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Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum - Nairaland / General - Nairaland

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Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by zikirullah(m): 5:12pm On Nov 14, 2008
Hi, ladies and gents of Nairalanders,

I hereby bring a decision for the entire nairalanders to please stop speaking Pidgin english whenever you are on Nairaland Forum.

cool cool cool

I think the resistance of Pidgin english in nairaland will improve our knowlede on english language, and its another opportunities for those who do not speak fluent and correct english to learn from this forum of ours.

Please i will like everyone in nairaland to cooperate and lets join head together to improve our knowlede.

Thanks to all nairalanders.  cool cool cool
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by AmakaOne(f): 5:19pm On Nov 14, 2008
zikirullah:

Hi, ladies and gents of Nairalanders,

I hereby bring a decision for the entire nairalanders to please stop speaking Pidgin english whenever you are on Nairaland Forum.

cry cry cry

I think the resistance of Pidgin english in nairaland will improve our knowlede on english language, and its another opportunities for those who do not speak fluent and correct english to learn from this forum of ours.

Please i will like everyone in nairaland to cooperate and lets join head together to improve our knowlede.

Thanks to all nairalanders. 


So you enter Secondary School Finish and you still no sabi speak or write correct English, and na Nairaland u wan take learn am so?

Hmm,  your papa fit go collect the school fees wey hin pay ontop yua head!
*smh*
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by zikirullah(m): 5:43pm On Nov 14, 2008
Why do you take it so hot, with the posts of some of our friends on nairaland you suppose to know what i am saying.

We should all talk on how to improve our education not to shrik our knowledge, and besides the english man says practice make perfect, if you dont practice the english you've been taught in the school, how will you be perfect in all the speach you make.

Please try and be a literate of your citizen and make your country proud of you, not an illiterate.
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by Phemour: 5:47pm On Nov 14, 2008
huh
zikirullah:

Hi, ladies and gents of Nairalanders,

I hereby bring a decision for the entire nairalanders to please stop speaking Pidgin english whenever you are on Nairaland Forum.

cool cool cool

I think the resistance of Pidgin english in nairaland will improve our knowlede on english language, and its another opportunities for those who do not speak fluent and correct english to learn from this forum of ours.

Please i will like everyone in nairaland to cooperate and lets join head together to improve our knowlede.

Thanks to all nairalanders.  cool cool cool

True Talk , but this task too heavy ooooooo, make i no talk pidgin? Next world
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by MrCrackles(m): 5:50pm On Nov 14, 2008
AMAKAONE:


So you enter Secondary School Finish and you still no sabi speak or write correct English, and na Nairaland u wan take learn am so?

Hmm,  your papa fit go collect the school fees wey hin pay ontop yua head!
*smh*






you see why i said you are Mrs Brash in waiting!! becoz u read my mind and took the above from it!


POSTER

SHUT UP

MAKE I HEAR WORD
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by Phemour: 5:52pm On Nov 14, 2008
but Alfa Zikirullahi, u must be the Class Captain of ur school  bcs all this Antagonism wey i dey see dey make me catch cold

cheesy  cheesy  cheesy
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by AmakaOne(f): 5:55pm On Nov 14, 2008
zikirullah:

Why do you take it so hot, with the posts of some of our friends on nairaland you suppose to know what i am saying.

We should all talk on how to improve our education not to shrik our knowledge, and besides the english man says practice make perfect, if you don't practice the english you've been taught in the school, how will you be perfect in all the speach you make.

Please try and be a literate of your citizen and make your country proud of you, not an illiterate.


