₦airaland Forum

Welcome, Guest: Join Nairaland / LOGIN! / Trending / Recent / New
Stats: 2,211,642 members, 4,828,005 topics. Date: Friday, 22 March 2019 at 09:16 AM

U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. - Travel (102) - Nairaland

Nairaland Forum / Nairaland / General / Travel / U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. (267396 Views)

Canadian Express Entry/Federal Skilled Workers Program- Connect Here Part 4 / Canadian Express Entry/Federal Skilled Workers Program-Connect Here Part 2 / Avoiding Cancellation Of USA B1/B2 Visa At The Port Of Entry, POE (2) (3) (4)

(1) (2) (3) ... (99) (100) (101) (102) (103) (104) (Reply) (Go Down)

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by jayfierce(m): 7:44pm On Jan 31
Here's my third POE transcript. Flew Delta Airlines Economy Comfort+. Best decision I've ever taken because of my long legs and flight distance to Texas. Was hoping to use the self help kiosk at Atlanta airport but I was directed to join the queue. The queue was really long and I am sure I spent almost an hour there before it got to my turn:

Me: Good morning.

CBP: Good morning. Passport please.

CBP: Where are we heading to?

Me: Mentioned somewhere in Texas.

CBP: Slightly shocked look on face with a slight smile: "Who lives there"? He said almost throwing his hands up in mock amazement.

Me: Going to visit my Sister and wife. Wifey just put to birth and I am going to see our baby.

CBP: Okay. How long are you staying?

Me: Just 8 days because I need to get back to work.

CBP: Oh? What do you do?

Me: I work as a....with.....
.
CBP: Nods. How much do you have with you?

Me: $200 in cash and......

CBP: **Stamps my passport while I was talking and I didn't get to finish.**

CBP: Hands my passport back to me: "Have a great day sir."

Me: Takes my passport. Takes a step away from his desk and turns back to him with a confused look on my face as my biometrics were not taken.

Me: "Sir, what about this?". Pointing to the biometrics machine

CBP: Looks straight at me without smiling: " You are good to go sir."

Me: Thanked him and quickly left his cubicle before I begin to create unnecessary suspicion.

Picked up my bags and one of those small dogs that sniff bags came and wouldn't leave my bag for about 30secs. I was scared that he was going to send me to secondary inspection. The officer smiled and pulled him away. I smiled back and headed to my interconnecting flight. No agric and no extra questions from any of the officers I passed.

2nd leg of flight was delayed a little and Delta tried to make up by loading us with snacks once we boarded. Asked for a sugar free drink and the hostess tried to pull my legs by asking me if I truly believed any of those drinks are sugar free. Like how can something taste so sweet and still have no sugar. Lol. Had a nice time. Economy Comfort+ is Bae.

5 Likes 1 Share

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 8:53pm On Jan 31
jayfierce:
Here's my third POE transcript. Flew Delta Airlines Economy Comfort+. Best decision I've ever taken because of my long legs and flight distance to Texas. Was hoping to use the self help kiosk at Atlanta airport but I was directed to join the queue. The queue was really long and I am sure I spent almost an hour there before it got to my turn:

2nd leg of flight was delayed a little and Delta tried to make up by loading us with snacks once we boarded. Asked for a sugar free drink and the hostess tried to pull my legs by asking me if I truly believed any of those drinks are sugar free. Like how can something taste so sweet and still have no sugar. Lol. Had a nice time. Economy Comfort+ is Bae.

Nice one bro... Hope Delta Economy Comfort is not really expensive and Congrats. smiley
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by jayfierce(m): 9:54am On Feb 01
seyewest:


Nice one bro... Hope Delta Economy Comfort is not really expensive and Congrats. smiley
Thanks a lot bro. It was expensive. Paid over 900k.

1 Like

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 1:55pm On Feb 01
jayfierce:
Thanks a lot bro. It was expensive. Paid over 900k.

Hnmmm... well it's premium economy, reason for the high amount, the most important thing is that you enjoyed the flight and the entry was seamless.

1 Like

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by yemilasko: 2:25pm On Feb 07
ijeomaobi1:
. I have been granted F1 student visa and I went with my daughter and she got F2.

