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Set Apart - Literature (6) - Nairaland

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Chinua Achebe Showing Off His Book 'Things Fall Apart' In 1960 (Throwback Photo) / Achebe's 'things Fall Apart' Makes 12 'greatest Books Ever Written' List / 14 Quotes From 'Things Fall Apart' By Chinua Achebe (2) (3) (4)

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Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 6:08am On Feb 10
Kaycee9242:
Nice one Shewrites I have even forgotten dt investigation was going on.

Abi... everyday for the thief... one day for the owner...
Re: Set Apart by Nobody: 1:03am On Feb 13
SheWrites:
I will be posting the story every weekend, due to my schedule.

There are about 25 chapters in 'Set Apart', once we get to the 20th chapter, I will upload the complete story on bambooks.io

You will be able to read the rest of the story on this site.

Or you can support my ministry by getting your copy on Okadabooks.com, Litireso.com or Domingobooks.com

Thanks.


Dear Mrs shewrite,
Is there anyway I can be able to register on Amazon Kindle without having much difficulties as regards country?
It seems Nigerians aren't permitted to publish their books there.
How possible is it to pull through with the registration process without having to come across such difficulty?

However,I planned registering with okadabooks as well but,was told to pay in a certain amount of money. How authentic is this and what's the easiest way to pull through with it?





I'm an ardent fan of your works and to be candid,your works made me want to write. Though I'm more of a scientist than an artist though grin

I love your books and the way you craft every detail.

100% interesting.
Kudos and keep up the good work.

Looking forward to getting a reply from you.

1 Like

Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 5:44am On Feb 13
StacyO:



Dear Mrs shewrite,
Is there anyway I can be able to register on Amazon Kindle without having much difficulties as regards country?
It seems Nigerians aren't permitted to publish their books there.
How possible is it to pull through with the registration process without having to come across such difficulty?

However,I planned registering with okadabooks as well but,was told to pay in a certain amount of money. How authentic is this and what's the easiest way to pull through with it?





I'm an ardent fan of your works and to be candid,your works made me want to write. Though I'm more of a scientist than an artist though grin

I love your books and the way you craft every detail.

100% interesting.
Kudos and keep up the good work.

Looking forward to getting a reply from you.

Morning beautiful *hugs*

When I registered on Amazon Kindle, I was not stopped to publish as a Nigerian.

My husband is also a Nigerian and he has published books in Amazon Kindle.

The only ish is how to get paid. Amazon fancy PayPal... and Nigerians can't receive payments through this medium.

But some people have been able to bypass these policies... but if you're caught, PayPal will cage your funds.

Amazon Kindle accepts Payoneer as a payment outlet or they send you a direct cheque (I don't know how this work).

My advise, when you register on Amazon, pick Payoneer as your payout option.

I am aware that some people help writers et al to register and publish on Amazon at a fee. But my darling, you can do it yourself. Pay nobody. Except you don't have the time. Na only data the process go chop *winks*

As per Okadabooks, it is free to register and publish on their platform. Pls don't give anyone your hard earned money. They only deduct 30% from the sales of your books, likewise Amazon.

Even a Scientist can also write *winks*. In my view everybody, regardless of their profession can write.

I am available for more questions.
You can also chat me up on WhatsApp 08050445897 or mail me iyareserah@gmail.com

Have a lovely weekend *hugs*
Re: Set Apart by Nobody: 11:42am On Feb 13
SheWrites:


Morning beautiful *hugs*

When I registered on Amazon Kindle, I was not stopped to publish as a Nigerian.

My husband is also a Nigerian and he has published books in Amazon Kindle.

The only ish is how to get paid. Amazon fancy PayPal... and Nigerians can't receive payments through this medium.

But some people have been able to bypass these policies... but if you're caught, PayPal will cage your funds.

Amazon Kindle accepts Payoneer as a payment outlet or they send you a direct cheque (I don't know how this work).

My advise, when you register on Amazon, pick Payoneer as your payout option.

I am aware that some people help writers et al to register and publish on Amazon at a fee. But my darling, you can do it yourself. Pay nobody. Except you don't have the time. Na only data the process go chop *winks*

As per Okadabooks, it is free to register and publish on their platform. Pls don't give anyone your hard earned money. They only deduct 30% from the sales of your books, likewise Amazon.

Even a Scientist can also write *winks*. In my view everybody, regardless of their profession can write.

I am available for more questions.
You can also chat me up on WhatsApp 08050445897 or mail me iyareserah@gmail.com

Have a lovely weekend *hugs*


Wow!

I'm actually speechless.
However,thank you so much for this piece.









*hugs & kisses* grin
I've learnt something new.

1 Like

Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 2:42pm On Feb 13
StacyO:


Wow!
I'm actually speechless. However,thank you so much for this piece.








