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Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 - Sports (78) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Entertainment / Sports / Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 (154769 Views)

Nigeria Vs Mali: FIFA U-17 World Cup Final (2 - 0) On 8th November, 2015 / Nigeria Vs Germany (0 - 1): FIFA U-20 Women WC Final On 8th August 2014 / Sweden Vs Nigeria: FIFA U-17 WC Semi-Final (0 - 3) On 5th November 2013 (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by imperiouxx(m): 5:36am On Nov 09, 2013
toshmann:

bad guy. . . .Nepa sef na wa o . . . grin dem no even gree person watch our boys as dem defeat our opponents

Wahali, those nepa guys deserve beating.
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by khalids: 7:10am On Nov 09, 2013
To all those saying the boys are overage , please see the links below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkctVBAO9IM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWVHA1yfGac

You will understand

1 Like

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by solomon111(m): 8:41am On Nov 09, 2013
Ammanda :
yea like I said, our journey to dubai is not without success. *taps David Mark and shutters, 'these boy hav really done us proud let's just give them the full package inside the brown envelope as against our plan to share the it into two, I think they deserve all'*
Giving them too much money will see their career nose-dive.
They're too young for too much comfort.
It's the desire to be comfortable that will help them take their career serious.
Messi was not rich when he was 17.

2 Likes

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by oyeleyemaureen(m): 8:57am On Nov 09, 2013
Gr8 guys

1 Like

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Nobody: 10:55am On Nov 09, 2013
solomon111: Giving them too much money will see their career nose-dive.
They're too young for too much comfort.
It's the desire to be comfortable that will help them take their career serious.
Messi was not rich when he was 17.

On point!
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by lastpage: 11:26am On Nov 09, 2013
solomon111: Giving them too much money will see their career nose-dive.
They're too young for too much comfort.
It's the desire to be comfortable that will help them take their career serious.
Messi was not rich when he was 17.

We dont have to give them raw cash now?
This is Nigeria where NOTHING IS CERTAIN .... except POVERTY! shocked shocked

*How about investing the money in shares of viable companies like NEPA! Jesuzz!! Did l just say that? Well, point l am making is that if we put the money into companies that are "unavoidable" (Food production, Health Services, Power generation, Insurance, e.t.c), the money can only multiply and it will be there for them in the future.

*Again, they have parents and siblings, how about putting part of the money in an education endowment fund (that would pay their tuition throughput University/Technical college), if they decide to study in future?

*How about a House for their family, at least Mama Landlord will leave them alone, for life?

Too many of our "good footballers" have lived the later stage of their life in poverty and penury.

Well, if the Boyz dont have it, there is someone in that NFF/Minister who has already perfected his/her plans on looting the money.

No be today o! wink wink Na wetin bird chop na im d dey carry fly!

Lastpage!

BTW: The Messi you guys are using as a reference point, lives in an environment where even if you dont have work and your parents are dead and you dont know a single person on earth, Govt will still give you small money to survive. Na die you go die, for Nigeria, dem no send you!
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by saga202: 12:51pm On Nov 09, 2013
Fynestboi: Ok no wahala let go there. Up Nigeria
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by toshmann(m): 1:56pm On Nov 09, 2013
khalids: To all those saying the boys are overage , please see the links below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkctVBAO9IM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWVHA1yfGac

You will understand.

Truly Truly I understand shocked
Damn!!! shocked

Make I see anyone wey talk say these kids no deserve this victory angry
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Shewen1(f): 4:00pm On Nov 09, 2013
duni04:
Isn't it rather ironic that African countries keep winning these youth competitions over and over again and yet have never been able to replicate these victories at the senior level? Same reason why these players fizzle into obscurity shortly after winning these competitions. Its cos they're old! Let's not all forget what Partizan belgrade said about Taribo west's age. The main reason for these youth competitions is to raise and identify future talent and not the trophies. Its a concept Africans are yet to understand. So while the rest of the world continues using these competitions to build future teams that will be successful later on, we can continue winning them with old men that will surely fizzle out in a few years.
sir, it's poor management by the NFF and poor decision- making by the players that ruin their careers. Even talented players frm other teams do fizzle out if they are not properly managed. Remember Sinama Pongolle and Le Tallec of France, 2001.
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by PatrykUtulu(m): 8:13pm On Nov 09, 2013
FIFA: POLICY OF STRATEGIC AMBIGUITY ON FOOTBALL PLAYERS' ON-FIELD DISPLAY OF RELIGIOSITY!©
(a.k.a., Pragmatism and Paradox of Profit, Pox and Purity)©
--Attorney Patryk Utulu

As a hugely successful, multi-billion dollar business enterprise, which so far, has successfully created the perception that it is owned-by-the-world, and therefore “ownerless,” FIFA has a billion reasons to be tolerant of football players’ ostentatious on-field display of religious piety. After all, FIFA is aware that even in our rapidly secularizing world, majority of football followers are people who are either religiously-observant, or at least, tolerant of religion. Despite what you hear a majority of people on earth don’t hate religion. People don’t hate religion per se. People just hate other peoples’ religion.