Hope I can share my transcript as it just occurred about 7.15 am this morning

VO - good morning
Me and daughter- g8d morning with smile
What program are u going for- doctorate in business administration
How many schools did you apply - 2 . one in Canada and one in USA
Why this school- it gives me room of having a doctorate to be used for my career growth and for education
Who is your sponsor- uncle
Where do you work - bla bla
How long- 4 yrs but I had worked in bla bla for 7 yrs
Why going to school now- personal satisfaction and to start up my passion which is agric export so I can b among the forerunners that will move Nigeria from focusing on oil sector to agriculture
How many chikdren- 2 one is a USA citizen. Do you need to see the receipt of medical bill?

VO- not necessary
A little typing, then congratulations pls go to Victoria island for your visa pick up.

I know someone might need the above.
Good morning house. So my school is in California. I would love to be guided as per flights to take(cheapest with luggage space o .4 yrs is serious business)
And POE that's okay
Thank you

hello sis pls can you share yiur experience at the POE cuz i will be going with my 4yrs son too
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by Kaybj2: 4:32am On Feb 10
Pls I will be traveling to Houston in March and my visiting visa will be expiring August. Pls what are the likely questions at P.O.E? Do I need to have any fear abt d visa expiration cos will be there for a month ? Pls I need opinions
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 11:01pm On Feb 10
Kaybj2:
Pls I will be traveling to Houston in March and my visiting visa will be expiring August. Pls what are the likely questions at P.O.E? Do I need to have any fear abt d visa expiration cos will be there for a month ? Pls I need opinions

Go through this thread, you will get more than enough likely questions.

1 Like

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by megastu(m): 3:40pm On Feb 12
All these point of entry issues makes me scared to use my U.S visa.

That is how my previous 2 years almost expired i had to quickly rush to U.S to use it. I did renewal by dropbox last year and it is almost one year now i have not used the visa because of all these scary stories on POE questions. Hopefully, i get to use it before the 2 years expire.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by OmoBendel24: 4:47pm On Feb 12
megastu:
All these point of entry issues makes me scared to use my U.S visa.

That is how my previous 2 years almost expired i had to quickly rush to U.S to use it. I did renewal by dropbox last year and it is almost one year now i have not used the visa because of all these scary stories on POE questions. Hopefully, i get to use it before the 2 years expire.

Surprising! Why? I think you are all good and really have no reason to exactly join the SCARED crew.... You that was previously able to use an almost expired visa? Worry less methinks.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by OmoBendel24: 4:50pm On Feb 12
Culled from QUORA

What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA?

Overall the US is a pretty laid-back country and welcoming to foreign visitors. You’re not likely to offend people as long as you try your best to be polite. However, by following the tips below you can ensure the smoothest visit possible:

Don’t assume that the US is exactly the way it is portrayed on American films and series. Please leave your stereotypes and pre-conceived notions at the airport. American movies and TV shows don’t accurately represent the country.

Not everyone is wealthy (we actually have a lot of poverty, and our middle class is struggling). Not everyone is fat. Not everyone parties constantly. Not everyone lives on hamburgers. Not everyone owns a gun. Not everyone lives in New York City or Southern California.

Try to approach every person that you meet as an individual rather than a walking stereotype, and you will be well received. (This is good advice for travelling anywhere, really).

Don’t underestimate the size or diversity of the United States. The US is the third largest country in the world, after Russia and Canada (roughly tied for size with China). Every region has a distinct culture, so much so that journalist Colin Woodard proposed that America is really 11 separate nations:


Which of the 11 American nations do you live in?

Your experience as a visitor to the US will be VASTLY different in Chicago vs rural Kansas vs New England vs Alaska vs Southern California vs Atlanta, Georgia. Do some research on the culture and history of the citie(s) and state(s) you plan on visiting. Don’t expect that the whole country is a monolith. It is not.

Don’t overbook your visit. If you only have two or three weeks in the US, don’t try to hit every major attraction in the country. You can’t, and you’ll exhaust yourself trying. It’s a better idea to plan a trip in one or two regions of the country, based on your personal interests. Southern California or Florida if you love theme parks. The East Coast corridor (Boston, Philadelphia, NYC, Washington DC) for history and museums. Hawaii for beaches, volcanoes and surfing. If you love the outdoors, try the national and state parks in Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, Alaska, Utah, California, Washington or Oregon.