*hugs & kisses* grin I've learnt something new.
You're welcome.
*winks*
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 2:57pm On Feb 13
CHAPTER 11

Rukevwe began lectures at LASU School of part-time Studies, Jibowu campus. She was astounded that at twenty-two, she wasn’t the only one in her twenties at the school. Even in her department, there were people in their thirties. Some were working and schooling, others, like her, were unemployed. There were a lot of students between the ages of sixteen and twenty. She pondered on why they didn’t enroll into the university. She overheard some people discussing how the U.M.E examination had disgraced them many times over. Others didn’t have the means to support themselves financially. Working and schooling at the same time was their only option. She attended the morning classes because of her father’s reservations about her being employed before she was a graduate. No one, not even her mother, had been able to convince him to allow her to work.

One day, on her way home after lectures, while waiting at the bus-stop for a vehicle heading to Yaba, she saw her sister’s boyfriend, Chukwuemeka, in his black Hyundai car. She wanted to call out to him and wave, but saw her sister too, seated at the passenger seat! Was Ejiro in town? She rarely visited home since she began her service year in Port Harcourt. She always claimed that the transportation fare was costly.

A large vehicle halted at the bus-stop. Rukevwe got in with a few other people. She found a good seat, but sooner than expected, she was sandwiched between two other women. She endured the discomfort till the bus got to her destination. The distance between her house and the junction wasn’t that far. She could have trekked, but her curious mind made her to stop a bike. She wanted to find out if Ejiro informed their parents that she would be coming home.
The moment the bike rider stopped in front of her house, she paid him and ran to her mother’s shop, but it was locked. She hurried into the compound, let herself into the flat and went straight to the kitchen. She found her mother eating from a bowl of apples.

“Mummy, good afternoon,” she dropped her bag on the table.

“Afternoon dear. How was school today?” Itoro bit into the fruit.

“Fine ma,” she leaned against the refrigerator. “Is Ejiro back?”

Itoro raised an eye brow. “Did she tell you that she was coming home?”

She shook her head.

“I think she is waiting for the Christmas holiday before visiting. Thank God that she will be completing her service year in March next year.”

Rukevwe’s brows came together in a frown. She wasn’t happy that her sister snuck into Lagos to spend time with her boyfriend without the knowledge of her family.

Her mother noticed the expression on her face. “I miss her too. Don’t worry, she will soon be home.”

She looked at the tabletop gas cooker. “What’s for dinner?”

Itoro eyed her, “Dinner kwa? I did not cook.”

“Oh-ooooh!” She stomped her feet on the ground.

The older woman looked her up and down. “If you are hungry, go and cook.”

“Ehn…what about your husband? What will he eat?”

“None of your business.”

“Winch kain wahala bi dis sef?” She pulled the strap of her bag and dragged it out of the kitchen. She went into the room she shared with her sister, dropped the bag on the floor, kicked off her shoes and slumped on the bed. There were days she hated living with her parents.

Maybe Indomie noodles and eggs will suffice for lunch, then she might eat garri and groundnut or meat suya for dinner. She pulled out her phone from her jeans pockets and dialed her sister’s number.

“Hello…”

“Hello yourself? What are you doing in Lagos?”

There was silence at the other end of the line.

She lay on her tummy. “Don’t bother lying. I saw you in your boyfriend’s car this afternoon.”

“I am going back to Port Harcourt tomorrow morning.”

Rukevwe rolled her eyes. “Why didn’t you come home first?”

“I just came to see my boyfriend briefly.”

“How long have you been around, ehn… Ejiro?”

Her voice became stern, “Rukevwe, when did you turn into a detective?”

“Have you been sleeping at his place?” her heart missed a beat.

Silence.

“Wow! Wow! So, you have been sneaking into Lagos and you have been sleeping over at your guy’s place?”

Silence.

“Eh! Ejiroghene Etadafe,” she placed a hand on her head.

“Shut your trap and mind your own business. Is this why you called me?”

She sat up quickly. “Sister Ejiro, you are my business.”

“Gerra-out!”

“You know I am supposed to be looking up to you. What kind of example are you…”

The telephone went dead.

“Hello…” she stared at the phone.

Did her sister cut the call? She dialed the number again, but it was no longer available. She shook her head and sighed heavily. She decided not to intimate her mother. Her sister would probably come to her senses soon enough. She hoped.
Rukevwe was aware that Ejiro really, really liked the guy, but, that wasn’t enough reason to start sleeping over at his place, no matter how short the duration of the visit was.

She tried to call the number again, but, the line was switched off. She dropped the phone on the bed and climbed down. She was so hungry. She wasn’t sure if Indomie noodles would suffice anymore.

***

“Who is watching the chicken frying in that pan?” Itoro yelled from the kitchen doorway.

Tega, Ochuko’s girlfriend came running in. “Mumsie. I am watching it,” she ran to the cooker.

“Watching? The chicken is in here and you are out there playing Romeo and Juliet with Ochuko,” Itoro eyed her.

Rukevwe giggled while she cut the salad ingredients. If she laughed out loud, her mother would surely chop off her head and fry it along with the chicken.

“If you know that you are not ready to assist me, just go back in there and sit on your man’s laps. No hard feelings.”

Tega paid attention to the chicken she was frying. But it was harder not to respond while her boyfriend’s mother lashed out at her.

