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Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? - Foreign Affairs - Nairaland

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Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 10:56pm On Apr 07, 2011
Okay we have seen all of Africa's recent problems and most responses can be categorized as Pro-West and Anti-West, but what about solutions? I was watching a lecture by Philip Emaegwali and he made a good case that technology is the answer to Africa's problems, what do you think?
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 7:48am On Apr 10, 2011
@2muchlogic
i'm very optimistic that technology will go a long way in solving Africa's problem.
1. Militarily if our technology is well advanced we won't be looking up to developed nations for armaments and because they are very expensive we can't arm our armed forces up to standard(international)
2. Economically Africa is like a dumping ground for the advanced nation,since we can't produce most of our needs ourselves we import almost everything and from our basic economics we know when import outweight export development can't be meaningful. We've most of the raw materials the world need yet we export raw material and import finished produce,what an economic waste.
Politically since militarily we're down and economically then its very definite we're down politically,for any slight development we want to attain we've to call on the advanced nation of the world and its just natural that your master will not want you to grow beyond him.
If we start to increase our technology our dependence will start decreasing hence development will set in. For example our oil is explored by African oil company and then sold to whoever wants it outside Africa rather than our oil being explored by foreign companies then sold back to us same for other resources in Africa.
We produce our motors,planes,weapons e.t.c. Our problem will start reducing.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 10:03am On Apr 10, 2011
cdoffx:

@2muchlogic
i'm very optimistic that technology will go a long way in solving Africa's problem.


Thats great.

cdoffx:

1. Militarily if our technology is well advanced we won't be looking up to developed nations for armaments and because they are very expensive we can't arm our armed forces up to standard(international)

A strong army cannot be built without world class education and communication; African centered scientific education will give one the means to produce weps that have not even been invented yet and communication amongst africa's numerous ethnic groups will lead to UNITY.

cdoffx:

2. Economically Africa is like a dumping ground for the advanced nation,since we can't produce most of our needs ourselves we import almost everything and from our basic economics we know when import outweight export development can't be meaningful. We've most of the raw materials the world need yet we export raw material and import finished produce,what an economic waste.

Unbelievably SAD!

cdoffx:


If we start to increase our technology our dependence will start decreasing hence development will set in. For example our oil is explored by African oil company and then sold to whoever wants it outside Africa rather than our oil being explored by foreign companies then sold back to us same for other resources in Africa.
We produce our motors,planes,weapons e.t.c. Our problem will start reducing.

spot on, not only that it will create mass employment and Africa will start to use its own resources. The implication will be an increase in the price of Africas raw materials – its a win win solution.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 5:48pm On Apr 10, 2011
2muchlogic:



Thats great.

A strong army cannot be built without world class education and communication; African centered scientific education will give one the means to produce weps that have not even been invented yet and communication amongst africa's numerous ethnic groups will lead to UNITY.

Unbelievably SAD!

spot on, not only that it will create mass employment and Africa will start to use its own resources. The implication will be an increase in the price of Africas raw materials – its a win win solution.


exactly.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 5:50pm On Apr 10, 2011
2muchlogic:



Thats great.

A strong army cannot be built without world class education and communication; African centered scientific education will give one the means to produce weps that have not even been invented yet and communication amongst africa's numerous ethnic groups will lead to UNITY.

Unbelievably SAD!

spot on, not only that it will create mass employment and Africa will start to use its own resources. The implication will be an increase in the price of Africas raw materials – its a win win solution.


exactly.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 5:50pm On Apr 10, 2011
2muchlogic:



Thats great.

A strong army cannot be built without world class education and communication; African centered scientific education will give one the means to produce weps that have not even been invented yet and communication amongst africa's numerous ethnic groups will lead to UNITY.

Unbelievably SAD!

spot on, not only that it will create mass employment and Africa will start to use its own resources. The implication will be an increase in the price of Africas raw materials – its a win win solution.


exactly.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by AjanleKoko: 7:52pm On Apr 10, 2011
Technology is good. But what will really solve Africa's problems is the establishment of strong institutions, made up of strong men who have a passion for the emancipation and growth of the continent, and have the right balance of wisdom, guts, and integrity. Men who can navigate the global political scene and force-feed Africa with the needed paradigm shift.