A road trip is a classic, all-American way to see large parts of the country. It will cost more money and take more time than you think. I would say three to four weeks is the minimum, if you want to cross from one coast to the other at a leisurely pace, with time to stop and see things on the way. Do keep in mind that a lot of the “heartland” (the area between the coastal states) is empty and really boring. There are wonderful things to see in the middle of the country, but expect hours and hours of driving past cows, oil wells, and endless open land. Download some good audiobooks.

Don’t settle for bad food. There is amazing food in the US, you just have to seek it out. Please don’t eat fast food for your entire visit and then complain that the food was bad!

Most major cities, states and regions have their own food specialties. Lobster in Maine. New York style pizza in NYC, or deep-dish pizza in Chicago. Gumbo and jambalaya in Louisiana. Giant burritos in California. Tex-Mex in Texas and the southwest. Barbecue in Memphis. Grilled salmon in the Pacific Northwest. Philly cheesesteaks. Georgia peach pie.

Research and seek these out. Ask locals you meet for their restaurant recommendations. Try the local wine or beer, and maybe the local ice cream too!

If you’re visiting a big city, you can find excellent food from all over the world, from Ethiopian to Thai to Mexican. Food carts are gaining in popularity in many American cities as well. They often serve really innovative and tasty food for less than the restaurant price.

Don’t count on speaking any language besides English. Most Americans only speak English and will expect you to do the same. If you go to a doctor or hospital they can call an interpreter for you, but otherwise you need to speak English fluently to get around. You could probably manage with just Spanish if you are visiting the southwest, but keep in mind it will be a Mexican/Latin American dialect. It’s best to brush up on your English skills before your visit.

Don’t stress out about clothes. Outside the big East Coast cities, the US is a very casual country. You’ll see people in workout clothes, sweats and sneakers everywhere. A common outfit in the US, for both men and women, is jeans, a T-shirt, sneakers, and a fleece jacket or hooded sweatshirt depending on the weather. Only very nice restaurants require men to wear sports coats.

Do some research on the local climate during the dates of your visit, and pack comfortable clothes that are appropriate for the expected weather conditions and the activities you plan on doing. If you forget something, you can buy it here (and if you’re from Europe, you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised by the low clothing prices!).

Don’t discuss politics, religion, race or money with new acquaintances. These are perfectly fine topics of conversation between close friends and family, but they are considered personal and sensitive matters. It would not be appropriate to bring them up in conversation with a person you just met. “Safe” topics of conversation include sports, the weather, movies, music, books, art, travel, hobbies and your impressions of the US.

Don’t be afraid to share your culture with Americans. We’re not exactly the most cosmopolitan people—it comes from living in such a big, geographically isolated country. Many Americans can’t afford the airfare or time off work to travel abroad. But that doesn’t mean we don’t want to hear about where you come from! You’ll find that most Americans are curious about your country, be it Sweden or Somalia. If you are not from western Europe or a major anglophone nation (Australia, New Zealand, Canada) people may not know much about your country or even where it is on a map. Don’t take offense, just talk about daily life where you live (food, work/school, what you do with your friends and family, how it compares to the US) and you will probably find plenty of interest.

Don’t be disrespectful to the police. Hopefully you are not planning to break any laws while in the US, but you might still need to deal with the police. Please keep in mind that we do have a gun violence problem in the US, and as such officers tend to be on edge. They don’t know if you have a weapon or not. In many countries, it’s normal to get out of the car to talk with the officer if you get pulled over. Don’t even think about doing that in the US as it will cause the officer to freak out and yell at you to get back in the car. If you get pulled over, roll down the window, turn off the engine, turn on the interior light if it’s dark outside, and then sit still with your hands on the steering wheel. Don’t make sudden movements or reach for things unless you’re asked to provide a document. Also, make sure to carry the proper ID (your driver’s license from home and an international driver’s license should suffice—check with your car rental agency).

Don’t expect service workers to clean up after you. Always clean up after yourself. Littering is illegal and you may have to pay a big fine if you get caught. If you go out to eat, don’t make a mess and leave garbage everywhere. The service staff are not your personal servants.