Itoro frowned when she saw the unattended pot of stew on the cooker. “Who is watching the stew?”

Silence.

“Who wants to burn the stew that our visitor will eat today?” her voice grew louder.

Ese, Eru’s girlfriend ran into the kitchen. “Is the stew done?”

“Ask me again,” Itoro felt like spanking her.

Ese went over to the stew she was cooking. It was cooked and ready. She turned off the burner and glanced at Tega who still had a bucket of chicken to fry.

“Let me help. I will get another pan.”

“Thanks,” Tega sighed in relief.

Ese opened the cupboard and brought out another fry pan.

“Rukevwe, are you going to deliver a baby in that spot?”

Tega and Ese giggled.

She lifted her head and met her mother’s glare.

“How long does it take to cut those vegetables?"

“Mum…”

“Please!” She raised a hand. “Put down that tray. I will do it myself. Go and check on your sister.”

Rukevwe placed the tray on the table and made her way out of the kitchen. She couldn’t wait for the day to be over. Chukwuemeka Obi and his people were coming to see her family to ask for Ejiro’s hand in marriage. It was a small introduction, but her mother was treating everyone like a hired help! She didn’t blame her. The woman simply wanted everything to go well.

“The traditional and church wedding is scheduled two weeks after my service year in March…” Ejiro conversed with two of her friends who were seated with her on the bed.

All eyes flew to the doorway when Rukevwe shut it.

“Are they here?” the excitement in her eyes melted her younger sister’s annoyance.

“Not yet.”

Ejiro lay back on the bed. “It is almost twelve. When do they plan to get here?”

Rukevwe went over to the window. “Relax sis. They will be here sooner than you think.”

“I hope so,” she turned on her side.

“You should get dressed. If mum comes in here and meets you in your pajamas…” she started to shake her head.

Ejiro hissed. “That woman… the sooner I get married and leave this house for you people, the better.”

Her friends started to laugh.

“Senami and Gbemisola are here!” she glanced at her sister, “Did you invite them?”

Ejiro jumped down from the bed. “Yes, I did. I am so glad they came,” she ran to the window.

“I heard that Senami is graduating next year and Gbemisola is now in year three.”

“I know…” Ejiro grabbed her sister by the hand. “Go and bring them.”

“Get dressed…” she pulled at her sister’s pajamas.

“I will,” Ejiro pushed her towards the door.

Rukevwe left. The last time she saw her former roommates was several months ago. Many times, they tried to call and chat her up, but she avoided them. What will they say if they found out that she was starting afresh at a part-time school? She didn’t really care. The important thing was that she was back at school.

“Rukky!”

“Oh my God!”

Senami and Gbemisola flew into her arms when she opened the door front door.

“It’s being ages…” Gbemisola eyes glistened with unshed tears.

“Where is your sister?” Senami peeped into the house. She saw Eru and Ochuko eating from a plate of fried chicken.

“In the room and she is not dressed yet.”

Senami placed her hands on her head. “That girl!” she hurried into the house.

Rukevwe met her friend’s gaze.

“You never pick my call or reply my messages. I am not your enemy.”

“I know. It’s just that…” her throat went dry with emotion.

“It’s okay,” Gbemisola pulled her close in a hug. “I miss you so, so much.”

Rukevwe chuckled. “Me too.”

She backed away, “You didn’t come back to school.”

Rukevwe shrugged. “I am now in a part-time school.”

Gbemisola laughed. “My dear, school is school. So long as you get educated.”

She heaved a sigh of relief. She expected judgement but got understanding. “You’ve got that right.”

“I want to see the bride-to-be…”

Rukevwe led her into the flat. “Come and see her. Maybe you can convince her to get dressed before her fiancé and his people arrive.”

The girls reunited and chatted for a long while. About an hour later, Itoro came into her girls’ room.

“Look at these children! Chukwuemeka is here already with his people!”

“Oh my God!” Ejiro jumped down from the bed. “Rukevwe help me with my clothes!”

Rukevwe and the other girls went into a frenzy, all in the attempt to get the bride-to-be dressed up.

****

Rukevwe got down from the bike and strolled into the compound. She had just completed her first semester examination. She was looking forward to a refreshing holiday. She thought of her elder sister. Ejiro was supposed to complete her service year and come home to get married to her heartthrob before easter.

“Hello stranger.”

The familiar voice filled her ears. She turned around saw her sister standing by the gate, holding her luggage and smiling at her.

“Ejiro!” she could hardly believe her own eyes.

“Wow! Look at you. You have eaten mummy’s food and added weight.”

She chuckled and ran into her sister’s arms. “You look good too.”

“What did you expect?”

They both laughed. Rukevwe helped her sister with some of her luggage. They dragged them into the house, and went straight to their room.

“My oh my,” Ejiro looked around the bedroom. “You have turned this room into…”

“My territory, my kingdom,” she shoved her sister’s luggage to a corner.

Ejiro couldn’t help laughing.

“Dad said that you can stay in the boy’s room till after the wedding,” she settled on the bed.

