products, she will call on any of us to interpret what the person is saying for her. Overtime some of her consistent customers had to learn Edo as a result so they would be able to communicate with her effectively . She certainly would have sold her products at a cheaper price for someone that she would not need an interpreter to communicate to.

Another positive one. Thank you so much.

MODs please move to front page

(1) (Reply)

Impactful One Year In Office: OUF President Celebrates Gov. Umo Eno / Accelerationism / Globe Chamber Of Commerce And Industry

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2024 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 24
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.