Don’t invade people’s personal space. Comfortable speaking distance in the US is about an arm’s length. If you stand closer than this you will make people nervous. When adults are formally introduced or meet for the first time, they usually shake hands. Hugs are for close friends and family (and straight guys don’t usually hug each other). Hand holding is for couples, or parents and small children. Kissing on both cheeks is seen as something European, and only very cosmopolitan people in big cities ever do it.

Don’t insult US armed service members or veterans. Americans revere the military, and those who serve or have served are honored as heroes. It’s okay to disagree with certain wars or military actions that the US was involved in—lots of Americans do too—but don’t criticize or insult the institution of the military, or armed service members or veterans. The person you are talking to may be a veteran themselves or have family members who served.

Don’t look grumpy or sulky. Americans smile a LOT! A friendly smile, eye contact and a firm handshake when you meet someone new will help you make a good impression. Outside the big cities, it’s normal to smile and say “hi” to strangers, and stop to chat with people you know.

If you visit the US, I hope you have an amazing time exploring this wonderful country! Feel free to send me a message with specific questions and I will try to help.

- Elisabeth Arian, Freelance QA Tester (2017-present)

5 Likes

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by Electroweb(m): 5:35pm On Feb 12
OmoBendel24:
Culled from QUORA

What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA?

Overall the US is a pretty laid-back country and welcoming to foreign visitors. You’re not likely to offend people as long as you try your best to be polite. However, by following the tips below you can ensure the smoothest visit possible:

Don’t assume that the US is exactly the way it is portrayed on American films and series. Please leave your stereotypes and pre-conceived notions at the airport. American movies and TV shows don’t accurately represent the country.

Not everyone is wealthy (we actually have a lot of poverty, and our middle class is struggling). Not everyone is fat. Not everyone parties constantly. Not everyone lives on hamburgers. Not everyone owns a gun. Not everyone lives in New York City or Southern California.

Try to approach every person that you meet as an individual rather than a walking stereotype, and you will be well received. (This is good advice for travelling anywhere, really).

Don’t underestimate the size or diversity of the United States. The US is the third largest country in the world, after Russia and Canada (roughly tied for size with China). Every region has a distinct culture, so much so that journalist Colin Woodard proposed that America is really 11 separate nations:


Which of the 11 American nations do you live in?

Your experience as a visitor to the US will be VASTLY different in Chicago vs rural Kansas vs New England vs Alaska vs Southern California vs Atlanta, Georgia. Do some research on the culture and history of the citie(s) and state(s) you plan on visiting. Don’t expect that the whole country is a monolith. It is not.

Don’t overbook your visit. If you only have two or three weeks in the US, don’t try to hit every major attraction in the country. You can’t, and you’ll exhaust yourself trying. It’s a better idea to plan a trip in one or two regions of the country, based on your personal interests. Southern California or Florida if you love theme parks. The East Coast corridor (Boston, Philadelphia, NYC, Washington DC) for history and museums. Hawaii for beaches, volcanoes and surfing. If you love the outdoors, try the national and state parks in Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, Alaska, Utah, California, Washington or Oregon.

A road trip is a classic, all-American way to see large parts of the country. It will cost more money and take more time than you think. I would say three to four weeks is the minimum, if you want to cross from one coast to the other at a leisurely pace, with time to stop and see things on the way. Do keep in mind that a lot of the “heartland” (the area between the coastal states) is empty and really boring. There are wonderful things to see in the middle of the country, but expect hours and hours of driving past cows, oil wells, and endless open land. Download some good audiobooks.

Don’t settle for bad food. There is amazing food in the US, you just have to seek it out. Please don’t eat fast food for your entire visit and then complain that the food was bad!

Most major cities, states and regions have their own food specialties. Lobster in Maine. New York style pizza in NYC, or deep-dish pizza in Chicago. Gumbo and jambalaya in Louisiana. Giant burritos in California. Tex-Mex in Texas and the southwest. Barbecue in Memphis. Grilled salmon in the Pacific Northwest. Philly cheesesteaks. Georgia peach pie.

Research and seek these out. Ask locals you meet for their restaurant recommendations. Try the local wine or beer, and maybe the local ice cream too!