“Yuck! That’s Eru and Ochuko’s former room.”

“Yeah, it is now a guest room.”

Eyes widened. “So, I am now a guest.”

“You are the one getting married in three weeks’ time,” Rukevwe stuck out her tongue at her.

“Okay, no wahala. I don’t blame you people at all.”

She chuckled and sized up her sister. She looked fuller in all the right places and had a certain glow on her dark skin.

“I am famished,” Ejiro sat beside her.

“I think there is rice and stew in the kitchen.”
Ejiro hissed. “Fresh or leftover?”

She started to clap her hands. “Beggars don’t have choices.”

She hissed again. “I am in my father’s house. Go and bring me food.”

“Soon, all roads will lead to your husband’s house.”

Ejiro pushed her till she got up. “I hear you. Food, Rukevwe, give me food.”

Her sister went out and returned with a plate of white rice, garnished with fish stew, sliced boiled eggs and sweet potato.

Ejiro’s mouth watered at the sight of the food. “Eh-ehn, this is what I am talking about,” she pulled off her boots and loosened her belt.

Rukevwe placed the tray on the bed and returned to the kitchen. She picked a glass cup from the shelf and a bottle of water from the fridge. She walked back to the room and met her sister eating as if she’d been starving all day.

“Man, you are hungry,” she placed the bottle on the floor after filling the glass cup with water.

“You have no idea,” Ejiro collected the cup and took a long drink.

Rukevwe sat on the bed and watched her.
“Senami, Gbemisola and our brothers’ girlfriends are going to be my bridesmaids, right?”

Ejiro nodded her head and continued eating.
“Have you called them?”

She swallowed the food in her mouth. “Yes.”

“What about your chief bride’s maid? Who is she?”

She winked at her sister. “Oghenerukevwe Etadafe.”

Rukevwe started to laugh. “See Trouble in Form Six. Who will pay for my clothes, shoes, bags, jewelry, hair-do, everything?!”

Ejiro drained the glass cup. “Don’t panic. I’ve got you covered.”

“Cool,” her thoughts travelled to the wedding day. She was sure that she would look beautiful beside her sister.

Itoro knocked and came in, “Corper, you are back.”

“Mummy,” she raised her head.

Itoro was happy when she heard the voice of her older daughter on her way to her own room. She had been expecting the girl to come home since last week. “Welcome. Eat, ehn. Tonight, I will pound yam for you.”

“Thank you, mum,” she swallowed the food in her mouth.

Her sister hissed.

“Are you jealous? When you serve, I will pound yam for you too.”

Rukevwe hissed again. “Part-time students do not serve.”

“Says who?” her mum and sister chorused.

She crossed her legs. “Don’t know, don’t care. But those are the rules.”

Ejiro shared a glance with her mother. “Doh…na wa o,” she refilled the glass with water.

“Ehn…don’t worry, when you graduate, I will pamper you too.”

“I hear you,” she rolled her eyes.

Itoro leaned against the wall and sized up her daughter. She looked at her face, then her hands and legs. Her heart beat accelerated. “Ejiro…”

“Ma…” she looked up at her mum.

“How many months?” Itoro’s concerned stare bore into the younger girl’s shocked ones.

Ejiro blinked, then looked away. She ate the last grain of rice and dropped the empty plate on the floor.

Her brows came together in a frown. “How far gone are you?”

Ejiro drank every drop of water in the glass and placed it on the plate.

The girl’s silence confirmed her fears. “I asked you a question!”

Rukevwe looked from her mother to her sister. What were they talking about? She was totally lost.

“Are you still in your first trimester?!” Her voice hit the roof.

Trimester? Was her sister pregnant? No wonder she was glowing and looking round and full. Rukevwe’s hand went over her mouth. Her eyes fell on her sister who looked unremorseful.

“Mum, why all these JAMB questions? Haba,” Ejiro arranged some pillows on the wall.

“You are very, very stupid!” Itoro’s dark eyes turned red.

She leaned against the pillows on the wall. “My wedding is in three weeks. I am approaching my second trimester and it is not going to show.”

Itoro ran a hand through her braids. “It is not your fault. You think you are now grown, abi?”

“Take a chill pill mum,” she rubbed a hand on her tummy.

“God punish that your mouth!” She approached the girl.

Rukevwe got up quickly and stood in between her mother and her sister.

“I don’t understand what I have done wrong,” Ejiro got up and stood in the middle of the bed and folded her arms across her chest.

“You are mad! You don’t know what you have done wrong…”

Itoro attempted to climb the bed, but Rukevwe blocked her way.

“Something is wrong with your brain. When did God start supporting sex before marriage?”

Ejiro hissed. “Are you God? Ehn…mama, are you God?”

The woman pulled off her slippers and flung it at the girl. One hit her on the head and the other on the chest.

“Mama!” Rukevwe hoped her sister wasn’t injured. She began to wish that her brothers were still living with them. Where was her father? She thought he was in his Chemist shop.

“Yeh! Ah my head! Oh, my chest!” she held her head. “Do you want to kill me? Do you want to injure your first grandchild?”