CONTEXT tends to bring better clarity so a brief re-introduction of FIFA is useful. The Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded on May 21, 1904 to govern national football associations. Despite marketing itself like one, FIFA is not a philanthropic organization. It is, first and always, a profit-oriented enterprise with powerful financial stakeholders [mostly European nations in collaboration with multinational corporations in Asia, Europe and North America] who make millions of dollars in yearly profits by marketing products, fame and physique. Far removed from the patriotic chants of cheering global audiences – and operating from corporate boardrooms and V.I.P. boxes – these financial stakeholders have two primary objectives: (1) ensure that FIFA uses every technological tool (public relations and mass media) to expand football’s fan base from slums to suburbs, and from every house on every hill to every village in every valley; (2) provide corporate and public relations infrastructure to enable FIFA achieve objective #1 without attracting competition and/or controversies.

But the world is an irritable polygamy of cultures, politics, religions and regional idiosyncrasies!

PRAGMATISM is great but not magical! By successfully marketing the perception that it is owned-by-the-world FIFA also created expectation in billions of people that their biases will have central consideration in its decisions. Starting in the 1960’s FIFA adopted a 3-prong global strategy: (1) Grow the game by developing pockets of indigenous talents around the world, (2) Maintain fan loyalty in existing football markets by participating in token but visible social programs, and (3) Avoid controversies by avoiding issues of cultures/politics/religion. Indeed, so faithful was FIFA to its policy of avoidance (worried about alienating ticket-buying fans in Europe) that it didn’t begin to seriously confront overt racism against players by other players, and rich unruly fan clubs, until just very recently.

21ST CENTURY ISSUES! Like all global actors, FIFA has had to deal with a new world filled with new possibilities and petty insecurities. Unfortunately, bureaucracies are creatures of habit so FIFA tried to solve modern problems with outdated solutions. For example, when developing nations demanded (i) Stronger representation in FIFA’s Executive Committee, (ii) Greater financial transparency, (iii) More slots at World Cup Finals, (iv) Profit-Sharing, (v) Compensation for houses demolished to build world cup stadiums, (vi) Affordable tickets for low wealth nations, (vii) Display of religious/cultural insignia, (viii) Reducing the suffocating presence of corporate sponsors, etc., FIFA often responded not by addressing the issues but by spending millions of dollars on commercial outreach, public relation campaigns, and high profile visits by famous players on the mistaken belief that all that glitters is gold. Sometimes FIFA simply avoided the issues outright by declaring them “too political” or too “localized.”

TRADITION VS. MODERNITY! FIFA’s greatest weakness is that even though its products are marketed to mass audiences it seldom cultivated horizontal relationships with grassroots community organizations. Instead, FIFA relies on aging sport legends, models and social playmakers as vertical spokespersons. That approached worked well in past decades when superstars were rarely seen in public. But in our current autobiographical, Facebook/YouTube world of oversaturated images, the words of superstars has fleeting durability. Also, outside of their comfort zones stars are unpredictable. Often, they used FIFA’s platform to publicize not what FIFA wanted but instead, the social/cultural/political issues the stars care about. [Hmmm, OK, now you know why FIFA instituted the 30-seconds transmission delay policy].

The paradox of pragmatism, profit, (small)pox and purity confronts FIFA. Alliances of tradition and modernity are possible but these are always partnerships of nervous tension and mutual suspicions. Things haven’t yet fallen apart at FIFA’s Zurich (Switzerland) headquarters but there is a siege mentality as it tries to harmonize the competing – and often, contradictory – interests of various segments of its global audiences. One emerging crisis is how far to accommodate football players’ on-field display of religious piety on the global stage [which FIFA’s customary audiences don’t mind] without alienating millions of viewers in new frontier markets of China/USA/secular youths [who are uncomfortable with open display of religiosity]. FIFA may avoid providing a clear statement on this vexing issue that won’t go away. But it must provide guidelines even if it is one of strategic ambiguity that muddles the water. Even an ostrich knows the futility of merely burying its head in the sand when cornered by a fierce predator.

CONTROVERSIES! FIFA is an expert at controversies. One way to view FIFA’s situation is to imagine a Used Car dealer with a questionable reputation and a team of good lawyers that keeps him out of jail. Injustice breeds controversies. For example, FIFA’s membership is comprised of 209 “national associations” [by that standard, FIFA is bigger than the U.N. which has 193 members]. In theory, FIFA Congress (Reps of national associations) is the supreme body. In practice, the real power rests with FIFA’s Executive Committee (FIFA President, General Secretary and selected officers). Since its founding (excepting for Joao Havelange of Brazil) all FIFA Presidents/Secretaries General have been Europeans!

Another source of controversy is the allocation of slots at World Cup Finals. FIFA has 6 “Confederations”:
AFC: Asia Football Association. Asia has 44 nations but gets only 4.5 slots at the world cup finals
CAF: Confederation of African Football. Africa has 54 nations but gets only 5 slots
CONCACAF: North/Central America/Caribbean has 23 nations but gets 3.5 slots
CONMEBOL: South American Football has 12 nations but gets 4.5 slots [Brazil, as host, gets 1]
OFC: Oceania Football Confederation has 14 nations but gets 0.5 slot
UEFA: Europe has 47 nations but gets 13 slots (Asian nations of Israel, Russia, Turkey, Cyprus and Kazakhstan play under UEFA qualification due to political reasons. Still it is manifestly unfair that at the world cup finals, Europe has 3 slots more than the 113 nations of Africa, Asia and Oceania combined!)