If you’re visiting a big city, you can find excellent food from all over the world, from Ethiopian to Thai to Mexican. Food carts are gaining in popularity in many American cities as well. They often serve really innovative and tasty food for less than the restaurant price.

Don’t count on speaking any language besides English. Most Americans only speak English and will expect you to do the same. If you go to a doctor or hospital they can call an interpreter for you, but otherwise you need to speak English fluently to get around. You could probably manage with just Spanish if you are visiting the southwest, but keep in mind it will be a Mexican/Latin American dialect. It’s best to brush up on your English skills before your visit.

Don’t stress out about clothes. Outside the big East Coast cities, the US is a very casual country. You’ll see people in workout clothes, sweats and sneakers everywhere. A common outfit in the US, for both men and women, is jeans, a T-shirt, sneakers, and a fleece jacket or hooded sweatshirt depending on the weather. Only very nice restaurants require men to wear sports coats.

Do some research on the local climate during the dates of your visit, and pack comfortable clothes that are appropriate for the expected weather conditions and the activities you plan on doing. If you forget something, you can buy it here (and if you’re from Europe, you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised by the low clothing prices!).

Don’t discuss politics, religion, race or money with new acquaintances. These are perfectly fine topics of conversation between close friends and family, but they are considered personal and sensitive matters. It would not be appropriate to bring them up in conversation with a person you just met. “Safe” topics of conversation include sports, the weather, movies, music, books, art, travel, hobbies and your impressions of the US.

Don’t be afraid to share your culture with Americans. We’re not exactly the most cosmopolitan people—it comes from living in such a big, geographically isolated country. Many Americans can’t afford the airfare or time off work to travel abroad. But that doesn’t mean we don’t want to hear about where you come from! You’ll find that most Americans are curious about your country, be it Sweden or Somalia. If you are not from western Europe or a major anglophone nation (Australia, New Zealand, Canada) people may not know much about your country or even where it is on a map. Don’t take offense, just talk about daily life where you live (food, work/school, what you do with your friends and family, how it compares to the US) and you will probably find plenty of interest.

Don’t be disrespectful to the police. Hopefully you are not planning to break any laws while in the US, but you might still need to deal with the police. Please keep in mind that we do have a gun violence problem in the US, and as such officers tend to be on edge. They don’t know if you have a weapon or not. In many countries, it’s normal to get out of the car to talk with the officer if you get pulled over. Don’t even think about doing that in the US as it will cause the officer to freak out and yell at you to get back in the car. If you get pulled over, roll down the window, turn off the engine, turn on the interior light if it’s dark outside, and then sit still with your hands on the steering wheel. Don’t make sudden movements or reach for things unless you’re asked to provide a document. Also, make sure to carry the proper ID (your driver’s license from home and an international driver’s license should suffice—check with your car rental agency).

Don’t expect service workers to clean up after you. Always clean up after yourself. Littering is illegal and you may have to pay a big fine if you get caught. If you go out to eat, don’t make a mess and leave garbage everywhere. The service staff are not your personal servants.

Don’t invade people’s personal space. Comfortable speaking distance in the US is about an arm’s length. If you stand closer than this you will make people nervous. When adults are formally introduced or meet for the first time, they usually shake hands. Hugs are for close friends and family (and straight guys don’t usually hug each other). Hand holding is for couples, or parents and small children. Kissing on both cheeks is seen as something European, and only very cosmopolitan people in big cities ever do it.

Don’t insult US armed service members or veterans. Americans revere the military, and those who serve or have served are honored as heroes. It’s okay to disagree with certain wars or military actions that the US was involved in—lots of Americans do too—but don’t criticize or insult the institution of the military, or armed service members or veterans. The person you are talking to may be a veteran themselves or have family members who served.

Don’t look grumpy or sulky. Americans smile a LOT! A friendly smile, eye contact and a firm handshake when you meet someone new will help you make a good impression. Outside the big cities, it’s normal to smile and say “hi” to strangers, and stop to chat with people you know.

If you visit the US, I hope you have an amazing time exploring this wonderful country! Feel free to send me a message with specific questions and I will try to help.