We can all see the impact of ICT on governance, how it aided the protest movements in North Africa, and how it has helped to create a huge buzz with respect to Nigeria's 2011 elections. Right now political stability is what Africans should fight for, getting leaders in place who have the continent's interest at heart, and who can stand up for development.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by Rossikk(m): 12:07am On Apr 11, 2011
cdoffx said:

since we can't produce most of our needs ourselves we import almost everything


No. We import almost everything because we don't produce most of our needs, not because we can't.

There's virtually nothing we can't do today. We have seasoned experts in every field you care to mention, even rocket science and nanotechnology.

So we can do anything.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 7:36am On Apr 11, 2011
@Rossikk
i believe what we've here in Nigeria are theoretical scientists,i don't know of other African countries. But anyway that's not my point,my point is simply that we import most of our consumptions exporting just little and even when we export we export raw materials to import finished goods. What a waste
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 7:38am On Apr 11, 2011
@Rossikk
i believe what we've here in Nigeria are theoretical scientists,i don't know of other African countries. But anyway that's not my point,my point is simply that we import most of our consumptions exporting just little and even when we export we export raw materials to import finished goods. What a waste
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by AjanleKoko: 4:50pm On Apr 11, 2011
cdoffx:

@Rossikk
i believe what we've here in Nigeria are theoretical scientists,i don't know of other African countries. But anyway that's not my point,my point is simply that we import most of our consumptions exporting just little and even when we export we export raw materials to import finished goods. What a waste

Nah, you got it wrong.
Prior to 1985, we were manufacturing a lot of stuff in Nigeria. Both public and private sector. The manufacturing and production sectors were very active, and we only imported raw materials that could not be refined in Nigeria. OBJ's indigenization decree of the 1970s also ensured that ownership of a lot of MNCs passed to Nigeria. We had sunk serious investment into the development of iron ore and steel, our refineries were online and functioning, and we had an enviable Naira to Dollar exchange rate, the best in sub saharan Africa.

Ever heard of Union Dicon Salt? Ajaokuta Steel? Nigerian Iron Ore Mining Company in Itakpe? Delta Steel, Aladja?, Nigerian Sugar Company, Bacita?
Those are all dead parastatals now. At some point those parastatals were actually producing. We didn't have a vibrant private sector back then, but do we really have one now?

The IBB regime started the cycle of destruction in Nigeria. I saw a report recently that identified almost a thousand manufacturing companies that had gone under in the last 20 years. Meanwhile, in the last 20 years, countries like China, India, and Indonesia, emerged as new developing countries, the so-called Asian Tigers. Nigeria in the meantime started a cycle of mind-boggling treasury looting, a graft culture, and cyclical destruction of productive sectors, which has continued till today.

When you think about all these things, you'll realise that governance is the only problem Africa needs to solve. We have the right minds and a teeming population, eager to work and be productive. What we don't have is the right leadership.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 5:22pm On Apr 11, 2011
AjanleKoko:

Nah, you got it wrong.
Prior to 1985, we were manufacturing a lot of stuff in Nigeria. Both public and private sector. The manufacturing and production sectors were very active, and we only imported raw materials that could not be refined in Nigeria. OBJ's indigenization decree of the 1970s also ensured that ownership of a lot of MNCs passed to Nigeria. We had sunk serious investment into the development of iron ore and steel, our refineries were online and functioning, and we had an enviable Naira to Dollar exchange rate, the best in sub saharan Africa.

Ever heard of Union Dicon Salt? Ajaokuta Steel? Nigerian Iron Ore Mining Company in Itakpe? Delta Steel, Aladja?, Nigerian Sugar Company, Bacita?
Those are all dead parastatals now. At some point those parastatals were actually producing. We didn't have a vibrant private sector back then, but do we really have one now?

The IBB regime started the cycle of destruction in Nigeria. I saw a report recently that identified almost a thousand manufacturing companies that had gone under in the last 20 years. Meanwhile, in the last 20 years, countries like China, India, and Indonesia, emerged as new developing countries, the so-called Asian Tigers. Nigeria in the meantime started a cycle of mind-boggling treasury looting, a graft culture, and cyclical destruction of productive sectors, which has continued till today.