FIFA praises democratic traditions and suspends national associations at the slightest hint of domestic political interference, but it doesn’t practice democracy. International Football Association Board (IFAB) enforces FIFA rules. Six of its eight members are required to change any rules. FIFA nominates 4 of the 8 while the UK [England, Northern Island, Scotland and Wales] provides the other 4 “permanent” members. FOUR PERMANENT MEMBERS! The excuse is that these UK nations helped to develop IFAB in 1882. The Greeks also founded the Olympics in 8th Century BC but does anyone believe that Greece should have a permanent right to host the Olympiad “every other” 4 years?

FIFA is beset by allegations of bribery, vote-rigging, match-fixing and even vote-tampering. In his book, “Foul! The Secret World of FIFA: Bribes, Vote-Rigging and Ticket Scandals,”[2006] British investigative reporter, Andrew Jennings, meticulously documented evidence of massive Pay2Play, cash for contract corruption at FIFA. Mr. Jennings alleged, with proof, that FIFA’s marketing partner, International Sports Leisure (ISL), paid over 170 bribes worth more than $100 Million to top FIFA officials to secure contracts.
FIFA’S LIST OF ACCOMPLISHMENT deserves favorable mention too. It includes, but is not limited to:
1) Organizing the first truly global sport event in history and keeping it relatively free of politics
2) Helping low wealth nations in Europe/Africa/Asia/Caribbean to compete on the global stage
3) Reducing global tensions by crystallizing the Culture that Sports-is-above-Politics
4) Partnering with International Olympics Committee to build international standards for global sports
5) Developing Football Goodwill Ambassadors (a model for other international organizations)
6) Getting infrastructural development by asking for improved infrastructures to meet global standard
From Africa to Arabia, Argentina to Australia, Canada to Columbia, Europe to Eurasia and all the way to the Plains of Outer Mongolia, football has been true to FIFA’s motto, “For the Game. For the World.” It is the biggest individual global sport, and since the first World Cup was played in Uruguay in 1930, the event has been held without interruption every 4 years except in 1942 (during World War II, 1939-1945).

FORWARD TO THE PAST? Wherever collective human endeavor goes culture/politics/religion follows. In addition to those passions that civilization and decorum have restricted to bedrooms, sports gives us the greatest social licenses to publicly express animalistic passions. It offers occasions to live our lives but also to pretend that we can do better than society’s best. For example, sports can give a morbidly obese man in front of a TV the license to complain that an athlete in peak condition isn’t good enough and that he, the fat man, could do better. The essence of sports is participation. We partake through personal involvement or by supporting participants or adopting teams/mascots. The social objective of sports is to live vicariously so as to forget our individual differences and celebrate our common humanity.

So, what modern position should we assign ancient passions of culture/politics/religion at FIFA events? FIFA might be well-served to review opinions of U.S. Supreme Court on the vexing issue of “Separation of Church & State (nation)." In America’s first 200 years the role of religion in public space wasn’t a major issue as U.S. population was mainly Christian. But as racial, ethnic, cultural and religious diversity has grown the Supreme Court was obliged to provide guidelines. Loosely speaking, the Court’s common sense views on religion in the public space are: (1) religious objects may remain in public space if they have historical significance beyond mere religious purpose, (2) prayers, except in few exceptions, should be limited to private venues, (3) some religious displays are acceptable if there is no discriminatory intent [it’s OK to display a “Cross” if you also display Islamic “Crescent” or Jewish “Menorah,” etc.], (4) guidelines are not exclusive, so the Supreme Court may limit or expand rules based on circumstances.

FIFA needs to speak up otherwise FIFA will continue to behave like the duplicitous and cowardly polygamist who brings daily misery on his family by telling the older wife (in front of her ferocious sons) that marrying the second wife was a mistake he intends to correct, while simultaneously (and always in the privacy of the bedroom), promising the younger wife that tomorrow – and always tomorrow! – he would get rid of the older wife.

Patryk Utulu is a U.S.-based attorney and Strategic Communications Consultant
[All Rights Reserved. All materials subject to Copyright Privileges and Immunities
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by PatrykUtulu(m): 8:21pm On Nov 09, 2013
FIFA: POLICY OF STRATEGIC AMBIGUITY ON FOOTBALL PLAYERS' ON-FIELD DISPLAY OF RELIGIOSITY!©
(a.k.a., Pragmatism and Paradox of Profit, Pox and Purity)©
--Attorney Patryk Utulu

As a hugely successful, multi-billion dollar business enterprise, which so far, has successfully created the perception that it is owned-by-the-world, and therefore “ownerless,” FIFA has a billion reasons to be tolerant of football players’ ostentatious on-field display of religious piety. After all, FIFA is aware that even in our rapidly secularizing world, majority of football followers are people who are either religiously-observant, or at least, tolerant of religion. Despite what you hear a majority of people on earth don’t hate religion. People don’t hate religion per se. People just hate other peoples’ religion.

CONTEXT tends to bring better clarity so a brief re-introduction of FIFA is useful. The Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded on May 21, 1904 to govern national football associations. Despite marketing itself like one, FIFA is not a philanthropic organization. It is, first and always, a profit-oriented enterprise with powerful financial stakeholders [mostly European nations in collaboration with multinational corporations in Asia, Europe and North America] who make millions of dollars in yearly profits by marketing products, fame and physique. Far removed from the patriotic chants of cheering global audiences – and operating from corporate boardrooms and V.I.P. boxes – these financial stakeholders have two primary objectives: (1) ensure that FIFA uses every technological tool (public relations and mass media) to expand football’s fan base from slums to suburbs, and from every house on every hill to every village in every valley; (2) provide corporate and public relations infrastructure to enable FIFA achieve objective #1 without attracting competition and/or controversies.