See ehn, This one pass me. I no fit do , lie lie . I no even sabi wetin e mean sef.
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by skfa1: 5:56pm On Nov 14, 2008
PHEMOUR:

huh
True Talk , but this task too heavy ooooooo, make i no talk pidgin? Next world

You don talk am my guy  cheesy
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by server34(m): 5:58pm On Nov 14, 2008
Instead of make una dey advocate for the future of pidgin, una dey criticize. This piece here go make some pipu sabi d kain global recognition wey this our language get.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Nigerian Pidgin is an English-based pidgin or creole language spoken as a kind of lingua franca across Nigeria that is referred to simply as "Pidgin", "Broken English" or "Brokan". It is often not considered a creole language since most speakers are not native speakers, although many children do learn it early. Nonetheless it can be spoken as a pidgin, a creole, or a decreolised acrolect by different speakers, who may switch between these forms depending on the social setting. Its superstrate is English with Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo as the main substrate languages. Ihemere (2006) reports that Nigerian Pidgin is the native language of approximately 3 to 5 million people and is a second language for at least another 75 million. Nigerian Pidgin is also spoken across West Africa, in countries such as Ghana, and Cameroon.

Variations

Each of the 250 or more ethnic groups in Nigeria can converse in this language, though they usually have their own additional words. For example, the Yorùbás added the words 'Şe' and 'Abi' to the language. These are often used at the start or end of an intonated sentence or question. For example, "You are coming, right?" becomes "Şe you dey come?" or "You dey come abi?" Another example the Igbos added the word, "Nna" also used at the beginning of some sentences to add effect to the meaning of their sentence. For example, "that test was hard" becomes "Nna men, dat test hard no be small".

Nigerian Pidgin also varies from place to place. Dialects of Nigerian Pidgin may include the Lagos, Onitsha, Benin City, and Ibadan dialects. There is also the Warri dialect which includes a lot of slangs that are constantly being added and replaced. Sometimes the language may vary even in different parts of the same city.

Similarity to Caribbean dialects

Nigerian Pidgin, along with the various pidgin and creole languages of West Africa, displays a remarkable similarity to the various dialects of English found in the Caribbean. Linguists hypothesize that this stems from the fact that the majority of slaves taken to the New World were of West African origin, and many words and phrases in Nigerian Pidgin can be found in Jamaican Creole (also known as Jamaican Patois or simply Patois) and the other creole languages of the West Indies. The pronunciation and accents often differ a great deal, mainly due to the extremely heterogeneous mix of African languages present in the West Indies, but if written on paper or spoken slowly, the creole languages of West Africa are for the most part mutually intelligible with the creole languages of the Caribbean. The presence of repetitious phrases in Jamaican Creole such as "su-su" (gossip) and "pyaa-pyaa" (sickly) mirror the presence of such phrases in West African languages such as "bam-bam", which means "complete" in the Yoruba language. Repetitious phrases are also present in Nigerian Pidgin, such as, "koro-koro", meaning "clear vision", "yama-yama", meaning "disgusting", and "dorti-dorti", meaning "garbage". Furthermore, the use of the words of West African origin in Jamaican Patois, such as "boasie" (meaning proud, a word that comes from the Yoruba word "bosi" also meaning "proud"wink and "Unu" - Jamaican Patois or "Una" - West African Pidgin (meaning "you people", a word that comes from the Ibo word "unu" also meaning "you people"wink display some of the interesting similarities between the English pidgins and creoles of West Africa and the English pidgins and creoles of the West Indies, as does the presence of words and phrases that are identical in the languages on both sides of the Atlantic, such as "Me a go tell dem" (I'm going to tell them) and "make we" (let us). Use of the word "deh" or "dey" is found in both Jamaican Patois and Nigerian Pidgin English, and is used in place of the English word "is" or "are". The phrase "We dey foh London" would be understood by both a speaker of Patois and a speaker of Nigerian Pidgin to mean "We are in London". Other similarities, such as "pikin" (Nigerian Pidgin for "child"wink and "pikney" (or "pikiny"--Jamaican Patois for "child"wink and "chook" (Nigerian Pidgin for "poke" or "stab"wink which corresponds with the Jamaican Patois word "jook" further demonstrate the linguistic relationship.

Homophones

The most important differences to other types of English is that there are only some consonants, vowels (6) and diphthongs (3) used. This produces a lot of homophones (words sound the same with different meanings), like thin, thing and tin which are all three pronounced like /tin/. This circumstance gives a high importance to the context, the tone, the body speech and any other ways of communication for the distinction of the homophones.