“What child? That bastard in your tummy?!”

Ejiro glared at her mother. “My child is not a bastard. The father is Chukwuemeka Obi.”

“God punish both of you,” Itoro spat at the girl.

“Yuck!” she cleaned the spittle on her arm.

Rukevwe made an attempt to pull her mother towards the door. She wished her father would leave his shop and come into the house. But she doubted if he could hear them.

“If God punishes us, you won’t be left out. You will partake of this punishment!”

Itoro freed herself from Rukevwe’s grip. She picked up the plate and the glass cup and flung them at her older daughter. The girl dropped on her knees in an instant, dodging the flying utensils. They hit the wall, one after the other and the pieces went in different directions.

“So, you want to kill me! Ah! I can see your true colours. Come on, go ahead, come and kill me!” she got on her feet again.

Rukevwe wished her sister would keep quiet. Her attitude was fueling their mother’s anger. “Ejiro! Stop it!” she held her mother by the elbow.

She panted for breath, fuming. “Stop what? Are you supporting her?” she eyed her sister. “Do you want to compare yourself to me? You that five men have rendered your private part completely useless.”

Mother and daughter became still, they looked at Ejiro in shock. Neither could believe that she uttered those unkind words.

“Just one man have seen my unclothedness. Just one man ooooo! And my mother wants to kill me.”

Tears streamed down Rukevwe’s face. Her sister’s words had hit a spot that still hurt her deeply. She let go of her mother and walked out of the room.

“I don’t know that you have decided to ruin your life,” Itoro applauded her. “Congratulations! Well done!” she spat on the floor and marched out.

Ejiro hissed and hissed again. She settled back on the bed and took a long deep breath. She tried to relax, but her body was shaking as if it was connected to a life wire. She placed her hands on her round tummy and sighed. Her four months old pregnancy was becoming obvious. She doubted if she would be able to fit into her wedding dress. She might need to get a bigger one.

She didn’t understand why her mother was so angry. The woman was supposed to be happy for her and supportive. Other mothers would have done just that. Was it her fault that she took in? After all, her body cells were not made up of wood and plastic. She had held onto her virginity for as long as she could remember. At twenty-four, giving herself to someone she loved, was more than an accomplishment.

3 Likes

Re: Set Apart by aprilwise(m): 4:43pm On Feb 13
Ejiro do not try at all how could she say such words to her sister. She doesn't know what's a stake. Thanks for the update
Re: Set Apart by crossfm: 5:09pm On Feb 13
The wards of Heraclitus comes to mind,"the only constant thing is change ".

I can't believe what I just read now.This new version of Ejiro is a big surprise.
Her change is so drastic and her words vulgar.

She thinks getting married is the end of the world. It's either her husband to be has been influencing her negatively or she has been like this from the onset.

Thanks shewrites.In the voice of Mr macaroni," you are doing well".
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 6:56pm On Feb 13
aprilwise:
Ejiro do not try at all how could she say such words to her sister. She doesn't know what's a stake. Thanks for the update

You're welcome.
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 6:57pm On Feb 13
crossfm:
The wards of Heraclitus comes to mind,"the only constant thing is change ".

I can't believe what I just read now.This new version of Ejiro is a big surprise.
Her change is so drastic and her words vulgar.

She thinks getting married is the end of the world. It's either her husband to be has been influencing her negatively or she has been like this from the onset.

Thanks shewrites.In the voice of Mr macaroni," you are doing well".

Hehehehe... thanks
Re: Set Apart by Ann2012(f): 8:52pm On Feb 13
Hmmmm Ejiro.... I pray all ends well for you ooo

Thanks for the update ma’am
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 9:18pm On Feb 13
Ann2012:
Hmmmm Ejiro.... I pray all ends well for you ooo

Thanks for the update ma’am

*winks*
Re: Set Apart by yewande1234(f): 11:58am On Feb 14
Ma'am when will this story be up on okadabooks
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 2:27pm On Feb 14
yewande1234:
Ma'am when will this story be up on okadabooks

Hi, once we get to Chapter 20, I will upload the complete story on bambooks.io, Okadabooks etc
Re: Set Apart by YoungBruzzy: 4:37pm On Feb 14
Thanks for the update ma'am.. Now Ejiro is being senseless undecided simply because she is getting married in three weeks time.. That's alright, I just hope that Rukevwe can also find a man for herself.. Don't even know whether the wedding will take place or not ..
Re: Set Apart by HORLADSTAR(m): 5:51pm On Feb 14
I gotta pitch my tent here mehn cos I can't avoid to miss this story no more.
A very captivating story you got going here, keep it going ma'am.
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 8:42pm On Feb 14
HORLADSTAR:
I gotta pitch my tent here mehn cos I can't avoid to miss this story no more.

A very captivating story you got going here, keep it going ma'am.