When you think about all these things, you'll realise that governance is the only problem Africa needs to solve. We have the right minds and a teeming population, eager to work and be productive. What we don't have is the right leadership.
yeah i agree with you infact grateful for the info,you know was still in the heaven then awaiting signal from God to proceed here on earth but you're still missing the main point according to you,before the last 20yrs Nigeria had been a vast in productions now let assume nothing killed the progress probably by now we'll be producing machineries and many other thing just like the industrialized western europe and let assume the same thing happens in many other African nations. But something stopped that hence we receded to consumer instead of producer importing so much than we export while China and the likes step up to be producers(exporters), i heard sometimes that its a policy for britain not to import finished good where possible and neither to export raw material. You know what that means? But now we send out our raw materials to get back finished goods. Does it makes sense? Now like you've said when we've the desired good governance industrialisation and technological advancement will be efficient tools for them to develop Africa.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 5:28pm On Apr 11, 2011
AjanleKoko:

Nah, you got it wrong.
Prior to 1985, we were manufacturing a lot of stuff in Nigeria. Both public and private sector. The manufacturing and production sectors were very active, and we only imported raw materials that could not be refined in Nigeria.

Well, I can see where cdoffx is coming from, Nigeria may have manufactured more in the olden days but it was unimpressive at best and we can see the results today.  If Nigeria was manufacturing substantial amounts of goods and services, the country would have a high number of exports too match. Name me ONE car manufactured in Nigeria that has been exported (NOT ASSEMBLED ) Name me ONE reliable Electronic brand manufactured in nigeria NOT ASSEMBLED ) that has been exported.

AjanleKoko:

OBJ's indigenization decree of the 1970s also ensured that ownership of a lot of MNCs passed to Nigeria. We had sunk serious investment into the development of iron ore and steel, our refineries were online and functioning, and we had an enviable Naira to Dollar exchange rate, the best in sub saharan Africa.

Ever heard of Union Dicon Salt? Ajaokuta Steel? Nigerian Iron Ore Mining Company in Itakpe? Delta Steel, Aladja?, Nigerian Sugar Company, Bacita?

Investement or ITT, who built Ajaokuta? And all the other complexes you have mentioned above? It was Europeans not Nigerians.  How many Nigerians did they employ? despite all the so called Engineers we have in that country,  this still happens today.  Foreign contractors employ their own nationals and build basic infrastructure such as roads and bridges.  This proves most Africans have no proven, practical skills – they are just book warriors.  Even when the exchange rate was N2 to £1 the infrastructure left by the British colonial rulers was crumbling while the politicians squabled and looted. The economy was in better shape up to the early 80s due to the foundation left by the British, since their exodus we can see the value added by Nigerians – nothing.

AjanleKoko:

When you think about all these things, you'll realise that governance is the only problem Africa needs to solve. We have the right minds and a teeming population, eager to work and be productive. What we don't have is the right leadership.

There will never be good leadership until Africans STOP practicing a system of government that is alien to them.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 6:20pm On Apr 11, 2011
2muchlogic:

 
Well, I can see where cdoffx is coming from, Nigeria may have manufactured more in the olden days but it was unimpressive at best and we can see the results today.  If Nigeria was manufacturing substantial amounts of goods and services, the country would have a high number of exports too match. Name me ONE car manufactured in Nigeria that has been exported (NOT ASSEMBLED ) Name me ONE reliable Electronic brand manufactured in nigeria NOT ASSEMBLED ) that has been exported.

Investement or ITT, who built Ajaokuta? And all the other complexes you have mentioned above? It was Europeans not Nigerians.  How many Nigerians did they employ? despite all the so called Engineers we have in that country,  this still happens today.  Foreign contractors employ their own nationals and build basic infrastructure such as roads and bridges.  This proves most Africans have no proven, practical skills – they are just book warriors.  Even when the exchange rate was N2 to £1 the infrastructure left by the British colonial rulers was crumbling while the politicians squabled and looted. The economy was in better shape up to the early 80s due to the foundation left by the British, since their exodus we can see the value added by Nigerians – nothing.