Examples

* Wetin dey happen means What is happening?
* I no no, I no know, Me no no or Me no know means I don't know
* Come chop means Come & eat
* How Far? means whats up? or hi
* babe means fine girl or chick
* show means meet up with me
* Yarn or Yarning means to talk
* I no know wetin u dey yarn means I don't know what you are talking about
* No dey yarn okpas for hia means stop talking trash or nonsense in here
* I don pay you means I have paid you
* No Shaking means No Problem
* Sharraap thia means shut up
* this your tori get K-leg means your story is suspicious
* You no sabi wetin you dey yarn means you don't know what you are talking about
* Abeg make una check dis one out means please come check this out
* Hia means here
* you no sabi di tin wey we dey tok means you can't understand what we are talking about
* The tin you just yarn don vex me finish means what you just said has pissed me off
* Man dey go sleep means i am leaving or going to sleep
* The babe dey do iyanga means the girl is playing hard to get
* Nna make we gist means lets talk or gossip
* Make i gist you wetin happen means lets me tell you what happened
* That kain maths e get as e be means that kind of math is hard to understand or explain
* I go wooze you finish means that i will slap you silly
* I dey cut out means am going out
* make una come means you all should come
* we dey hia means we are here
* Na nothing means it's nothing
* " I no sabi" means I can't do it or I don't know


French Influence

Some French words are also included in Nigerian pidgin. For example, the word "boku" in pidgin means "a lot" and comes from the french word beaucoup.
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by Phemour: 6:00pm On Nov 14, 2008
server34:

Instead of make una dey advocate for the future of pidgin, una dey criticize. This piece here go make some pipu sabi d kain global recognition wey this our language get.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Nigerian Pidgin is an English-based pidgin or creole language spoken as a kind of lingua franca across Nigeria that is referred to simply as "Pidgin", "Broken English" or "Brokan". It is often not considered a creole language since most speakers are not native speakers, although many children do learn it early. Nonetheless it can be spoken as a pidgin, a creole, or a decreolised acrolect by different speakers, who may switch between these forms depending on the social setting. Its superstrate is English with Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo as the main substrate languages. Ihemere (2006) reports that Nigerian Pidgin is the native language of approximately 3 to 5 million people and is a second language for at least another 75 million. Nigerian Pidgin is also spoken across West Africa, in countries such as Ghana, and Cameroon.

Variations

Each of the 250 or more ethnic groups in Nigeria can converse in this language, though they usually have their own additional words. For example, the Yorùbás added the words 'Şe' and 'Abi' to the language. These are often used at the start or end of an intonated sentence or question. For example, "You are coming, right?" becomes "Şe you dey come?" or "You dey come abi?" Another example the Igbos added the word, "Nna" also used at the beginning of some sentences to add effect to the meaning of their sentence. For example, "that test was hard" becomes "Nna men, that test hard no be small".

Nigerian Pidgin also varies from place to place. Dialects of Nigerian Pidgin may include the Lagos, Onitsha, Benin City, and Ibadan dialects. There is also the Warri dialect which includes a lot of slangs that are constantly being added and replaced. Sometimes the language may vary even in different parts of the same city.