Thanks *winks*
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 8:44pm On Feb 14
Happy Valentine's Day everyone kiss
Enjoy ;-)
Re: Set Apart by Adeola25(f): 8:50pm On Feb 14
Ejiro have turned to something else oo. But I hope it's pregnancy hormones sha...Thanks for the update ma'am
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 8:56pm On Feb 14
CHAPTER 12

Oghenekaro came into the flat and found Rukevwe seated on the floor in the sitting room, sobbing as if her whole life had ended. He stood at the doorway for a while, watching the girl, speculating on what the matter was. His heart missed a beat when the thought that she must have had another night or day vision crossed his mind.

“Rukevwe…” he hurried to her side. “What is it? Talk to me.”

She raised her head to meet her father’s worried countenance. “Ejiro…” she whimpered.

His eyes grew wide with fear. “What happened to your sister? Is she okay? Did God reveal something to you about her?”

She shook her head and dropped her gaze.

“Rukevwe talk to me.”

“Ejiro said… she said my… my private part has been rendered completely useless by those men.”

He opened his mouth and closed it. He couldn’t fathom what made his older daughter to speak in such a manner to her sister.

“She said what?!” his voice hit the roof.

Itoro walked in. “I don’t know what has come over the girl. She is acting as if she is possessed or something.”

He regarded his wife. “Is she back from Port Harcourt?”

She made herself comfortable on the chair closest to the television. “Yes. And since then, all hell has broken loose.”

His brows came together in a frown. “What’s going on?”

Itoro gave a shake of head. “Your daughter is pregnant and unremorseful about it.”

Oghenekaro could hardly believe his ears. He used to pride himself with the fact that his daughters and even his sons were disciplined. None of them had given him cause to worry or fear. He could beat his chest and vouch any day, anytime that his daughters were virgins, “She is what?!” the room vibrated.

“She is pregnant, my husband.”

A sudden headache took over his head. It was as if his brain was splitting in two. “Ejiro! Ejiro! Ejiroghene!”

The twenty-four-year-old strode into the sitting room. “Who did I offend? Why did I come home? Who send me message sef? I should have just gone straight to Chukwuemeka’s place.”

Oghenekaro and Itoro shared a confused glance.

Ejiro continued talking to herself. “Am I the first lady to get pregnant out of wedlock? Ehn? Why are you people behaving like stone age men? The world has gone beyond your level of understanding. Both of you are no longer current. You don’t know what is happening,” she eyed her mother, then looked her father up and down.

Rukevwe stared at her sister like one who had lost her marbles.

He placed a hand on his chest. “Ejiro, you are calling me and your mother stone age men.”

The girl hissed and sat on the settee. “Daddy, what else do you want me to say? Your wife has already pronounced judgement on myself and my fiancé. She has decided to play God, and I…”

“Shut your mouth!” he felt like giving her a sound beating.

Ejiro jerked at the tone of her father’s voice. The rage in his eyes terrified her, but she knew that he would never lay a finger on her. The man stopped beating her and her siblings when they all turned eighteen.

“Can you imagine?” he looked at his wife.

“She thinks she is all grown up. She thinks she can say or do whatever she likes. I am so, so sorry for her,” Itoro snarled at the girl.

“I don’t believe this…” Oghenekaro started to pace the room. “First and foremost, you must apologize to your younger sister.”

Ejiro turned to look at her sister. The girl seemed unhappy and distraught. She bit at her lower lip. She knew that she was the cause of her sister’s wounded state.

“Number two, we are going to sort this… this your unwarranted issue out as a family,” he directed his gaze at his wife. “Please call Ochuko. I will call Eru.”

Itoro got up and left the room.

“I said you should apologize to your sister!” his red eyes met her reluctant ones.

Ejiro cleared her throat. “I… I am sorry. I didn’t mean to... to, you know?”

Rukevwe raised an eyebrow. “I don’t believe you.”
She opened her mouth, then turned to her father.

Oghenekaro folded his arms across his chest. “Convince her.”

She adjusted her sitting position. How was she supposed to persuade the girl and assure her that she didn’t mean what she said? She had no intention of reminding her of her ugly past or reopening the scars of her wounds.

****

Eru walked into the large office. He adjusted the hand of the knapsack on his shoulder and waved a greeting at the people in the room. He located his brother’s desk and settled down on the spare seat opposite the table.

“Hey…”

“What’s up?”

“Are you ready to leave?”

Ochuko shook his head. “Almost through. My oga gave me something to do at the last minute."

“Oh…” he eyed the pile of folders on his brother’s desk. “Did dad call you?” He crossed his legs.

Ochuko gave a shake of head, “No, but mum did. She said something about Ejiro disgracing the family and et cetera,” his eyes remained on the monitor.

Eru nodded in affirmation. “Dad said she is pregnant.”

He lifted his eyes to meet his brother’s tired gaze. “Seriously?”

“Yep.”

“That girl…” he hissed.

Eru leaned against the leather chair. “Can you blame her? Didn’t you see the way Chukwuemeka was looking at her during the introduction ceremony?”

His brother started to laugh. “Yeah, I saw him too. He was staring at her like a lion dissecting its prey with visual teeth.”

Eru burst into laughter.