There will never be good leadership until Africans STOP practicing a system of government that is alien to them.


thanks for coming to my aid. You know sometimes we're contended with old glories which is not supposed to be. We should always constantly look to the future,how the future will outstand the past and present.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by AjanleKoko: 6:22pm On Apr 11, 2011
2muchlogic:

 
Well, I can see where cdoffx is coming from, Nigeria may have manufactured more in the olden days but it was unimpressive at best and we can see the results today.  If Nigeria was manufacturing substantial amounts of goods and services, the country would have a high number of exports too match. Name me ONE car manufactured in Nigeria that has been exported (NOT ASSEMBLED ) Name me ONE reliable Electronic brand manufactured in nigeria NOT ASSEMBLED ) that has been exported.

Investement or ITT, who built Ajaokuta? And all the other complexes you have mentioned above? It was Europeans not Nigerians.  How many Nigerians did they employ? despite all the so called Engineers we have in that country,  this still happens today.  Foreign contractors employ their own nationals and build basic infrastructure such as roads and bridges.  This proves most Africans have no proven, practical skills – they are just book warriors.  Even when the exchange rate was N2 to £1 the infrastructure left by the British colonial rulers was crumbling while the politicians squabled and looted. The economy was in better shape up to the early 80s due to the foundation left by the British, since their exodus we can see the value added by Nigerians – nothing.

There will never be good leadership until Africans STOP practicing a system of government that is alien to them.



You're wrong. Very wrong.
Up till the time of IBB, the importation of a wide category of finished goods was prohibited. And all those parastatals were populated by Nigerian engineers. Not by Europeans. The Railways, NITEL, Ajaokuta, NIOMC Itakpe, the dams at Kainji and Jebba, were all operated by Nigerian engineers. Even in the early 90s as an engineering student, I visited Jebba and Kainji on excursion, and didn't run into any white people running operations. Most of these parastatals had very solid training schools, and routinely sent Nigerian engineers overseas on training

Which one of the institutions I mentioned was left by the British? Can you identify one? The British left no roads, no airports, no modern power plant save a coal plant at Enugu, a barely functioning railway, very little by way of telecoms (P&T) in 1960. And you say the British left infrastructure?
The New Niger Bridge, all the major interstate highways, all the airports in Nigeria today, the NITEL grid, power grid, Western Avenue, National Theatre, all were built by Gowon's government, or the Murtala/OBJ government. The contractors ranged from Germans to Russians, Americans to Indians, not even British. Do the British even have a serious engineering company that can compete with the likes of Siemens, ABB and Krupp?

I once rode on the Shanghai express. The trains were built by Mitsubishi, a Japanese company. I suppose that makes the Chinese morons or undeveloped, for getting the Japanese to install trains for them? What about Qatar and the UAE?

You must have not been born, or have been a baby back in the 80s is all I can say. If that is the case, I don't blame you.
Also if you don't know anything about engineering in Nigeria, or the work of Nigerian engineers, don't broadcast your ignorance here. Seek some education.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 6:31pm On Apr 11, 2011
@Ajanlekoko
now tell me where all those thing are now? You've not just answer my question assuming the trend continue like those day will Nigeria be where it is now. Simple economics says when you consume more than you produce,problem. When you import more than you export, problem. When you are supposed to process your raw materials and send them out finished good but rather choose to export raw and import finished,your economy sucks. So which one of this is not happening now? Just answer that
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by AjanleKoko: 6:47pm On Apr 11, 2011
cdoffx:

@Ajanlekoko
now tell me where all those thing are now? You've not just answer my question assuming the trend continue like those day will Nigeria be where it is now. Simple economics says when you consume more than you produce,problem. When you import more than you export, problem. When you are supposed to process your raw materials and send them out finished good but rather choose to export raw and import finished,your economy sucks. So which one of this is not happening now? Just answer that

That's a reasonable question.
Those institutions were systematically destroyed by the criminals who have been in governance since 1985. Let me proceed to list specific criminal acts perpetuated against Nigerians by these criminals.