- Elisabeth Arian, Freelance QA Tester (2017-present)

Nice info
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 9:46pm On Feb 12
OmoBendel24:
Culled from QUORA

What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA?

Overall the US is a pretty laid-back country and welcoming to foreign visitors. You’re not likely to offend people as long as you try your best to be polite. However, by following the tips below you can ensure the smoothest visit possible:


Don’t look grumpy or sulky. Americans smile a LOT! A friendly smile, eye contact and a firm handshake when you meet someone new will help you make a good impression. Outside the big cities, it’s normal to smile and say “hi” to strangers, and stop to chat with people you know.

If you visit the US, I hope you have an amazing time exploring this wonderful country! Feel free to send me a message with specific questions and I will try to help.

- Elisabeth Arian, Freelance QA Tester (2017-present)

This is long abeg but informative...
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by OmoBendel24: 3:43pm On Feb 13
seyewest:


This is long abeg but informative...

Lolz! I have a Social Science/Arts background, this isn’t a problem to us at all, as long as it doesn’t require all those mathematical theories and calculations, we then are good. I suspect you are from the “other side” though!

2 Likes

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 6:31pm On Feb 13
OmoBendel24:


Lolz! I have a Social Science/Arts background, this isn’t a problem to us at all, as long as it doesn’t require all those mathematical theories and calculations, we then are good. I suspect you are from the “other side” though!

Used to be a Science student until I moved to social Science for Bsc... How you dey my broda? Hope all is well.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by OmoBendel24: 11:21pm On Feb 13
seyewest:


Used to be a Science student until I moved to social Science for Bsc... How you dey my broda? Hope all is well.
Oh, okay. I bam my broda, all is very well! Trust it’s so at your end too.... Many greetings to you and the family bruv.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 12:20pm On Feb 14
OmoBendel24:

Oh, okay. I bam my broda, all is very well! Trust it’s so at your end too.... Many greetings to you and the family bruv.

We're all fine...

1 Like

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by buzitins: 12:32am On Feb 20
Please house, what could make someone that has been travelling to US and also who has British visa turned back at second screening MMIA Not even US port of entry. A woman was refused bording Delta Airline to Atlantic last week. The Airline claimed they received a call from US immigration not to allow her fly.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by KaptainAfrika: 10:32am On Feb 20
Lies, misinformation, something they missed during the interview or review of the form - the person should report to the US Embassy asap, to clear any issue that may have arisen.

buzitins:
Please house, what could make someone that has been travelling to US and also who has British visa turned back at second screening MMIA Not even US port of entry. A woman was refused bording Delta Airline to Atlantic last week. The Airline claimed they received a call from US immigration not to allow her fly.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 11:02am On Feb 20
buzitins:
Please house, what could make someone that has been travelling to US and also who has British visa turned back at second screening MMIA Not even US port of entry. A woman was refused bording Delta Airline to Atlantic last week. The Airline claimed they received a call from US immigration not to allow her fly.

Too bad... Maybe they discovered something about her after the issuance of her visa, she must go to the nearest U.S Embassy as soon as possible.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by cutelass: 11:35am On Feb 24
We renewed our visa almost at the last quarter of last year. Initial visa was issued for childbirth, had two babies with it. It was the perfect profile for 221g. God showed us mercy. Passport was back in about 3 weeks. Fast forward to weeks ago, Orlando POE. Hubby, I, 2 kids. From what I've read from here, I didn't try to go to the queue for citizens, joined the visitors queue. An Indian couple with a USC baby was told by a cbp officer to join the visitors queue. From the queue I could see a man who was being attended to by a female cbp officer, laughing and being very friendly with her and I said to myself, dem go send this one to secondary...I just felt she would think he was trying to hide something by being overtly friendly. She sent him to secondary.

Cbp: addressing my husband 'where are you coming from'
Hubby: Dubai
Cbp: I mean where are you coming from (he wasn't friendly at all).
Hubby: Nigeria
Cbp: Where exactly are you coming from (almost hostile at this point). I felt he was asking for the actual city in Nigeria...all the while, the cbp officers behind who take people to secondary inspection was signalling him, one had stepped forward a bit.
Hubby: oh we live in so and so but took off from Abuja. Actually we were supposed to be here for Christmas but I had a tight schedule so we decided to squeeze in some days. We are only here for 3 days and them then we leave to Houston, few days there and we return back to Nigeria. (I don't know if it's what he said or something but the cbp became very relaxed). One the other guys signalled to him like 'should I come and take them' he waved and said something like I've got it. He stood up to see the kids and stamped us all in. Nothing was asked as per the receipts for the birth etc...it was a short but enjoyable trip anf we are back.