Ochuko’s brows creased in a frown. “Mum is mad.”

“So is dad. But, what is done is done. We cannot turn back the hands of time.”

“Hmmm…” he dropped his head and continued typing. “Are you going there now?”

“Yes. I guess I have to wait for you, shey?”

“Yep. But I doubt if there will be food in that house today.”

Eru smiled. “We will eat something somewhere before going to settle the war, the fight and the indaboski.”

Ochuko couldn’t help but roar with laughter.

****

Ejiro and Chukwuemeka were ushered into the vehicle after they had taken pictures with their family and friends outside the court house, alongside their best man and chief bride’s maid. They arrived at the reception hall in less than twenty minutes.

“I will let the MC know that we have arrived,” the best man, Andy, came out of the vehicle.

“Thanks man, get us some drinks on your way back,” Chukwuemeka called after his friend.

“Sure,” Andy responded and left.

“I will go and get us some food. It is advisable to eat now before all the dancing starts,” Rukevwe climbed out of the car.

“You are right. I once heard of a couple who didn’t taste a spoon out of all the delicacies their caterer made. They left their own reception on empty stomachs,” Chukwuemeka added.

“God forbid!” Ejiro hissed. “I want pounded yam and melon soup with catfish,” she instructed her sister.

“Roger that,” she winked at her and cat-walked away.

Chukwuemeka pulled his wife into his arms. “I can’t wait for us to get to the hotel,” he whispered in her ears.

Ejiro giggled. “Me too.”

“Hope you are ready for some pounding tonight."

Ejiro started to laugh. She was happy that her traditional and court wedding went well as planned. Although they had to scrap the church wedding because her pregnancy was beginning to show. And the pastor that was supposed to officiate the ceremony told them that it was against the church’s rule to wed couples who were already expecting a baby. She found the policy harsh.

“I am more than ready, my love,” her gaze bored into his.

His eyes began to twinkle, “Or should we abandon the wedding guest and flee to the hotel?”

She started to laugh again.

“What’s funny? I am sure you have been dreaming of our wedding night for days and weeks now,” he started to tickle her.

“Emeka stop it!” her screams rented the air.

The best man returned with bottles of wine and glasses. “The wine is chilled, man,” he stood by the window.

“Great…” Chukwuemeka adjusted his tie.

Rukevwe came back bearing a large tray of food. “We need to eat fast. The MC said he will call us in the next ten minutes.”

Ejiro hissed. “They will wait until I am done eating.”

“Exactly, he doesn’t know that she is eating for two, or three sef,” her husband added.

Rukevwe and Andy exchanged glances and they began to laugh.

Hours later, Chukwuemeka and Ejiro left the reception hall and were driven to their honeymoon suite at Sheraton hotel.

****

Rukevwe stood beside the vehicle that was supposed to take them home. Her parents were already seated, but the driver couldn’t leave because they were waiting for Eru and Ochuko. The boys were at the junction, trying to secure a cab that would take their girlfriends home.

“Rukevwe, please go and look for your brothers,” Itoro looked out of the window of the car.

She grumbled and stood where she was. She was in no shape to start walking around and searching for two grown men. Telling her mother that might spark an argument.

“Why are we even waiting for them? Can’t they find their own way home?” Oghenekaro hissed.

“They said it is too late to get to their own apartment. They are coming home with us,” Rukevwe pulled off her high heeled shoes. She was happy that she brought along a pair of slippers.

Her father hissed again. “Maybe you should go and look for them. I can’t sit here and wait.”

Rukevwe looked towards the junction and saw her brothers approaching the gate of the reception hall. She heaved a sigh of relief. “They are here.”

“Thank God,” Itoro leaned against the car seat. She closed her eyes and started to doze off.

Oghenekaro hissed again. He was extremely worn out. All he wanted to do was to shower and sleep.

Rukevwe and her family arrived home an hour and half before midnight that day. She went straight to her room, her parents retired to theirs and her brothers went to the guest room.

“I am so happy it’s all over now,” Ochuko pulled off his jacket.

“Same here. This year, I will be clocking twenty-eight,” Eru lay on the bed. “It will make perfect sense to get married now.”

Ochuko eyed him. “Are you sure you are ready to be tied to one woman for the rest of your life?”

“Yes, I am. I love Ese and she is the one for me."

Ochuko was silent for a while. “This means that there might be another wedding in the family this year,” he winked at his brother.

Eru started to laugh. “You got that right.”

He lay beside his brother. “Tega isn’t bad either. Aside a few of her shenanigans, she is a good woman.”

Eru turned to look at his younger brother. “So, are you also willing to tie the knot this year?”

“I am thinking about it?” he closed his eyes.

Eru placed a pillow under his head. He wondered how their parents would feel if they told them that they might be getting married simultaneously that same year.

****

Six months pregnant Ejiro stirred the soup in the pot and covered it. She slow-walked out of the kitchen and strolled into the master bedroom. She sat on the bed, arranged some pillows and lay on her back.

Chukwuemeka walked into the room fuming. “How long does it take you to cook? I came back from work two hours ago, yet, no food,” he glared at her.