-  Firstly, looting NEPA's revenues to pay for various adventures in Liberia, Sierra Leone, without any re-investment into the company. Ditto NITEL. Ditto FAAN, Nigeria Airways, and so many other parastatals that need funds to survive. Even as recent as 2003, 2 banks - AFEX bank and AIB - were wrecked of shareholders' funds to pay for an adventure in Sao Tome. One of those bank's CEOs was rewarded with a Group Finance Director position in NNPC.

- Criminal neglect of the railways in order to promote road transport haulage, the forte of the Dangotes, Dantatas, and the rest of them. Some of these men are hailed as Nigeria's 'entrepreneurs'.

- Abolishing OBJ's indigenization decree, as well as import control, allowing for used junk to be imported from just about anywhere. The early 1990s saw the advent of 'Tokunbo' everything, from pressing irons to fridges, freezers, and TVs, while the likes of Thermocool, Philips, and Adebowale Industries started to struggle with a number of factors I will continue to list below:

- Systematic abolition of petroleum subsidies and continued increases in pump price of petroleum products, despite an astronomical climb in crude revenues since 1990. Add that to the beginning of systems failure and supply of gas to the thermal plants owned by NEPA starting from 1991.

- Indiscriminate allocation of oil resources to cronies of the government. People like Kema Chikwe and Patricia Etteh own oil blocks in Nigeria.

-Total neglect of solid minerals saw the death of Ajaokuta and Itakpe projects. Go check the website of the Ministry of Solid Minerals. Do you know that there are solid minerals in every state in Nigeria? Ever heard of the Ajaokuta buy-back scam? You can google it up. Since everybody was making so much cash from oil, there was no need to bother with all those solid minerals.

-Introduction of ridiculous import regime and tariffs, such that Togo and Cotonou are now preferred destinations for shipping from Europe and America.

-And finally, governance failure, IBB's failed 40 billion naira transitions, from 1990, 1992, 1993, 6 years of Abacha, and 12 years of PDP looting.

Tell me how any meaningful development can be made in any country with those extenuating circumstances. Tell me how any manufacturing initiative can survive with all these things happening. These are all well-documented, so take time to go and research them all. Find out how Unilever, Dunlop, Michelin, among others, have left Nigeria for good. Do your research.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 7:18pm On Apr 11, 2011
AjanleKoko:

You're wrong. Very wrong.

You're dumb, imeasurably dumb!

AjanleKoko:

Up till the time of IBB, the importation of a wide category of finished goods was prohibited. And all those parastatals were populated by Nigerian engineers. Not by Europeans. The Railways, NITEL, Ajaokuta, NIOMC Itakpe, the dams at Kainji and Jebba, were all operated by Nigerian engineers. Even in the early 90s as an engineering student,

now AJA learn to read, I asked a simple polite question:


[size=13pt]who built Ajaokuta? And all the other complexes you have mentioned above?[/size]

Now you obviously, cannot read properly and do not understand the word BUILT.  All you did was bore us with stories about Nigerians OPERATING a complex built by Europeans.  Stop confusing the word BUILT with OPERATE - dummy!  grin grin grin grin grin grin


AjanleKoko:

I visited Jebba and Kainji on excursion, and didn't run into any white people running operations. Most of these parastatals had very solid training schools, and routinely sent Nigerian engineers overseas on training

AJA! You're ignorance is shinning through yet again! You have just confirmed what we have both said! They studied abroad to be TRAINED up!

AjanleKoko:

Which one of the institutions I mentioned was left by the British? Can you identify one? The British left no roads, no airports, no modern power plant save a coal plant at Enugu, a barely functioning railway, very little by way of telecoms (P&T) in 1960. And you say the British left infrastructure?

Yes they did! Who is the most prestigious district in lagos named after? They colonized nigeria for decades don't you know that old man! Or did they give you brain damage before they granted Nigeria independence?

AjanleKoko:

You must have not been born, or have been a baby back in the 80s is all I can say. If that is the case, I don't blame you.
Also if you don't know anything about engineering in Nigeria, or the work of Nigerian engineers, don't broadcast your ignorance here. Seek some education.