But the world is an irritable polygamy of cultures, politics, religions and regional idiosyncrasies!

PRAGMATISM is great but not magical! By successfully marketing the perception that it is owned-by-the-world FIFA also created expectation in billions of people that their biases will have central consideration in its decisions. Starting in the 1960’s FIFA adopted a 3-prong global strategy: (1) Grow the game by developing pockets of indigenous talents around the world, (2) Maintain fan loyalty in existing football markets by participating in token but visible social programs, and (3) Avoid controversies by avoiding issues of cultures/politics/religion. Indeed, so faithful was FIFA to its policy of avoidance (worried about alienating ticket-buying fans in Europe) that it didn’t begin to seriously confront overt racism against players by other players, and rich unruly fan clubs, until just very recently.

21ST CENTURY ISSUES! Like all global actors, FIFA has had to deal with a new world filled with new possibilities and petty insecurities. Unfortunately, bureaucracies are creatures of habit so FIFA tried to solve modern problems with outdated solutions. For example, when developing nations demanded (i) Stronger representation in FIFA’s Executive Committee, (ii) Greater financial transparency, (iii) More slots at World Cup Finals, (iv) Profit-Sharing, (v) Compensation for houses demolished to build world cup stadiums, (vi) Affordable tickets for low wealth nations, (vii) Display of religious/cultural insignia, (viii) Reducing the suffocating presence of corporate sponsors, etc., FIFA often responded not by addressing the issues but by spending millions of dollars on commercial outreach, public relation campaigns, and high profile visits by famous players on the mistaken belief that all that glitters is gold. Sometimes FIFA simply avoided the issues outright by declaring them “too political” or too “localized.”

TRADITION VS. MODERNITY! FIFA’s greatest weakness is that even though its products are marketed to mass audiences it seldom cultivated horizontal relationships with grassroots community organizations. Instead, FIFA relies on aging sport legends, models and social playmakers as vertical spokespersons. That approached worked well in past decades when superstars were rarely seen in public. But in our current autobiographical, Facebook/YouTube world of oversaturated images, the words of superstars has fleeting durability. Also, outside of their comfort zones stars are unpredictable. Often, they used FIFA’s platform to publicize not what FIFA wanted but instead, the social/cultural/political issues the stars care about. [Hmmm, OK, now you know why FIFA instituted the 30-seconds transmission delay policy].

The paradox of pragmatism, profit, (small)pox and purity confronts FIFA. Alliances of tradition and modernity are possible but these are always partnerships of nervous tension and mutual suspicions. Things haven’t yet fallen apart at FIFA’s Zurich (Switzerland) headquarters but there is a siege mentality as it tries to harmonize the competing – and often, contradictory – interests of various segments of its global audiences. One emerging crisis is how far to accommodate football players’ on-field display of religious piety on the global stage [which FIFA’s customary audiences don’t mind] without alienating millions of viewers in new frontier markets of China/USA/secular youths [who are uncomfortable with open display of religiosity]. FIFA may avoid providing a clear statement on this vexing issue that won’t go away. But it must provide guidelines even if it is one of strategic ambiguity that muddles the water. Even an ostrich knows the futility of merely burying its head in the sand when cornered by a fierce predator.

CONTROVERSIES! FIFA is an expert at controversies. One way to view FIFA’s situation is to imagine a Used Car dealer with a questionable reputation and a team of good lawyers that keeps him out of jail. Injustice breeds controversies. For example, FIFA’s membership is comprised of 209 “national associations” [by that standard, FIFA is bigger than the U.N. which has 193 members]. In theory, FIFA Congress (Reps of national associations) is the supreme body. In practice, the real power rests with FIFA’s Executive Committee (FIFA President, General Secretary and selected officers). Since its founding (excepting for Joao Havelange of Brazil) all FIFA Presidents/Secretaries General have been Europeans!

Another source of controversy is the allocation of slots at World Cup Finals. FIFA has 6 “Confederations”:
AFC: Asia Football Association. Asia has 44 nations but gets only 4.5 slots at the world cup finals
CAF: Confederation of African Football. Africa has 54 nations but gets only 5 slots
CONCACAF: North/Central America/Caribbean has 23 nations but gets 3.5 slots
CONMEBOL: South American Football has 12 nations but gets 4.5 slots [Brazil, as host, gets 1]
OFC: Oceania Football Confederation has 14 nations but gets 0.5 slot
UEFA: Europe has 47 nations but gets 13 slots (Asian nations of Israel, Russia, Turkey, Cyprus and Kazakhstan play under UEFA qualification due to political reasons. Still it is manifestly unfair that at the world cup finals, Europe has 3 slots more than the 113 nations of Africa, Asia and Oceania combined!)

FIFA praises democratic traditions and suspends national associations at the slightest hint of domestic political interference, but it doesn’t practice democracy. International Football Association Board (IFAB) enforces FIFA rules. Six of its eight members are required to change any rules. FIFA nominates 4 of the 8 while the UK [England, Northern Island, Scotland and Wales] provides the other 4 “permanent” members. FOUR PERMANENT MEMBERS! The excuse is that these UK nations helped to develop IFAB in 1882. The Greeks also founded the Olympics in 8th Century BC but does anyone believe that Greece should have a permanent right to host the Olympiad “every other” 4 years?