4 Likes

Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by ayenikunle: 12:44pm On Feb 24
Arrived IAH yesterday we evening.

Me: Good evening
CBP: Good evening, what are you here for?
Me:Conference and visit

Then asked a whole lot about the conference, my job bla bla bla... Just wondering why I was invited when they have loads of professors @ the Uni

CBP: How long will you be staying?

Me: 3 weeks

CBP: Place your fingers on the scanner and look at the camera.

Did that, stamps me in for 6 months and hands over my passport.

Me: Am I free to go?

CBP: Yes.

I flew Emirates with a connection in Dubai.

The flight from Dubai to Houston was great as I flew (emirates) in their big double deck A380 plane with excellent leg room space.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 4:56pm On Feb 24
cutelass:
We renewed our visa almost at the last quarter of last year. Initial visa was issued for childbirth, had two babies with it. It was the perfect profile for 221g. God showed us mercy. Passport was back in about 3 weeks. Fast forward to weeks ago, Orlando POE. Hubby, I, 2 kids. From what I've read from here, I didn't try to go to the queue for citizens, joined the visitors queue. An Indian couple with a USC baby was told by a cbp officer to join the visitors queue. From the queue I could see a man who was being attended to by a female cbp officer, laughing and being very friendly with her and I said to myself, dem go send this one to secondary...I just felt she would think he was trying to hide something by being overtly friendly. She sent him to secondary.

Cbp: addressing my husband 'where are you coming from'
Hubby: Dubai
Cbp: I mean where are you coming from (he wasn't friendly at all).
Hubby: Nigeria
Cbp: Where exactly are you coming from (almost hostile at this point). I felt he was asking for the actual city in Nigeria...all the while, the cbp officers behind who take people to secondary inspection was signalling him, one had stepped forward a bit.
Hubby: oh we live in so and so but took off from Abuja. Actually we were supposed to be here for Christmas but I had a tight schedule so we decided to squeeze in some days. We are only here for 3 days and them then we leave to Houston, few days there and we return back to Nigeria. (I don't know if it's what he said or something but the cbp became very relaxed). One the other guys signalled to him like 'should I come and take them' he waved and said something like I've got it. He stood up to see the kids and stamped us all in. Nothing was asked as per the receipts for the birth etc...it was a short but enjoyable trip anf we are back.


Their wahala is too much... good of your husband to explain things to him in clear and relaxing manner... which airline did you take?
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 6:28pm On Feb 24
ayenikunle:
Arrived IAH yesterday we evening.

Me: Good evening
CBP: Good evening, what are you here for?
Me:Conference and visit

Then asked a whole lot about the conference, my job bla bla bla... Just wondering why I was invited when they have loads of professors @ the Uni

CBP: How long will you be staying?

Me: 3 weeks

CBP: Place your fingers on the scanner and look at the camera.

Did that, stamps me in for 6 months and hands over my passport.

Me: Am I free to go?

CBP: Yes.

I flew Emirates with a connection in Dubai.

The flight from Dubai to Houston was great as I flew in their big double deck A380 plane with excellent leg room space.


Hope you have a splendid holiday.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by cutelass: 7:48pm On Feb 24
seyewest:


Their wahala is too much... good of your husband to explain things to him in clear and relaxing manner... which airline did you take?

Emirates. Thanks to you, we decided to depart from Abuja to enjoy the layover...we enjoyed more than you sef...23 hrs...Copthorne + free buffet breakfast, lunch, dinner...awesome experience. Same on our way back.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 10:31pm On Feb 24
cutelass:


Emirates. Thanks to you, we decided to depart from Abuja to enjoy the layover...we enjoyed more than you sef...23 hrs...Copthorne + free buffet breakfast, lunch, dinner...awesome experience. Same on our way back.