[size=15pt]I created this thread so we can learn and enlighten ourselves with respect; but you have infiltrated it with your vulgar, senseless, waffling – what a prat.  You sound like a bitter old man trying to defend your generation for their uselesness, I am more educated than your entire family.  Stay off this thread and create your own or return for a more severe lyrical beatdown.
[/size]
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by AjanleKoko: 7:21pm On Apr 11, 2011
^^
As a rule, I don't throw insults around on a nameless faceless forum.
You've only exposed yourself for what you are: An ignorant child. Carry on with your ignorance. No point even trying to educate you further.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 7:26pm On Apr 11, 2011
/\  /\ 
Now you are making a fool of yourself, you insult me then return saying you don't throw insults about? 

Are you not the disrespectful boy that posted:

AjanleKoko:

[size=13pt]You're wrong. Very wrong.

You must have not been born, or have been a baby back in the 80s is all I can say. If that is the case, I don't blame you. 
Also if you don't know anything about engineering in Nigeria, or the work of Nigerian engineers, don't broadcast your ignorance here. Seek some education.
[/size]

what a liar!  angry angry angry angry



You are obviously under the influence of some unpleasant substance aren't you? "Child this",  "child that" - I guarantee you i am older  than you.  Now, I told you before to get off of this thread did I not?  [size=14pt]Beat it!!![/size] silly Dog.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by PhysicsMHD(m): 7:32pm On Apr 11, 2011
AjanleKoko:

That's a reasonable question.
Those institutions were systematically destroyed by the criminals who have been in governance since 1985. Let me proceed to list specific criminal acts perpetuated against Nigerians by these criminals.

-  Firstly, looting NEPA's revenues to pay for various adventures in Liberia, Sierra Leone, without any re-investment into the company. Ditto NITEL. Ditto FAAN, Nigeria Airways, and so many other parastatals that need funds to survive. Even as recent as 2003, 2 banks - AFEX bank and AIB - were wrecked of shareholders' funds to pay for an adventure in Sao Tome. One of those bank's CEOs was rewarded with a Group Finance Director position in NNPC.

- Criminal neglect of the railways in order to promote road transport haulage, the forte of the Dangotes, Dantatas, and the rest of them. Some of these men are hailed as Nigeria's 'entrepreneurs'.

- Abolishing OBJ's indigenization decree, as well as import control, allowing for used junk to be imported from just about anywhere. The early 1990s saw the advent of 'Tokunbo' everything, from pressing irons to fridges, freezers, and TVs, while the likes of Thermocool, Philips, and Adebowale Industries started to struggle with a number of factors I will continue to list below:

- Systematic abolition of petroleum subsidies and continued increases in pump price of petroleum products, despite an astronomical climb in crude revenues since 1990. Add that to the beginning of systems failure and supply of gas to the thermal plants owned by NEPA starting from 1991.

- Indiscriminate allocation of oil resources to cronies of the government. People like Kema Chikwe and Patricia Etteh own oil blocks in Nigeria.

-Total neglect of solid minerals saw the death of Ajaokuta and Itakpe projects. Go check the website of the Ministry of Solid Minerals. Do you know that there are solid minerals in every state in Nigeria? Ever heard of the Ajaokuta buy-back scam? You can google it up. Since everybody was making so much cash from oil, there was no need to bother with all those solid minerals.

-Introduction of ridiculous import regime and tariffs, such that Togo and Cotonou are now preferred destinations for shipping from Europe and America.

-And finally, governance failure, IBB's failed 40 billion naira transitions, from 1990, 1992, 1993, 6 years of Abacha, and 12 years of PDP looting.

Tell me how any meaningful development can be made in any country with those extenuating circumstances. Tell me how any manufacturing initiative can survive with all these things happening. These are all well-documented, so take time to go and research them all. Find out how Unilever, Dunlop, Michelin, among others, have left Nigeria for good. Do your research.

Tragic. undecided

That's the only word that comes to mind.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 7:45pm On Apr 11, 2011
AjanleKoko:

That's a reasonable question.
Those institutions were systematically destroyed by the criminals who have been in governance since 1985. Let me proceed to list specific criminal acts perpetuated against Nigerians by these criminals.