FIFA is beset by allegations of bribery, vote-rigging, match-fixing and even vote-tampering. In his book, “Foul! The Secret World of FIFA: Bribes, Vote-Rigging and Ticket Scandals,”[2006] British investigative reporter, Andrew Jennings, meticulously documented evidence of massive Pay2Play, cash for contract corruption at FIFA. Mr. Jennings alleged, with proof, that FIFA’s marketing partner, International Sports Leisure (ISL), paid over 170 bribes worth more than $100 Million to top FIFA officials to secure contracts.

FIFA’S LIST OF ACCOMPLISHMENT deserves favorable mention too. It includes, but is not limited to:
1) Organizing the first truly global sport event in history and keeping it relatively free of politics
2) Helping low wealth nations in Europe/Africa/Asia/Caribbean to compete on the global stage
3) Reducing global tensions by crystallizing the Culture that Sports-is-above-Politics
4) Partnering with International Olympics Committee to build international standards for global sports
5) Developing Football Goodwill Ambassadors (a model for other international organizations)
6) Getting infrastructural development by asking for improved infrastructures to meet global standard

From Africa to Arabia, Argentina to Australia, Canada to Columbia, Europe to Eurasia and all the way to the Plains of Outer Mongolia, football has been true to FIFA’s motto, “For the Game. For the World.” It is the biggest individual global sport, and since the first World Cup was played in Uruguay in 1930, the event has been held without interruption every 4 years except in 1942 (during World War II, 1939-1945).

FORWARD TO THE PAST? Wherever collective human endeavor goes culture/politics/religion follows. In addition to those passions that civilization and decorum have restricted to bedrooms, sports gives us the greatest social licenses to publicly express animalistic passions. It offers occasions to live our lives but also to pretend that we can do better than society’s best. For example, sports can give a morbidly obese man in front of a TV the license to complain that an athlete in peak condition isn’t good enough and that he, the fat man, could do better. The essence of sports is participation. We partake through personal involvement or by supporting participants or adopting teams/mascots. The social objective of sports is to live vicariously so as to forget our individual differences and celebrate our common humanity.

So, what modern position should we assign ancient passions of culture/politics/religion at FIFA events? FIFA might be well-served to review opinions of U.S. Supreme Court on the vexing issue of “Separation of Church & State (nation)." In America’s first 200 years the role of religion in public space wasn’t a major issue as U.S. population was mainly Christian. But as racial, ethnic, cultural and religious diversity has grown the Supreme Court was obliged to provide guidelines. Loosely speaking, the Court’s common sense views on religion in the public space are: (1) religious objects may remain in public space if they have historical significance beyond mere religious purpose, (2) prayers, except in few exceptions, should be limited to private venues, (3) some religious displays are acceptable if there is no discriminatory intent [it’s OK to display a “Cross” if you also display Islamic “Crescent” or Jewish “Menorah,” etc.], (4) guidelines are not exclusive, so the Supreme Court may limit or expand rules based on circumstances.

FIFA needs to speak up otherwise FIFA will continue to behave like the duplicitous and cowardly polygamist who brings daily misery on his family by telling the older wife (in front of her ferocious sons) that marrying the second wife was a mistake he intends to correct, while simultaneously (and always in the privacy of the bedroom), promising the younger wife that tomorrow – and always tomorrow! – he would get rid of the older wife.

Patryk Utulu is a U.S.-based attorney and Strategic Communications Consultant
[All Rights Reserved. All materials subject to Copyright Privileges and Immunities]
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Jdesilentkiller(m): 9:00pm On Nov 09, 2013
Patryk_Utulu: FIFA: POLICY OF STRATEGIC AMBIGUITY ON FOOTBALL PLAYERS' ON-FIELD DISPLAY OF RELIGIOSITY!©
(a.k.a., Pragmatism and Paradox of Profit, Pox and Purity)©
--Attorney Patryk Utulu

As a hugely successful, multi-billion dollar business enterprise, which so far, has successfully created the perception that it is owned-by-the-world, and therefore “ownerless,” FIFA has a billion reasons to be tolerant of football players’ ostentatious on-field display of religious piety. After all, FIFA is aware that even in our rapidly secularizing world, majority of football followers are people who are either religiously-observant, or at least, tolerant of religion. Despite what you hear a majority of people on earth don’t hate religion. People don’t hate religion per se. People just hate other peoples’ religion.

CONTEXT tends to bring better clarity so a brief re-introduction of FIFA is useful. The Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded on May 21, 1904 to govern national football associations. Despite marketing itself like one, FIFA is not a philanthropic organization. It is, first and always, a profit-oriented enterprise with powerful financial stakeholders [mostly European nations in collaboration with multinational corporations in Asia, Europe and North America] who make millions of dollars in yearly profits by marketing products, fame and physique. Far removed from the patriotic chants of cheering global audiences – and operating from corporate boardrooms and V.I.P. boxes – these financial stakeholders have two primary objectives: (1) ensure that FIFA uses every technological tool (public relations and mass media) to expand football’s fan base from slums to suburbs, and from every house on every hill to every village in every valley; (2) provide corporate and public relations infrastructure to enable FIFA achieve objective #1 without attracting competition and/or controversies.

But the world is an irritable polygamy of cultures, politics, religions and regional idiosyncrasies!