She looked up at him and smiled. Her husband actually returned home from work about forty-five minutes ago, but there was no need to correct him. “Please, please be patient.”

“Patient? For how long?” his angry eyes bored into her calm ones.

She dropped her gaze and kept quiet.

“Didn’t your common sense tell you to make sure that your husband’s food is ready before he returns from work?”

She sighed and raised her head to meet his glower. “Honey…”

“Don’t honey me!” he looked her up and down.

“Dear, you know I went to the clinic today.”

“So?” his face hardened. “Are you the only one going for Ante-natal brouhaha?”

“They didn’t release us till around two, then I went to the market. And by the time I started cooking, it was like five or so.”

“I don’t care!” He thundered.

She trembled at the sound of his voice. It was the first time she was seeing him that angry.

“I am hungry. I want my food now!” He walked up to her and dragged her down.

“Chukwuemeka!” her heart missed a beat. “Take it easy now,” she steadied herself and frowned at him.

“Get me my food!” he stood toe to toe with her.

She backed away. She didn’t know what possessed her husband that evening. It wasn’t the first time his dinner had been delayed. “The soup is not yet ready. Please be patient.”

“Go and bring me my food,” he gave her a push towards the door.

She lost her balance, staggered and almost fell flat on her tummy. “Emeka!” Her heart beat quickened. She held her round stomach and looked up at him. “What is wrong with you? What if I had fallen?” Her throat tightened and tears gathered in her eyes.

“I will not repeat myself,” he pointed a finger at her. “Go and get my food.”

“Am I the fire? Do I look like the gas cooker to you?” she eyed him. She was hurt because he wasn’t even remorseful. “Abeg, abeg, abeg…”
She tried to seat at the edge of the bed, but he pulled her by the hand and pushed her towards the door again. This time around, she fell on her buttocks and shrieked in pain.

“Get up! Lazy bones! Get up!”

“You are crazy! Do you want to kill me? Do you want to kill the baby?!” She looked him in the eye with tears streaming down hers.

He pulled her by the hand again. “Get up!”

“Leave me alone!” When she couldn’t free her hand from his grip, she bit into his flesh.

He yelled in pain and hit her across the face with the other hand. Then yanked his bitten hand free from her sharp teeth.

“Witch! Look at my hand! She wants to suck my blood!” he stared at the teeth marks. Blood flowed freely from the bruise.

She held her hurting face and began to sob. It was the first he was hitting her. She had no idea that the man she married was capable of such atrocity.

“It is my blood you want to go and donate to your coven, right? You will not succeed. You hear me? It will not work,” he picked his car keys from the bedside table and marched out of the bedroom.

Her sobs got louder. She checked her tummy and other parts of the body, hoping that she didn’t hurt herself when she fell. Her mind travelled to her dating period. Chukwuemeka didn’t show such crazy tendencies while he courted her. What was going on? It’s been barely eight weeks since they got married. Did he change? Or was she overwhelmed with his love and gifts and missed one or two warning signals?

10 Likes

Re: Set Apart by crossfm: 11:11pm On Feb 14
Welcome to the world of marriage Ejiro.

Ejiro the computer age lady,it's time to make use of all your technology to solve your marital problem.

You failed to look before you leaped.

Marriage is a serious business,and I ascribe to doing your background check before saying I do,just the way it was done in the olden days.

Thanks shewrites for the update.

2 Likes

Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 2:03am On Feb 15
crossfm:
Welcome to the world of marriage Ejiro.

Ejiro the computer age lady,it's time to make us of all your technology to solve your marital problem.

You failed to look before you leaped.

Marriage is a serious business,and I ascribe to doing your background check before saying I do,just the way it was done in the olden days.

Thanks shewrites for the update.








*winks*
Re: Set Apart by Kaycee9242(m): 11:40am On Feb 15
Nice one Shewrites
Re: Set Apart by izaray(f): 12:09pm On Feb 15
Interesting, thanks for the update ma'am
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 12:20pm On Feb 15
Kaycee9242:
Nice one Shewrites
*winks*
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 12:21pm On Feb 15
izaray:
Interesting, thanks for the update ma'am
You're welcome
Re: Set Apart by Liposure: 1:08pm On Feb 15
SheWrites:

You're welcome
I'm enjoying your work even tho i'm behind schedule.
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 4:19pm On Feb 15
Liposure:
I'm enjoying your work even tho i'm behind schedule.

Thanks. No wahala
Re: Set Apart by Halyma(f): 11:31am On Feb 16
Well done Mama!!!
Re: Set Apart by SheWrites(f): 7:34pm On Feb 16
Halyma:
Well done Mama!!!
Thank you *hugs*
Re: Set Apart by bimberry1307(f): 10:48am On Feb 17
I'm already sending a hug to the person (hubby) that recommended your books to me. He's actually someone you know.

Btw, thanks ma'am for this wonderful piece. Can't wait to see the end.
Re: Set Apart by Halyma(f): 12:53pm On Feb 17
It has been a while Rukky dreamt?

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