Similarity to Caribbean dialects

Nigerian Pidgin, along with the various pidgin and creole languages of West Africa, displays a remarkable similarity to the various dialects of English found in the Caribbean. Linguists hypothesize that this stems from the fact that the majority of slaves taken to the New World were of West African origin, and many words and phrases in Nigerian Pidgin can be found in Jamaican Creole (also known as Jamaican Patois or simply Patois) and the other creole languages of the West Indies. The pronunciation and accents often differ a great deal, mainly due to the extremely heterogeneous mix of African languages present in the West Indies, but if written on paper or spoken slowly, the creole languages of West Africa are for the most part mutually intelligible with the creole languages of the Caribbean. The presence of repetitious phrases in Jamaican Creole such as "su-su" (gossip) and "pyaa-pyaa" (sickly) mirror the presence of such phrases in West African languages such as "bam-bam", which means "complete" in the Yoruba language. Repetitious phrases are also present in Nigerian Pidgin, such as, "koro-koro", meaning "clear vision", "yama-yama", meaning "disgusting", and "dorti-dorti", meaning "garbage". Furthermore, the use of the words of West African origin in Jamaican Patois, such as "boasie" (meaning proud, a word that comes from the Yoruba word "bosi" also meaning "proud"wink and "Unu" - Jamaican Patois or "Una" - West African Pidgin (meaning "you people", a word that comes from the Ibo word "unu" also meaning "you people"wink display some of the interesting similarities between the English pidgins and creoles of West Africa and the English pidgins and creoles of the West Indies, as does the presence of words and phrases that are identical in the languages on both sides of the Atlantic, such as "Me a go tell them" (I'm going to tell them) and "make we" (let us). Use of the word "deh" or "dey" is found in both Jamaican Patois and Nigerian Pidgin English, and is used in place of the English word "is" or "are". The phrase "We dey foh London" would be understood by both a speaker of Patois and a speaker of Nigerian Pidgin to mean "We are in London". Other similarities, such as "pikin" (Nigerian Pidgin for "child"wink and "pikney" (or "pikiny"--Jamaican Patois for "child"wink and "chook" (Nigerian Pidgin for "poke" or "stab"wink which corresponds with the Jamaican Patois word "jook" further demonstrate the linguistic relationship.

Homophones

The most important differences to other types of English is that there are only some consonants, vowels (6) and diphthongs (3) used. This produces a lot of homophones (words sound the same with different meanings), like thin, thing and tin which are all three pronounced like /tin/. This circumstance gives a high importance to the context, the tone, the body speech and any other ways of communication for the distinction of the homophones.

Examples

* Wetin dey happen means What is happening?
* I no no, I no know, Me no no or Me no know means I don't know
* Come chop means Come & eat
* How Far? means whats up? or hi
* babe means fine girl or chick
* show means meet up with me
* Yarn or Yarning means to talk
* I no know wetin u dey yarn means I don't know what you are talking about
* No dey yarn okpas for hia means stop talking trash or nonsense in here
* I don pay you means I have paid you
* No Shaking means No Problem
* Sharraap thia means shut up
* this your tori get K-leg means your story is suspicious
* You no sabi wetin you dey yarn means you don't know what you are talking about
* Abeg make una check this one out means please come check this out
* Hia means here
* you no sabi di tin wey we dey tok means you can't understand what we are talking about
* The tin you just yarn don vex me finish means what you just said has pissed me off
* Man dey go sleep means i am leaving or going to sleep
* The babe dey do iyanga means the girl is playing hard to get
* Nna make we gist means lets talk or gossip
* Make i gist you wetin happen means lets me tell you what happened
* That kain maths e get as e be means that kind of math is hard to understand or explain
* I go wooze you finish means that i will slap you silly
* I dey cut out means am going out
* make una come means you all should come
* we dey hia means we are here
* Na nothing means it's nothing
* " I no sabi" means I can't do it or I don't know


French Influence

Some French words are also included in Nigerian pidgin. For example, the word "boku" in pidgin means "a lot" and comes from the french word beaucoup.

Applause my guy
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by AmakaOne(f): 6:01pm On Nov 14, 2008
@server34 long tori

which kin ban pidgin on NL is the OP talking about?

Nonsense upon rubbish!

Na WAEC English Classroom we dey?

Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by server34(m): 6:07pm On Nov 14, 2008
PHEMOUR:

Applause my guy

. . . . bowing!! Thank u, thank u.
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by Mustay(m): 7:11am On Nov 15, 2008
Not another thread for this again.

Some words are better expressed in their original form.

NL's official language is English. You can always enclose pidgin language in italics. Abi no be so?
Re: Antagonism To Pidgin English In Nairaland Forum by UNLEASHED(m): 2:44pm On Nov 18, 2008
Mustay:

Not another thread for this again.

Some words are better expressed in their original form.

NL's official language is English. You can always enclose pidgin language in italics. Abi no be so?

Na so!

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