PRAGMATISM is great but not magical! By successfully marketing the perception that it is owned-by-the-world FIFA also created expectation in billions of people that their biases will have central consideration in its decisions. Starting in the 1960’s FIFA adopted a 3-prong global strategy: (1) Grow the game by developing pockets of indigenous talents around the world, (2) Maintain fan loyalty in existing football markets by participating in token but visible social programs, and (3) Avoid controversies by avoiding issues of cultures/politics/religion. Indeed, so faithful was FIFA to its policy of avoidance (worried about alienating ticket-buying fans in Europe) that it didn’t begin to seriously confront overt racism against players by other players, and rich unruly fan clubs, until just very recently.

21ST CENTURY ISSUES! Like all global actors, FIFA has had to deal with a new world filled with new possibilities and petty insecurities. Unfortunately, bureaucracies are creatures of habit so FIFA tried to solve modern problems with outdated solutions. For example, when developing nations demanded (i) Stronger representation in FIFA’s Executive Committee, (ii) Greater financial transparency, (iii) More slots at World Cup Finals, (iv) Profit-Sharing, (v) Compensation for houses demolished to build world cup stadiums, (vi) Affordable tickets for low wealth nations, (vii) Display of religious/cultural insignia, (viii) Reducing the suffocating presence of corporate sponsors, etc., FIFA often responded not by addressing the issues but by spending millions of dollars on commercial outreach, public relation campaigns, and high profile visits by famous players on the mistaken belief that all that glitters is gold. Sometimes FIFA simply avoided the issues outright by declaring them “too political” or too “localized.”

TRADITION VS. MODERNITY! FIFA’s greatest weakness is that even though its products are marketed to mass audiences it seldom cultivated horizontal relationships with grassroots community organizations. Instead, FIFA relies on aging sport legends, models and social playmakers as vertical spokespersons. That approached worked well in past decades when superstars were rarely seen in public. But in our current autobiographical, Facebook/YouTube world of oversaturated images, the words of superstars has fleeting durability. Also, outside of their comfort zones stars are unpredictable. Often, they used FIFA’s platform to publicize not what FIFA wanted but instead, the social/cultural/political issues the stars care about. [Hmmm, OK, now you know why FIFA instituted the 30-seconds transmission delay policy].

The paradox of pragmatism, profit, (small)pox and purity confronts FIFA. Alliances of tradition and modernity are possible but these are always partnerships of nervous tension and mutual suspicions. Things haven’t yet fallen apart at FIFA’s Zurich (Switzerland) headquarters but there is a siege mentality as it tries to harmonize the competing – and often, contradictory – interests of various segments of its global audiences. One emerging crisis is how far to accommodate football players’ on-field display of religious piety on the global stage [which FIFA’s customary audiences don’t mind] without alienating millions of viewers in new frontier markets of China/USA/secular youths [who are uncomfortable with open display of religiosity]. FIFA may avoid providing a clear statement on this vexing issue that won’t go away. But it must provide guidelines even if it is one of strategic ambiguity that muddles the water. Even an ostrich knows the futility of merely burying its head in the sand when cornered by a fierce predator.

CONTROVERSIES! FIFA is an expert at controversies. One way to view FIFA’s situation is to imagine a Used Car dealer with a questionable reputation and a team of good lawyers that keeps him out of jail. Injustice breeds controversies. For example, FIFA’s membership is comprised of 209 “national associations” [by that standard, FIFA is bigger than the U.N. which has 193 members]. In theory, FIFA Congress (Reps of national associations) is the supreme body. In practice, the real power rests with FIFA’s Executive Committee (FIFA President, General Secretary and selected officers). Since its founding (excepting for Joao Havelange of Brazil) all FIFA Presidents/Secretaries General have been Europeans!

Another source of controversy is the allocation of slots at World Cup Finals. FIFA has 6 “Confederations”:
AFC: Asia Football Association. Asia has 44 nations but gets only 4.5 slots at the world cup finals
CAF: Confederation of African Football. Africa has 54 nations but gets only 5 slots
CONCACAF: North/Central America/Caribbean has 23 nations but gets 3.5 slots
CONMEBOL: South American Football has 12 nations but gets 4.5 slots [Brazil, as host, gets 1]
OFC: Oceania Football Confederation has 14 nations but gets 0.5 slot
UEFA: Europe has 47 nations but gets 13 slots (Asian nations of Israel, Russia, Turkey, Cyprus and Kazakhstan play under UEFA qualification due to political reasons. Still it is manifestly unfair that at the world cup finals, Europe has 3 slots more than the 113 nations of Africa, Asia and Oceania combined!)

FIFA praises democratic traditions and suspends national associations at the slightest hint of domestic political interference, but it doesn’t practice democracy. International Football Association Board (IFAB) enforces FIFA rules. Six of its eight members are required to change any rules. FIFA nominates 4 of the 8 while the UK [England, Northern Island, Scotland and Wales] provides the other 4 “permanent” members. FOUR PERMANENT MEMBERS! The excuse is that these UK nations helped to develop IFAB in 1882. The Greeks also founded the Olympics in 8th Century BC but does anyone believe that Greece should have a permanent right to host the Olympiad “every other” 4 years?