-  Firstly, looting NEPA's revenues to pay for various adventures in Liberia, Sierra Leone, without any re-investment into the company. Ditto NITEL. Ditto FAAN, Nigeria Airways, and so many other parastatals that need funds to survive. Even as recent as 2003, 2 banks - AFEX bank and AIB - were wrecked of shareholders' funds to pay for an adventure in Sao Tome. One of those bank's CEOs was rewarded with a Group Finance Director position in NNPC.

- Criminal neglect of the railways in order to promote road transport haulage, the forte of the Dangotes, Dantatas, and the rest of them. Some of these men are hailed as Nigeria's 'entrepreneurs'.

- Abolishing OBJ's indigenization decree, as well as import control, allowing for used junk to be imported from just about anywhere. The early 1990s saw the advent of 'Tokunbo' everything, from pressing irons to fridges, freezers, and TVs, while the likes of Thermocool, Philips, and Adebowale Industries started to struggle with a number of factors I will continue to list below:

- Systematic abolition of petroleum subsidies and continued increases in pump price of petroleum products, despite an astronomical climb in crude revenues since 1990. Add that to the beginning of systems failure and supply of gas to the thermal plants owned by NEPA starting from 1991.

- Indiscriminate allocation of oil resources to cronies of the government. People like Kema Chikwe and Patricia Etteh own oil blocks in Nigeria.

-Total neglect of solid minerals saw the death of Ajaokuta and Itakpe projects. Go check the website of the Ministry of Solid Minerals. Do you know that there are solid minerals in every state in Nigeria? Ever heard of the Ajaokuta buy-back scam? You can google it up. Since everybody was making so much cash from oil, there was no need to bother with all those solid minerals.

-Introduction of ridiculous import regime and tariffs, such that Togo and Cotonou are now preferred destinations for shipping from Europe and America.

-And finally, governance failure, IBB's failed 40 billion naira transitions, from 1990, 1992, 1993, 6 years of Abacha, and 12 years of PDP looting.

Tell me how any meaningful development can be made in any country with those extenuating circumstances. Tell me how any manufacturing initiative can survive with all these things happening. These are all well-documented, so take time to go and research them all. Find out how Unilever, Dunlop, Michelin, among others, have left Nigeria for good. Do your research.
i don't need to do any research. All what you've pointed out here that you said no longer exist are simply industrialisation and when you talk about industrialisation you're talking about technology. So what are you saying?
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by 2muchlogic(m): 7:59pm On Apr 11, 2011
[size=13pt] =====================  back to the discussion ===================== [/size]
 
  Organisations set up to help Africa such as NEPAD are also responsible for dampening the enthusiasm of Africans towards technology.  I just think that creation coupled with the advancement of technology should be promoted and integrated into the African way of life.  Most of their focus is on Agriculture, which is understandable however the unfortunate truth is that African governments are simply not investing enough money! In reality Africans need to take more responsibility too the government cannot do it all; is it too much for African people to initiate small projects which may attract public or private investment?
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cdoffx(m): 9:44pm On Apr 11, 2011
2muchlogic:

                                                                          
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  Organisations set up to help Africa such as NEPAD are also responsible for dampening the enthusiasm of Africans towards technology.  I just think that creation coupled with the advancement of technology should be promoted and integrated into the African way of life.  Most of their focus is on Agriculture, which is understandable however the unfortunate truth is that African governments are simply not investing enough money! In reality Africans need to take more responsibility too the government cannot do it all; is it too much for African people to initiate small projects which may attract public or private investment?
 

 


the influential ones among the Africa people prefer to invest in some foreign countries rather than invest in the growth of their own nation.
Re: Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems? by cheikh: 6:33pm On Apr 16, 2011
"Will Technology Solve Africa's Problems?"

@2muchlogic

^^What are Africa's Problems? Do we know what they are? etc. You have not defined what you mean by "Technology"
What is technology? Is it "home" grown technology or "adapted" foreign technology? or wholesale "Imported" technology? etc or something else- "technology"? Are we really lacking in "technology" or is "technology" absent or present in Africa? What kind of technology do you mean?etc We cannot assume that we are on the same page bros hence I am asking questions? wink Thanks
@2muchlogic
Pls explain, because we maybe wrongly or rightly assuming "technology" per se is the panacea to so called "Africa's Problems".

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