Chai.... grin grin grin We in Abuja dey enjoy ooo
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by ayenikunle: 11:33pm On Feb 24
seyewest:


Chai.... grin grin grin We in Abuja dey enjoy ooo

No be only Abuja o.. same with Lagos.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by Greatg0809: 2:27am On Feb 25
cutelass:
We renewed our visa almost at the last quarter of last year. Initial visa was issued for childbirth, had two babies with it. It was the perfect profile for 221g. God showed us mercy. Passport was back in about 3 weeks. Fast forward to weeks ago, Orlando POE. Hubby, I, 2 kids. From what I've read from here, I didn't try to go to the queue for citizens, joined the visitors queue. An Indian couple with a USC baby was told by a cbp officer to join the visitors queue. From the queue I could see a man who was being attended to by a female cbp officer, laughing and being very friendly with her and I said to myself, dem go send this one to secondary...I just felt she would think he was trying to hide something by being overtly friendly. She sent him to secondary.

Cbp: addressing my husband 'where are you coming from'
Hubby: Dubai
Cbp: I mean where are you coming from (he wasn't friendly at all).
Hubby: Nigeria
Cbp: Where exactly are you coming from (almost hostile at this point). I felt he was asking for the actual city in Nigeria...all the while, the cbp officers behind who take people to secondary inspection was signalling him, one had stepped forward a bit.
Hubby: oh we live in so and so but took off from Abuja. Actually we were supposed to be here for Christmas but I had a tight schedule so we decided to squeeze in some days. We are only here for 3 days and them then we leave to Houston, few days there and we return back to Nigeria. (I don't know if it's what he said or something but the cbp became very relaxed). One the other guys signalled to him like 'should I come and take them' he waved and said something like I've got it. He stood up to see the kids and stamped us all in. Nothing was asked as per the receipts for the birth etc...it was a short but enjoyable trip anf we are back.

Please can you post your renewal transcript pls
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 10:24am On Feb 25
Greatg0809:

Please can you post your renewal transcript pls

Take your time to read the post... The visa was renewed via dropbox nothing like interview.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by Greatg0809: 11:31am On Feb 25
seyewest:


Take your time to read the post... The visa was renewed via dropbox nothing like interview.
Lol ok
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by Redaddict: 1:47pm On Feb 25
Good day everyone, Please I need advice on the issue below:
when my Hubby and 2 kids obtained their US visa last year (I had a valid visa), they informed the VO that the kids were going on a vacation to Disney World. we couldn't make the trip last year and are planning for it this year however, we just discovered that the cost of ticket to Orlando is too expensive (N2.5million) and are considering the possibility of taking them to another state (ticket to LA or Newyork or Washington DC costs N1.3m). However, We are not sure if this change would cause any issue at the POE. Please advice. Thank you.
Re: U.S Visit: Port Of Entry Interview/stories. by seyewest(m): 4:12pm On Feb 25
Redaddict:
Good day everyone, Please I need advice on the issue below:
when my Hubby and 2 kids obtained their US visa last year (I had a valid visa), they informed the VO that the kids were going on a vacation to Disney World. we couldn't make the trip last year and are planning for it this year however, we just discovered that the cost of ticket to Orlando is too expensive (N2.5million) and are considering the possibility of taking them to another state (ticket to LA or Newyork or Washington DC costs N1.3m). However, We are not sure if this change would cause any issue at the POE. Please advice. Thank you.

Not at all just make sure that the State/City you're going to his children/family friend (Like where the kids can visit and learn something e.g Zoo, Museum, Aquarium etc)

(1) (2) (3) ... (99) (100) (101) (102) (103) (104) (Reply)

General German Student Visa Enquiries Part 5 / General U.s.a (student) Visa Enquiries-part 14 / Which Country In Africa Has The Most Beautiful Women?

(Go Up)

Sections: politics (1) business autos (1) jobs (1) career education (1) romance computers phones travel sports fashion health
religion celebs tv-movies music-radio literature webmasters programming techmarket

Links: (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Nairaland - Copyright © 2005 - 2019 Oluwaseun Osewa. All rights reserved. See How To Advertise. 387
Disclaimer: Every Nairaland member is solely responsible for anything that he/she posts or uploads on Nairaland.