FIFA is beset by allegations of bribery, vote-rigging, match-fixing and even vote-tampering. In his book, “Foul! The Secret World of FIFA: Bribes, Vote-Rigging and Ticket Scandals,”[2006] British investigative reporter, Andrew Jennings, meticulously documented evidence of massive Pay2Play, cash for contract corruption at FIFA. Mr. Jennings alleged, with proof, that FIFA’s marketing partner, International Sports Leisure (ISL), paid over 170 bribes worth more than $100 Million to top FIFA officials to secure contracts.

FIFA’S LIST OF ACCOMPLISHMENT deserves favorable mention too. It includes, but is not limited to:
1) Organizing the first truly global sport event in history and keeping it relatively free of politics
2) Helping low wealth nations in Europe/Africa/Asia/Caribbean to compete on the global stage
3) Reducing global tensions by crystallizing the Culture that Sports-is-above-Politics
4) Partnering with International Olympics Committee to build international standards for global sports
5) Developing Football Goodwill Ambassadors (a model for other international organizations)
6) Getting infrastructural development by asking for improved infrastructures to meet global standard

From Africa to Arabia, Argentina to Australia, Canada to Columbia, Europe to Eurasia and all the way to the Plains of Outer Mongolia, football has been true to FIFA’s motto, “For the Game. For the World.” It is the biggest individual global sport, and since the first World Cup was played in Uruguay in 1930, the event has been held without interruption every 4 years except in 1942 (during World War II, 1939-1945).

FORWARD TO THE PAST? Wherever collective human endeavor goes culture/politics/religion follows. In addition to those passions that civilization and decorum have restricted to bedrooms, sports gives us the greatest social licenses to publicly express animalistic passions. It offers occasions to live our lives but also to pretend that we can do better than society’s best. For example, sports can give a morbidly obese man in front of a TV the license to complain that an athlete in peak condition isn’t good enough and that he, the fat man, could do better. The essence of sports is participation. We partake through personal involvement or by supporting participants or adopting teams/mascots. The social objective of sports is to live vicariously so as to forget our individual differences and celebrate our common humanity.

So, what modern position should we assign ancient passions of culture/politics/religion at FIFA events? FIFA might be well-served to review opinions of U.S. Supreme Court on the vexing issue of “Separation of Church & State (nation)." In America’s first 200 years the role of religion in public space wasn’t a major issue as U.S. population was mainly Christian. But as racial, ethnic, cultural and religious diversity has grown the Supreme Court was obliged to provide guidelines. Loosely speaking, the Court’s common sense views on religion in the public space are: (1) religious objects may remain in public space if they have historical significance beyond mere religious purpose, (2) prayers, except in few exceptions, should be limited to private venues, (3) some religious displays are acceptable if there is no discriminatory intent [it’s OK to display a “Cross” if you also display Islamic “Crescent” or Jewish “Menorah,” etc.], (4) guidelines are not exclusive, so the Supreme Court may limit or expand rules based on circumstances.

FIFA needs to speak up otherwise FIFA will continue to behave like the duplicitous and cowardly polygamist who brings daily misery on his family by telling the older wife (in front of her ferocious sons) that marrying the second wife was a mistake he intends to correct, while simultaneously (and always in the privacy of the bedroom), promising the younger wife that tomorrow – and always tomorrow! – he would get rid of the older wife.

Patryk Utulu is a U.S.-based attorney and Strategic Communications Consultant
[All Rights Reserved. All materials subject to Copyright Privileges and Immunities]
I read what u wrote, but now I ask. What's the relevance
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Xfactoria: 9:11pm On Nov 09, 2013
demmy:

You know this but the FIFA people don't?

FIFA folks are no fools, they know. They have just accepted the MRI as a fair apple to apple comparison tool and in my opinion it is only fair for them to accept that as a proxy for age.

toshmann:

though i didnt watch the games, i refuse to let you take away the authenticity of their victory angry . . . the average african is smaller than his european age-mate, those boys must be young bc i refuse to believe that the nigerian authorities will even attempt to present overaged kids in this 2013 with new technology here and there.

meanwhile bone age na bone age. . . . if their bone age na de same, then its fair game, period angry

No one is taking the shine off these guys. If they can play at the level they did at an average age of 21 yrs in Nigeria (just guessing), then that is a huge progress for Nigerian football. Before now, we have been presenting 30+ years old as 17 years but these present corp of U-17 players are truly young even though we know that they might be a few years (and by few I mean 2 - 4 years) past 17. These guys are the youngest Nigerian U-17 ever!!
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by imperiouxx(m): 10:57pm On Nov 09, 2013
Patryk_Utulu: FIFA: POLICY OF STRATEGIC AMBIGUITY ON FOOTBALL PLAYERS' ON-FIELD DISPLAY OF RELIGIOSITY!©
(a.k.a., Pragmatism and Paradox of Profit, Pox and Purity)©
--Attorney Patryk Utulu

..................................blablabla
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..........................................................blablabla

Patryk Utulu is a U.S.-based attorney and Strategic Communications Consultant
[All Rights Reserved. All materials subject to Copyright Privileges and Immunities]

*yawn* Abeg, no kill me with sleep.

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Kenny4lyfe(m): 1:38pm On Nov 10, 2013
helpee: Na akure connection be that!!! I remember very well

o mehn!!! shocked
How far nah?!
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by isalegan2: 2:32pm On Nov 10, 2013
shymexx:

Hey you, you just love posting pictures everywhere, don't you? tongue

I wonder what your room is going to look like with all kinds of pictures and wall papers. undecided

I post pics cos:
- Sometimes a page full of words can be boring and hypnosis-inducing;
- When I'm too lazy to write - a picture is worth a thousand words sometimes;
- To entertain the brethren;
- It's a new age, the age of multimedia. There's no need to only write words anymore. You can post a song, a picture, or whatever catches your fancy.

Oh, before I forget. . . Shymexx, you so weird! undecided

grin grin grin cheesy
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Nobody: 4:07pm On Nov 10, 2013
isale_gan2:

Fifa has always allowed 3 or 4 senior players in junior tournaments. I'm not sure of the exact number or limit.

I remember CRonaldo playing with Portugal under 21 after he was already older.

It's too bad some of our people are tormented by self-loathing, they just keep bringing up this age cheating thing. undecided I don't mean you, Shymexx. I just happened to see your post.

@the bolded - Fifa only allows 3 senior players for Olympics and that's Under-23. However, the same rule isn't applicable to other under-age championships.

Also, the European under-21 competition is different from Fifa's. In Europe, players a year or two older than 21 are allowed to play at the under-21 championships. However, the only time they comply with Fifa's rules is when it comes to the under-20. Under-21 in Europe is more or less like the mini national team. I guess that's why they organise these competitions just to keep the young players busy.
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Nobody: 4:16pm On Nov 10, 2013
isale_gan2:

I post pics cos:
- Sometimes a page full of words can be boring and hypnosis-inducing;
- When I'm too lazy to write - a picture is worth a thousand words sometimes;
- To entertain the brethren;
- It's a new age, the age of multimedia. There's no need to only write words anymore. You can post a song, a picture, or whatever catches your fancy.

Oh, before I forget. . . Shymexx, you so weird! undecided

grin grin grin cheesy

I hear. Interesting perspective from a half-Fulani and half-Igbo lady born and raised in Lagos. tongue

And why do you think I'm weird? - post a picture to illustrate why you think I'm an ar.sehole and a pain in the ar.se! grin

Anyway, I'm not weird. I'm just eccentric with a weird sense-of-humour. I'd say I'm like a puzzle that's impossible to solve. A mystery. I'm more or less different experiences in one and a combination of so many things. The more you look, the less you see. Heck, I don't even understand myself. undecided
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by isalegan2: 4:21pm On Nov 10, 2013
S'okay. I like weirdos. wink MPD tinz. tongue

shymexx: @the bolded - Fifa only allows 3 senior players for Olympics and that's Under-23. However, the same rule isn't applicable to other under-age championships.

Also, the European under-21 competition is different from Fifa's. In Europe, players a year or two older than 21 are allowed to play at the under-21 championships. However, the only time they comply with Fifa's rules is when it comes to the under-20. Under-21 in Europe is more or less like the mini national team. I guess that's why the organise these competitions just to keep the young players busy.

My brain just melted. Thanks a bunch, you hear? embarassed
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Longeria(m): 6:28pm On Nov 10, 2013
I'm proud of the eaglets, age say, age no say.

1 Like 1 Share

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by naptu2: 8:22pm On Nov 10, 2013
Nduka Ugbade was captain of the Golden Eaglets squad that won the world cup in 1985 - he was received by General Buhari.

He was a member of the Super Eagles squad that won the African Nations Cup in 1994 - he was received by General Abacha.

He is the Assistant Coach of the Golden Eaglets (2013 squad) - he is currently (this minute) being received by President Jonathan.

1 Like

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by uffforum: 10:50am On Nov 11, 2013
This players are great and there are the future Eagles, I hope there still make Nigerians proud of them.
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by ortodoxa(f): 12:39pm On Nov 12, 2013
naija noni:
See dis onitsha boy/girl dey form mexico.Mexico kor :p

Yes from Mexico. Congratulations.... Very superior game and well earned. We are also proud of our boys in comparison to the main mnt who have been a disgrace. I just hope these two underdog teams succeed at the adult level, as a national team and not in their own $$$clubs.

And by the way, not an Onitsha neither by geography nor as an insult. Gracias

1 Like

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by ortodoxa(f): 12:50pm On Nov 12, 2013
peleo: Hi, I'm mexican and naturally I expect Mexico will win, but nonetheless I think both teams have equal chances of winning that match. I just hope they don't make it to the penalties, it would be too nerve wrecking!! My forecast: 3-1, Mexico wins grin. Greetings from Guadalajara, Mexico!!

Hola paisano!! Ni modo, Nigeria fue superior pero aun asi admiro a los chicos MX! Ahora a esperar a la selección mayor con Nueva Zelanda. Dios nos ayude!!
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by ortodoxa(f): 12:58pm On Nov 12, 2013
greall1: Another MEXICO On Nairaland.



Oh so this is no public domain? Oy.señor, perdon. Anyway, will not count a few rude for plenty happy nice 9ja's I have friendship with. By the way, many Nigerians in MX. smiley
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Chekitaut: 10:16pm On Nov 16, 2013
Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Afam4eva(m): 11:58pm On Nov 19, 2013
Did you guys know that Bright Dike and Emmanuel Emenike are cousins?

1 Like

Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by vinobieze(m): 9:12pm On Dec 17, 2013
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Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by Chekitaut: 9:19pm On Dec 18, 2013
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Re: Mexico Vs Nigeria FIFA U17 WC Final (0 - 3) On 8th November 2013 by jayjayworld: 2:24pm On May 12, 2015
God is involve

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